Classical Studies

Director of Undergraduate Studies: To be announced

Departmental Secretary: Kathleen M. Fox, Cl 22B, 702-8514

E-mail: classics-department@uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The Bachelor of Arts program in classical studies offers the opportunity to gain competence in Greek and Latin and provides a broad introduction to the culture of the Greeks and Romans: their philosophy, religion, history, politics, art, and especially their literature. The curriculum is flexible and interdisciplinary. It serves the needs both of students who want a general classical foundation and those who wish to pursue the study of classics at the graduate level.

Program Requirements

Candidates for the B.A. in classical studies may choose to concentrate either in Greek or in Latin, to the exclusion of the other language, or they may choose to concentrate in one language and minor in the other. The program assumes that students begin their language study in college. However, those who have a strong high school background in either Latin or Greek can gain admission to intermediate-level courses by achieving a satisfactory grade on the placement examination.

Undergraduates who intend to continue classical studies at the graduate level are advised to satisfy the course requirements under the preprofessional variant described below.

Course Requirements. The course requirements for the concentration are as follows:

1. Nine courses in Greek or Latin, of which at least six must be taken in the same language. This requirement is satisfied by taking Greek and Latin courses numbered 101 to 206 and 211 to 290. The first three courses in Greek (Greek 101 to 103 or Greek 111 to 113) or the first four courses in Latin (Latin 101 to 204) fulfill the Common Core foreign language requirement. Any course for which a student has received placement credit may be counted toward the nine courses required.

2. Three courses in Greek or Roman history, philosophy, science, religion, or art, with courses divided between at least two fields, and with approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Some courses that satisfy this requirement may include: Art History 100 to 189 or higher, Classical Civilization 201 to 259; Fundamentals 202, 222, 227, 256, 270, 272, and 292; History 203 to 209; Philosophy 250 and 350 to 359; and Political Science 255 and 315. Other courses in ancient history, philosophy, science, religion, or art may be substituted with permission.

3. Three departmental courses based on the study of classical literature in translation. The purpose of this requirement is to encourage wider reading and more active reflection about classical literature than usually occurs in Greek and Latin language courses, and to help stimulate thinking about possible subjects for a bachelor's paper. Courses that satisfy this requirement are Classical Civilization 260 to 297. Courses that are comparable to those listed (but not more than one reading course) may be substituted with the permission of the director of undergraduate studies.

4. An independent study course (Classical Civilization 298) on the subject of the bachelor's paper. This course is to be taken at least one quarter before the quarter in which the student expects to graduate.

No course that is used to satisfy a requirement under one of these categories may be used simultaneously to satisfy a requirement under any other.

Summary of Requirements

General Greek 101-102-103, Greek 111-112-113,

Education or Latin 101-102-103-204

Concentration    5 - 6 courses in Latin or 6 courses in Greek

3 courses in Greek or Roman history,

philosophy, science, religion, or art

3 departmental courses on classical

literature in translation (see above

description for distribution

requirements)

1 ClCiv 298 (bachelor's paper)

12 - 13

The Preprofessional Variant. College students who intend to continue classical studies at the graduate level are advised to elect a program that gives them greater linguistic proficiency and a grounding in both classical languages. In the preprofessional variant, six language courses are added to the basic requirements and two other courses are subtracted. The courses required in this variant are:

1. Nine courses in one classical language (either Greek or Latin), and six courses in the other.

2. Two courses in Greek or Roman history, philosophy, science, religion, or art.

3. Two departmental courses (ClCiv 260 to 97) based on the study of classical literature in translation.

4. An independent study course on the subject of the bachelor's paper.

Except for the number of courses, the requirements within each category are the same as those set out in the preceding section.

