Contacts | Institute for Molecular Engineering | Major Program in Molecular Engineering | Summary of Requirements for the Major in Molecular Engineering -- Chemical & Soft Materials Track | Summary of Requirements for the Major in Molecular Engineering -- Biology Track | Summary of Requirements for the Major in Molecular Engineering -- Quantum Track | Minor Program in Molecular Engineering | Grading | Honors | Courses

Department Website: http://ime.uchicago.edu/students/undergraduates

Engineering is the science of solving complex technological problems and, in the case of molecular engineering, using tools and concepts that arise from the fundamentals of science at the nanoscale. The tools of engineering are important in making and translating basic discoveries in other fields into new intellectual opportunities and, sometimes, useful technologies.

Institute for Molecular Engineering

The Institute for Molecular Engineering (IME) is founded on the principle of collaborative problem-solving, not rigid academic disciplines. It is at the forefront of an emerging field that has the potential to address fundamental problems of societal import. This exciting new field involves the incorporation of synthetic molecular building blocks into functional systems that will impact technologies from advanced medical therapies to quantum computing.

Created in partnership with Argonne National Laboratory, the IME builds on the tradition of collaboration and cutting-edge research well established at Argonne and the University of Chicago. It conducts research at the intersection of chemical, electrical, mechanical, and biological engineering, as well as materials, biological, and physical sciences. The institute’s exploration of innovative technologies in nanoscale manipulation and design at a molecular scale has the potential for impact in such areas as energy, health care, and the environment.

Major Program in Molecular Engineering

The BS degree program in Molecular Engineering offers undergraduates a cutting-edge engineering curriculum built on a strong foundation in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. Courses are designed to develop quantitative reasoning and problem-solving skills; to introduce engineering analysis of physical, chemical, and biological systems; and to address open-ended technological questions across a spectrum of disciplines. The program will both prepare undergraduates for a wide variety of careers in technology-focused industries and position graduates for further postgraduate study in such fields as science, engineering, medicine, business, or law. The aim is to introduce invention and design, along with inquiry and discovery, as fruitful and complementary intellectual activities.

Majors are able to choose from three quantitative engineering analysis tracks: one aimed at engineering with a chemical and soft materials emphasis, one with a focus on biology, and one geared toward applied physics. The applied physics track, offered in close collaboration with the Department of Physics, is one of the first initiatives worldwide to formally educate quantum engineers at the undergraduate level. MENG 29500 Engineering Design is a 300-unit design course offered as a capstone, in which student teams spend an intensive quarter working with a faculty mentor to solve an open-ended problem, for example, analyzing chemical and biological properties of cancer cells to develop new treatment and delivery vehicles or harnessing the properties of electrons in materials to develop quantum information technologies. The course also combines technical skills with an exploration of economics, regulatory and legal issues, and ethics.

Major Program Requirements

1. A strong and broad background in mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It is imperative for a modern engineer to have a strong and broad background in the sciences. Traditional engineering disciplines have had requirements in math, chemistry, and physics for decades and many programs have evolved to require biology as well. The highly interdisciplinary nature of Molecular Engineering requires a foundation built across the mathematical, physical, and biological sciences. Students are encouraged to complete their general education requirements at the highest level for which they are prepared. This will position them better to take advantage of advanced electives and research opportunities.

As discussed in more detail below, there will be three tracks for Molecular Engineering majors: the Chemical & Soft Materials Track, the Biological Sciences Track, and the Quantum Track. Students in the first two tracks will follow precedents set by Chemistry and Biological Sciences majors in that they will likely take chemistry in year 1, physics in year 2, and follow the recommended mathematics courses in the Chemistry curriculum. Students in the quantum track will follow precedent set by Physics majors in that they will likely take physics in year 1, follow the mathematics guidelines of Physics majors, and take chemistry in year 2.

2. MENG 26030 Introduction to Engineering Analysis. One of the first courses for all Molecular Engineering majors, this course teaches students to apply mathematical methods towards solving problems that cut across multiple engineering sub-disciplines. A major objective of the course is to teach simple programming skills and computational methods in applied mathematics, including the use of engineering software such as Matlab, Mathematica, Comsol, and elements of Python. The skills that are introduced here will be further developed and strengthened throughout the rest of the curriculum.

