Contacts | Programs of Study | Language and Literature Variant | Language Intensive Variant | Greek and Roman Cultures Variant | Grading | Honors | Minor Program in Classical Studies | Prizes and Grants | Courses

Department Website: http://classics.uchicago.edu

Programs of Study

The BA degree in Classical Studies allows students to explore Greek and Roman antiquity in a variety of ways and provides excellent preparation for careers that require strong skills in interpretation and writing, such as teaching, scholarly research, law, and publishing, and in the humanities in general. Students may choose from the following three variants based on their preparation, interests, and goals:

  1. The Language and Literature Variant combines the study of Greek and Latin texts with coverage of diverse areas, including art and archaeology, history, philosophy, religion, and science.
  2. The Language Intensive Variant focuses on languages with the aim of reading a larger selection of texts in the original languages; it is designed especially for those who wish to pursue graduate studies in classics.
  3. The Greek and Roman Cultures Variant emphasizes courses in art and archaeology, history, material culture, and texts in translation.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in Classical Studies. Information follows the description of the major.

Language and Literature Variant

The Language and Literature variant combines the study of Greek and Latin texts with coverage of diverse areas, including art and archaeology, history, philosophy, religion, and science. It allows students to focus their language study exclusively on Greek or on Latin, or they may study both languages with an emphasis on one or the other.

  1. Six courses (or the equivalent) in Greek and/or Latin, including the intermediate level (20100-20200-20300) or above in at least one of those languages. The program assumes that, in addition to the requirements for the major, students have completed or have credit for an initial year of language study in either Latin or Greek. Beginning-level courses may count in the major only if the student has already taken an intermediate (or higher) sequence in the other language. Examples of ways to satisfy the language requirement include: LATN 20100-20200-20300 Intermediate Latin I-II-III AND LATN 21100 Roman Elegy-LATN 21200 Roman Novel-LATN 21300 Vergil; OR LATN 20100-20200-20300 Intermediate Latin I-II-III AND GREK 10100-10200-10300 Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III
  2. Six courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation, with courses divided between at least two of those fields and with approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Any course that carries a Classical Civilization listing, or a Classics listing between 30100 and 39000, meets this requirement. Other eligible courses are offered in disciplines such as Art History, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, Philosophy, and Political Science. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
  3. By the end of the Spring Quarter of their third year, students are required to submit to the director of undergraduate studies a research skills paper of around 10–12 pages as a Word or PDF file in an email attachment. The paper, which will normally substitute for a final paper in a Greek (above 20300), Latin (above 20300), Classical Civilization, or Classics course, is designed to prepare students for the BA paper. Students will be expected to develop a reasoned argument on a particular topic, based not only on primary materials (ancient literary texts; material culture; etc.) but also on research of relevant secondary bibliography. Students should declare at the start of the quarter if they wish to take a certain course in conjunction with the research skills paper and should work closely throughout the quarter with the faculty instructor, who must approve the paper as satisfying the requirement.
  4. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar, a one-quarter course spread over Autumn and Winter Quarters. See BA Paper Seminar and BA Paper for more information.

Summary of Requirements: Language and Literature Variant

Six courses in Greek or Latin *600
Six courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, science, religion, material culture, or classical literature in translation +600
CLCV 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Units1300

Language Intensive Variant

The Language Intensive Variant is designed for students who expect to continue Classical Studies at the graduate level. It aims to provide the level of linguistic proficiency in both Greek and Latin that is commonly expected of applicants to rigorous graduate programs. The program assumes that, in addition to the requirements for the major, students have completed, or have credit for, a year of language study in either Greek or Latin. Students must also use some of their general electives to meet the language requirements of this program variant.

No course that is used to meet one of the following requirements may be used simultaneously to meet a requirement under any other category.

  1. Six courses (or the equivalent) in one classical language (Greek or Latin) at the 20000 level or above.
  2. Six courses (or the equivalent) in the other classical language, three of which may be at the introductory level.
  3. Four courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation, with courses divided between at least two of those fields, and with approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Any course that carries a Classical Civilization listing, or a Classics listing between 30100 and 39000, meets this requirement. Other eligible courses are offered in disciplines such as Art History, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, Philosophy, and Political Science. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
  4. By the end of the Spring Quarter of their third year, students are required to submit to the director of undergraduate studies a research skills paper of around 10–12 pages as a Word or PDF file in an email attachment. The paper, which will normally substitute for a final paper in a Greek (above 20300), Latin (above 20300), Classical Civilization, or Classics course, is designed to prepare students for the BA paper. Students will be expected to develop a reasoned argument on a particular topic, based not only on primary materials (ancient literary texts; material culture; etc.) but also on research of relevant secondary bibliography. Students should declare at the start of the quarter if they wish to take a certain course in conjunction with the research skills paper and should work closely throughout the quarter with the faculty instructor, who must approve the paper as satisfying the requirement.
  5. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar, a one-quarter course spread over Autumn and Winter Quarters. See BA Paper Seminar and BA Paper for more information.

Summary of Requirements: Language Intensive Variant

Six courses in Greek *600
Six courses in Latin *600
4 courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation +400
CLCV 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Units1700

Greek and Roman Cultures Variant

This variant is designed for students who are interested in ancient Greece and Rome but wish to focus more on history (political, intellectual, religious, social) and material culture than on language and literature. Because the program allows many courses taught in other departments to count toward the major, it is especially suited to students who declare their major late or who wish to complete two majors. 

The program assumes that, in addition to requirements for the major, students have met the general education requirement in civilization studies by taking two or three courses in a sequence related to the Ancient Mediterranean World: HIST 16700-16800-16900 Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III; Rome: Antiquity to the Baroque sequence (taught in Rome); or Athens: Greek Antiquity and Its Legacy sequence (taught in Athens). Students who have met the general education requirement in civilization studies with a different sequence should complete one of these three sequences, which may then count toward the nine courses in classical civilization required for the major.

No course that is used to meet one of the following requirements may be used simultaneously to meet a requirement under any other category.

  1. Three courses in Greek or Latin (or the equivalent) at a level appropriate to the student’s prior competency, including at least one course at or above the 10300 level. 
  2. Nine courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation, with courses divided between at least four of those fields, and with approval of the director of undergraduate studies. Any course that carries a Classical Civilization listing, or a Classics listing between 30100 and 39000, meets this requirement. Any course that carries a Classical Civilization listing or a Classics listing between 30100 and 39000 meets this requirement. Other eligible courses are offered in disciplines such as Art History, Interdisciplinary Studies in the Humanities, Philosophy, and Political Science. These courses should be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.
  3. By the end of the Spring Quarter of their third year, students are required to submit to the director of undergraduate studies a research skills paper of around 10-12 pages as a Word or PDF file in an email attachment. The paper, which will normally substitute for a final paper in a Greek (above 20300), Latin (above 20300), Classical Civilization, or Classics course, is designed to prepare students for the BA paper. Students will be expected to develop a reasoned argument on a particular topic, based not only on primary materials (ancient literary texts; material culture; etc.) but also on research of relevant secondary bibliography. Students should declare at the start of the quarter if they wish to take a certain course in conjunction with the research skills paper and should work closely throughout the quarter with the faculty instructor, who must approve the paper as satisfying the requirement.
  4. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar, a one-quarter course spread over Autumn and Winter Quarters. See BA Paper Seminar and BA Paper for more information.

Summary of Requirements: Greek and Roman Cultures Variant

3 courses in Greek or Latin300
9 courses in Greek or Roman art, history, philosophy, religion, science, material culture, or classical literature in translation +900
CLCV 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Units1300

BA Paper Seminar and BA Paper

Candidates for the BA degree in all variants of the Classical Studies major are required to write a substantial BA paper. The purpose of the BA paper is to enable students to improve their research and writing skills and to give them an opportunity to focus their knowledge of the field upon an issue of their own choosing.

In their third year, by Monday of eighth week of Spring Quarter, students must submit to the director of undergraduate studies a short statement proposing an area of research. The statement should include an abstract of a paragraph or more, outlining the problem that you wish to tackle and sketching the argument you hope to elaborate in response.  You can, if you wish, discuss questions of method or earlier scholarship. You should make reference here with as much specificity as possible to the primary sources on which you will draw to substantiate your claim.

The statement must be approved in writing by a member of the Classics faculty who agrees to be the director of the BA paper. In certain cases, students may have two co-chairs, including one member of the Classics faculty and one faculty member from another department. Classics faculty at the level of associate professor and above may advise up to three BA papers, while assistant professors may advise as many as two papers. Students needing assistance in finding a faculty member with whom to work should consult with the director of undergraduate studies.