Summary of Requirements

(Preprofessional Variant)

General Latin 101-102-103-204

Education

Concentration 11 courses in Latin and Greek

2 courses in Greek or Roman history,

philosophy, science, religion, or art

2 departmental courses on classical

literature in translation

1 ClCiv 298 (bachelor's paper)

16

Bachelor's Paper. All candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree in classical studies are required to write a bachelor's paper. By May 15 of the junior year, students must submit a proposal that states the topic of the bachelor's paper and is signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct it. Students are expected to read on the topic of the bachelor's paper during the summer. In the autumn of the senior year, students are required to take an independent studies course supervised by the faculty director of the bachelor's paper. This course is devoted to research and the preparation of a draft of the bachelor's paper. As part of the course, students attend biweekly meetings with other seniors to discuss their work on the bachelor's paper. The grade for the independent studies course is based both on participation in the course and on the completed bachelor's paper. The bachelor's paper is due on May 1 of the senior year. Copies must be submitted to the faculty supervisor, a second reader, and the director of undergraduate studies. In order for a student to be recommended for honors, the bachelor's paper must be judged worthy of honors both by the faculty supervisor and the second reader.

Grading. The first-year sequences in Latin and Greek (Latin 101-102-103, Greek 101-102-103, and Greek 111-112-113) and the courses in Greek and Latin composition are open for P/N grading for students not using these courses to meet the College or concentration language requirements. All other courses in classics may only be taken for letter grades.

Honors. To be recommended for an honors degree, a student must maintain an overall grade point average of 3.0 or better and must demonstrate superior ability in the bachelor's paper to interpret Greek or Latin source material and to develop a coherent argument.

The John G. Hawthorne Prize in Classical Studies. The John G. Hawthorne Prize in Classical Studies is a cash award made annually to the graduating senior with the best record of achievement in classical languages, literatures, or civilization. All students concentrating in classical studies are eligible for consideration, although nominations are not limited to concentrators in classical studies.

Faculty

MICHAEL I. ALLEN, Assistant Professor, Department of Classical Languages & Literatures and the College

ELIZABETH ASMIS, Professor, Departments of Classical Languages & Literatures and New Testament & Early Christian Literature, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World, and the College

CHRISTOPHER A. FARAONE, Associate Professor, Departments of Classical Languages & Literatures and New Testament & Early Christian Literature, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World, and the College

JONATHAN HALL, Assistant Professor, Departments of Classical Languages & Literatures and Department of History

NANCY PEARCE HELMBOLD, Professor Emerita, Departments of Classical Languages & Literatures and New Testament & Early Christian Literature, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World, and the College

W. R. JOHNSON, John Matthews Manly Distinguished Service Professor of Classical Languages & Literatures, Department of Comparative Literature, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World, and the College

JAMES M. REDFIELD, Howard L. Willett Professor of Classical Languages & Literatures, Committee on Social Thought, and the College; Chairman, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World

D. NICHOLAS RUDALL, Associate Professor, Department of Classical Languages & Literatures, Committees on the Ancient Mediterranean World and General Studies in the Humanities, and the College

RICHARD SALLER, Professor, Departments of Classical Languages & Literatures and History, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World, and the College; Dean, Division of Social Sciences

LAURA SLATKIN, Associate Professor, Department of Classical Languages & Literatures, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World, and the College

PETER WHITE, Professor, Departments of Classical Languages & Literatures and New Testament & Early Christian Literature, Committee on the Ancient Mediterranean World, and the College

Courses

Courses designated "Classical Civilization" do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin.

Classical Civilization

212/312. History and Theory of Drama I (=ClCiv 212/312, ComLit 306, Eng 139/311, GS Hum 243/343). This course covers Aeschylus to Ayckbourne and Sophocles to Sade. D. N. Rudall. Winter.

217/317. Archaeology for Ancient Historians (=ClCiv 217/317, Hist 209/309). This course is intended to act not as an introduction to classical archaeology but as a methods course illuminating the potential contribution of material cultural evidence to ancient historians while at the same time alerting them to the possible misapplications. Theoretical reflections on the relationship between history and archaeology are interspersed with specific case studies from the Graeco-Roman world. J. M. Hall. Winter.

224/324. Roman Culture. S. Bartsch. Spring.

227/327. Pompeii (=ArtH 205/305, ClCiv 227/327). PQ: Any 100-level ArtH or COVA course, or consent of instructor. Buried by the eruption of Vesuvius in A.D. 79, Pompeii presents a time capsule of life in southern Italy under the Flavian emperors. Peopled in successive periods by Greeks, Oscans, Samnites, Etruscans, and Latins, the city harbored a surprisingly cosmopolitan mix of cultures, languages, and people, which produced a rich archaeological record. Each session of the course begins with an individual monument (like the amphitheatre) or area of the city (like the Forum), working outward to investigate various aspects of civic culture on the basis of literary as well as archaeological evidence. With four faculty members of widely differing backgrounds, the course aims for interdisciplinary and analytical depth. I. Rowland, G. Pinney, P. White, R. Saller. Winter.

