Contacts | Programs of Study | Program Requirements | Language and Literature Variant | Language Intensive Variant | Greek and Roman Cultures Variant | Grading | Honors | Minor Program in Classical Studies | Courses

Department Website: http://classics.uchicago.edu

Programs of Study

The BA degree in Classical Studies allows students to explore Greek and Roman antiquity in a variety of ways and provides excellent preparation for careers that require strong skills in interpretation and writing, such as teaching, scholarly research, law, and publishing, and in the humanities in general. Students may choose from the following three variants based on their preparation, interests, and goals:

  1. The Language and Literature Variant combines the study of Greek and Latin texts with coverage of diverse areas, including art and archaeology, history, philosophy, religion, and science.
  2. The Language Intensive Variant focuses on languages with the aim of reading a larger selection of texts in the original languages; it is designed especially for those who wish to pursue graduate studies in classics.
  3. The Greek and Roman Cultures Variant emphasizes courses in art and archaeology, history, material culture, and texts in translation.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in Classical Studies. Information follows the description of the major.

Program Requirements

Language and Literature Variant

Students who take the Language and Literature Variant may focus exclusively on Greek or exclusively on Latin, or they may study both languages with an emphasis on one or the other. The program assumes that, in addition to the requirements for the major, students have completed, or have credit for, a year of language study in either Greek or Latin.

No course that is used to meet one of the following requirements may be used simultaneously to meet a requirement under any other category.

1. Six courses in Greek or Latin in the major that must include the 20100-20200-20300 Intermediate sequence or higher in at least one language. The requirement can be satisfied by, for example:

LATN 20100-20200-20300Intermediate Latin I-II-III300
One of the following:300
Roman Elegy
   and Roman Novel
   and Vergil
Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III

2. Six courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, science, religion, material culture, or classical literature in translation, with courses divided between at least two fields, and with approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Any course that carries a Classical Civilization (CLCV) listing or a Classics (CLAS) listing between 30100 and 39000 meets this requirement. Other eligible courses are offered in disciplines such as Art History, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, Philosophy, and Political Science. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.

3. A research skills paper of from ten to twelve pages, to be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the end of Spring Quarter of the third year. The paper will normally substitute for a final paper in a Greek (above 20300), Latin (above 20300), Classical Civilization (CLCV), or Classics (CLAS) course, and is designed to prepare students for the BA paper. Students will be expected to develop a reasoned argument on a particular topic, based not only on primary materials (ancient literary tests; material culture; etc.) but also on research of relevant secondary bibliography. Students should declare at the start of the quarter if they wish to write the research skills paper in a given course, and should work closely throughout the quarter with the instructor, who must be a member of the Classics faculty.

4. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar, a one-quarter course spread over two quarters in the fourth year, as described below.

Summary of Requirements: Language and Literature Variant

6 courses in Greek or Latin (must include 20100-20200-20300) *600
6 courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, science, religion, material culture, or classical literature in translation600
CLCV 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Units1300
*

Credit will not be granted by examination.

Language Intensive Variant

The Language Intensive Variant is designed for students who expect to continue Classical Studies at the graduate level. It aims to provide the level of linguistic proficiency in both Greek and Latin that is commonly expected of applicants to rigorous graduate programs.

No course that is used to meet one of the following requirements may be used simultaneously to meet a requirement under any other category.

  1. Six courses in one classical language (Greek or Latin) at the 20000 level or above and six courses in the other (three of which may be at the introductory level).
  2. Four courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation, with courses divided between at least two fields, and with approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Any course that carries a Classical Civilization (CLCV) listing or a Classics (CLAS) listing between 30100 and 39000 meets this requirement. Other eligible courses are offered in disciplines such as Art History, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, Philosophy, and Political Science. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
  3. A research skills paper of from ten to twelve pages, to be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the end of Spring Quarter of the third year. The paper will normally substitute for a final paper in a Greek (above 20300), Latin (above 20300), Classical Civilization (CLCV), or Classics (CLAS) course, and is designed to prepare students for the BA paper. Students will be expected to develop a reasoned argument on a particular topic, based not only on primary materials (ancient literary tests; material culture; etc.) but also on research of relevant secondary bibliography. Students should declare at the start of the quarter if they wish to write the research skills paper in a given course, and should work closely throughout the quarter with the instructor, who must be a member of the Classics faculty.
  4. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar, a one-quarter course spread over two quarters in the fourth year, as described below.

Summary of Requirements: Language Intensive Variant

6 courses in Greek *600
6 courses in Latin *600
4 courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation400
CLCV 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Units1700
*

 Six courses in one classical language (Greek or Latin) at the 20000 level or above, and six courses in the other (three of which may be at the introductory level). Credit will not be granted by examination.

Greek and Roman Cultures Variant

This variant is designed for students who are interested in ancient Greece and Rome but wish to focus more on history (political, intellectual, religious, social) and material culture than on language and literature. Because the program allows many courses taught in other departments to count toward the major, it is especially suited to students who declare their major late or who wish to complete two majors. The program assumes that, in addition to requirements for the major, students have met the general education requirement in civilization studies by taking CLCV 20700-20800 Ancient Mediterranean World I-II, the Athens Program, or the Rome Program. Students who have met the general education requirement in civilization studies with a different sequence should complete one of these three sequences, which may then count among the nine courses in classical civilization required for the major.

No course that is used to meet one of the following requirements may be used simultaneously to meet a requirement under any other category.

  1. Three courses in Greek or Latin beyond the level of placement. Students who have not received credit by placement tests or Advanced Placement examinations may register for first-year Greek or Latin courses.
  2. Nine courses in art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation, with courses divided between at least four fields, and with approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Any course that carries a Classical Civilization (CLCV) listing or a Classics (CLAS) listing between 30100 and 39000 meets this requirement. Other eligible courses are offered in disciplines such as Art History, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, Philosophy, and Political Science. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
  3. A research skills paper of from ten to twelve pages, to be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the end of Spring Quarter of the third year. The paper will normally substitute for a final paper in a Greek (above 20300), Latin (above 20300), Classical Civilization (CLCV), or Classics (CLAS) course, and is designed to prepare students for the BA paper. Students will be expected to develop a reasoned argument on a particular topic, based not only on primary materials (ancient literary tests; material culture; etc.) but also on research of relevant secondary bibliography. Students should declare at the start of the quarter if they wish to write the research skills paper in a given course, and should work closely throughout the quarter with the instructor, who must be a member of the Classics faculty.
  4. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar, a one-quarter course spread over two quarters in the fourth year, as described below.

