Social Sciences Collegiate Division General Education Sequences | Collegiate Courses | Collegiate Courses in Civilization Studies Abroad

The distinguished American sociologist, David Riesman, who played a major role in the creation of the general education program in the social sciences at Chicago, once observed that it was only with a "marvelous hubris" that students were encouraged to range over such "large territory" in the social sciences. Indeed, since the 1940s, yearlong sequences designed to introduce students to different types of social scientific data and different forms of social sciences inquiry have become a permanent feature of the Chicago curriculum. Although considerable variety manifests itself in the way the social sciences courses in general education are organized, most of the sequences are informed, as Robert Redfield once suggested, by an attempt "to communicate the historical development of contemporary society" and by an effort "to convey some understanding of the scientific spirit as applied to social problems and the capacity to address oneself in that spirit to such a problem." By training students in the analysis of social phenomena through the development and use of interdisciplinary and comparative concepts, the courses also try to determine the characteristics common among many societies, thus enabling the individual to use both reason and special knowledge to confront rapid social change in the global world of the late twentieth century.

All three courses in a SOSC sequence must be taken in order. Once students begin a sequence, they are expected to remain in the same sequence. NOTE: Students registered in any of the sequences below must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

Please note: The Power, Identity, and Resistance sequence changed order and numbering in 2017–18. Students who need only one of these courses should consult with their College adviser to confirm they are taking the correct one.

Please note: The Self, Culture, and Society sequence changed order and numbering in 2018–19. Students who need only one of these courses should consult with their College adviser to confirm they are taking the correct one.

Social Sciences Collegiate Division General Education Sequences

SOSC 11400-11500-11600Power, Identity, Resistance I-II-III300
SOSC 12400-12500-12600Self, Culture, and Society I-II-III300
SOSC 13100-13200-13300Social Science Inquiry I-II-III300
SOSC 13110-13210-13310Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory300
SOSC 13120-13220-13320Social Science Inquiry: Spatial Analysis300
SOSC 14100-14200-14300Mind I-II-III300
SOSC 15100-15200-15300Classics of Social and Political Thought I-II-III300
SOSC 16100-16200-16300Global Society I-II-III300

SOSC 11400-11500-11600. Power, Identity, Resistance I-II-III.

"Power, Identity, and Resistance" examines multiple and interrelated aspects of power, from the roles of economic markets and political states to the social structures that determine individual, class, and gender inequalities.

SOSC 11400. Power, Identity, Resistance I. 100 Units.

The first quarter of this sequence focuses on key texts for liberal political and state conceptions. We explore the distinctly modern liberal claim that society or groups of associated individuals make states for their own protection and the governance of their affairs. We interrogate authors on questions concerning individuality, liberty, equality, the limitation of state power, the importance of political stability, the value of democratic participation in governance, the role that organized society plays in political life, and the degree to which social and political relations vary historically-- among other issues. We address both defenders and critics of the liberal conception of liberty and the state. Texts vary by year. Typical authors assigned include some combination of Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Burke, Constant, Smith, Wollstonecraft, Paine, Hegel, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, Du Bois, Durkheim, Weber, Dewey, Schmitt, Arendt, Polanyi, Hayek, Foucault.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 11500. Power, Identity, Resistance II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter focuses on the work of central figures in modern political economy and social theory. The course highlights the organization of economic process and the ways in which it relates to social and political relations and institutions. The central questions are these: How historically distinctive is the modern form of capitalist economy? Do human beings "naturally" act in certain ways in the economy and society? To what degree can we rely on individual self-control? Is inequality an inevitable outcome of capitalist economic development? What is the role of power in economic life? How should we think about the relationship between political power and economic practice? Readings vary by year. Typical texts include some combination of Aristotle, Mandeville, Rousseau, Smith, Marx, Mill, Durkheim, Weber, Polanyi, Hayek, Keynes, Foucault, Marshall, Roepke, Friedman, Stiglitz, Krugman.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 11400. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 11600. Power, Identity, Resistance III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter analyzes the way in which selected themes from the first two quarters work themselves out in the history of the nineteenth, twentieth, and twenty-first centuries. Broadly, we consider the scope of liberal claims about rights, liberty, and resistance, and we explore themes like identity, equality, democracy, and human beings' relationship to nature. In the past, the course has also included explorations of colonialism, racial and gender equality, and different forms of violence. Themes and readings vary by year. Texts used previously include: Smith, Kant, Hegel, Herder, Fichte, Marx, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Nietzsche, Freud, Lenin, Luxemburg, Trotsky, Sorel, Dewey, Hayek, Polanyi, Keynes, Fanon, Cesaire, DuBois, Arendt, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, Foucault, de Beauvoir, and Butler.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 11500. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 12400-12500-12600. Self, Culture, and Society I-II-III.