Students may register for CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar in either Autumn or Winter Quarter of their fourth year, but they are expected to participate in seminar meetings throughout both quarters. The focus of the seminar is to discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their BA papers. Participants in the regular seminar meetings are expected to exchange criticism and ideas with each other and with the preceptor, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the BA Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the BA paper and, therefore, is not reported to the Registrar until the paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the BA paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. At the end of Autumn Quarter, a provisional grade will be assigned by the preceptor and communicated to the student via the director of undergraduate studies. Once the BA paper has been submitted, the final grade will be determined jointly by the preceptor and faculty director.

The deadline for submitting the BA paper in final form is Friday of third week of Spring Quarter. This deadline represents the formal submission, which is final; students should expect to submit and defend substantial drafts much earlier. Both hard copies and digital copies are to be submitted to the faculty director, seminar preceptor, and director of undergraduate studies, unless otherwise indicated. Students who fail to meet the deadline may not be able to graduate in that quarter and will not be eligible for honors consideration.

Students who undertake a double major may meet the requirement for a BA paper in Classical Studies by making it part of a single BA paper that is designed to meet the requirements of both majors. This combined paper must have a substantial focus on texts or issues of the classical period, and must have a Classics faculty member as a reader. CLCV 29800 BA Paper Seminar (the two-quarter BA Paper Seminar) is required of all students majoring in Classical Studies, whether as a double major or as a single major. The use of a single essay to meet the requirement for a BA paper in two majors requires approval from directors of undergraduate studies in both majors. A consent form, to be signed by the directors of undergraduate studies, is available from the College advisers. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Grading

All courses taken to meet requirements in the major or minor must be taken for quality grades.

The first-year sequences in Greek and Latin (GREK 10100-10200-10300 Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III and LATN 10100-10200-10300 Introduction to Classical Latin I-II-III) and the courses in Greek and Latin composition (GREK 34400 Greek Prose Composition and LATN 34400 Latin Prose Composition) are open for P/F grading for students not using these courses to meet language requirements for the major.

Honors

To be recommended for honors, a student (1) must maintain an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher and a GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major and (2) must also demonstrate superior ability in the BA paper to interpret Greek or Latin source material and to develop a coherent argument. For a student to be recommended for honors, the BA paper must be judged worthy of honors by the faculty director, preceptor, and an additional faculty committee. Before the end of the Winter Quarter, the director of undergraduate studies will consult with both the faculty director and the BA preceptor to ascertain which students in the BA Seminar are likely to be nominated for honors and which papers will be forwarded to the faculty committee.

Minor Program in Classical Studies

The minor in Classical Studies requires a total of seven courses in Greek, Latin, or classical civilization. Students may choose one of two variants: a language variant that includes three courses at the 20000 level or higher in one language, or a classical civilization variant.

Students must meet with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Students choose courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The director’s approval for the minor program should be submitted to a student’s College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

CLCV courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student’s major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements.

Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be courses completed at the University of Chicago.

The following groups of courses would comprise a minor in the areas indicated. Other programs may be designed in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. Minor program requirements are subject to revision.

Greek (or Latin) Sample Variant
GREK 10100-10200-10300Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III *300
GREK 20100-20200-20300Intermediate Greek I-II-III *300
CLCV 21200History and Theory of Drama I **100
Total Units700
Greek (or Latin) Sample Variant
One of the following sequences:300
Intermediate Greek I-II-III
Intermediate Latin I-II-III
CLCV 20700-20800-20900Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III300
CLCV 21400Marg Populations Of Rom Empire **100
Total Units700
Classical Civilization Sample Variant
CLCV 20700-20800-20900Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III **300
CLCV 22000Greek Tragedy and Its Influences100
CLCV 22100Epictetus/Marcus Aurelius100
CLCV 24200Invention Of Love Poem100
CLCV 23400Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy100
Total Units700

 Credit will not be granted by examination to meet the language requirement for the minor program.

Prizes and Grants

The Arthur Adkins Summer Research Fellowship is expected to be worth $5,000 this year. The fellowship is targeted to third-year undergraduates who are bound for graduate school, and it provides means and opportunity for the writing of a superior research paper on any aspect of the ancient world from the Bronze Age through Late Antiquity. It may be used for travel to classical sites and collections or to other research centers, and/or for living expenses during a summer devoted to research between the third and fourth year. Applicants must submit to the Classics Secretary (by Monday, April 8, 2019) a transcript, a statement (2–3 pages) outlining their project and its relationship to existing knowledge in the field, a plan of research together with a provisional budget for the summer, and a letter from a faculty supervisor. A written report of what was accomplished during the period of the fellowship must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the first week of the following Autumn Quarter.

This fellowship is not limited to Classical Studies majors and minors, or even to students of Greek and Latin, and although it may be used for research abroad, it does not require such research. But it does require that a student have a well-developed research project by the time of application.

The David Grene Fellowship is expected to be worth $5,000 this year. The fellowship is targeted to undergraduates whose intellectual interests in the classical world have led them to an area of knowledge which they are unable to pursue during the regular academic year, and it allows them an opportunity to explore that interest through independent study during the summer before graduation. The independent study may involve training in a new discipline such as paleography or numismatics, first-hand experience of ancient sites and artifacts, or ancillary language study. It may be carried out under the auspices of an organized program like the American School of Classical Studies at Athens or the American Academy in Rome, or it may be tailored entirely according to the student's own plan. Applicants must submit to the Classics Secretary (by Monday, April 8, 2019) a transcript, project statement (2–3 pages), a provisional budget, and a faculty letter of recommendation. A written report of what was accomplished during the period of the fellowship must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the first week of the following Autumn Quarter.

This fellowship is not limited to Classical Studies majors and minors, or even to students of Greek and Latin, and it need not directly involve the study of classics, but applicants must be able to demonstrate a background of interest in the classical world.

The Pausanias Summer Research Fellowship is expected to be worth $5,000 this year. The fellowship provides support to an undergraduate student in Classical Studies for research abroad in sites of interest for classical studies. It may be used to pursue a project of the student's own design or to participate in appropriate institutional programs abroad. Applicants must submit to the Classics Secretary (by Monday, April 8, 2019) a transcript, project statement (2–3 pages), provisional budget, and a faculty letter of recommendation. A written report of what was accomplished during the period of the fellowship must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the first week of the following Autumn Quarter.

This fellowship is limited to Classical Studies majors and minors.

The John G. Hawthorne Travel Prize is expected to be worth $5,000 this year. The prize is given to an outstanding undergraduate student of classical languages, literature, or civilization for travel to Greece or Italy or for study of classical materials in other countries. It may be used to pursue a project of the student's own design or to participate in appropriate programs conducted in Greece or Italy. Applicants must submit to the Classics Secretary (by Monday, April 8, 2019) a transcript, project statement (2–3 pages), provisional budget, and a faculty letter of recommendation. A written report of what was accomplished during the period of the prize must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the first week of the following Autumn Quarter.

This prize is open to any student who has taken a GREK, LATN, or CLCV course in the College, and may be used for travel in Greece and/or Italy, or for classics-related study there or in other appropriate locations.

The Leon Golden Undergraduate Research Fellowship is expected to be worth $5,000 this year. The fellowship is intended to enable undergraduates majoring in Classical Studies to develop an original research project in the field or to pursue training in ancillary studies that will enrich their work in classics. Applicants must submit to the Classics Secretary (by Monday, April 8, 2019) a transcript, a statement (2–3 pages) outlining their project together with a provisional budget, and a letter from a faculty supervisor. A written report of what was accomplished during the period of the fellowship must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the first week of the following Autumn Quarter.

This fellowship is limited to Classical Studies majors, and it requires that a student have a well-developed project by the time of application.

The Nancy P. Helmbold Travel Award is expected to be worth $5,000 this year. It is awarded to an outstanding undergraduate student of Greek and/or Latin for travel to Greece or Italy. Applicants must submit to the Classics Secretary (by Monday, April 8, 2019) a transcript, an itinerary or project statement (2–3 pages), proposed budget, and a faculty letter of recommendation. A written report of what was accomplished during the period of the award must be submitted to the director of undergraduate studies by the first week of the following Autumn Quarter.

This award requires a student to have taken a GREK or LATN course (not merely a CLCV course) in the College. It may or may not be used for study or research, but it must be used in Greece and/or Italy.