Summary of Requirements: Greek and Roman Cultures Variant

3 courses in Greek or Latin *300
9 courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation900
CLCV 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Units1300
*

Credit will not be granted by examination.

BA Paper Seminar and BA Paper

Candidates for the BA degree in all variants of the Classical Studies major are required to write a substantial BA paper. The purpose of the BA paper is to enable students to improve their research and writing skills and to give them an opportunity to focus their knowledge of the field upon an issue of their own choosing.

In their third year, by Monday of eighth week of Spring Quarter, students must submit to the director of undergraduate studies a short statement proposing an area of research that must be approved by a member of the Classics faculty who agrees to be the director of the BA paper. At the same time, students should meet with the preceptor of the BA Paper Seminar to plan a program of research.

Students may register for the CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar in either Autumn or Winter Quarter of their fourth year, but they are expected to participate in seminar meetings throughout both quarters. The focus of the seminar is to discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their BA papers. Participants in the regular seminar meetings are expected to exchange criticism and ideas with each other and with the preceptor, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the BA Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the BA paper and, therefore, is not reported until the paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the BA paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. At the end of Autumn Quarter, a provisional grade will be assigned by the preceptor and communicated to the student via the director of undergraduate studies. Once the BA paper has been submitted, the final grade will be determined jointly by the preceptor and faculty director.

The deadline for submitting the BA paper in final form is Friday of third week of Spring Quarter. This deadline represents the formal submission, which is final; students should expect to submit and defend substantial drafts much earlier. Hard copies are to be submitted to the faculty director, seminar preceptor, and director of undergraduate studies. Students who fail to meet the deadline may not be able to graduate in that quarter and will not be eligible for honors consideration.

Students who undertake a double major may meet the requirement for a BA paper in Classical Studies by making it part of a single BA paper that is designed to meet the requirements of both majors. This combined paper must have a substantial focus on texts or issues of the classical period, and must have a Classics faculty member as a reader. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar (the two-quarter BA Paper Seminar) is required of all students majoring in Classical Studies, whether as a double major or as a single major. The use of a single essay to meet the requirement for a BA paper in two majors requires approval from directors of undergraduate studies in both majors. A consent form, to be signed by the directors of undergraduate studies, is available from the College advisers. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Grading

The following first-year sequences in Greek and Latin and the courses in Greek and Latin composition are open for P/F grading for students not using these courses to meet language requirements for the major. All courses taken to meet requirements in the major must be taken for quality grades.

GREK 10100-10200-10300Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III300
GREK 11100-11200-11300Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III300
LATN 10100-10200-10300Introduction to Classical Latin I-II-III300
LATN 11100-11200-11300Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I-II-III300

Honors

To be recommended for honors, a student (1) must maintain an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher and a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major and (2) must also demonstrate superior ability in the BA paper to interpret Greek or Latin source material and to develop a coherent argument. The BA paper must be judged worthy of honors by the faculty director, the preceptor, and an additional faculty reader. Before the end of fifth week of Winter Quarter, the preceptor will make an initial recommendation for honors to the director of undergraduate studies, who will then consult with the faculty director. If the recommendation is approved, the student will select a second faculty reader in consultation with the faculty director.

Prizes

The Arthur Adkins Summer Research Fellowship (up to $5,000) is targeted to third-year undergraduates who are bound for graduate school, and it provides means and opportunity for the writing of a superior research paper on any aspect of the ancient world from the Bronze Age through Late Antiquity. It may be used for travel to classical sites and collections or to other research centers, and/or for living expenses during a summer devoted to research between the third and fourth year. Applicants must submit (in the first week of Spring Quarter) a transcript, statement (two to three pages) outlining their project and its relationship to existing knowledge in the field, plan of research together with a provisional budget for the summer, and letter from a faculty supervisor.

The Classics Prize is a cash award of $300 made annually to the student who graduates with the best record of achievement in the Classical Studies major.

The David Grene Summer Fellowship (up to $5,000) is targeted to undergraduates whose intellectual interests in the classical world have led them to an area of knowledge that they are unable to pursue during the regular academic year, and it allows them an opportunity to explore that interest through independent study during the summer before graduation. The independent study may involve training in a new discipline (e.g., paleography, numismatics), first-hand experience of ancient sites and artifacts, or ancillary language study. It may be carried out under the auspices of an organized program (e.g., American School of Classical Studies at Athens, American Academy in Rome), or it may be tailored entirely according to the student's own plan. Applicants must submit (in the first week of Spring Quarter) a transcript, project statement, provisional budget, and faculty letter of recommendation.

The John G. Hawthorne Travel Prize (up to $5,000) is awarded annually to an outstanding undergraduate student of classical languages, literature, or civilization for travel to Greece or Italy or for study of classical materials in other countries. The award may be used to pursue a project of the student's own design or to participate in appropriate programs conducted in Greece or Italy. Applicants must submit (in the first week of Spring Quarter) a transcript, project statement, provisional budget, and faculty letter of recommendation.

The Leon Golden Undergraduate Research Fellowship is expected to be worth $5,000 this year. The fellowship is intended to enable undergraduates majoring in Classical Studies to develop an original research project in the field or to pursue training in ancillary studies that will enrich their work in classics. Applicants must submit to the Classics secretary (by Monday, April 2, 2018) a transcript, a statement (two to three pages) outlining their project together with a provisional budget, and a letter from a faculty supervisor. A written report of what was accomplished during the period of the fellowship must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the first week of the following Autumn Quarter.

This fellowship is limited to Classical Studies majors, and it requires that a student have a well-developed project by the time of application.

The Nancy P. Helmbold Travel Award (up to $4,500) is awarded annually to an outstanding undergraduate student of Greek and/or Latin for travel to Greece or Italy. Applicants must submit (in the first week of Spring Quarter) a transcript, project statement, proposed budget, and faculty letter of recommendation.