3. Three Molecular Engineering tracks. Reflecting the research and education themes of the IME, three highly intertwined but recognizably different tracks for the major are available to students. One is aimed at preparing students oriented towards biological engineering, another is aimed toward chemical and soft materials, and the other is aimed at preparing students oriented towards engineering of quantum-based materials, devices, and processes. The latter track is offered in close collaboration with the Department of Physics. The main differences in the tracks relate to a choice between two sequences of three courses under the heading of quantitative engineering analysis and in the requirements for advanced electives.

4. MENG 29500 Engineering Design (300-unit capstone course). This “immersion” design course teaches students how to bring combinations of fundamental science and engineering together to solve open-ended and challenging engineering problems. It also serves as a vehicle to teach other equally important non-technical skills, including:

  • Problem identification: technology analysis, competitive analysis, market analysis, stakeholder analysis, product definition
  • Impact of the project, including sociological and engineering ethics
  • Project planning
  • Project economics: costs, value/investment analysis, risk analysis and adjustment
  • Prototyping, experimental design, data analysis, error analysis
  • IP: patenting, prior art, patentability
  • Legal and regulatory analysis
  • Proposing, presenting and reporting
  • Teamwork

IME faculty and fellows will propose open-ended projects for which they will serve as mentors. Students will work together in groups of three.

5. Advanced electives (3 required courses in the major). The major is offered in such a way as to allow for considerable flexibility for students to tailor their programs along individualized trajectories, with help from faculty advisors. Not only can students choose between multiple tracks, but they can further build breadth or depth through their choice of and advanced electives. Moreover, we anticipate that our students will use their general electives outside of the major requirements to strengthen their backgrounds in specific areas of interest, also in consultation with Molecular Engineering advisors, to achieve desired outcomes such as preparation for graduate school in more traditional engineering disciplines.

6. Laboratory skills and hands-on experience. Critical skills that molecular engineers must acquire as part of their educational program include the ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering and the ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as the ability to analyze and interpret data. Molecular Engineering majors develop these skills through lab components associated with required courses in the physical and biological sciences, Molecular Engineering courses including MENG 26101-26102 Transport Phenomena I: Forces + Flows; Transport Phenomena II, MENG 26201-26202 Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I-II, MENG 29500 Engineering Design, and some of the advanced electives such as MENG 27300 Polymer Physics and Engineering. We also anticipate that many Molecular Engineering students will receive advanced laboratory experience pursuing undergraduate research projects.

7. Non-technical skills. Many decades of workshops and panels engaging stakeholders in academia and industry, often associated with the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), have identified criteria for outcomes of students in accredited engineering education programs. Although there is no thought of seeking ABET accreditation for the Molecular Engineering major, many ABET criteria, particularly those related to non-technological skills, are viewed as essential to incorporate into the Molecular Engineering major. Examples of student outcomes that fall into this category include: (a) an ability to formulate or design a system, process, or program to meet desired needs, (b) an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams, (c) an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility, (d) an ability to communicate effectively, (e) the broad education necessary to understand the impact of solutions in a global and societal context, (f) a recognition of the need for and an ability to engage in life-long learning, and (g) a knowledge of contemporary issues. Many of these outcomes will be addressed through both the Molecular Engineering degree curriculum (emphasized in the design sequence and the research colloquium) and the College general education requirements. Students who are able to both develop and articulate these skills will be positioned favorably for employment in industry and for postgraduate study (engineering, medicine, law, and business administration).

Entering the Program

Students must indicate their intent to pursue the BS program at the end of the Autumn Quarter in their second year of study by completing the Intent to Pursue Molecular Engineering questionnaire (available on the IME website). They begin the engineering curriculum in the following Spring Quarter with enrollment in either MENG 26010 Engineering Principles of Conservation or MENG 26020 Engineering Electrodynamics. Both courses require the completion of their stated prerequisites. Students should work with their advisors early in their first year of study to plan for those prerequisites to be completed in a timely manner.