The Paul Shorey Foreign Travel Grant is expected to be worth $3,000 this year. The grant is given to a student of Greek or Latin who has been accepted to participate in the Athens Program or the Rome Program of the College, and it is to be used to defray costs incurred in the program. The terms of the grant stipulate that it is to be awarded to a "needy and deserving" student. Students who have been accepted into one of the programs and who wish to be considered for the Shorey grant are invited to submit statements explaining their need in the first week of Spring Quarter.

The Classics Prize is a cash award of $500 made annually to the student who graduates with the best record of achievement in the Classical Studies major.

Examples of past successful application statements for the summer awards are available from the undergraduate prize coordinator, Peter White, or the director of undergraduate studies, Sofia Torallas Tovar.

Offered through the Society for Classical Studies (SCS):

The Lionel Pearson Fellowship seeks to contribute to the training of American and Canadian classicists by providing for a period of study at an English or Scottish university. The competition is open to students majoring in Classics, or closely related fields. Fellows must undertake a course of study that broadens and develops their knowledge of Greek and Latin literature in the original languages; candidates should therefore have a strong background in the classical languages. Normally, the recipient will hold the fellowship in the academic year immediately after graduating with a bachelor’s degree. The term of the fellowship is one year. The recipient may use the fellowship for part of a longer program of study, but under no circumstances will support from the fellowship extend beyond one year. Fellows are responsible for seeking and obtaining admission to the English or Scottish university where they intend to study.

The maximum amount of the fellowship will be $24,000, which may be used to offset academic fees, travel expenses, housing and subsistence costs, and book purchases. The fellowship amount ($24,000) is the maximum that the SCS can award, but the Faculties of Classics of both Oxford and Cambridge Universities have generously offered to support the tuition expenses of any Pearson Fellow enrolled at their institution. In these instances funds provided by the SCS should be adequate to offset the fellow’s other expenses, and the SCS will attempt (but it cannot guarantee) to obtain a similar accommodation from another institution in the UK should the fellow attend a university other than Oxford or Cambridge. Note: The SCS cannot guarantee tuition support from other Faculties at Oxford and Cambridge (such as Philosophy or History). Students should be aware that if they can pursue their preferred course of study under the rubric of Classics, it would be to their advantage.

Candidates for the fellowship require nomination by the director of undergraduate studies by the end of the Spring Quarter for a rising fourth-year student. The Department of Classics may only nominate one student, and therefore requests that interested students submit the following materials by Friday of eighth week in the Spring Quarter of their third year:

  • A current copy of your transcript
  • One paragraph on why you would like to be nominated for the Pearson Fellowship, briefly suggesting what you might like to do with it. This should include which university or universities you are interested in attending, with whom you would like to work, and what kind of topic you would like to research and/or why you think a year doing so in the UK would be especially beneficial for you. 

See more information at https://classicalstudies.org/awards-and-fellowships/lionel-pearson-fellowship.

Classical Civilization Courses

CLCV 14113. Introduction to Roman Art and Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course offers a survey of the art and archaeology of the Roman world from the founding of Rome in the eighth century BC to the Christianization of the Empire in the fourth century AD. Students will witness the transformation of Rome from a humble village of huts surrounded by marshland in central Italy into the centripetal force of a powerful Empire that spanned mind-bogglingly distant reaches of space and time. Throughout the course, we will consider how the built environments and artifacts produced by an incredible diversity of peoples and places can make visible larger trends of historical, political, and cultural change. What, we will begin and end by asking, is Roman about Roman art?

Instructor(s): P. Crowley     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 14105

CLCV 15000. Myth and Its Critics. 100 Units.

Myth is essential to how humans make sense of the world: our foundational stories explain the nature of the world; they justify and explore social and sexual difference; they teach and test the limits of human agency. The course will survey contexts and uses of myth-making in the ancient Mediterranean world. We will also explore the many traditions of critique and anxiety about myth-making, among philosophers, literary critics and religious authorities.

Instructor(s): C. Ando     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26037

CLCV 20118. Changing, Resting, Living: Aristotle's Natural Philosophy. 100 Units.

How can many things be one thing? Aristotle's answer to this question treats living things--plants and animals--as the paradigm cases of unified multiplicities. In this course, we will investigate how such things are held together and what makes it possible for them to change over time. Readings will be from Aristotle's Physics, Metaphysics, De Anima, Parts of Animals, On Generation and Corruption, and De Motu Animalium. (B)

Instructor(s): A. Callard     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students who are not enrolled by the start of term but wish to enroll must (a) email the instructor before the course begins and (b) attend the first class.
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 30102, PHIL 20102, CLAS 20118

CLCV 20216. Egypt in Late Antiquity. 100 Units.

Egypt in Late Antiquity was a melting pot of cultures, languages, and religions. With the native Egyptians subject to a series of foreign masters (Greek and Roman), each with their own languages and religious practices, Egyptian society was marked by a rich and richly documented diversity. In this course we will pay special attention to the contact of languages and of religions, discussing on the basis of primary sources in translation different aspects characteristic of this period: the crises of the Roman Empire and their effects in Egypt, the emergence of Christianity and the decline of paganism, the development of monastic communities. The course will end at the Islamic conquest.

Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 35716, HREL 30287, NEHC 30287, NEHC 20287

CLCV 20400. Who Were the Greeks? 100 Units.

If the current resurgence of interest in ethnic studies is a direct reflection of a contemporary upsurge in ethnic conflict throughout the world, it remains the case that notions of peoplehood and belonging have been of periodic importance throughout history. This course will study the various expressions of Greek identity within shifting political, social, and cultural contexts from prehistory to the present day, though with a strong emphasis on classical antiquity. Particular attention will be given to theoretical issues such as anthropological definitions of ethnicity, the difference between ethnic and cultural identities, methods for studying ethnicity in historical societies, and the intersection of ethnicity with politics. Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 30400,CLCV 20400,HIST 30701,ANCM 30400

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 30400, CLAS 30400, HIST 20701, HIST 30701

CLCV 20700-20800-20900. Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and late antiquity (27 BC to the fifth century AD).

CLCV 20700. Anc Mediterr World-1: Greece. 100 Units.

This course surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the development of the institutions of the Greek city-state, the Persian Wars and the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the social and economic consequences of the Peloponnesian War, and the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians.

Instructor(s): J. Hall, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16700

CLCV 20800. Anc Mediterr World-2: Rome. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community. Instructor(s): C. Ando, Staff Terms Offered: Winter Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): C. Ando, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16800

CLCV 20900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. 100 Units.

This course will survey the social, political, and cultural history of the late antique Mediterranean from Constantine I to Charlemagne. Through close reading and discussion of primary sources, we will examine (among other topics) the rise and spread of Christianity and Islam, changing conceptions of Roman identity, and the inheritance of the classical world, as well as some implications of these topics for subsequent European history.

Instructor(s): R. Payne, staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16900

CLCV 21500. Medieval Book: History, Typology, Function. 100 Units.

The Medival Book: History, Typology, Function. The course will survey the cultural setting of books and book-learning from end of Antiquity to the Age of Print. We shall consider the new and varied historical impulses that shaped medieval techniques of writing, reading, and ordering of knowledge, and also the details of physical construction, textual presentation, and decoration, which often survived the transition from script to print culture To illustrate our discussions, we shall make use of holdings in Regenstein Special Collections and also take a special trip to the Newberry Library.

Instructor(s): M. Allen     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 31500

CLCV 21700. Archaeology for Anc Historians. 100 Units.

This course is intended to act not as an introduction to Classical archæology but as a methods course illuminating the potential contribution of material cultural evidence to ancient historians while at the same time alerting them to the possible misapplications. Theoretical reflections on the relationship between history and archaeology will be interspersed with specific case studies from the Græco-Roman world.

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 31700, HIST 39800, ANCM 31700, HIST 20901

CLCV 21717. Sophocles, Ajax. 100 Units.

A close literary and philological analysis of one of the most remarkable and perplexing of all Greek tragedies. We will consider the play's portrayal of the nature and limits of one form of male heroism against the background of earlier poetry and contemporary history; and we will attempt constantly for elate philological and literary approaches to one another in order to understand better not only Sophocles' play but also the strengths and limitations of the ways in which scholars try to come closer to it.

Equivalent Course(s): SCTH 31613, CLAS 31717

CLCV 21718. Socrates, Plato and Aristotle on Courage. 100 Units.