The Paul Shorey Foreign Travel Grant ($3,000) is awarded annually to a student of Greek or Latin who has been accepted to participate in the Athens Program or the Rome Program of the College, and it is to be used to defray costs incurred in the program. The terms of the grant stipulate that it is to be awarded to a "needy and deserving" student. Students who have been accepted into one of the programs and who wish to be considered for the Shorey grant are invited to submit statements explaining their need in the first week of Spring Quarter.

The Pausanias Summer Research Fellowship (up to $4,500) is awarded annually to an undergraduate student who is majoring or minoring in Classical Studies and is conducting research abroad in a site of interest for classical studies. The award may be used to pursue a project of the student's own design or to participate in an appropriate institutional program abroad. Applicants must submit (in the first week of Spring Quarter) a transcript, project statement, provisional budget, and faculty letter of recommendation.

Minor Program in Classical Studies

The minor in Classical Studies requires a total of seven courses in Greek, Latin, or classical civilization. Students may choose one of two variants: a language variant that includes three courses at the 20000 level or higher in one language or a classical civilization variant.

Students must meet with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Students choose courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to a student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

The following groups of courses would comprise a minor in the areas indicated. Other programs may be designed in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. Minor program requirements are subject to revision.

Greek (or Latin) Sample Variant*

GREK 10100-10200-10300Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III300
GREK 20100-20200-20300Intermediate Greek I-II-III300
CLCV 21200History and Theory of Drama I **100
Total Units700
*

The language requirement for the minor program must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

**

or, for example, CLCV 21400 Marg Populations Of Rom Empire

Greek (or Latin) Sample Variant*

One of the following sequences:300
Intermediate Greek I-II-III
Intermediate Latin I-II-III
CLCV 20700-20800-20900Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III300
CLCV 21400Marg Populations Of Rom Empire **100
Total Units700
*

 The language requirement for the minor program must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

**

or, for example, CLCV 21200 History and Theory of Drama I

Classical Civilization Sample Variant*

CLCV 20700-20800-20900Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III **300
CLCV 22000Greek Tragedy/Its Influences100
CLCV 22100Epictetus/Marcus Aurelius100
CLCV 24200Invention of Love Poem100
CLCV 23100Ancient Philosophy100
Total Units700
*

The language requirement for the minor program must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

**

or, for example, GREK 10100-10200-10300 Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III or LATN 10100-10200-10300 Introduction to Classical Latin I-II-III

 Credit will not be granted by examination to meet the language requirement for the minor program.

Classics - Classical Civilization Courses

CLCV 14113. Introduction to Roman Art and Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course offers a survey of the art and archaeology of the Roman world from the founding of Rome in the eighth century BC to the Christianization of the Empire in the fourth century AD. Students will witness the transformation of Rome from a humble village of huts surrounded by marshland in central Italy into the centripetal force of a powerful Empire that spanned mind-bogglingly distant reaches of space and time. Throughout the course, we will consider how the built environments and artifacts produced by an incredible diversity of peoples and places can make visible larger trends of historical, political, and cultural change. What, we will begin and end by asking, is Roman about Roman art?

Instructor(s): P. Crowley      Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 14105

CLCV 20017. Art and Archaeology of Death and Mourning in Ancient Greece. 100 Units.

No aspect of human existence so preoccupied the ancient Greeks as the condition of mortality—the knowledge that, unlike their immortal gods, they would inevitably die. This course will explore the role that material culture played in helping individuals process the effects of death in a variety of times and places within ancient Greece. It will provide an overview of burial and commemoration practices, tomb offerings and funerary monuments, as well as artistic and literary representations of death, mourning, and the afterlife. Many of the readings will be primary texts in translation—epic poems and plays, myths and stories that offered the Greeks paradigms for their own experiences. Throughout, we will consider the role works of art play in helping individuals cope with as personal an issue as bereavement, and we will draw on parallels from contemporary culture to help frame the ancient material.

Instructor(s): S. Estrin     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 17302

CLCV 20516. Pompeii: Life, Death, and Afterlife of a Roman City. 100 Units.

This course takes an in-depth look at the exceptional and exceptionally preserved city of Pompeii (along with others in the Bay of Naples region, including Herculaneum, Stabiae, and Oplontis) as a microcosm of the forms of Roman life in the first century. In the late summer or early autumn of AD 79, Pompeii suffered a cataclysmic event when Mount Vesuvius exploded in a terrible and spectacular fashion, spewing forth a tremendous cloud of ash over the city. While the disaster claimed the lives of tens of thousands of inhabitants in the area, the peculiar conditions of the eruption preserved the material traces of their daily lives. Students will explore the civic, commercial, and domestic spaces of Pompeii including its forum, temples and sanctuaries, cemeteries, theaters, brothels, bakeries, and especially its townhouses, the latter of which were decorated with brilliant wall paintings, floor mosaics, furniture, and lush portico gardens designed to offer rest and relaxation from the bustle of city life. Significant attention will also be paid not only to the discovery of Pompeii and its neighboring towns in the 18th century, but also its reception in the archaeological and popular imagination up to the present.

Instructor(s): P. Crowley     Terms Offered: Spring,Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 30506,CLAS 30516,ARTH 20506

CLCV 20517. The First Great Transformation: The Economies of the Ancient W. 100 Units.

This class examines the determinants of economic growth in the ancient world. It covers various cultural areas (especially Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome and China) from ca. 3000 BCE to c. 500 CE. By contrast with the modern world, ancient cultures have long been supposed to be doomed to stagnation and routine. The goal of this class is to revisit the old paradigm with a fresh methodology, which combines a rigorous economic approach and a special attention to specific cultural achievements. We will assess the factors that indeed weighed against positive growth, but we will also discover that far from being immobile the cultures of the ancient world constantly invented new forms of social and economic organization. This was indeed a world where periods of positive growth were followed by periods of brutal decline. But if envisaged on the longue durée, this was a period of decisive achievements, which provided the basis for the future accomplishments of the Early Modern and Modern world.  This course is part of the College Course Cluster program, Economic History.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26015,HIST 20505

CLCV 20700-20800-20900. Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and late antiquity (27 BC to the fifth century AD).