264/364. Greek Festivals and Calendar. Cults and festivals of Athens and Attica are examined in relation to the social and economic structures within which religious activities took place. Topics include the introduction of new gods, the relation between public and private cults, city and country calendars, hero cults, and the role of political figures in the religious life of the community. In addition to the Athenian material, selected cults of Boeotia, Laconia, and the Argolid are considered. Sources include literary and epigraphical texts, vase painting, sculpture, and the architecture of temples and shrines. Readings are in English and Greek. E. Gebhard. Winter.

298. Preparation for Bachelor's Paper. PQ: Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course form. In consultation with a faculty member, students devote an independent study course to preparing a bachelor's paper. The grade for this course is that of the bachelor's paper. Staff. Autumn, Winter.

299. Reading Course. PQ: Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Staff. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

Greek

101-102-103. Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This course sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like Greek 111-112-113, this sequence prepares students to move into the second-year sequence (Greek 204-205-206) and fulfills the Common Core foreign language requirement.

101. Introduction to Attic Greek I. PQ: Knowledge of Greek not required. This course introduces students to the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. L. Slatkin. Autumn.

102. Introduction to Attic Greek II: Prose. PQ: Greek 101. The remaining chapters of the introductory Greek textbook are covered. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek as selections from Xenophon are read. D. N. Rudall. Winter.

103. Introduction to Attic Greek III: Prose. PQ: Greek 102. This course fulfills the Common Core foreign language requirement. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in Greek 101-102 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Staff. Spring.

111-112-113. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I, II, III. This course sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in fifteen weeks. Like Greek 101-102-103, this sequence prepares students to move into the second-year sequence (Greek 204-205-206) and fulfills the Common Core foreign language requirement.

111. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I. PQ: Knowledge of Greek not required. This course introduces students to the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work. Staff. Autumn.

112. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek II. PQ: Greek 111. The remaining chapters of the introductory textbook are covered. Students then apply and improve their knowledge of Greek as they read selections from Xenophon. Staff. Winter.

113. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek III. PQ: Greek 112. This course fulfills the Common Core foreign language requirement. Students apply the grammatical skills taught in Greek 111-112 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure. Staff. Spring.

204. Plato: Apology. PQ: Greek 103 or equivalent. The text is read in Greek with careful attention to syntax and vocabulary, and the setting of the work. Staff. Autumn.

205. Sophocles: Antigone. PQ: Greek 103 or equivalent. The course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history. L. Slatkin. Winter.

206. Introduction to Homer. PQ: Greek 103 or equivalent. An introduction to the Homeric dialect and to the convention of oral epic through a study of the Iliad. C. Faraone. Spring.

214/314. Theocritus: Idylls. We read Theocritus' Idylls closely and discuss both the bucolic genre and Hellenistic poetry generally. C. Faraone. Spring.

217/317. Hesiod. Readings from the Theogony and the Works and Days. Our focus is on issues of ideology and literary form, including problems of genre and audience. Special attention is paid to Hesiodic representations of "justice" and social order, and their place in the continuum of archaic thought from Homer to Solon. L. Slatkin. Autumn.

233/333. Thucydides. All of Thucydides' History is read in English, but the narrative of the Sicilian expedition in books 6 and 7 is singled out for careful study in Greek. Lectures, discussions, and secondary readings address the principles on which Thucydides constructs history and the art by which he shapes a narrative. P. White. Winter.

299. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Staff. Autumn, Winter.

344. Greek Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This course is intended to strengthen and refine understanding of Greek syntax and style. Students translate a variety of passages from English to Greek. Greek texts are analyzed according to style, and students emulate these styles in their own writing. Staff. Not offered 1997-98; will be offered 1998-99.