What is courage? Is it: doing what you should do, even when you are afraid? Can you be courageous without being afraid? Can you be couragoues and know that you are doing the right thing? Can you be courageous if you are not in fact doing the right thing? Can you have precisely the correct amount of fear and still fail to be courageous? Could you be courageous if you weren't afraid to die? Courage is, arguably, the queen of the virtues. In this class, we will use some Socratic dialogues (Laches, Protagoras, Republic, Phaedo) and some Aristotelian treatises (Nicomachean Ethics, Eudemian Ethics) as partners in inquiry into the answers to the questions listed above. (A)

Instructor(s): A. Callard     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Students who are not enrolled by the start of term but wish to enroll must (a) email the instructor before the course begins and (b) attend the first class.
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 31718, PHIL 31717, PHIL 21717

CLCV 21807. Greek Art and Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course examines the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from ca. 1000 BCE - ca. 200 BCE. Participants will learn a lot of facts about the Greek world; they will see the Greeks emerge from poverty and anarchy to form a distinctive political and social system based on city-states, and they will see that system grow unstable and collapse. They will see the emergence of distinctive forms of sculpture, architecture, pottery, and urban design - many of which are still in use today. Along with these facts, they will acquire a conceptual toolkit for looking at works of art and for thinking about the relation of art to social life.

Instructor(s): S. Estrin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 14107

CLCV 21915. The Present Past in Greece Since 1769. 100 Units.

This discussion-based course will explore how conceptions of the ancient past have been mobilized and imagined in the political, social, and cultural discourses of modern Greece from the lead up to the War of Independence through to the present day. Among the themes that will be addressed are ethnicity and nationalism, theories of history, the production of archaeological knowledge, and the politics of display.

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 31006, ANCM 31915, HIST 21006, CLAS 31915

CLCV 22115. Carolingian Renaissance. 100 Units.

The Carolingian Renaissance flowered thanks to the leadership of a new royal (AD 751) and then (from Christmas 800) imperial dynasty. Expansive political and cultural initiatives reshaped Europe into a distinct space, not least, though paradoxically, through its fragmentation after AD 843. We shall study the actors and trends at play, the important role of Classical models and Latin book culture, and consider the relevant sources in all their physical, textual, and imaginative variety.

Instructor(s): M. Allen     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32115, RLST 21610, HIST 22115, CLAS 32115, HCHR 34304

CLCV 22117. Fate and Duty: European Tragedy from Aeschylus to Brecht. 100 Units.

This class will explore the development of European drama from Attic tragedy and comedy and their reception in Ancient Rome and French Neoclassicism to the transformation of dramatic form in 18-20th c. European literatures. The focus will be on the evolution of plot, characterization, time-and-space of dramatic action, ethical notions (free will, guilt, conscience), as well as on representations of affect. All readings in English. No prerequisites.

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 22402, CLAS 32117, GRMN 22402, REES 22402

CLCV 22216. Italian Renaissance: Dante, Machiavelli, and the Wars of Popes and Kings. 100 Units.

This course will consider Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250-1600), with a focus on literature, philosophy, primary sources, the revival of antiquity, and the papacy's entanglement with pan-European politics. We will examine humanism, patronage, politics, corruption, assassination, feuds, art, music, magic, censorship, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Writing assignments focus on higher-level writing skills, with a creative writing component linked to our in-class live-action-role-played (LARP) reenactment of a Renaissance papal election. This is a Department of History Gateway course.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Graduate students by consent only; register for the course as HIST 90000 (sect 53) Reading and Research: History.
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 22203, ITAL 16000, SIGN 26034, HIST 12203, KNOW 12203

CLCV 22514. Markets and Moral Economies. 100 Units.

This course examines the ways in which economic behavior in the Roman Empire was informed by, and itself came to inform, social and religious mores and practices. We will explore the interrelationship between culture and economy from the accession of Augustus to late antiquity and the conversion of the empire to Christianity. Particular attention will be given to Roman attitudes towards labor, the ethical issues surrounding buying and selling, and alternative allocative mechanisms to the market. Of constant concern will be the tension between the perspectives and prejudices of elites, which stand behind so much surviving literary evidence, and the realities of everyday commerce and economic life as they can be glimpsed in the archaeological and epigraphic record.

Instructor(s): L. Gardnier     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 32514

CLCV 22700. Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1. 100 Units.

An examination of ancient Greek philosophical texts that are foundational for Western philosophy, especially the work of Plato and Aristotle. Topics will include: the nature and possibility of knowledge and its role in human life; the nature of the soul; virtue; happiness and the human good.

Instructor(s): G. Richardson Lear     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in humanities.
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 25000

CLCV 22914. The Italian Renaissance. 100 Units.

Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250-1600), with a focus on literature and primary sources, the recovery of lost texts and technologies of the ancient world, and the role of the Church in Renaissance culture and politics. Humanism, patronage, translation, cultural immersion, dynastic and papal politics, corruption, assassination, art, music, magic, censorship, religion, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Assignments include creative writing, reproducing historical artifacts, and a live reenactment of a papal election. First-year students and non-history majors welcome.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HCHR 32900, CLAS 32914, ITAL 32914, KNOW 21405, HIST 32900, ITAL 22914, KNOW 31405, HIST 22900, RLST 22900

CLCV 22917. How to Build a Global Empire. 100 Units.

Empire is arguably the oldest, most durable, and most diffused form of governance in human history that reached its zenith with the global empires of Spain, Portugal and Britain. But how do you build a global empire? What political, social, economic, and cultural factors contribute to their formation and longevity? What effects do they have on the colonizer and the colonized? What is the difference between a state, an empire, and a "global" empire? We will consider these questions and more in case studies that will treat the global empires of Rome, Portugal, and Britain, concluding with a discussion of the modern resonances of this first "Age of Empires."

Equivalent Course(s): LACS 26128, HIST 26128, KNOW 23002

CLCV 23400. Boethius: Consolation of Philosophy. 100 Units.

The Consolation of Philosophy, which Boethius wrote in prison after a life of study and public service, offers a view on Roman politics and culture after Rome ceased to be an imperial capital. The Consolation is also a poignant testament from a man divided between Christianity and philosophy. About 70 pages of the text are read in Latin, and all of it in English. Secondary readings provide historical and religious context for the early sixth century AD.

Instructor(s): Peter White     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Latin 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 33400

CLCV 23608. Aristophanes' Athens. 100 Units.

This course will focus on nine of Aristophanes' plays in translation (Acharnians; Wasps; Clouds; Peace; Birds; Lysistrata; Thesmophoriazousai; Frogs; and Ploutos) in order to determine the value Old Comedy possesses for reconstructing sociohistorical structures, norms, expectations, and concerns. Among the topics to be addressed are the performative, ritual, and political contexts of Attic comedy, the constituency of audiences, the relationship of comedy to satire, the use of dramatic stereotypes, freedom of speech, and the limits of dissent.

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 33608, HIST 30803, HIST 20803, ANCM 33900

CLCV 23712. Aquinas: On God, Being and Evil. 100 Units.

This course considers sections from Saint Thomas Aquinas's Summa Theologica. Among the topics considered are God's existence; the relationship between God and Being; and human nature.

Instructor(s): S. Meredith     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 20700, RLST 23605

CLCV 24017. The Spartan Divergence. 100 Units.

Sparta was a Greek city, but of what type? The ancient tradition, or at least the larger part of it, paints the portrait of an ideal city-state. The city was supposed to be stable and moderately prosperous. Its citizens were allegedly models of virtue. For many centuries the city did not experience revolutions and its army was invincible on the battlefield. This success was attributed to its perfect institutions. Following the track opened by Ollier's Spartan Mirage, modern scholarship has scrupulously and successfully deconstructed this image of an ideal city. But what do we find if we go beyond the looking glass? Was Sparta really a city "like all the others"? This class will show that we must go deeper into our evidence in order to make sense of the extraordinary success followed by the brutal collapse of this very special city-state.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 30307, HIST 20307, CLAS 34017

CLCV 24116. History of Skepticism, Pre-socratic Greece to Enlightenment. 100 Units.