CLCV 20700. Ancient Mediterranean World I. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the development of the institutions of the Greek city-state, the Persian Wars and the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the social and economic consequences of the Peloponnesian War, and the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16700

CLCV 20800. Ancient Mediterranean World II. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16800

CLCV 20900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. 100 Units.

This quarter introduces problems and changes from the late second to sixth century. Lectures and discussion. Principal aspects of change and historical interpretation of the ancient world. Readings from selected primary sources and modern scholarship. Assignments include Peter Brown's "The World of Late Antiquity" and primary sources. Midterm and final examination, with a short paper.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16900

CLCV 21313. Prosody and Poetic Form: An Introduction to Comparative Metrics. 100 Units.

This class offers (i) an overview of major European systems of versification, with particular attention to their historical development, and (ii) an introduction to the theory of meter. In addition to analyzing the formal properties of verse, we will inquire into their relevance for the articulation of poetic genres and, more broadly, the history of literary (and sub-literary) systems. There will be some emphasis on Graeco-Roman quantitative metrics, its afterlife, and the evolution of Germanic and Slavic syllabo-tonic verse. No prerequisites, but a working knowledge of one European language besides English is strongly recommended.

Instructor(s): Boris Maslov     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 32303,CLAS 31313,SLAV 22303,SLAV 32303,ENGL 22310,ENGL 32303,GRMN 22314,GRMN 32314,CMLT 22303

CLCV 21517. Minoan Art, Modern Myths, and Problems of Prehistory. 100 Units.

This course will provide an introduction to the art of the Bronze Age culture of Minoan Crete, with an emphasis on the Palatial Period (ca. 1900–1450 BCE). We will cover both well-known works and recent archaeological finds, including those from outside of Crete that have altered our view of Minoan art in recent years. At the same time, we will investigate how our knowledge of this civilization and its art has been shaped by the mentalities of those who have excavated its remains and collected and displayed its art. We will look closely at archaeological reports, restorations, forgeries, and concepts of style and iconography to reveal how archaeological remains are transformed into historical narratives. While focused on the Minoans, the course is designed to build the analytical skills necessary for engaging with the art of prehistoric cultures and other ancient cultures heavily shaped by modern imaginaries.

Instructor(s): S. Estrin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 30510,CLAS 31517,ARTH 20510

CLCV 21807. Greek Art and Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course examines the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from ca. 1000 BCE – ca. 200 BCE. Participants will learn a lot of facts about the Greek world; they will see the Greeks emerge from poverty and anarchy to form a distinctive political and social system based on city-states, and they will see that system grow unstable and collapse. They will see the emergence of distinctive forms of sculpture, architecture, pottery, and urban design – many of which are still in use today. Along with these facts, they will acquire a conceptual toolkit for looking at works of art and for thinking about the relation of art to social life. 

Instructor(s): S. Estrin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 14107

CLCV 22117. Fate and Duty: European Tragedy from Aeschylus to Brecht. 100 Units.

This class will explore the development of European drama from Attic tragedy and comedy and their reception in Ancient Rome and French Neoclassicism to the transformation of dramatic form in 18-20th c. European literatures. The focus will be on the evolution of plot, characterization, time-and-space of dramatic action, ethical notions (free will, guilt, conscience), as well as on representations of affect. All readings in English. No prerequisites.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 32402,GRMN 22402,CLAS 32117,REES 22402,CMLT 22402

CLCV 22700. History of Philosophy I: Ancient Philosophy. 100 Units.

An examination of ancient Greek philosophical texts that are foundational for Western philosophy, especially the work of Plato and Aristotle. Topics will include: the nature and possibility of knowledge and its role in human life; the nature of the soul; virtue; happiness and the human good.

Instructor(s): A. Callard     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in humanities. Students who are not enrolled by the start of term but wish to enroll must (a) email the instructor before the course begins and (b) attend the first class.
Note(s): Students should register via discussion section.
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 25000

CLCV 22917. How to Build a Global Empire. 100 Units.

Empire is arguably the oldest, most durable, and most diffused form of governance in human history that reached its zenith with the global empires of Spain, Portugal and Britain. But how do you build a global empire? What political, social, economic, and cultural factors contribute to their formation and longevity? What effects do they have on the colonizer and the colonized? What is the difference between a state, an empire, and a "global" empire? We will consider these questions and more in case studies that will treat the global empires of Rome, Portugal, and Britain, concluding with a discussion of the modern resonances of this first "Age of Empires."

Instructor(s): S. McManus     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 23002,LACS 26128,HIST 26128

CLCV 23315. History of Skepticism, Pre-Socratic Greece to Enlightenment. 100 Units.

Doubt has been a fundamental tool from the foundations of Western philosophy, used by radicals and orthodox thinkers, skeptics and system-builders, theologians and scientists. Philosophical skepticism and its evolving palette of intellectual tools shaped the ancient philosophical schools of Greece and Rome, the solidification of early Christian doctrine, the scholastic debates of the later Middle Ages, the neoclassical explosions of the Renaissance, the "new philosophy" of the seventeenth century, the radical projects of the Enlightenment, and the advent of the modern scientific method. This course reviews the history of systematic philosophical doubt, focusing on primary source readings from Sextus Empiricus and Cicero to William of Ockham and the Averroist controversies, to Montaigne, Descartes, Bacon, and Diderot. Undergraduate writing assignments focus on polishing advanced writing ability through short assignments targeting concision, critical thinking, and journalistic writing skills with creative elements. Enrolled graduate students will be invited to additional graduate-only discussions and have supplementary assignments, including secondary source and historiographical readings and self-designed customized research papers. Both undergraduates and graduate students from outside the Department of History are welcome.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer      Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 33315

CLCV 23417. The Politics of Literature under Nero. 100 Units.

