Civilization Studies Courses on Campus | Civilization Studies Abroad Programs

Civilization studies provide an in-depth examination of the development and accomplishments of one of the world's great civilizations through direct encounters with significant and exemplary documents and monuments. These sequences complement the literary and philosophical study of texts central to the humanities sequences, as well as the study of synchronous social theories that shape basic questions in the social science sequences. Their approach stresses the grounding of events and ideas in historical context and the interplay of events, institutions, ideas, and cultural expressions in social change. The courses emphasize texts rather than surveys as a way of getting at the ideas, cultural patterns, and social pressures that frame the understanding of events and institutions within a civilization. And they seek to explore a civilization as an integrated entity, capable of developing and evolving meanings that inform the lives of its citizens.

Unless otherwise specified, courses should be taken in sequence. Note the prerequisites, if any, included in the course description of each sequence. Some civilization sequences are two-quarter sequences; others are three-quarter sequences. Students may meet a two-quarter civilization requirement with two courses from a three-quarter sequence.

Because civilization studies sequences offer an integrated, coherent approach to the study of a civilization, students cannot change sequences. Students can neither combine courses from a civilization sequence with a freestanding course nor combine various freestanding courses to create a civilization studies sequence. Students who wish to use such combinations are seldom granted approval to their petitions, including petitions from students with curricular and scheduling conflicts who have postponed meeting the civilization studies requirement until their third or fourth year in the College.

Civilization Studies Courses on Campus

CRES 24001-24002-24003. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

CRES 24001. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24001,HIST 18301,SOSC 24001

CRES 24002. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24002,HIST 18302,SOSC 24002

CRES 24003. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24003,HIST 18303,SALC 20702,SOSC 24003

EALC 10800-10900-11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

EALC 10800. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Summer,Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10800,SOSC 23500,HIST 15100

EALC 10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia II. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10900,SOSC 23600,HIST 15200

EALC 11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia III. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 11000,SOSC 23700,HIST 15300

GNSE 15002-15003. Gender and Sexuality in World Civilizations I-II.

This two-quarter sequence aims to expand students’ exposure to an array of texts—theoretical, historical, religious, literary, visual—that address the fundamental place of gender and sexuality in the social, political, and cultural creations of different civilizations. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

GNSE 15002. Gender and Sexuality in World Civilizations I. 100 Units.

The first quarter offers a theoretical framing unit that introduces concepts in feminist, gender, and queer theory, as well as two thematic clusters, “Kinship” and “Creativity and Cultural Knowledge.” The “Kinship” cluster includes readings on such topics as marriage, sex and anti-sex, love and anti-love, and reproduction. The “Creativity and Cultural Knowledge” cluster addresses the themes of authorship and authority, fighting and constructing the canon, and the debates over the influence of “difference” on cultural forms.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

GNSE 15003. Gender and Sexuality in World Civilizations II. 100 Units.

Three thematic clusters make up the second quarter. “Politics” focuses on texts related to activism/movement politics and women’s rights as human rights and the question of universalism. “Religion” contextualizes gender and sexuality through examinations of a variety of religious laws and teachings, religious practices, and religious communities. “Economics” looks at slavery, domestic service, prostitution as labor, consumption, and the gendering of labor in contemporary capitalism.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GNSE 15002
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIPS 17300-17400-17402-17501-17502-17503. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization I-II-II-III-IV-III.

This group of courses consists of two three-quarter sequences: HIPS 17300-17400-17501 or 17502, and HIPS 17400-17402-17503 or 17502. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. Each sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Each three-quarter sequence focuses on the origins and development of science in the West. Our aim is to trace the evolution of the biological, psychological, natural, and mathematical sciences as they emerge from the cultural and social matrix of their periods and, in turn, affect culture and society.

HIPS 17300. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization I. 100 Units.

The first quarter examines the sources of Greek science in the diverse modes of ancient thought and its advance through the first centuries of our era. We look at the technical refinement of science, its connections to political and philosophical movements of fifth- and fourth-century Athens, and its growth in Alexandria.

Instructor(s): J. Wee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 17300

HIPS 17400. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second quarter is concerned with the period of the scientific revolution: the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. The principal subjects are the work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Vesalius, Harvey, Descartes, and Newton.

Instructor(s): R. Richards     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 17400

HIPS 17402. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: History of Medicine 1. 100 Units.