“Self, Culture, and Society” introduces students to a broad range of social scientific theories and methodologies that deepen their understanding of basic problems of cultural, social, and historical existence. The sequence starts with the conceptual foundations of political economy and theories of capitalism and meaning in modern society. Students then consider the cultural and social constitution of the self, foregrounding the exploration of sexuality, gender, and race. Finally, students critically examine dominant discourses of science, individuality, and alterity, keeping an eye towards the application of social theory to contemporary concerns.

SOSC 12400. Self, Culture, and Society I. 100 Units.

The social theories of Ibn Khaldun, Smith, Marx, and Weber, supplemented by historical and ethnographic works, serve as points of departure for considering the characterizing features of the modern world. Particular emphasis is given to socioeconomic structure, theories of historical change, possibilities for individual freedom, the meaning of work, and globalization.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 12500. Self, Culture, and Society II. 100 Units.

In Winter Quarter, students tackle questions about the construction of self and society. The works of Durkheim, Freud, de Beauvoir, Fanon, and others inform investigation of symbolic representation, the strength of social forces, the unconscious, culture, ethics and violence, sexuality, gender, and race.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 12400. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 12600. Self, Culture, and Society III. 100 Units.

In Spring Quarter, students consider contemporary issues and social science approaches to them. Beginning with post-modern, post-colonial, and other critiques of sciences of self, culture, and society (as articulated by Kuhn, Foucault, and Said), the course investigates how new theories arise and new problems are addressed, how new perspectives (more global, more inclusive) test and challenge, and how social scientists change, renew, and improve their insights. The quarter focuses on topics of contemporary concern, including the human impact on the environment, feminism outside the West, and the rise of global cities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 12500. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13100-13200-13300. Social Science Inquiry I-II-III.

"Social Science Inquiry" explores classic and contemporary points of view about ways of gathering, analyzing, and interpreting information about public policy issues. The course aims to provide the student with an introduction to the philosophy of social science inquiry, a sense of how that inquiry is conducted, and an understanding of how policy implications can be drawn responsibly from evidence provided by empirical social science. The sequence's objective is to convey both the promise and the pitfalls of social science and a sense of its uses and abuses. During the 2018–19 academic year, two sections within the "Social Science Inquiry" sequence will each offer a different topical focus: one section on formal theory ("Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory" SOSC 13110-13210-13310) and one section on spatial analysis ("Social Science Inquiry: Spatial Analysis" 13120-13220-13320).

SOSC 13100. Social Science Inquiry I. 100 Units.

The Autumn Quarter starts by introducing students to the various ways that social scientists think about the world. Examples include theoretical models from Milton Friedman, Thomas Schelling, and John Nash; path-breaking experiments from Stanley Milgram and Daniel Kahneman; and quantitative research on topics ranging from voting to gun violence to baby names. Through these works, students will learn how researchers theorize about social phenomena.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13200. Social Science Inquiry II. 100 Units.

In the Winter Quarter, students will be introduced to social science research tools. They will learn how to collect data, conduct experiments, and make causal inferences from statistics. Using the General Social Survey, the National Election Studies, and other surveys, students will gain hands-on experience working with large data sets.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 13100. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13300. Social Science Inquiry III. 100 Units.

In the Spring Quarter, students will conduct their own substantial research project. Students will learn how to translate their ideas into research questions, their theories into testable hypotheses, and their findings into meaningful conclusions. By year's end, students will develop a critical perspective on many perennial social questions and, ultimately, acquire "quantitative literacy," essential skills in an increasingly data-driven world.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 13200. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13110-13210-13310. Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory.

Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory builds on the rich traditions of rational choice scholarship set in place by James Coleman and Gary Becker. Mastering game theoretic and public choice models is an invaluable tool for understanding how interest groups influence politics, how voting takes place in Congress, how matches are made in the dating world, or how neighborhood arrangements are coordinated. More broadly, applications of formal theory to social science include explaining how peace negotiations occur between governments and rebels in the aftermath of civil war, how trade unionists bargain over wages with employers, and even the decisions of autocrats to step down from power and allow for free elections. SSI-Formal Theory will introduce students to the systematic study of social, political, and economic interactions, where the optimal course of one person's action depends on the options and preferences of other people involved in the interaction. Students will learn how to model strategic situations in the language of mathematics and how to make equilibrium predictions.

SOSC 13110. Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory I. 100 Units.

Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory I introduces students to deductive reasoning and teaches them primitives of rational choice---players, strategies and preferences.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13210. Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory II. 100 Units.

Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory II covers two basic equilibrium concepts: Nash, and Subgame Perfect Nash.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 13110. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13310. Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory III. 100 Units.

Social Science Inquiry: Formal Theory III covers games of incomplete information, including Bayesian Nash and Perfect Bayesian Nash equilibrium.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 13210. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13120-13220-13320. Social Science Inquiry: Spatial Analysis.

Social Science Inquiry: Spatial Analysis deals with the fundamental role of space, place, location, distance, and interaction—crucial to tackling many research questions in the social sciences. This sequence of three courses explores the fundamentals of spatial analysis, a collection of quantitative methods in which space is explicitly accounted for. The three courses explore different concepts of space; how it is measured, represented, and accounted for in social science methodology; and how spatial problems are solved (spatial reasoning).

SOSC 13120. Social Science Inquiry: Spatial Analysis I. 100 Units.

This course explores the concept of spatial thinking and how it has been incorporated in research in the social sciences. Fundamental notions related to space, such as location, distance, spatial interaction, among others are explored in classic readings in quantitative geography, as well as in several recent examples of research papers in urban studies, sociology, political science, criminology, public health, and economics.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13220. Social Science Inquiry: Spatial Analysis II. 100 Units.

This second course in the sequence covers basic principles of spatial analysis, geographic information science and spatial statistics. A range of methods for spatial data exploration and analysis are covered. A heavy emphasis is on carrying out the analysis by means of the open source statistical software R and its many spatial packages.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 13120. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 13320. Social Science Inquiry: Spatial Analysis III. 100 Units.

In this third course of the spatial analysis sequence, the concepts and methods covered so far are applied to an actual research problem that deals with an issue where the role of space is important. The focus is on formulating a research question, collecting and analyzing data and communicating the results.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 13220. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 14100-14200-14300. Mind I-II-III.

"Mind" explores subjective experience and behavior through the lens of underlying mental processes, biological mechanisms, and social context. Drawing from research in the social sciences and beyond, the course broadly considers how empirical approaches can shape our understanding of long-standing questions about human experience. Each quarter of Mind is taught by a different group of faculty, and the material in each quarter is arranged into a broad theme that makes connections across quarters. These themes vary from year to year.

SOSC 14100. Mind I. 100 Units.

The first quarter of Mind builds an intellectual framework for understanding the mental and behavioral phenomena of animals, connecting philosophical and historical foundations to the modern scientific literature. What is the difference between the subjective and the objective? How do the mind and body relate to each other? How do nature and nurture impact behavior? These are some of the broad questions that are addressed.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 14200. Mind II. 100 Units.

The second quarter of Mind explores the concept of "mechanism," or different kinds of causal models and theories that are used to explain mental phenomena from different levels of scientific analysis (e.g., biological, cognitive). Focusing on empirical literature, this quarter's emphasis on mechanism builds upon the intellectual foundations established in Autumn Quarter.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 14100. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 14300. Mind III. 100 Units.

The third quarter of Mind explores the effects of different kinds of context on mental phenomena and mechanisms, including developmental, social, and cultural contexts. Focusing on empirical literature, this quarter highlights the impact of basic research on some of the big problems that face humans and society.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 14200. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 15100-15200-15300. Classics of Social and Political Thought I-II-III.

"Classics of Social and Political Thought" reads classic texts from Plato and Aristotle to Nietzsche and DuBois in order to investigate criteria for understanding and judging political, social, and economic institutions. What is justice? What makes a good society? This sequence examines such problems as the conflicts between individual interest and common good; between morality, religion, and politics; and between liberty and equality. We examine alternative conceptions of society, law, authority, consent, and dissent that underlie continuing controversies in contemporary political life.

SOSC 15100. Classics of Social and Political Thought I. 100 Units.