The emperor Nero is remembered as one of Rome’s most infamous despots. Notorious for poisoning his stepbrother, ordering the murder of his mother, and killing his pregnant wife in a fit of rage, his tyranny seemed to know no bounds. Yet Nero also facilitated and presided over the greatest literary renaissance since Augustus’ establishment of the Principate. Among the many intellectuals who flourished under his rule were Seneca the Younger, who wrote Stoic philosophy and mythical drama, Lucan, the author of an epic poem on civil war, and Petronius, whose Satyricon lampooned Rome’s nouveau riche. By the end of 65 C.E., however, each of these writers would be dead, forced to commit suicide by the princeps himself. In this class, we will explore the politics of literature under Nero. Did tyranny create or destroy the conditions for great literary production? Why was the aesthetic of the era so violent, hyperbolic, and paradoxical? What made life in the court such a risk for men like Seneca, Lucan, and Petronius? Reading their works alongside Tacitus’ Annals and Suetonius’ Life of Nero, we will search for answers to these questions. At stake is the relationship between politics and literature in imperial Rome and beyond.

Instructor(s): J. Mebane     Terms Offered: Autumn

CLCV 24113. The Archaeology of Death in Ancient Rome. 100 Units.

This course serves as a general introduction to the commemoration of death in Roman funerary monuments, giving particular attention to the social bonds they were meant to express and reinforce through visual modes of address. Memorials dedicated by a socially diverse group of patrons including both elites and non-elites, metropolitan Romans and far-flung provincials, will be studied in relation to an equally diverse body of material evidence including tomb architecture and cemetery planning, inscriptions, sarcophagi and cinerary urns, and portraiture. The course will also take advantage of sites in Chicago such as Rosehill or Graceland Cemetery as important points of comparison with the ancient material.

Instructor(s): P. Crowley      Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 24105

CLCV 25017. Peripheries of the Greek World. 100 Units.

What happens when we consider the cultures, histories, and politics of the ancient Greek world from outside its Aegean ecumene? From Homeric ethnographies to Hellenistic expansion, the borders and peripheries of Greek life became rich spaces for both imagining and constructing Greek identity and civilization through interactions with myriad “others”: barbarians, allies, kings, and monsters. And in recent decades, interdisciplinary research has examined what life was like on these peripheries, at the intersections of Greek colonization, trade, religion, and the state. In this course we examine the concept of peripheries (and cores) and question the methodologies that historians and archaeologists use to consider the dynamic spaces around the edges of the Aegean Sea: colonial settlements, sites of pilgrimage, industrial districts, and exotic fringes, among others. Using textual and material evidence, and taking a broad approach by exploring case studies from Iberia to India, we consider the practices through which diverse peripheries became intertwined with Greek culture (or not).

Instructor(s): C. Kearns     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 35017

CLCV 25417. Censorship from the Inquisition to the Present. 100 Units.

Collaborative research seminar on the history of censorship and information control, with a focus on the history of books and information technologies. The class will meet in Special Collections, and students will work with the professor to prepare an exhibit, The History of Censorship, to be held in the Special Collections exhibit space in the spring. Students will work with rare books and archival materials, design exhibit cases, write exhibit labels, and contribute to the exhibit catalog. Half the course will focus on censorship in early modern Europe, including the Inquisition, the spread of the printing press, and clandestine literature in the Renaissance and Enlightenment. Special focus on the effects of censorship on classical literature, both newly rediscovered works like Lucretius and lost books of Plato, and authors like Pliny the Elder and Seneca who had been available in the Middle Ages but became newly controversial in the Renaissance. The other half of the course will look at modern and contemporary censorship issues, from wartime censorship, to the censorship of comic books, to digital-rights management, to free speech on our own campus. Students may choose whether to focus their own research and exhibit cases on classical, early modern, modern, or contemporary censorship.  This course is part of the College Course Cluster, The Renaissance.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer & S. McManus     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Admission by consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 35417,HIST 35421,HIPS 25421,CHSS 35421,KNOW 21403,KNOW 31403,RLST 22121,HREL 34309,SIGN 26010,HIST 25421

CLCV 25510. Homer's Odyssey. 100 Units.

This course is a close reading of the Odyssey. Discussion topics include identity, maturation, hospitality and friendship, gender, travel, and fantasies about other cultures. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): W. Olmsted     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Required of new Fundamentals majors; open to others with consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 21901

CLCV 25700-25800-25900. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

CLCV 25700. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15602,NEHC 30011,NEHC 20011

CLCV 25800. Ancient Empires II: The Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

no course description available at this time

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15603,NEHC 30012,NEHC 20012

CLCV 25900. Ancient Empires III: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550–1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15604,NEHC 30013,NEHC 20013

CLCV 25808. Roman Law. 100 Units.

The course will treat several problems arising in the historical development of Roman law: the history of procedure; the rise and accommodation of multiple sources of law, including the emperor; the dispersal of the Roman community from the environs of Rome to the wider Mediterranean world; and developments in the law of persons. We will discuss problems like the relationship between religion and law from the archaic city to the Christian empire, and between the law of Rome and the legal systems of its subject communities.

Instructor(s): C. Ando     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 35808,HIST 21004,HIST 31004,SIGN 26017

CLCV 26017. Gods and God in Imperial Asia Minor, 1–300 CE. 100 Units.

Roman Asia Minor in the Imperial period provides an extraordinary case of religious plurality and creativity. Pagans, Jews, Christians, even already Christian heretics, interacted in the same space. The frontiers between Jewish and Christian communities were, at least at the beginning, more fluid than was long thought. But even the frontiers between paganism and Judaism or Christianity were certainly not as rigid as was later imagined. This does not mean, however, that there were no tensions between the various groups. This class will examine the various aspects of this religious diversity as well as the social and political factors that may explain the religious equilibrium prevailing at that time in Asia Minor.

Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 20308,HIST 20308

CLCV 26517. Ancient Greek Aesthetics. 100 Units.

The ancient Greek philosophical tradition contains an enormously rich and influential body of reflection on the practice of poetry.  We will focus our attention on Plato and Aristotle, but will also spend some time with Longinus and Plotinus.  Topics will include: the analysis of poetry in terms of mimesis and image; poetry-making as an exercise of craft, divine inspiration, or some other sort of knowledge; the emotional effect on the audience; the role of poetry in forming moral character and, more broadly, its place in society; the relation between poetry, rhetoric, and philosophy; aesthetic values of beauty, wonder, truth, and grace. (A) (IV)

Instructor(s): G. Richardson-Lear     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Undergrads enroll in sections 01 & 02. Graduates enroll in section 03.
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 29911,CLAS 36517,SCTH 39911,PHIL 39911

CLCV 28300. Ephron Seminar. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): The goal of this annual seminar of changing context is to promote innovative course design. Examples of past topics are gender, death, violence, and law in the ancient world.