Summary of Requirements for the Major in Molecular Engineering -- Chemical & Soft Materials Track

GENERAL EDUCATION
CHEM 10100
  &  10200
Introductory General Chemistry I
   and Introductory General Chemistry II (or higher) 1
200
One of the following sequences:200
Elementary Functions and Calculus I-II (requires a grade of A- or higher)
Calculus I-II 1
Honors Calculus I-II
One of the following sequences:200
Multiscale Modeling of Biological Systems I
   and Multiscale Modeling of Biological Systems II
Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology; Fundamentals of Genetics 2
Molecular Biology of the Cell; Biological Systems 3
Total Units600
MAJOR
CHEM 11300Comprehensive General Chemistry III (or higher) 1100
PHYS 13100-13200-13300Mechanics; Electricity and Magnetism; Waves, Optics, and Heat (or higher)300
One of the following sets of three courses:300
MATH 13300 Elementary Functions and Calculus III OR MATH 15300 Calculus III OR MATH 16300 Honors Calculus III OR MATH 19620 Linear Algebra, AND MATH 20000-20100 Mathematical Methods for Physical Sciences I-II 4
OR
MATH 16300 Honors Calculus III, AND MATH 20500 Analysis in Rn III OR MATH 20900 Honors Analysis in Rn III, AND MATH 27300 Basic Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations
MENG 26010Engineering Principles of Conservation100
MENG 26030Introduction to Engineering Analysis100
MENG 26101-26102Transport Phenomena I: Forces + Flows; Transport Phenomena II200
MENG 26201-26202Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I-II200
MENG 29501Undergraduate Research Colloquium000
MENG 29500Engineering Design300
Three advanced electives selected in consultation with the advisor for the Chemical and Soft Materials track. studies 5300
Total Units1900
1

Credit may be granted by examination. 

2

Molecular Engineering majors can take these courses without the Biological Sciences prerequisites (BIOS 20150-20151) unless they pursue a double major in the Biological Sciences. They are expected to show competency in mathematical modeling of biological phenomena covered in BIOS 20151 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic).

3

Open only to students with a 4 or 5 on the AP Biology exam. Upon completion of BIOS 20234-20235-20236, students will be awarded a total of 200 units to be counted toward the general education requirement in the biological sciences.

4

MATH 13300 requires a grade of A- or higher.

5

Students should seek approval for their major electives before registering for and completing the course.

Summary of Requirements for the Major in Molecular Engineering -- Biology Track

GENERAL EDUCATION
CHEM 10100
  &  10200
Introductory General Chemistry I
   and Introductory General Chemistry II (or higher) 1
200
One of the following sequences:200
Elementary Functions and Calculus I-II (requires a grade of A- or higher)
Calculus I-II 1
Honors Calculus I-II
One of the following sequences:200
Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology; Fundamentals of Genetics 2
Molecular Biology of the Cell; Biological Systems 3
Total Units600
MAJOR
CHEM 11300Comprehensive General Chemistry III (or higher) 1100
PHYS 13100-13200-13300Mechanics; Electricity and Magnetism; Waves, Optics, and Heat (or higher)300
One of the following sets of three courses:300
MATH 13300 Elementary Functions and Calculus III OR MATH 15300 Calculus III OR MATH 16300 Honors Calculus III OR MATH 19620 Linear Algebra, AND MATH 20000-20100 Mathematical Methods for Physical Sciences I-II 4
OR
MATH 16300 Honors Calculus III, AND MATH 20500 Analysis in Rn III OR MATH 20900 Honors Analysis in Rn III, AND MATH 27300 Basic Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations
MENG 26010Engineering Principles of Conservation100
MENG 26030Introduction to Engineering Analysis100
MENG 26101-26102Transport Phenomena I: Forces + Flows; Transport Phenomena II200
MENG 26201-26202Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I-II200
MENG 29501Undergraduate Research Colloquium000
MENG 29500Engineering Design300
Three advanced electives selected in consultation with the Biology track advisor (at least two should be in the Biological Sciences above BIOS 20242). 5300
Total Units1900
1

 Credit may be granted by examination.

2

Molecular Engineering majors can take these courses without the Biological Sciences prerequisites (BIOS 20150-20151) unless they pursue a double major in the Biological Sciences. They are expected to show competency in mathematical modeling of biological phenomena covered in BIOS 20151 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic).

3

Open only to students with a 4 or 5 on the AP Biology exam. Upon completion of BIOS 20234-20235-20236, students will be awarded a total of 200 units to be counted toward the general education requirement in the biological sciences. 

4

 MATH 13300 requires a grade of A- or higher.

5

Students should seek approval for their major electives before registering for and completing the course. 