This course examines the history of medicine from the Renaissance through the end of the eighteenth century, when many features of medicine that we now consider "modern" were coming into being. Topics include the history of anatomy and physiology, including Vesalius and Harvey; the history of relations between doctors and patients, including traditional medical practitioners and midwives; and the changing nature of the hospital.

Terms Offered: Not offered in 2016–17
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 17402

HIPS 17501. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: Medicine since the Renaissance. 100 Units.

This course is an examination of various themes in the history of medicine in Western Europe and America since the Renaissance. Topics include key developments of medical theory (e.g., the circulation of the blood and germ theory), relations between doctors and patients, rivalries between different kinds of healers and therapists, and the development of the hospital and laboratory medicine.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2016-17
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 17501

HIPS 17502. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization IV: Modern Science. 100 Units.

The advances science has produced have transformed life beyond anything that a person living in 1833 (when the term "scientist" was first coined) could have anticipated. Yet science continues to pose questions that are challenging and, in some instances, troubling. How will our technologies affect the environment? Should we prevent the cloning of humans? Can we devise a politically acceptable framework for the patenting of life? Such questions make it vitally important that we try to understand what science is and how it works, even if we never enter labs. This course uses evidence from controversies (e.g., Human Genome Project, International Space Station) to throw light on the enterprise of science itself.

Instructor(s): J. Evans     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 17502

HIPS 17503. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: History of Medicine 2. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Not offered in 2016-17
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 17503

HIST 10101-10102. Introduction to African Civilization I-II.

African Civilization introduces students to African history and anthropology in a two-quarter sequence and meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

HIST 10101. Introduction to African Civilization I. 100 Units.

Part one considers literary, oral, and archeological sources to investigate African societies and states from the early Iron Age through the emergence of the Atlantic world. Case studies include the empires of Ghana, Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also treats the diffusion of Islam, the origins and effects of European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended.

Instructor(s): E. Osborn     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20701,CRES 20701

HIST 10102. Introduction to African Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second segment of the African Civilizations sequence uses anthropological perspectives to investigate colonial and postcolonial encounters in West and East Africa. The course objective is to show that while colonialism was brutal and oppressive, it was by no means a unidirectional process of domination in which Europeans plundered the African continent and enforced a wholesale adoption of European culture. Rather, scholars today recognize that colonial encounters were complex culture, political, and economic fields of interaction. Africans actively adopted, reworked, and contested colonizers' policies and projects, and Europeans drew heavily from these encounters to form liberal conceptions of self, nation, and society. Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about forms of personhood, political economy, and everyday life in the twentieth century. Course themes will include social reproduction, kinship practices, medicine, domesticity, and development.

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. CHDV Distribution C*.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20702,CHDV 21401,CRES 20802

HIST 13001-13002-13003. History of European Civilization I-II-III.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13001. History of European Civilization I. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): F. Albritton Jonsson, C. Fasolt, J. Lyon, J. Padgett, A. Palmer, N. Ristuccia, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13002. History of European Civilization II. 100 Units.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): J. Goldstein, F. Hillis, N. Ristuccia, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13003. History of European Civilization III. 100 Units.

The two-quarter History of European Civilization sequence may be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. Topics in this third quarter of the sequence may include women in European history, religion and society, Church and State, the Enlightenment, the transformation of the Roman World, or other focused topics on cultural, economic, social, political, or religious aspects of European history.

Instructor(s): N. Ristuccia, Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13001 and HIST 13002
Note(s): Students who plan to complete a three-quarter sequence register for HIST 13003 in Spring Quarter after completing HIST 13001-13002. Students may not combine HIST 13003 with one other quarter of European Civilization to construct a two-quarter sequence.

HIST 13100-13200-13300. History of Western Civilization I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. The purpose of this sequence is threefold: (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of Western civilization since the sixth century BC, and (3) to assist them in discovering connections between the various epochs. The purpose of the course is not to present a general survey of Western history. Instruction consists of intensive investigation of a selection of original documents bearing on a number of separate topics, usually two or three a quarter, occasionally supplemented by the work of a modern historian. The treatment of the selected topics varies from section to section. This sequence is currently offered twice a year. The amount of material covered is the same whether the student enrolls in the Autumn-Winter-Spring sequence or the Summer sequence. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13100. History of Western Civilization I. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Autumn; J. Boyer, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13200. History of Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Winter, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13300. History of Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Spring; D. Koehler, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Spring
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13500-13600-13700. America in World Civilization I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence uses the American historical experience, set within the context of Western civilization to (1) introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) probe the ways political and social theory emerge within specific historical contexts, and (3) explore some of the major issues and trends in American historical development. This sequence is not a general survey of American history.