CLCV 28517. History of Skepticism. 100 Units.

Before we ask what is true or false, we must ask how we can know what is true or false. This course examines the vital role doubt and philosophical skepticism have played in the Western intellectual tradition, from pre-Socratic Greece through the Enlightenment, with a focus on how Criteria of Truth—what kinds of arguments are considered legitimate sources of certainty—have changed over time. The course will examine dialog between skeptical and dogmatic thinkers, and how many of the most fertile systems in the history of philosophy have been hybrid systems which divided the world into things which can be known, and things which cannot. The course will touch on the history of atheism, heresy and free thought, on fideism and skeptical religion, and will examine how the Scientific Method is itself a form of philosophical skepticism. Primary source readings will include Plato, Sextus Empiricus, Lucretius, Ockham, Pierre Bayle, Montaigne, Descartes, Francis Bacon, Hobbes, Voltaire, Diderot, and others.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): No prerequisites; first-year students welcome.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 39516,CLAS 38517,HIPS 29516,CHSS 39516,KNOW 21406,KNOW 31406,RLST 22123,HREL 39516,SIGN 26011,HIST 29516

CLCV 29000. Myth Course. 100 Units.

This course examines the social, political, cultural, and religious functions of ancient myth, as well as the various theoretical interpretations of myth that have been proposed in a variety of fields in order to investigate what myth can tell us about the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as those who regard themselves as the inheritors of classical culture.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring

CLCV 29113. Myth Course. 100 Units.

This course examines the social, political, cultural, and religious functions of ancient myth, as well as the various theoretical interpretations of myth that have been proposed in a variety of fields in order to investigate what myth can tell us about the ancient Greeks and Romans as well as those who regard themselves as the inheritors of classical culture.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring

CLCV 29700. Reading Course. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

CLCV 29800. BA Paper Seminar. 100 Units.

This seminar is designed to teach students the research and writing skills necessary for writing their BA paper. Lectures cover classical bibliography, research tools, and electronic databases. Students discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their BA papers. They are expected to exchange criticism and ideas in regular seminar meetings with the preceptor and with other students who are writing papers, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the BA Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the BA paper and, therefore, is not reported until the BA paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the BA paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. Students may register for this seminar in either Autumn or Winter Quarter, but they are expected to participate in meetings throughout both quarters.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing

Classics - Greek Courses

GREK 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III.

This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like GREK 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

GREK 10100. Introduction to Attic Greek I. 100 Units.

This course introduces the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Knowledge of Greek not required.

GREK 10200. Introduction to Attic Greek II. 100 Units.

Study of the introductory textbook continues through this quarter, covering further verbal morphology (participle, subjunctive, optative) and syntax of complex clauses. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek through reading brief passages from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GREK 10100

GREK 10300. Introduction to Attic Greek III: Prose. 100 Units.

Concurrently with finishing the final chapters of the textbook in the beginning of the quarter, students read a continuous prose text (Lysias 1). This is followed by extensive review of the year's grammar and vocabulary and further reading (Plato's Crito). The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GREK 10200

GREK 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Ancient Greek. 300 Units.

Summer Introductory Ancient Greek comprises a thorough introduction to the Classical Greek language in eight weeks, using the Joint Association of Classical Teachers' Reading Greek (2nd ed.). In daily classes, students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Greek texts, and complete exercises in Greek to gain an active command of the language. In the latter half of the course, students will also read unadapted Greek from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. By the end of the eight weeks, students will be thoroughly familiar with Classical Greek idiom and sentence structure, and will be able to proceed to reading courses in the language. Summer Introductory Ancient Greek is an intensive course that requires a full-time commitment on the part of the student, meeting approximately five hours per day and demanding independent review and memorization in the evenings. Note: Since grammar and vocabulary will be introduced starting on the first day of class, students should be able to read and write the letters of the Greek alphabet before beginning the course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

GREK 11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III.

This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in fifteen weeks. Like GREK 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

GREK 11100. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek I. 100 Units.

This course introduces the rudiments of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work.

Instructor(s): Staff.     Terms Offered: Autumn

GREK 11200. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek II. 100 Units.

The remaining chapters of the introductory textbook are covered. Students then apply and improve their knowledge of Greek as they read selections from Xenophon.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GREK 11100

GREK 11300. Accelerated Introduction to Attic Greek III. 100 Units.

Students apply the grammatical skills taught in GREK 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text by a classical author such as Lysias, Xenophon, or Plato. The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GREK 11200

GREK 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Greek I-II-III.

This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

GREK 20100. Intermediate Greek I: Plato. 100 Units.

We read Plato's text with a view to understanding both the grammatical constructions and the artistry of the language. We also give attention to the dramatic qualities of the dialogue. Grammatical exercises reinforce the learning of syntax.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): GREK 10300, 11300 or equivalent

GREK 20200. Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. 100 Units.

This course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean language and dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history.

Instructor(s): H. Dik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20100 or equivalent

GREK 20300. Intermediate Greek III: Homer. 100 Units.

We will read closely two books of the Odyssey, with an emphasis on the language along with elements of Greek historical linguistics.

Instructor(s): E. Austin.     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20200 or equivalent

GREK 20123. Summer Intensive Intermediate Ancient Greek. 100 Units.

Summer Intensive Intermediate Greek combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of Classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Greek and for the use of Greek texts in their research. Texts studied are taken from a variety of representative and important Classical authors, and typically include Plato and Herodotus, Demosthenes, or Thucydides. The backbone of the review sessions is Mastronarde’s Introduction to Ancient Greek combined with sight reading skill practice. The program meets during both mornings and afternoons for approximately five hours a day. Students are responsible for considerable amounts of class preparation in the evenings, requiring a full-time commitment for the duration of the course. This course equips students to continue with advanced course work or independent reading in Ancient Greek in all its varieties. Summer Intermediate Greek corresponds to a full year's worth of instruction at the University of Chicago.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of GREK 10300 or the equivalent placement.

GREK 21216. Greek Philosophy. 100 Units.