Summary of Requirements for the Major in Molecular Engineering -- Quantum Track

GENERAL EDUCATION
PHYS 13100-13200Mechanics; Electricity and Magnetism (or higher)200
One of the following sequences:200
Elementary Functions and Calculus I-II (requires a grade of A- or higher)
Calculus I-II 1
Honors Calculus I-II
Total Units400
MAJOR
PHYS 13300Waves, Optics, and Heat (or higher)100
One of the following:100
Elementary Functions and Calculus III (requires a grade of A- or higher)
Calculus III
Honors Calculus III
Introduction to Mathematical Methods in Physics
CHEM 10100
  &  10200
  &  11300
Introductory General Chemistry I
   and Introductory General Chemistry II
   and Comprehensive General Chemistry III (or higher)
300
One of the following:100
Mathematical Methods in Physics
Analysis in Rn III
Honors Analysis in Rn III
PHYS 15400Modern Physics100
PHYS 23400-23500Quantum Mechanics I-II200
MENG 26020Engineering Electrodynamics100
MENG 26030Introduction to Engineering Analysis100
MENG 26201-26202Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I-II200
MENG 29501Undergraduate Research Colloquium000
MENG 29500Engineering Design300
Three advanced electives selected in consultation with the Quantum track advisor.300
Total Units1900
1

Credit may be granted by examination; consult quantum track advisor.

Approved Quantum Track Advanced Electives

All 20000-level molecular engineering courses not otherwise required for the major (except those numbered MENG 20XXX and 29XXX)
All 20000-level physics courses (except PHYS 29100-29200-29300 and PHYS 29700)
Courses in Mathematics and Statistics (no more than two to be used as program electives):
Analysis in Rn II
Honors Analysis in Rn II
Analysis in Rn III (Neither MATH 20500 nor MATH 20900 can be counted toward electives if substituted for PHYS 22100.)
Honors Analysis in Rn III
Basic Complex Variables
Basic Functional Analysis
Basic Theory of Ordinary Differential Equations
Introduction to Differentiable Manifolds and Integration on Manifolds
Basic Theory of Partial Differential Equations
Statistical Models and Methods
Statistical Theory and Methods I
Statistical Theory and Methods II
Other courses in the physical sciences:
Chemical Kinetics and Dynamics
Computational Chemistry and Biology
Scientific Visualization
Introduction to Scientific Computing
Physics of the Earth
Climate Dynamics of the Earth and Other Planets
Courses in the biological sciences:
Introduction to Medical Physics and Medical Imaging
Classes not listed here can satisfy the elective requirement if explicitly approved, on a case-by-case basis, by the program advisor for the IME quantum track.

Sample Major Programs

Below is a sample four-year program for the Chemical & Soft Materials track. Students should rely on relevant placement tests and on the direction of the College advisors in creating a personal four-year program that accommodates their individual backgrounds and interests. Again, we recommend that students complete their science and mathematics general education requirements at the highest level for which they are prepared.

First Year
Autumn QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter
MATH 15100MATH 15200MATH 15300
CHEM 11100CHEM 11200CHEM 11300
Second Year
Autumn QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter
PHYS 13100PHYS 13200PHYS 13300
MATH 20000MATH 20100MENG 26010
BIOS 20186BIOS 20187 
Third Year
Autumn QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter
MENG 26101MENG 26102MENG 26202
MENG 26030MENG 26201Advanced Elective
Fourth Year
Autumn QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter
MENG 29501MENG 29500Advanced Elective
Advanced Elective  

 Below is a sample four-year program for the Quantum track. Students should rely on relevant placement tests and on the direction of the College advisors in creating a personal four-year program that accommodates their individual backgrounds and interests. Again, we recommend that students complete their science and mathematics general education requirements at the highest level for which they are prepared.

First Year
Autumn QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter
MATH 15100MATH 15200MATH 15300
PHYS 14100PHYS 14200PHYS 14300
Second Year
Autumn QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter
CHEM 11100CHEM 11200CHEM 11300
PHYS 22100 MENG 26020
PHYS 15400 PHYS 23400
Third Year
Autumn QuarterWinter QuarterSpring Quarter
MENG 26030MENG 26201MENG 26202
PHYS 23500Advanced ElectiveAdvanced Elective
Fourth Year
Autumn QuarterWinter Quarter 
MENG 29501MENG 29500 
Advanced Elective  

Minor Program in Molecular Engineering

The minor program in molecular engineering is designed for undergraduates majoring in physical or biological science, mathematics, computer science, economics, or related fields. The overall objective of the program is to provide basic engineering tools and ways of thinking to students that augment scientific approaches and problem solving skills.