HIST 13500. America in World Civilization I. 100 Units.

This quarter examines the basic order of early colonial society; the social, political, and intellectual forces for a rethinking of that order; and the experiences of the Revolution and of making a new polity.

Instructor(s): E. Cook, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13600. America in World Civilization II. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): A. Green, A. Lippert, A. Stanley, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13500; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13700. America in World Civilization III. 100 Units.

This quarter focuses on the definitions of Americanism and social order in a multicultural society; Taylorism and social engineering; culture in the shadow of war; the politics of race, ethnicity, and gender; and the rise of new social movements.

Instructor(s): K. Belew, J. Dailey, J. Sparrow     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13600; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13900-14000. Introduction to Russian Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence, which meets the general education requirement in civilization studies, provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

HIST 13900. Introduction to Russian Civilization I. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): E. Gilburd, W. Nickell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24000,REES 26011

HIST 14000. Introduction to Russian Civilization II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): R. Bird, E. Gilburd     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24100,REES 26012

HIST 16700-16800-16900. Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and late antiquity (27 BC to the fifth century AD).

HIST 16700. Ancient Mediterranean World I. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the development of the institutions of the Greek city-state, the Persian Wars and the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the social and economic consequences of the Peloponnesian War, and the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians.

Instructor(s): J. Hall, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20700

HIST 16800. Ancient Mediterranean World II. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community.

Instructor(s): C. Ando, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20800

HIST 16900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. 100 Units.

This quarter introduces problems and changes from the late second to sixth century. Lectures and discussion. Principal aspects of change and historical interpretation of the ancient world. Readings from selected primary sources and modern scholarship. Assignments include Peter Brown's "The World of Late Antiquity" and primary sources. Midterm and final examination, with a short paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20900

HMRT 10100-10200. Human Rights in World Civilizations I-II.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

HMRT 10100. Human Rights in World Civilizations I. 100 Units.

The first quarter begins with a set of conceptual problems and optics designed to introduce students to the critical study of human rights, opening up questions of the universal, human dignity, and the political along with the practices of witness and testimony. It is followed by two thematic clusters. "Anti-Slavery, Humanitarianism, and Rights" focuses on the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries to historicize notions of dignity, sympathy, and witness. "Declarations as a Human Rights Genre" examines revolutionary eighteenth-century rights declarations in France, the United States, and Haiti against the aspirations of the 1948 UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Instructor(s): M. Bradley and S. Thakkar     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

HMRT 10200. Human Rights in World Civilizations II. 100 Units.

Four thematic clusters structure the second quarter. "Migration, Minorities, and Refugees" examines minority rights, the evolution of legal norms around refugees, and human trafficking. "Late Twentieth Century Human Rights Talk" explores the contestations between rights claims in the political-civil and socio-economic spheres, calls for sexual rights, and cultural representations of human rights abuses. "Global Justice" considers forms of international criminal law, transitional justice, and distributive justice. "Indigenous Rights as Human Rights" takes up the relatively new domain of the rights of indigenous peoples and how they relate to contemporary human rights practice.

Instructor(s): B. Laurence and Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HMRT 10100
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence; students must have taken HMRT 10100 to enroll in this course.

Jewish Civilization: JWSC 20120–20199 and JWSC 20220–20299  
*Note: This Jewish Civilization course numbering system is new in 2015–2016.

Jewish Civilization courses may be taken in any order and may be used to fulfill the College’s general education requirement in civilization studies. To fulfill the general education civilization requirement, at least one course must pertain to the ancient or medieval periods (in the range JWSC 20120–20199), and at least one course must pertain to the modern period (in the range JWSC 20220–20299). Please see the Jewish Studies page or contact the department for more specific information.

*Note: This Jewish Civilization course numbering system is new in 2015–2016. Students who have already taken one or two courses from the previous JWSC civilization studies sequences (JWSC 20001-20003 or JWSC 20004-20006) and wish to complete the civilization requirement may take an additional JWSC civilization course from the set of eligible courses, as defined above, provided that they end up having taken at least one JWSC course in the ancient or medieval period and one in the modern period, and provided that they do not take the same course twice under two different numbers.