The Phaedrus is one of the most fascinating and compelling of Plato’s dialogues. Beginning with a playful treatment of the theme of erotic passion, it continues with a consideration of the nature of inspiration, love, and knowledge. The centerpiece is one the the most famous of the Platonic myths, the moving description of the charioteer and its allegory of the vision, fall, and incarnation of the soul. We will read the entire dialogue, with special attention the language and style, with a particular focus on religious and theological ideas.

Terms Offered: Spring. Not offered 2017-18
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31216

GREK 21300. Tragedy. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to Aeschylean drama, seen through the special problems posed by one play, Prometheus Bound. Lectures and discussions are concerned with the play, the development and early form of Attic drama, and philosophical material. Modern Aeschylean scholars are also read and discussed.

Instructor(s): E. Asmis     Terms Offered: Autumn. Not offered 2017-18
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31300,BIBL 31300

GREK 21700. Lyric and Epinician Poetry. 100 Units.

This course will examine instances of Greek lyric genres throughout the archaic and classical periods, focusing on the structure, themes and sounds of the poetry and investigating their performative and historical contexts. Readings will include Alcman, Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreon, Ibycus, Alcaeus, Simonides, Bacchylides, Pindar and Timotheus. In Greek.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn. Will be offered 2018-19.
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31700

GREK 21800. Greek Epic. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of Book 3 of the Argonautica of Apollonius of Rhodes. We consider character, story world, and the presence of the poet as we endeavor to understand what has become of epic poetry in the hands of its Hellenistic inheritors.

Terms Offered: Spring. Will be offered 2018-19.
Prerequisite(s): Two years or more of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31800

GREK 21900. Greek Oratory. 100 Units.

"With Isocrates, Greek artistic prose reached its technical perfection," says L. R. Palmer in The Greek Language. Yet Isocrates has not found nearly so prominent a place in the university curriculum as have Demosthenes and Lysias. This course will attempt to give the great orator his due. We will start with his speech on Helen, comparing it with Gorgias' famous Encomium. We will also read the ad Demonicum, which became something of a handbook in later Hellenistic and Roman-period schools, and the Panegyricus. We will consider carefully Isocratean language and diction, and why it has merited such sustained praise among connoisseurs of Greek prose style, ancient and modern. We will also emphasize the centrality of Isocrates' contribution to Greek paideia.

Terms Offered: Spring. Will be offered 2018-19.
Prerequisite(s): Two years or more of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31900

GREK 22300. Greek Tragedy: Hellenistic/Imperial Literature. 100 Units.

This course features selections from the poetry and/or prose of the Hellenistic and Imperial periods. This year we will read selections from Hellenistic poetry, with a particular focus on the Hymns of Callimachus.

Instructor(s): D. Wray     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 32300

GREK 22317. Hellenistic/Imperial Literature. 100 Units.

This course features selections from the poetry and/or prose of the Hellenistic and Imperial periods. This year we will read selections from Hellenistic poetry, with a particular focus on the Hymns of Callimachus.

Instructor(s): D. Wray     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 32317

GREK 22400. Greek Comedy: Aristophanes. 100 Units.

We will read in Greek Aristophanes' Clouds, considering its portrait of Socrates against the backdrop of fifth-century Athens and Plato’s portrait of him. Our inquiry will include larger questions of the relationship between poetry and philosophy and of the philosopher to the city. Reading will include translation as well as secondary readings.

Instructor(s): E. Austin.     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 32400,HIST 20403,HIST 30403,FNDL 22400

GREK 22515. Greek Historians: Thucydides. 100 Units.

In this course we will read book 1 of Thucydides, his description of the run-up to the Peloponnesian War, in Greek. We will pay attention to Thucydides' style and approach to historiography, sinking our teeth into this difficult but endlessly fascinating text. 

Instructor(s): H. Dik.     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring
Prerequisite(s): At least two years of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 22517,GREK 32515

GREK 25000. Mastering Greek. 100 Units.

Mastering Greek is an intensive Greek language course for pre-professional Hellenists. Do you find yourself fudging accents sometimes? Wondering about the use of infinitives versus participles? Pondering the future less vivid? Is there a past contrary-to-fact in Greek? (No.) This course will review your Attic Greek from the level of the word to the short paragraph, leaving matters of style to Prose Composition (Winter). Recommended for advanced undergraduates and graduate students, especially those who aspire to teach Greek. Assignments will include extensive written homework in Attic Greek, analytic exercises, and regular quizzes in order to advance to strong, active mastery of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn. Will be offered 2019-20.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 35000

GREK 25117. Philo of Alexandria. 100 Units.

In this course we will read the Greek text of Philo's de opificio mundi, with other brief excerpts here and there in the Philonic corpus. Our aim will be to use this treatise to elucidate the thought and character of one of the most prolific theological writers of the first century. We will seek to understand Philo as a Greek author and the nature and origins of his style, Philo as a proponent of Platonism, and Philo as a Jew in the context of Alexandrian Judaism. We will also examine his use of the allegorical method as an exegetical tool, and its implications for pagan, Jewish and early Christian approaches to sacred texts.

Instructor(s): David Martinez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): At least two years of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 35117,BIBL 44003

GREK 29700. Reading Course. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Classics - Latin Courses

LATN 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Classical Latin I-II-III.

This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like LATN 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

LATN 10100. Introduction to Classical Latin I. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Latin. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and discussion of student work.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

LATN 10200. Introduction to Classical Latin II. 100 Units.

This course continues through the basic text begun in LATN 10100.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LATN 10100

LATN 10300. Introduction to Classical Latin III. 100 Units.

After finishing the text, the course involves reading in Latin prose and poetry, during which reading the students consolidate the grammar and vocabulary taught in LATN 10100 and 10200.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LATN 10200

LATN 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Latin. 300 Units.

Summer Intensive Introductory Latin offers a comprehensive introduction to Classical Latin language in eight weeks, using Keller and Russell's Learn to Read Latin. In daily classes, students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Latin texts, and complete exercises in Latin to gain an active command of the language. Students will also read unadapted Latin from classical authors, including Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero. By the end of the summer Latin course, students will be thoroughly familiar with Latin idiom and sentence structure and will be able to proceed to reading courses in the language. Summer Introductory Latin is an intensive course that requires a full-time commitment on the part of the student, meeting approximately five hours per day and demanding independent review and memorization in the evenings.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

LATN 11100-11200-11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I-II-III.