Doubt has been a fundamental tool from the foundations of Western philosophy, used by radicals and orthodox thinkers, skeptics and system-builders, theologians and scientists. Philosophical skepticism and its evolving palette of intellectual tools shaped the ancient philosophical schools of Greece and Rome, the solidification of early Christian doctrine, the scholastic debates of the later Middle Ages, the neoclassical explosions of the Renaissance, the "new philosophy" of the seventeenth century, the radical projects of the Enlightenment, and the advent of the modern scientific method. This course reviews the history of systematic philosophical doubt, focusing on primary source readings from Sextus Empiricus and Cicero to William of Ockham and the Averroist controversies, to Montaigne, Descartes, Bacon, and Diderot. Undergraduate writing assignments focus on polishing advanced writing ability through short assignments targeting concision, critical thinking, and journalistic writing skills with creative elements. Enrolled graduate students will be invited to additional graduate-only discussions and have supplementary assignments, including secondary source and historiographical readings and self-designed customized research papers. Both undergraduates and graduate students from outside the Department of History are welcome.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 29314, HIST 39314, CLAS 34116

CLCV 24118. Coptic Bible. 100 Units.

The Coptic versions of the Bible present one of the earliest translations of Christian scripture as the new religion spread. Understanding how the Bible (canonical and non-canonical) was read and used in Egypt at this early stage implies studying the development of Christian communities in those agitated times, as well as paying attention to questions of literacy and linguistic environment, book production, Bible (both Greek and Coptic) on papyrus, and translation and interpretation in Antiquity. The course will draw on materials assembled from my work on the critical edition of the Gospel of Mark, but will also look into other materials like the Coptic Old Testament, and non-canonical scriptures such as Nag Hammadi and the Gnostic scriptures. No previous knowledge of Coptic is required. A brief introduction to the Coptic language will be part of the class, and parallel sessions of additional language instruction will be planned for those who are interested in learning more.

Instructor(s): S. Torallas     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 34118, CLAS 34118, BIBL 31418, NEHC 24118, RLST 21450

CLCV 24306. Byzantine Empire: 330-610. 100 Units.

A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the formation of early Byzantine government, society, and culture. Although a survey of events and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. There will be some discussion of relevant archaeology and topography. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Final examination and a short paper. Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 34306,CLCV 24306,HIST 31701,ANCM 34306

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 34306, ANCM 34306, HIST 21701, HIST 31701

CLCV 24307. Byzantine Empire: 610-1025. 100 Units.

A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the principal developments with respect to government, society, and culture in the Middle Byzantine Period. Although a survey of events and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Midterm, final examination, and a short paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 34307, HIST 21702, NEHC 21702, NEHC 31702, CLAS 34307, HIST 31702

CLCV 24309. Byzantium and Islam. 100 Units.

This lecture/discussion course covers selected Byzantine-Islamic experiences from the emergence of Islam in the seventh century through the middle of the eleventh century. With no single textbook, this course is not a narrative survey. Topics include diplomatic (political), military, economic, cultural, and religious relations that range from subtle influences and adaptations to open polemics. Readings include modern scholarly interpretations and primary source readings. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 34309, HIST 22001, HIST 32001

CLCV 24406. War & Society in Graeco Roman World. 100 Units.

This course studies the interplay between warfare and the political, social, and economic structures of the ancient Mediterranean world. We explore such topics as the motivations for and ideology of armed conflict, the relationship between military organization and civic structure, and the impact of hegemonic and imperial expansion on both the conquerors and the conquered. Readings incorporate foundational modern perspectives, but they emphasize ancient sources in translation.

Instructor(s): C. Hawkins     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 34410, HIST 30402, CLAS 34406, HIST 20402

CLCV 24718. Longinus' On the Sublime. 100 Units.

Composed around the first or second century C.E., Longinus' On the Sublime marks a new direction in ancient aesthetics and later had a profound influence on the aesthetics of the Romantic period and afterward. It was a watershed between viewing art as imitation and viewing it as self-expression. Great literature was now seen as producing ecstasy, not instruction; and the hearer was thought to share in the creativity of the author. We will read most of this text in Greek, with a view to understanding what is so innovative about it.

Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 24718, CLAS 34718

CLCV 24818. The Body and Embodiment in Ancient Greek Art. 100 Units.

Whether naked or clothed, male or female, mortal or divine, the body takes pride of place in the visual worlds constructed by ancient Greek artists. Yet this emphasis on depicting the body begs the question: What is a body that exists as an image? What, in other words, is a body that is not embodied? This problem, articulated already in our ancient sources, serves as the starting point for this course's investigation of the relationship between images of the body in Greek art and the experiences such images solicited from their viewers. It examines, on the one hand, how Greek art promoted the body as a social construct--through artistic practices that configured the body's appearance, like distinctive techniques, styles, and iconography; through conceptual categories that ascribed identities, like gender, class, and race; and through contexts that integrated depictions of the body into lived experience, like sanctuaries, cemeteries, and domestic settings. But we will give equal attention to the viewer's subjective experience of embodiment, including its sensorial and affective dimensions, and the ways in which that experience is negotiated and articulated as a function of works of art. Finally, we will turn to the legacy of the Greek body in more recent centuries and consider its enduring impact as a visual paradigm today.

Instructor(s): S. Estrin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 24810, CLAS 34818, ARTH 34810

CLCV 24918. Early Traveling Writing: Pausanias in Roman Greece. 100 Units.

Through a close reading of Pausanias, who wrote his Description of Greece during the Roman imperial period, this course explores ancient forms of travel writing and associated interests in the places, peoples, myths, ruins, and material objects of the Mediterranean world. Moving from the apparent ethnographic lens of earlier Greek literature to Roman imperialist expeditions, readings and discussions will examine the sociopolitical contexts out of which Pausanias emerged as a literary author, and his legacies in and relationship to the wide array of genres of modern travel writing, from Lewis and Clark to John Steinbeck. Key topics will include: movement through space, tourism, nature, landscape, town and country, sites and spectacles, myth, ritual, and acts of remembering and forgetting.

Instructor(s): C. Kearns     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 34918, FNDL 24918, CLAS 34918

CLCV 25117. Philo of Alexandria. 100 Units.

In this course we will read the Greek text of Philo's de opificio mundi, with other brief excerpts here and there in the Philonic corpus. Our aim will be to use this treatise to elucidate the thought and character of one of the most prolific theological writers of the first century. We will seek to understand Philo as a Greek author and the nature and origins of his style, Philo as a proponent of Platonism, and Philo as a Jew in the context of Alexandrian Judaism. We will also examine his use of the allegorical method as an exegetical tool, and its implications for pagan, Jewish and early Christian approaches to sacred texts.

Instructor(s): David Martinez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): At least two years of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): BIBL 44003, CLAS 35117

CLCV 25218. Mediterranean Islands: Odd and Insular Histories. 100 Units.

Islands, and Mediterranean islands in particular, have long provoked curiosity and intrigue, and have persisted as places for thinking about utopia, incongruity, distinctiveness, or backwardness since antiquity. This course interrogates the representations of islands in ancient thought as well as their own archaeological and historical records in order to trace their often elliptical categorization in modern scholarship. Are islands unique because they are isolated, or rather because they become crossroads of interaction? From the mythical island of the Cyclopes, to the Aegean archipelagos, to the large masses like Sicily or Cyprus, discussions will explore approaches to insularity, isolation, connectivity, and identity using a wide range of textual and material evidence and theoretical insights from geography, anthropology, history, literature, and environmental science.

Instructor(s): C. Kearns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 35218, CLAS 35218

CLCV 25417. Censorship from the Inquisition to the Present. 100 Units.

Collaborative research seminar on the history of censorship and information control, with a focus on the history of books and information technologies. The class will meet in Special Collections, and students will work with the professor to prepare an exhibit, The History of Censorship, to be held in the Special Collections exhibit space in the spring. Students will work with rare books and archival materials, design exhibit cases, write exhibit labels, and contribute to the exhibit catalog. Half the course will focus on censorship in early modern Europe, including the Inquisition, the spread of the printing press, and clandestine literature in the Renaissance and Enlightenment. Special focus on the effects of censorship on classical literature, both newly rediscovered works like Lucretius and lost books of Plato, and authors like Pliny the Elder and Seneca who had been available in the Middle Ages but became newly controversial in the Renaissance. The other half of the course will look at modern and contemporary censorship issues, from wartime censorship, to the censorship of comic books, to digital-rights management, to free speech on our own campus. Students may choose whether to focus their own research and exhibit cases on classical, early modern, modern, or contemporary censorship. This course is part of the College Course Cluster, The Renaissance.

Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 25421, HREL 34309, CLAS 35417, CHSS 35421, SIGN 26010, RLST 22121, KNOW 21403, HIST 35421, KNOW 31403, HIST 25421

CLCV 25700-25800-25900. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

CLCV 25700. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

The first course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Hittite Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15602, NEHC 20011

CLCV 25800. Ancient Empires-2. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects-both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

Instructor(s): Hakan Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20012, HIST 15603

CLCV 25900. Ancient Empires-3. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15604, NEHC 20013

CLCV 25806. The Epigraphy of the Greek World. 100 Units.