LACS 16100-16200-16300. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

LACS 16100. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.

Instructor(s): A. Kolata     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23101,CRES 16101,HIST 16101,HIST 36101,LACS 34600,SOSC 26100

LACS 16200. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23102,CRES 16102,HIST 16102,HIST 36102,LACS 34700,SOSC 26200

LACS 16300. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.

Instructor(s): B. Fischer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23103,CRES 16103,HIST 16103,HIST 36103,LACS 34800,SOSC 26300

MUSI 12100-12200. Music in Western Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

MUSI 12100. Music in Western Civilization I: To 1750. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Robertson     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 12700,SOSC 21100

MUSI 12200. Music in Western Civilization II: 1750 to the Present. 100 Units.


,This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 12800,SOSC 21200

NEHC 20001-20002-20003. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement for civilization studies.

NEHC 20001. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I: Egypt. 100 Units.

This course surveys the political, social, and economic history of ancient Egypt from pre-dynastic times (ca. 3400 B.C.) until the advent of Islam in the seventh century of our era.

Instructor(s): J. Johnson, B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Autumn. Not offered 2016-17
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30001

NEHC 20002. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society II: Mesopotamia. 100 Units.

This course introduces the history of Mesopotamia. We begin with the origins of writing and cities in Sumer (ca. 3200 BC); then cover the great empires of Assyria, Babylon, and Persia; and end with the arrival of Alexander the Great in the late fourth century BC.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Winter. Not offered 2016-17
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30002

NEHC 20003. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society III: Anatolia and Levant. 100 Units.

This course surveys the political, social, and economic history of ancient Anatolia and the Levant (Syria-Palestine) from ca. 2300 BC until the conquest of the region by Alexander that inaugurated the Hellenistic period in the Near East.

Instructor(s): P. Goedegebuure     Terms Offered: Spring. Not offered 2016-17

NEHC 20004-20005-20006. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I-II-III.

This sequence surveys the thought and literature of the Near East. Each course in the sequence focuses on a particular culture or civilization. Texts in English. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is not required.

NEHC 20004. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I: Mesopotamian Literature. 100 Units.

This course takes as its topic the literary tradition surrounding Gilgamesh, the legendary king of the Mesopotamian city-state of Uruk.  The course will focus on the Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh and its Sumerian forerunners, and their cultural and historical contexts. We will also read a number of Sumerian and Akkadian compositions that are thematically related to the Gilgamesh tradition, including Atrahasis, the Sumerian Flood story, and the Epics of Enmerkar and Lugalbanda, also of first dynasty of Uruk.

Instructor(s): S. Paulus     Terms Offered: TBD
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30004

NEHC 20005. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature II: Anatolian Literature. 100 Units.

This course will provide an overview of Anatolian/Hittite literature, as “defined” by the Hittites themselves, in the wider historical-cultural context of the Ancient Near East. In the course of discussions, we will try to answer some important questions about Hittite inscriptions, such as: why were they written down, why were they kept, for whom were they intended, and what do the answers to these questions (apart from the primary content of the texts themselves) tell us about Hittite society? 

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: TBD
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30005

NEHC 20006. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature III: Egypt. 100 Units.

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction.

Instructor(s): B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30006

NEHC 20011-20012-20013. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEHC 20011. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

The first course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Hittite Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25700,HIST 15602,NEHC 30011

NEHC 20012. Ancient Empires II: The Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

The second course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Ottoman Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25800,HIST 15603,NEHC 30012

NEHC 20013. Ancient Empires III: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550–1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25900,HIST 15604,NEHC 30013

NEHC 20416-20417-20418. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEHC 20416. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I. 100 Units.

This course looks at the earliest attestation of East Semitic as a language: Akkadian which was first written in the 3rd millennium BC in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq).  Akkadians were in close contact with Sumerians, the other important language of Mesopotamia, and adapted their script (cuneiform) to write a Semitic language. This class critically examines the connection between script, language, peoples and ethnos. Furthermore, this course explores the political expansion of Akkadian in connection with the development of an early “empire” and the emergence of historical, legal and literary traditions in Akkadian and its influence for the Ancient Near East and beyond. Texts covered included historical inscriptions, the Law Code of Hammu-râpi, Flood Stories and divination texts (omina). Visits to the Oriental Institute Museum will complement the exploration of the Akkadian culture. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): S. Paulus     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15702,NEHC 30416

NEHC 20417. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations II. 100 Units.