Minor Program Requirements

Before a student can declare the minor in molecular engineering, the student must complete the general education requirements in mathematics and physical sciences along with the course prerequisites for MENG 26010 Engineering Principles of Conservation. Following completion of all requirements, students may apply to the director of undergraduate studies of the Institute for Molecular Engineering for admission into the minor in molecular engineering program.

A student must receive the director of undergraduate studies’ approval of the minor program on a form obtained from the student's College adviser. Once signed by the director, this form must then be returned to the student's College adviser by the end of Spring Quarter of the student's third year.

To earn the minor in molecular engineering, a student must complete six courses as outlined below.  Advanced electives must be chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.  All courses in molecular engineering are pre-approved as advanced electives for the minor.  Students should seek pre-approval for all advanced electives that are outside of molecular engineering.  Before meeting with the director, students should invest some thought into which courses they would like to complete for the minor and how those courses relate as a set. 

Courses in the minor program may not be (1) double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors, or (2) counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Summary of Requirements for the Minor in Molecular Engineering

MENG 26010Engineering Principles of Conservation100
MENG 26030Introduction to Engineering Analysis100
One of the following sequences:200
Transport Phenomena I: Forces + Flows; Transport Phenomena II
Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I-II
Two advanced electives selected in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. **200
Total Units600
**

Students must secure approval before enrolling in courses they wish to use as advanced electives in the minor program.

Grading

In order to qualify for the BS degree, a GPA of 2.0 or higher (with no grade lower than C-) is needed in all courses required in the major. Students majoring in Molecular Engineering must receive quality grades in all courses required in the degree program. All courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades. Nonmajors and nonminors may take Molecular Engineering courses on a P/F basis; only grades of C- or higher constitute passing work.

Honors

Students who pursue a substantive research project with a faculty member of the Institute for Molecular Engineering are encouraged to write and defend an honors thesis based on their work. Students who wish to be considered for honors are expected to complete their arrangements with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of their third year and to register for one quarter of MENG 29700 Undergraduate Research for Molecular Engineering during their third or fourth years.

To be eligible to receive honors, students in the BS degree program must write a creditable honors paper describing their research. The paper must be submitted before the deadline established by the director of undergraduate studies and must be approved by the department chairperson. In addition, an oral presentation of the research is required. The research paper or project used to meet this requirement may not be used to meet the BA/BS paper or project requirement in another major.

To earn a BS degree with honors in Molecular Engineering, students must also have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher.

Molecular Engineering Courses

MENG 20000. Introduction to Emerging Technologies. 100 Units.

This course will examine five emerging technologies (stem cells in regenerative medicine, quantum computing, water purification, new batteries, etc.) over two weeks each. The first of the two weeks will present the basic science underlying the emerging technology; the second of the two weeks will discuss the hurdles that must be addressed successfully to convert a good scientific concept into a commercial product that addresses needs in the market place.

Instructor(s): Matthew Tirrell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirements in mathematics and physical or biological sciences

MENG 20100. Turning Science and Innovation into Impactful Technologies. 100 Units.

This course will focus on the process of turning science into working technologies for the public good. How does one take an innovation or a discovery and perform the due diligence required to identify application areas, protect intellectual property, carry out competitive analysis, and then develop a reliable, affordable product? By examining both successes and failures, students will learn to 1) appreciate the key factors that influence the outcome of an innovation; 2) learn to use the proven processes and tools to investigate market dynamics, assess risk and develop value propositions for the technology at hand; and 3), develop skills in critical decision-making. The course will include distinguished guest speakers from industrial leaders who will describe their own experiences in turning basic research into technology.

Instructor(s): Supratik Guha, Sharon Feng     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: MENG 20000

MENG 21000. Molecularly Engineered Materials and Material Systems. 100 Units.

Synthesis, processing and characterization of new materials are the pervasive, fundamental necessities for molecular engineering. Understanding how to design and control structure and properties of materials at the nanoscale is the essence of our research and education program. This course will provide an introduction to molecularly engineered materials and material systems. We will start with atomic-level descriptions and means of thinking about the structure of materials, and then we will build towards understanding nano- and meso-scale materials architectures and their structure-dependent thermal, electrical, mechanical, and optical properties. Strategies in materials processing (heat treatment, diffusion, self-assembly) to achieve desired structure will also be introduced. In the latter part of the course, we will study applications of major concepts of the course in quantum materials, electronic materials, energy-related materials, and biomaterials.