Greek inscriptions provide us with a unique and specific approach to the ancient Greek world. This class will investigate both private and public inscriptions of ancient Greek city-states, from the Archaic to the Imperial period. It will allow us to explore both new forms of expression of the Greek language and specific and highly diversified cultural features. The class is open to students with Greek proficiency at the intermediary level or higher.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35809, HIST 20309, CLAS 35806

CLCV 25818. Stoic Ethics Through Roman Eyes. 100 Units.

The major ideas of the Stoic school about virtue, appropriate action, emotion, and how to live in harmony with the rational structure of the universe are preserved in Greek only in fragmentary texts and incomplete summaries. But the Roman philosophers give us much more, and we will study closely a group of key texts from Cicero and Seneca, including Cicero's De Finibus book III, his Tusculan Disputations book IV, a group of Seneca's letters, and, finally, a short extract from Cicero's De Officiis, to get a sense of Stoic political thought. For fun we will also read a few letters of Cicero's where he makes it clear that he is unable to follow the Stoics in the crises of his own life. We will try to understand why Stoicism had such deep and wide influence at Rome, influencing statesmen, poets, and many others, and becoming so to speak the religion of the Roman world. (A)

Instructor(s): M. Nussbaum     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Ability to read the material in Latin at a sufficiently high level, usually about two-three years at the college level. Assignment will usually be about 8 Oxford Classical Text pages per week, and in-class translation will be the norm.
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 35818, PHIL 25818, PLSC 25818, PHIL 35818, RETH 35818, PLSC 35818

CLCV 26011. Ancient Views of the Economy. 100 Units.

The ancient economy is a topic that for a long period had fallen into neglect. But for a few years it has experienced an exceptional revival in the field of ancient studies. This is why it is time to revisit classical authors and examine what they can tell us on the economic world they were living in. Starting with Herodotus, moving on with Thucydides, Ps-Iamblichus, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Polybius, Livy and Cicero, this course will provide a general outlook of what the writers of the Classical and Hellenistic period (for Greece) or Republican period (for Rome) can teach us on the topic. It will show certain continuities between some of them but will also be explicit on the vivid debates that could oppose others. Beyond the economic paradigm, it will also provide a new approach to a series of ancient authors.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 36011

CLCV 26017. Gods and God in Imperial Asia Minor (1-300 CE) 100 Units.

Roman Asia Minor in the Imperial period provides an extraordinary case of religious plurality and creativity. Pagans, Jews, Christians, even already Christian heretics, interacted in the same space. The frontiers between Jewish and Christian communities were, at least at the beginning, more fluid than was long thought. But even the frontiers between paganism and Judaism or Christianity were certainly not as rigid as was later imagined. This does not mean, however, that there were no tensions between the various groups. This class will examine the various aspects of this religious diversity as well as the social and political factors that may explain the religious equilibrium prevailing at that time in Asia Minor.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 36017, HIST 30308, HIST 20308, CLAS 36017

CLCV 26037. Myth and Its Critics. 100 Units.

Myth is essential to how humans make sense of the world: our foundational stories explain the nature of the world; they justify and explore social and sexual difference; they teach and test the limits of human agency. The course will survey contexts and uses of myth-making in the ancient Mediterranean world. We will also explore the many traditions of critique and anxiety about myth-making, among philosophers, literary critics and religious authorities.

Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 15000

CLCV 26216. Pagans and Christians: Greek Backgrounds to Early Christianity. 100 Units.

This course will examine some of the Greco-Roman roots of early Christianity. We will focus on affinities between Christianity and the classical tradition as well as ways in which the Christian faith may be considered radically different. Some of the more important issues that we will analyze are: 1. "The spell of Homer." How the Homeric poems exerted immeasurable influence on the religious attitudes and practices of the Greeks. 2. The theme of creation in Greek and Roman authors such as Hesiod and Ovid. The Orphic account of human origins. The Early Christian theme of Christ as creator/savior. 3. Greek and Roman conceptions of the afterlife. The response to the Homeric orientation in the form of the great mystery cults of Demeter, Dionysus, and Orpheus. The views of the philosophers (esp. Plato). The New Testament conception of resurrection. 4. Greek and Roman conceptions of sacrifice, the crucifixion of Christ as archetypal sacrifice and early Christian reflection upon it. 5. The world of ancient magic and the Christian response.

Instructor(s): David Martinez     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 36216, RLST 20505

CLCV 26517. Ancient Greek Aesthetics. 100 Units.

The ancient Greek philosophical tradition contains an enormously rich and influential body of reflection on the practice of poetry. We will focus our attention on Plato and Aristotle, but will also spend some time with Longinus and Plotinus. Topics will include: the analysis of poetry in terms of mimesis and image; poetry-making as an exercise of craft, divine inspiration, or some other sort of knowledge; the emotional effect on the audience; the role of poetry in forming moral character and, more broadly, its place in society; the relation between poetry, rhetoric, and philosophy; aesthetic values of beauty, wonder, truth, and grace. (A) (IV)

Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 36517, PHIL 29911, SCTH 39911, PHIL 39911

CLCV 26601. The Ancient City: The Greek World. 100 Units.

This annually offered course focuses on the development and transformation of cities in the ancient Mediterranean world. Among the issues to be discussed are how one defines a city and whether ancient cities satisfy those definitional criteria; what factors account for the emergence of cities; and what elements give rise to a particularly urban way of life. Theoretical reflections will be interspersed with specific case-studies. This year the focus will be on the cities of the Greek world and will consider topics such as the relationship between the city and the polis and the degree to which Athens was a typical Greek city.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16601

CLCV 26811. Plotinus. 100 Units.

We will read selections from the Enneads of Plotinus with an emphasis on the nature of beauty and its role in spiritual ascent. We will consider the relationship between spiritual vocation and the beauty of the world, the proper orientation to human embodiment as a condition for the successful pursuit of the contemplative life, and the power of language to communicate the ecstatic accomplishment of this life. (IV)

Instructor(s): G. Lear, M. Payne     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 35720, SCTH 34201, FNDL 27906, CLAS 36811, PHIL 25720

CLCV 26916. Aztecs and Romans: Antiquity in the Making of Modern Mexico. 100 Units.

Modern Mexico stands in the shadow of two vibrant premodern urban societies: the Mexica (commonly known as the Aztecs) and the Romans. In this course, we will examine how Mesoamerican and Mediterranean antiquities overlapped and interacted in shaping the culture, politics, and society of the area we call Mexico from the late colonial period to the twenty-first century. Topics will include creole patriotism, the political thought of the early Mexican Republic and the Mexican Revolution of 1910, nationalist archæology, indigenismo, mestizaje, and neoclassical and neo-Aztec art and architecture. All readings will be in translation.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26123, KNOW 23001, LACS 26123

CLCV 27200. Virgil: The Aeneid in Translation. 100 Units.

Description unavailable.

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 28001, FNDL 26611, CLAS 37200, CMLT 38001

CLCV 27506. Archaic Greece. 100 Units.

In order to understand the institutions, ideals, and practices that characterized Greek city-states in the Classical period, it is necessary to look to their genesis and evolution during the preceding Archaic period (ca. 700-480 BC). This course will examine the emergence and early development of the Greek city-states through a consideration of ancient written sources, inscriptions, material artifacts, and artistic representations as well as more recent secondary treatments of the period. General topics to be covered will include periodization, the rise of the polis, religion, warfare, the advent and uses of literacy, tyranny, and the emergence of civic ideology.

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 20303, CLAS 37506, ANCM 37506, HIST 30303

CLCV 29110. Ancient Myth. 100 Units.

Description unavailable.

CLCV 29700. Reading Course: Classical Civ. 100 Units.

No description available. Prerequisite(s): Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of faculty sponsor and director of undergraduate studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

CLCV 29800. BA Paper Seminar. 100 Units.

This seminar is designed to teach students the research and writing skills necessary for writing their BA paper. Lectures cover classical bibliography, research tools, and electronic databases. Students discuss research problems and compose preliminary drafts of their BA papers. They are expected to exchange criticism and ideas in regular seminar meetings with the preceptor and with other students who are writing papers, as well as to take account of comments from their faculty readers. The grade for the BA Paper Seminar is identical to the grade for the BA paper and, therefore, is not reported until the BA paper has been submitted in Spring Quarter. The grade for the BA paper depends on participation in the seminar as well as on the quality of the paper. Students may register for this seminar in either Autumn or Winter Quarter, but they are expected to participate in meetings throughout both quarters.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing

Greek Courses

GREK 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Attic Greek I-II-III.