This course explores the historical evidence for several Semitic peoples who dwelled in Syria and Northern Iraq in the third to first millennia BCE (Eblaites, Amorites, Ugariteans, Assyrians). These peoples' languages belong either to the larger group of Northwest Semitic, that comprises languages such as Aramaic and Canaanite (including Biblical Hebrew), or to the northern dialects of East Semitic. The shared characteristic of these people is to have recorded their cultural legacy on clay tablets, using Mesopotamian cuneiform or an alphabetic script adapted from it, noting either their own language or several aspects of their history, culture and religion through a borrowed language (Akkadian). The class will focus on major cultural traditions that have echoes in younger records that came to be influential for the modern Middle East and for the Western world – especially the Hebrew Bible, but also some traditions of Pre-Islamic Arabia. This includes a close examination and discussion of representative ancient sources, as well as readings in modern scholarship. Ancient sources include literary, historical, and legal documents. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): H. Reculeau     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15703,NEHC 30417

NEHC 20418. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations III. 100 Units.

This course explores the histories and literatures of Aramaic- and Arabic-writing Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities in the first millennium CE. Beginning with the reception of Ancient Mesopotamian culture in late antiquity, the class will focus on the development of Syriac Christian, Rabbinic, and early Muslim sacred literatures in relation to the social, political, and economic contexts of the Roman and Iranian empires and inter-imperial Arabia. It will then turn to the literary and intellectual revival of the early Islamic caliphates, in which representatives of all three religions participated. Among the works to be read in translation are the Acts of Thomas, the Babylonian Talmud, the Qur’ān, and early Arabic poetry.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Not open to first-year students.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15704,NEHC 30418

NEHC 20501-20502-20503. Islamic History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the main trends in the political history of the Islamic world, with some attention to economic, social, and intellectual history. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

NEHC 20501. Islamic History and Society I: The Rise of Islam and the Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general eduation requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30501,HIST 25704,HIST 35704,ISLM 30500,RLST 20501

NEHC 20502. Islamic History and Society II: The Middle Period. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30502,HIST 25804,HIST 35804,ISLM 30600

NEHC 20503. Islamic History and Society III: The Modern Middle East. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Instructor(s): A. Shissler     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25904,HIST 35904,ISLM 30700,NEHC 30503

NEHC 20601-20602-20603. Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III.

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

NEHC 20601. Islamic Thought and Literature I. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 950, concentrating on the career of the Prophet Muhammad; Qur‘an and Hadith; the Caliphate; the development of Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical discourses; sectarian movements; and Arabic literature.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30601,RLST 20401,SOSC 22000,HIST 25610,HIST 35610,ISLM 30601

NEHC 20602. Islamic Thought and Literature II. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 950 to 1700, surveying works of literature, theology, philosophy, sufism, politics, history, etc., written in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, as well as the art, architecture and music of the Islamicate traditions. Through primary texts, secondary sources and lectures, we will trace the cultural, social, religious, political and institutional evolution through the period of the Fatimids, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, and the "gunpowder empires" (Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals).

Instructor(s): F. Lewis     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30602,RLST 20402,SOSC 22100,ISLM 30602,CMES 30602

NEHC 20603. Islamic Thought and Literature III. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1700 to the present, exploring works of Arab intellectuals who interpreted various aspects of Islamic philosophy, political theory, and law in the modern age. We look at diverse interpretations concerning the role of religion in a modern society, at secularized and historicized approaches to religion, and at the critique of both religious establishments and nation-states as articulated by Arab intellectuals. Generally, we discuss secondary literature first and the primary sources later.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30603,RLST 20403,SOSC 22200

SALC 20100-20200. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II.

This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

SALC 20100. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I. 100 Units.

The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia’s early encounters with Europe.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000

SALC 20200. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II. 100 Units.

The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India.

Instructor(s): D. Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SALC 20100,ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24102,HIST 10900,SASC 20100,SOSC 23100

Civilization Studies Abroad Programs

Students may also complete their civilization studies requirement by participating in one of the College's Study Abroad programs. For more information about these programs, consult the Study Abroad section of this catalog or visit study-abroad.uchicago.edu.