'Classics of Social and Political Thought' reads classic texts from Plato and Aristotle to Nietzsche and DuBois in order to investigate criteria for understanding and judging political, social, and economic institutions. What is justice? What makes a good society? This sequence examines such problems as the conflicts between individual interest and common good; between morality, religion, and politics; and between liberty and equality. We examine alternative conceptions of society, law, authority, consent, and dissent that underlie continuing controversies in contemporary political life. In recent years, thinkers read in the Autumn Quarter have included Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, and Machiavelli.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 15200. Classics of Social and Political Thought II. 100 Units.

'Classics of Social and Political Thought' reads classic texts from Plato and Aristotle to Nietzsche and DuBois in order to investigate criteria for understanding and judging political, social, and economic institutions. What is justice? What makes a good society? This sequence examines such problems as the conflicts between individual interest and common good; between morality, religion, and politics; and between liberty and equality. We examine alternative conceptions of society, law, authority, consent, and dissent that underlie continuing controversies in contemporary political life. In recent years, thinkers read in the Winter Quarter have included Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 15100. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 15300. Classics of Social and Political Thought III. 100 Units.

'Classics of Social and Political Thought' reads classic texts from Plato and Aristotle to Nietzsche and DuBois in order to investigate criteria for understanding and judging political, social, and economic institutions. What is justice? What makes a good society? This sequence examines such problems as the conflicts between individual interest and common good; between morality, religion, and politics; and between liberty and equality. We examine alternative conceptions of society, law, authority, consent, and dissent that underlie continuing controversies in contemporary political life. In recent years, thinkers read in the Spring Quarter have included J.S. Mill, Tocqueville, Marx, Nietzsche, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Simone de Beauvoir.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 15200. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 16100-16200-16300. Global Society I-II-III.

Global Society is organized around three essential areas for making sense of a globalized world: social thought, population, and social change. The sequence is designed to cultivate an understanding of social science research that extends beyond experiences and processes that are particular to Western civilizations. The curriculum will expose students to a long-standing, globally expansive canon within the social sciences and teach students to distinguish cultural particulars from universal concerns.

SOSC 16100. Global Society I. 100 Units.

The first quarter of Global Society addresses social thought from a global perspective by first considering some classic works from the Western tradition and then reading major statements about society from the classical traditions of others cultures including: Latin America, Islam, East Asia, and Africa. In Global Society, students read these statements simultaneously as theoretical treatises, as empirical approaches, and as normative prescriptions for the social world. This three-pronged approach enables us to disentangle differences in empirical perception from differences in values and to assess how, in combination, these color our own inevitably particular judgments of world events. The course opens a set of themes that will run through the entire sequence: individual-and-society, tradition-and-change, sources of social values, difference and particularity. The pedagogical emphasis is on close reading, discussion, and analytic writing. Possible readings include: Thomas More, J. J. Rousseau, D. F. Sarmiento, Ali Shariati, Raden Ayu Kartini, and Léopold Sédar Senghor

Instructor(s): A. Abbott     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 16200. Global Society II. 100 Units.

The second quarter of Global Society is built around the theme of population and is designed as a hybrid course that brings together a) an intellectual history of population thought and census-taking and b) a practical introduction to basic demographic tools and contemporary debates about population. Students will engage Malthus, his detractors, and new incarnations of Malthusian thought in detail. Questions considered will include: What is a population? What is at stake when we count? How many people can this earth support? What are the implications of population shifts for individual life chances? For social values and patterns of difference? Students will learn how to construct basic period lifetables, how to compare populations and sub-populations using basic standardization techniques, and how to analyze generations and cohorts in context. At the same time, since population issues like reproduction, migration, and mortality are simultaneously philosophical, political, and empirical matters, students will connect these practical and empirical analyses to political and value debates about the causes and consequences of population change. Possible texts include: Graunt, Petty, Malthus, Nehru, Wu Ta-k'un, and contemporary instantiations.

Instructor(s): J. Trinitapoli     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 16100. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

SOSC 16300. Global Society III. 100 Units.