This sequence covers the introductory Greek grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like GREK 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (GREK 20100-20200-20300).

GREK 10100. Introduction to Attic Greek I. 100 Units.

This course introduces the basic rules of ancient Greek. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and discussion of student work.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Knowledge of Greek not required.

GREK 10200. Introduction To Attic Greek II. 100 Units.

Study of the introductory textbook continues through this quarter, covering further verbal morphology (participle, subjunctive, optative) and syntax of complex clauses. Students apply and improve their understanding of Greek through reading brief passages from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GREK 10100

GREK 10300. Introduction to Attic Greek III: Prose. 100 Units.

Concurrently with finishing the final chapters of the textbook in the beginning of the quarter, students read a continuous prose text (Lysias 1). This is followed by extensive review of the year's grammar and vocabulary and further reading (Plato's Crito). The aim is familiarity with Greek idiom and sentence structure.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GREK 10200

GREK 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Ancient Greek. 300 Units.

Summer Introductory Ancient Greek comprises a thorough introduction to the Classical Greek language in eight weeks, using the Joint Association of Classical Teachers' Reading Greek (2nd ed.). In daily classes, students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Greek texts, and complete exercises in Greek to gain an active command of the language. In the latter half of the course, students will also read unadapted Greek from classical prose authors, including Plato and Xenophon. By the end of the eight weeks, students will be thoroughly familiar with Classical Greek idiom and sentence structure, and will be able to proceed to reading courses in the language. Summer Introductory Ancient Greek is an intensive course that requires a full-time commitment on the part of the student, meeting approximately five hours per day and demanding independent review and memorization in the evenings. Note: Since grammar and vocabulary will be introduced starting on the first day of class, students should be able to read and write the letters of the Greek alphabet before beginning the course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

GREK 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Greek I-II-III.

This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

GREK 20100. Intermediate Greek I: Plato. 100 Units.

We read Plato's text with a view to understanding both the grammatical constructions and the artistry of the language. We also give attention to the dramatic qualities of the dialogue. Grammatical exercises reinforce the learning of syntax.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): GREK 10300, 11300 or equivalent

GREK 20200. Intermediate Greek II: Sophocles. 100 Units.

This course includes analysis and translation of the Greek text, discussion of Sophoclean language and dramatic technique, and relevant trends in fifth-century Athenian intellectual history.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20100 or equivalent

GREK 20300. Intermediate Greek III. 100 Units.

This course is a close reading of two books of Homer, one from the Iliad and one from the Odyssey, with an emphasis on language, meter, and literary tropes.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20200 or equivalent

GREK 20123. Summer Intensive Intermediate Ancient Greek. 300 Units.

Summer Intensive Intermediate Greek combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of Classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Greek and for the use of Greek texts in their research. Texts studied are taken from a variety of representative and important Classical authors, and typically include Plato and Herodotus, Demosthenes, or Thucydides. The backbone of the review sessions is Mastronarde's Introduction to Ancient Greek combined with sight reading skill practice. The program meets during both mornings and afternoons for approximately five hours a day. Students are responsible for considerable amounts of class preparation in the evenings, requiring a full-time commitment for the duration of the course. This course equips students to continue with advanced course work or independent reading in Ancient Greek in all its varieties. Summer Intermediate Greek corresponds to a full year's worth of instruction at the University of Chicago.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of GREK 10300 or the equivalent placement.

GREK 21216. Greek Philosophy. 100 Units.

The Phaedrus is one of the most fascinating and compelling of Plato's Dialogues. Beginning with a playful treatment of the theme of erotic passion, it continues with a consideration of the nature of inspiration, love, and knowledge. The centerpiece is one the the most famous of the Platonic myths, the moving description of the charioteer and its allegory of the vision, fall, and incarnation of the soul.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2016-17
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 21200, BIBL 31200, GREK 31216, FNDL 21005

GREK 21300. Greek Tragedy. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to Aeschylean drama, seen through the special problems posed by one play, Prometheus Bound. Lectures and discussions are concerned with the play, the development and early form of Attic drama, and philosophical material. Modern Aeschylean scholars are also read and discussed.

Instructor(s): E. Asmis     Terms Offered: Autumn. Not offered 2017-18
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31300

GREK 21700. Lyric and Epinician Poetry. 100 Units.

This course will examine instances of Greek lyric genres throughout the archaic and classical periods, focusing on the structure, themes and sounds of the poetry and investigating their performative and historical contexts. Readings will include Alcman, Sappho, Alcaeus, Anacreon, Ibycus, Alcaeus, Simonides, Bacchylides, Pindar and Timotheus. In Greek.

Instructor(s): M. Payne     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31700

GREK 21800. Greek Epic. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of sections from Homer's Iliad. We will focus on character, emotions, and relationality in the poem, with an eye to evaluating the poem's many perspectives on mortality, relations with the divine, conceptions of the polis, and the nature of excellence.

Instructor(s): E. Austin     Terms Offered: Winter. Topic: Homer
Prerequisite(s): Two years or more of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31800

GREK 21900. Greek Oratory. 100 Units.

With Isocrates, Greek artistic prose reached its technical perfection," says L. R. Palmer in The Greek Language. Yet Isocrates has not found nearly so prominent a place in the university curriculum as have Demosthenes and Lysias. This course will attempt to give the great orator his due. We will start with his speech on Helen, comparing it with Gorgias' famous Encomium. We will also read the ad Demonicum, which became something of a handbook in later Hellenistic and Roman-period schools, and the Panegyricus. We will consider carefully Isocratean language and diction, and why it has merited such sustained praise among connoisseurs of Greek prose style, ancient and modern. We will also emphasize the centrality of Isocrates' contribution to Greek paideia.

Instructor(s): D. Martinez     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Two years or more of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 31900

GREK 22300. Greek Tragedy: Hellenistic/Imperial Literature. 100 Units.

This course features selections from the poetry and/or prose of the Hellenistic and Imperial periods. This year we will read selections from Hellenistic poetry, with a particular focus on the Hymns of Callimachus.

Terms Offered: Spring. Will be offered 2020-21
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 32300

GREK 22400. Greek Comedy: Aristophanes. 100 Units.

We will read in Greek Menander's Dyskolos, with an eye to understanding "New Comedy" and its robust afterlife in Renaissance Europe and modern sitcoms. We will also devote some time to reading and assessing fragments from Menander's contemporaries. Coursework will include translation as well as secondary readings.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2020-21
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 32400, GREK 32400, HIST 30403, HIST 20403

GREK 22515. Greek Historians: Thucydides. 100 Units.

In this course we will read book 1 of Thucydides, his description of the run-up to the Peloponnesian War, in Greek. We will pay attention to Thucydides' style and approach to historiography, sinking our teeth into this difficult but endlessly fascinating text.

Instructor(s): D. Martinez     Terms Offered: Autumn. Will be offered 2020-21
Prerequisite(s): At least two years of Greek.
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 32515, FNDL 22517

GREK 23915. The Greek Magical Papryi. 100 Units.

No description available.

Equivalent Course(s): GREK 33915, BIBL 45603

GREK 24600. Philo of Alexandria. 100 Units.

In this course we will read the Greek text of Philo's de opificio mundi, with other brief excerpts here and there in the Philonic corpus. Our aim will be to use this treatise to elucidate the thought and character of one of the most prolific theological writers of the first century. We will seek to understand Philo as a Greek author and the nature and origins of his style, Philo as a proponent of Platonism, and Philo as a Jew in the context of Alexandrian Judaism. We will also examine his use of the allegorical method as an exegetical tool, and its implications for pagan, Jewish and early Christian approaches to sacred texts.

Equivalent Course(s): GREK 34600, BIBL 44500

GREK 25116. Reading Greek Literature in the Papyri. 100 Units.

The earliest--and often the only--witnesses for Greek literary works are the papyri. This makes their testimony of great importance for literary history and interpretation, but that testimony does not come without problems. In this course we will cover some of the concepts and techniques needed to recover the literary treasure contained in this highly complex material: from the history of book forms, the textual tradition of literary works, and the creation of the canons to more philological aspects such as editorial practice, Textkritik, and paleography. Our literary corpus will include biblical texts, paraliterary (school and magical) texts, and translations of Egyptian texts into Greek. We will work with photographs of the papyri, and every part of the course will be based on practice. As appropriate we will also work with the University of Chicago's collections of papyri.