Latin

101. Introduction to Classical Latin I. The sequence Latin 101-102-103 has essentially the same aims as Latin 111-112-113, and both sequences use the same introductory text; upon completing either sequence a student is prepared to move on to the second-year sequence (Latin 204-205-206). The sequence Latin 101-102-103, however, covers the introductory grammar at a slower pace, taking approximately 22 weeks to complete the text (as opposed to 15 in Latin 111-112): it is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace will allow them better to assimilate the material. Latin 101 introduces students to the basic rules of classical Latin. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and discussion of student work. Knowledge of Latin not required. M. Behnke. Autumn.

102. Introduction to Classical Latin II. PQ: Latin 101. This course continues the presentation of basic Latin, with translations and exercises in grammar. M. Behnke. Winter.

103. Introduction to Classical Latin III. PQ: Latin 102. After completing the remaining chapters of the introductory textbook, students apply and improve their linguistic skills as they read a variety of Latin prose texts. M. Behnke. Spring.

111. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I. Knowledge of Latin not required. This course covers the first half of the introductory Latin textbook (Wheelock). Classes are devoted to presentation of grammar, discussion of problems in learning Latin, and written exercises. P. White. Autumn.

112. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin II: Prose Writings. PQ: Latin 111. This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in Latin 101 and concludes with readings in Latin from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose. D. Wray. Winter.

113. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin III: Cicero. PQ: Latin 112. This course involves the reading of a complete speech by Cicero. The course seeks to consolidate knowledge of Latin grammar and syntax and to increase the ability to read Cicero's prose, which has had a lasting influence on European literary expression. W. Stull. Spring.

204-205-206. This three-course sequence is designed to make the transition from intermediate Latin to upper-level language and literature courses. Students normally complete the Common Core foreign language requirement by taking Latin 204. However, any of the courses from the Latin 204-205-206 sequence fulfill the requirement. Students planning to proceed to advanced literature courses should complete the entire sequence.

204. Livy. PQ: Latin 103 or equivalent. This course fulfills the Common Core foreign language requirement. The purpose of this course is twofold: to review Latin grammar, and to give students experience in reading portions of the thirty-fourth book of Livy. There are weekly grammar quizzes related to Latin readings in class. Students are expected to conduct their own grammar review but with specific directives from the instructor. They are asked to read a certain amount of modern material concerning Roman Republican history in order to give the Latin reading a more intelligible context. Staff. Autumn.

205. Virgil: Selections from the Aeneid. PQ: Latin 103 or equivalent. This course fulfills the Common Core foreign language requirement. A reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid. Emphasis is on Virgil's language and versification. Students are also required to read in English translation those books of the poem that are not read in Latin. S. Bartsch. Winter.

206. Horace and Catullus. PQ: Latin 103 or equivalent. This course fulfills the Common Core foreign language requirement. Selected poems of Catullus and Horace are read, with special emphasis on style and form. Staff. Spring.

231/331. Ovid. PQ: Latin 206 or equivalent. Readings are selected from Knox's Heroides (1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11). The emphasis is on narratology and feminist perspectives. W. R. Johnson. Winter.

232/332. Sallust and Tacitus. PQ: Latin 206 or equivalent. The primary readings are drawn from books 1 through 3 of the Histories. which describe the series of plots and wars that followed Nero's overthrow in A.D. 68. Parallel accounts and secondary readings are used to help bring out the methods of selecting and ordering data and the stylistic effects that typify a Tacitean narrative. P. White. Autumn.

233/333. Roman Comedy. PQ: Latin 103 or equivalent. The primary readings consist of two short plays of Plautus, the Casina and the Stichus; secondary readings explain the social context and the theatrical conventions of Roman comedy. Class discussion explores Plautus's weaknesses and strengths in staging, plotting, and language. P. White. Spring.

299. Reading Course. PQ: Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Staff. Autumn, Winter, Spring.

344. Latin Prose Composition. PQ: Consent of instructor. This is a practical introduction to the styles of classical Latin prose. After a brief and systematic review of Latin syntax, the course combines regular exercises in composition with readings from a variety of prose stylists. The course is intended to increase the students' awareness both of the classical artists' skill and their own command of Latin idiom and sentence structure. Staff. Not offered 1997-98; will be offered 1998-99.