This third part of the sequence marries themes that emerge from Global Social Thought and Population, with an emphasis on social change and development during twentieth and twenty-first centuries. From the perspective of Global Society, "change" and "development" encompass everything from micro-level changes in gender relations to macro-level shifts in the global economy. With new theoretical and empirical tools from parts 1 & 2 of the sequence, students will engage the empirical, the theoretical, and the normative aspects of defining and evaluating long-run and short-run social change. Using global and comparative lenses, we examine forms of state repression, civil resistance, religious transformations, technological and economic changes, and the effects of these large social patterns on individual persons. Students will write about the relationship of individuals to broad forces of social change, connecting themes from the first and second quarters. The sequence concludes with a set of writing workshops designed to guide students through the steps of producing a capstone sequence paper. Using the skills and tools they've acquired throughout the sequence, students will analyze the relationship of a particular cohort (anchored in a time, place) to social change, with a focus on the empirical, normative, and theoretical stakes, their causes and consequences. Possible texts include: Geertz, DuBois, Srinivas, and contemporary instantiations.

Instructor(s): K. Hoang     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SOSC 16200. These courses must be taken in sequence. Students registered in this sequence must attend the first and second class sessions or their registration will be dropped.

Collegiate Courses

SOSC 02980. Practicum. 25 Units.

This course is for students who secure a summer internship. For details, visit careeradvancement.uchicago.edu/jobs-internships-research/internships-for-credit. Students write a short paper (two to three pages) and give an oral presentation reflecting on their internship experience.

Instructor(s): D. Spatz     Terms Offered: Summer
Note(s): Must be taken for P/F grading; students who fail to complete the course requirements will receive an F on their transcript (no W will be granted). Students receive 025 units of credit at completion of course. Course meets once in Spring Quarter and once in Autumn Quarter. Course fee $150; students in need of financial aid should contact Jay Ellison at 702.8609.
Equivalent Course(s): HUMA 02980

SOSC 21100-21200. Music in Western Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

SOSC 21100. Music In Western Civilization I: To 1750. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): A. Robertson     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 12700, MUSI 12100

SOSC 21200. Music In Western Civ II. 100 Units.

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): MUSI 12200, HIST 12800

SOSC 22000-22100-22200. Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

SOSC 22000. Islamic Thought and Literature I. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 950, concentrating on the career of the Prophet Muhammad; Qur'an and Hadith; the Caliphate; the development of Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical discourses; sectarian movements; and Arabic literature.

Instructor(s): T. Qutbuddin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20601, HIST 35610, RLST 20401, CMES 30601, NEHC 30601, ISLM 30601, HIST 25610, MDVL 20601

SOSC 22100. Islamic Thought and Literature II. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 950 to 1700, surveying works of literature, theology, philosophy, sufism, politics, history, etc., written in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, as well as the art, architecture and music of the Islamicate traditions. Through primary texts, secondary sources and lectures, we will trace the cultural, social, religious, political and institutional evolution through the period of the Fatimids, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, and the "gunpowder empires" (Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals).

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): MDVL 20602, CMES 30602, NEHC 20602, NEHC 30602, ISLM 30602, HIST 25615, RLST 20402, HIST 35615

SOSC 22200. Islamic Thought and Literature III. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1700 to the present, exploring works of Arab intellectuals who interpreted various aspects of Islamic philosophy, political theory, and law in the modern age. We look at diverse interpretations concerning the role of religion in a modern society, at secularized and historicized approaches to religion, and at the critique of both religious establishments and nation-states as articulated by Arab intellectuals. Generally, we discuss secondary literature first and the primary sources later.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20603, HIST 35616, NEHC 30603, ISLM 30603, RLST 20403, HIST 25616

SOSC 23000-23100. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II.

This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

SOSC 23000. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I. 100 Units.

The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia's early encounters with Europe.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24101, SALC 20100, HIST 10800, MDVL 20100

SOSC 23100. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II. 100 Units.

The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India.

Instructor(s): Dipesh Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SALC 20100,ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 20200, ANTH 24102, HIST 10900

SOSC 23500-23600-23700. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

SOSC 23500. Intro To East Asian Civilization I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn Summer
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only; all students attend the MW lecture and register for one F discussion section.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10800, HIST 15100, EALC 10800

SOSC 23600. Intro to East Asian Civilization II. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a three-quarter sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Summer Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only; all students attend the MW lecture and register for one F discussion section.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 10900, CRES 10900, HIST 15200

SOSC 23700. Intro to East Asian Civilization III. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): K. H. Choi     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only; all students attend the MW lecture and register for one F discussion section.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15300, CRES 11000, EALC 11000