Prerequisite(s): at least two years of Greek
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 35116, BIBL 36916, HCHR 36916

GREK 26517. Indo-European Linguistic Paleontology. 100 Units.

Linguistic paleontology is a method of inspecting reconstructed linguistic data (including early lexical borrowings) in order to derive information about the original geographical location ("homeland"), natural environment (terrain, flora, fauna), economy, and material and spiritual culture of the speakers of a protolanguage. In this course we will examine the reconstructed lexicon of Proto-Indo-European and correlate it with evidence from archaeology to formulate hypotheses about PIE homeland and economic and cultural practices. Time permitting, we may apply these methods to other language families outside Indo-European as well.

Equivalent Course(s): LING 21320, LING 31320, CLAS 37415, GREK 36517

GREK 29700. Reading Course: Greek. 100 Units.

No description available. Prerequisite(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Latin Courses

LATN 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to Classical Latin I-II-III.

This sequence covers the introductory Latin grammar in twenty-two weeks and is intended for students who have more complex schedules or believe that the slower pace allows them to better assimilate the material. Like LATN 11100-11200-11300, this sequence prepares students to move into the intermediate sequence (LATN 20100-20200-20300).

LATN 10100. Introduction to Classical Latin I. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the rudiments of ancient Latin. Class time is spent on the explanation of grammar, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and discussion of student work.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

LATN 10200. Introduction to Classical Latin II. 100 Units.

This course continues through the basic text begun in LATN 10100.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LATN 10100

LATN 10300. Introduction to Classical Latin III. 100 Units.

After finishing the text, the course involves reading in Latin prose and poetry, during which reading the students consolidate the grammar and vocabulary taught in LATN 10100 and 10200.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LATN 10200

LATN 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Latin. 300 Units.

Summer Intensive Introductory Latin offers a comprehensive introduction to Classical Latin language in eight weeks, using Keller and Russell's Learn to Read Latin. In daily classes, students learn new grammatical concepts and morphology, practice reading and translating increasingly complex Latin texts, and complete exercises in Latin to gain an active command of the language. Students will also read unadapted Latin from classical authors, including Caesar, Sallust, and Cicero. By the end of the summer Latin course, students will be thoroughly familiar with Latin idiom and sentence structure and will be able to proceed to reading courses in the language. Summer Introductory Latin is an intensive course that requires a full-time commitment on the part of the student, meeting approximately five hours per day and demanding independent review and memorization in the evenings.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

LATN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Latin I-II-III.

This sequence is aimed at students who have completed one of the introductory sequences and at entering students with extensive previous training, as evidenced by a placement exam. As a whole, it provides students with an overview of important genres and with the linguistic skills to read independently, and/or to proceed to advanced courses in the language.

LATN 20100. Intermediate Latin I: Cicero. 100 Units.

Readings concentrate on Cicero's Catalinarian Orations, the famous group of speeches he delivered in 63 BC against L. Sergius Catilina, who was plotting to overthrow the Roman government. Some discussion of the history and culture of the period; study of problems of grammar as necessary.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): LATN 10300 or 11300, or equivalent

LATN 20200. Intermediate Latin II: Aeneid. 100 Units.

This course is a reading of selections from the Metamorphoses, with emphasis on Ovid's language, versification, and literary art.

Instructor(s): E. Austin     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20100 or equivalent

LATN 20300. Intermediate Latin III: 100 Units.

This course is a reading of selections from the first six books of the Aeneid, with emphasis on Vergil's language, versification, and literary art. Students also are required to read the whole of the epic in an English translation.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20200 or equivalent

LATN 20123. Summer Intensive Intermediate Latin. 300 Units.

Summer Intermediate Latin combines extensive reading of texts with a comprehensive review of Classical grammar and syntax; it prepares students for advanced courses in Latin and for the use of Latin texts in the course of their research. Texts studied are taken from a variety of representative and important authors, which may include Cicero, Seneca, Pliny, and others. The backbone of the review sessions is Keller and Russell, Learn to Read Latin, with supplementary exercises in composition. The program meets during both mornings and afternoons for approximately five hours a day. Students are responsible for considerable amounts of class preparation during the evenings, requiring a full-time commitment for the duration of the course. Summer Intermediate Latin equips students to continue with advanced course work or independent reading in Latin in all its varieties. Summer Intermediate Latin corresponds to a full year's worth of instruction at the University of Chicago.

Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-7/28/17
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of LATN 10300 or equivalent placement.

LATN 21100. Roman Elegy. 100 Units.

This course examines the development of the Latin elegy from Catullus to Ovid. Our major themes are the use of motifs and topics and their relationship to the problem of poetic persona.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2019-20
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31100, CMLT 31101, CMLT 21101

LATN 21200. Roman Novel. 100 Units.

We shall read from various Latin texts that participate in the tradition of the Ancient novel.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2019-20
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 21204, LATN 31200

LATN 21300. Vergil. 100 Units.

This course will survey the main interpretive issues surrounding Vergil's Aeneid through a selection of readings from books 1-12. You will also be required to read the entire epic in English translation. Class time will be given to translation of the Latin, discussion of the secondary readings, and attention to the epic's larger themes and meanings in the literary and cultural context of Augustan Rome.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn. Offered 2019-20.
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31300

LATN 21500. Roman Satire. 100 Units.

The object of this course is to study the emergence of satire as a Roman literary genre with a recognized subject matter and style. Readings include Horace Satires 1.1, 4, 6, and 10 and 2.1, 5 and 7; Persius 1 and 5; and Juvenal 1 and 3.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2020-21.
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31500

LATN 21600. Roman Oratory. 100 Units.

Cicero's first speech, in defense of a client charged with parricide, receives a close reading in Latin and in English. The speech is considered in relation to theories set out in Cicero's rhetorical writings, in relation to the role of the criminal courts in Late Republican Rome, and in relation to other defense speeches by Cicero.

Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31600

LATN 21700. Post-Virgilian Epic. 100 Units.

We will read several books of Lucan's Bellum Civile in Latin and the entire poem in translation. Discussion topics will include the historical context of the epic, its self-portrayal as anti-epic, the use of rhetoric, hyperbole, and paradox as ideological tools, and the narrator's intrusive voice. Requirements: 4 quizzes, midterm paper, final exam.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31700

LATN 21800. Roman Historian. 100 Units.

Primary readings are drawn from the Tiberian books of the Annals, in which Tacitus describes the consolidation of the imperial regime after the death of Augustus. Parallel accounts and secondary readings are used to help bring out the methods of selecting and ordering data and the stylistic effects that typify a Tacitean narrative.

Instructor(s): P. White     Terms Offered: Spring. Tacitus.
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31800

LATN 21900. Roman Comedy. 100 Units.

Plautus' Pseudolus is read in Latin, along with secondary readings that explain the social context and the theatrical conventions of Roman comedy. Class meetings are devoted less to translation than to study of the language, plot construction, and stage techniques at work in the Pseudolus.

Instructor(s): D. Wray     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LATN 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 31900

LATN 22100. Lucretius. 100 Units.

We will read selections of Lucretius' magisterial account of a universe composed of atoms. The focus of our inquiry is: how did Lucretius convert a seemingly dry philosophical doctrine about the physical composition of the universe into a gripping message of personal salvation? The selections include Lucretius' vision of an infinite universe, of heaven, and of the hell that humans have created for themselves on earth.

Terms Offered: Autumn. This course will be offered 2020-21.
Equivalent Course(s): LATN 32100

LATN 24615. Augustine: Early Philosophical Works. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): LATN 34615

LATN 27017. Einhard. 100 Units.

Einhard's Life of Charlemagne combined Ciceronian rhetorical theory, the modeling of Suetonius, and personal reminiscences to create one of the best-sellers of the Middle Ages. That work has a situational logic and stylistic place among Einhard's other activities and literate creations, including letters, epigraphy, theological reflection, and hagiographical narrative. We shall consider the inspirations, styles, and goals of the courtier, biographer, and pious lay retiree, who stands emblematically as both a "typical" and nonpareil figure of the Carolingian Renaissance.

Equivalent Course(s): LATN 37017

LATN 29700. Reading Course. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Peter White
Classics 25A
773.702.8515
Email

Administrative Contact

Administrative Assistant
Kathleen M. Fox
Cl 22B
773.702.8514
Email