This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in fifteen weeks and is appropriate as both an accelerated introduction and a systematic grammar review for students who have previously studied Latin. Like LATN 10100-10200-10300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

LATN 11100. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin I. 100 Units.

This course covers the first half of the introductory Latin textbook. Classes are devoted to the presentation of grammar, discussion of problems in learning Latin, and written exercises.

Terms Offered: Autumn

LATN 11200. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin II. 100 Units.

This course begins with the completion of the basic text begun in LATN 11100 and concludes with readings from Cicero, Caesar, or other prose texts in Latin.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LATN 11100

LATN 11300. Accelerated Introduction to Classical Latin III. 100 Units.

Students apply the grammatical skills taught in LATN 11100-11200 by reading a continuous prose text, such as a complete speech of Cicero. Our aim is familiarity with Latin idiom and sentence structure.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LATN 11200

LATN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Latin I-II-III.

This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

LATN 20100. Intermediate Latin I: Cicero. 100 Units.

Readings concentrate on Cicero's Catalinarian Orations, the famous group of speeches he delivered in 63 BC against L. Sergius Catilina, who was plotting to overthrow the Roman government. Some discussion of the history and culture of the period; study of problems of grammar as necessary.

Instructor(s): M. Allen.     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): LATN 10300 or 11300, or equivalent

LATN 20200. Intermediate Latin II: Aeneid. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid, with emphasis on Vergil’s language, versification, and literary art. Students are also required to read the whole of the epic in an English translation.

Instructor(s): P. White.     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20100 or equivalent

LATN 20300. Intermediate Latin III: Seneca. 100 Units.

Readings consist of Seneca’s tragedy Thyestes and selections from his prose letters and essays. Secondary readings on Rome in the Age of Nero, Hellenistic philosophy, and other related topics may also be assigned.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20200 or equivalent

LATN 20123. Summer Intensive Intermediate Latin. 300 Units.

Summer Intermediate Latin combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of Classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Latin and for the use of Latin texts in the course of their research. Texts studied are taken from a variety of representative and important authors, which may include Cicero, Seneca, Pliny, and others. The backbone of the review sessions is Keller and Russell, Learn to Read Latin, with supplementary exercises in composition. The program meets during both mornings and afternoons for approximately five hours a day. Students are responsible for considerable amounts of class preparation during the evenings, requiring a full-time commitment for the duration of the course. Summer Intermediate Latin equips students to continue with advanced course work or independent reading in Latin in all its varieties. Summer Intermediate Latin corresponds to a full year's worth of instruction at the University of Chicago.

Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-7/28/17
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of LATN 10300 or equivalent placement.

LATN 21100. Roman Elegy. 100 Units.

This course examines the development of the Latin elegy from Catullus to Ovid. Our major themes are the use of motifs and topics and their relationship to the problem of poetic persona.

Instructor(s): David Wray     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 21101,CMLT 31101,LATN 31100

LATN 21200. Roman Novel. 100 Units.

We shall read from various Latin texts that participate in the tradition of the Ancient novel.

Instructor(s): C. Ando     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31200

LATN 21300. Vergil. 100 Units.

This course will survey the main interpretive issues surrounding Vergil's Aeneid through a selection of readings from books 1–12. You will also be required to read the entire epic in English translation. Class time will be given to translation of the Latin, discussion of the secondary readings, and attention to the epic’s larger themes and meanings in the literary and cultural context of Augustan Rome.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn. Offered 2019-20.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 25201,LATN 31300

LATN 21700. Post-Virgilian Epic. 100 Units.

In this class we will read the Achilleid of Statius. We will focus on the poetics of the prequel, and the themes of maternity, boyhood, and the role of the nonhuman in the education of the young Achilles. We will also look at some accounts of the affective appeal of Homer’s Achilles, and ask what the Achilleid is trying to bring out about him.

Terms Offered: Autumn. Will be offered 2018-19.
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31700

LATN 21800. Roman Historian. 100 Units.

Primary readings are drawn from the later books of the Annals, especially book 11, in which Tacitus describes the reign of Claudius and early reign of Nero. Parallel accounts and secondary readings are used to help bring out the methods of selecting and ordering data and the stylistic effects that typify a Tacitean narrative.

Terms Offered: Winter. Will be offered 2018-19.
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31800

LATN 21900. Roman Comedy. 100 Units.

Plautus' Pseudolus is read in Latin, along with secondary readings that explain the social context and the theatrical conventions of Roman comedy. Class meetings are devoted less to translation than to study of the language, plot construction, and stage techniques at work in the Pseudolus.

Terms Offered: Spring. Will be offered 2018-19.
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31900

LATN 22100. Lucretius. 100 Units.

We will read selections of Lucretius' magisterial account of a universe composed of atoms. The focus of our inquiry is: how did Lucretius convert a seemingly dry philosophical doctrine about the physical composition of the universe into a gripping message of personal salvation? The selections include Lucretius' vision of an infinite universe, of heaven, and of the hell that humans have created for themselves on earth.

Instructor(s): M. Lowrie     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 32100,FNDL 24212

LATN 22200. Roman Satire. 100 Units.

The object of this course is to study the emergence of satire as a Roman literary genre with a recognized subject matter and style. Readings include Horace Satires 1.1, 4, 6, and 10 and 2.1, 5 and 7; Persius 1 and 5; and Juvenal 1 and 3.

Instructor(s): S. Bartsch-Zimmer     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 32200

LATN 22300. Roman Oratory. 100 Units.

Two of Cicero's speeches for the defense in the criminal courts of Rome receive a close reading in Latin and in English. The speeches are in turn considered in relation to Cicero's rhetorical theory as set out in the De Oratore and in relation to the role of the criminal courts in Late Republican Rome.

Instructor(s): P. White     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 32300

LATN 29700. Reading Course. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Sofia Torallas-Tovar
WB 119
773.702.4375
Email

Administrative Contact

Administrative Assistant
Kathleen M. Fox
Cl 22B
773.702.8514
Email