SOSC 24000-24100. Introduction to Russian Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence, which meets the general education requirement in civilization studies, provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

SOSC 24000. Intro to Russian Civilization-1. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources-from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces-we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): E. Gilburd, W. Nickell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 13900, REES 26011

SOSC 24100. Intro Russian Civilization-2. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources-from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces-we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): R. Bird, E. Gilburd     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): REES 26012, HIST 14000

SOSC 24001-24002-24003. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

SOSC 24001. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world. Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter. Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 18301, CRES 24001, ANTH 24001

SOSC 24002. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 18302, ANTH 24002, CRES 24002

SOSC 24003. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 20702, ANTH 24003, HIST 18303, CRES 24003

SOSC 25090. Anthropology of Olympic Sport. 100 Units.

If cultural differences are as powerful as Anthropology has conventionally stressed, how is it possible that over 200 national and innumerable sub-national and transnational cultural formations have found common cause in the modern Olympic Games? This course explores, theoretically and historically, the emergence of the Olympic Games as the liturgy of the world system of nation states and the current dialectic between the Olympic Movement and the Olympic Sports Industry. Extensive reading and an independent research paper will be required.

Instructor(s): John MacAloon     Terms Offered: Winter. Winter 2019
Equivalent Course(s): MAPS 47501, ANTH 20420, ANTH 30420

SOSC 25100. Urban Structure and Process. 100 Units.

This course reviews competing theories of urban development, especially their ability to explain the changing nature of cities under the impact of advanced industrialism. Analysis includes a consideration of emerging metropolitan regions, the microstructure of local neighborhoods, and the limitations of the past American experience as a way of developing urban policy both in this country and elsewhere.

Instructor(s): O. McRoberts     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 20104, CRES 20104, GEOG 32700, GEOG 22700, SOCI 30104

SOSC 26100-26200-26300. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

SOSC 26100. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America. The courses in this sequence may be taken in any order.

Instructor(s): A. Kolata     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36101, CRES 16101, ANTH 23101, HIST 16101, LACS 16100, LACS 34600

SOSC 26200. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 16102, LACS 16200, HIST 36102, PPHA 39770, ANTH 23102, HIST 16102, LACS 34700

SOSC 26300. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 16103, LACS 34800, PPHA 39780, HIST 36103, HIST 16103, LACS 16300, ANTH 23103

SOSC 26004. History of City Planning. 100 Units.

This lecture-based course provides a broad survey of the history of city planning. It focuses on the normative: the endeavor to control and design the physical fabric of cities. What are the different ways cities have been envisioned and planned and to what effect? What are the competing theories of good city design that underlie city plans, and how do these plans interrelate to the social, political, cultural, and economic forces shaping cities? The course explores city planning's successes and failures, its tangible effect on urban pattern and form, and the extent to which city planning ideals have changed over time. Though the emphasis is on city planning's history, current debates about city planning within the context of the history of the profession will also be engaged. Emphasis will be on U.S. and European city planning experience, although global practices will also be surveyed.

Instructor(s): E. Talen     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PBPL 26004, GEOG 26200, ENST 26004, SOSC 36004

SOSC 29700. Rdgs: Social Sciences. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and senior adviser
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

SOSC 29900. BA Paper in Russian Civilization. 100 Units.

This is a reading and research course for independent study related to BA research and BA paper preparation.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and undergraduate program chair
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

SOSC 34500-34600. Anthropology of Museums I-II.

Anthropology of Museums

SOSC 34500. Anthropology Of Museums-1. 100 Units.

Using anthropological theories and methodology as a conceptual framework, this seminar will explore the organizational and ideological aspects of museum culture(s). The course includes visits to museums with guest museum professionals as guides into the culture of museums.

Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 34501, ANTH 24510, MAPH 34400, CHDV 34501, MAPS 34500

SOSC 34600. Anthropology Of Museum-2. 100 Units.

Using anthropological theories and methodology as a conceptual framework, this seminar will explore the organizational and ideological aspects of museum culture(s). The course includes visits to museums with guest museum professionals as guides into the culture of museums.

Instructor(s): M. Fred     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and consent of instructor
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24511, MAPS 34600, ANTH 34502, CHDV 38102

Collegiate Courses in Civilization Studies Abroad

For more information about collegiate courses offered through Study Abroad, consult the Study Abroad section of this catalog or visit study-abroad.uchicago.edu.