Instructor(s): Paul Nealey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirements in mathematics and physical or biological sciences

MENG 23000. Mathematical Foundation of Molecular Engineering. 100 Units.

The predictive theoretical and modeling basis of molecular engineering rests, in one part, on the implications of a few important partial differential equations, which our students must master, fully appreciate, and be prepared to use. These include: Navier-Stokes, Schrödinger, and the Diffusion/Heat Conduction. This course will cover the physical origin and derivation of these equations in different applications, and discuss general methods of solution and approximations. Students will also be introduced to introductory computational methods for solving these equations. The emphasis will be on extracting the physical content embodied in these equations, leading to the ability to predict and engineer the properties of physical systems.

Instructor(s): Juan de Pablo, Giulia Galli     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MATH 20000 and MATH 20100 or MATH 22000 or PHYS 22100

MENG 23100. Applied Numerical Methods in Molecular Engineering. 100 Units.

The course is intended to provide the fundamental tools of numerical methods for problems in molecular engineering. It includes interpolation, integration, minimization techniques and weighted residuals. Application of the methods towards multi-scale solutions from atomistic to continuum approximations are covered. Finite differences, finite elements, boundary elements and collocation methods are explained and used in molecular engineering problems. Fundamental concepts of statistical thermodynamics, transport phenomena, electromagnetism and Rheology are revisited.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MATH 20000-20100 or MATH 22000 or PHYS 22100; and CHEM 11300/12300 or PHYS 13300/14300. Grads should have work in Thermodynamics and Transport.
Equivalent Course(s): MENG 33100

MENG 23310. Experimental Techniques and Advanced Instrumentation. 100 Units.

This course aims to provide students with a knowledge of state-of-the-art experimental measurement techniques and laboratory instrumentation for applications in broad scientific research environments, as well as industrial and general engineering practice. Topics include atomic-scale structural and imaging methods, electronic transport in low dimensional matter, magnetic and optical characterization of materials. Basic concepts in electronic measurement such as lock-in amplifiers, spectrum and network analysis, noise reduction techniques, cryogenics, thermometry, vacuum technology, as well as statistical analysis and fitting of data will also be discussed.

Instructor(s): David Awschalon     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of PHYS 23400 & PHYS 23500 for undergraduates.
Equivalent Course(s): MENG 33310

MENG 23320. Optics for Engineers. 100 Units.

The course will introduce the use of optics in engineering  We will cover the basics of wave optics, ray optics and topics such as interference, polarization and diffraction.  We will apply them to lens systems, estimates of resolution and aberrations; the interaction of light with solids including non-linear optical behavior, dispersion, and the propagation of light through multilayers.  Applications of optics in areas such as optical communications, photonics and imaging will be introduced.

Instructor(s): Supratik Guha     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): MENG 33320

MENG 23700. Quantum Computation. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals of quantum information to students who have not had training in quantum computing or quantum information theory. Some knowledge of quantum mechanics is expected, including bra-ket notation and the time-dependent form of Schrodinger’s equation.  Students will learn how to carry out calculations and gain a fundamental grasp of topics that will include some or all of: Entanglement, teleportation, quantum algorithms, cryptography, and error correction.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): MENG 33700

MENG 24100-24200. Selected Topics in Molecular Engineering: Molecular/Materials Modelling I-II.

Molecular modeling seeks to develop models and computational techniques for prediction of the structure, thermodynamic properties, and non-equilibrium behaviour of gases, liquids, and solids from knowledge of intermolecular interactions.

MENG 24100. Selected Topics in Molecular Engineering: Molecular/Materials Modelling I. 100 Units.

This course will introduce students to the methods of molecular modeling. The topics covered will include an introduction to the origin of molecular forces, a brief introduction to statistical mechanics and ensemble methods, and an introduction to molecular dynamics, Brownian dynamics, and Monte Carlo simulations. The course will also cover elements of advanced sampling techniques, including parallel tempering, umbrella sampling, and other common biased sampling approaches. Course work or research experience is strongly recommended in: (1) elementary programming (e.g., C or C++), and (2) physical chemistry or thermodynamics.

Instructor(s): Juan de Pablo, Giulia Galli     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MATH 20000 and MATH 20100 or MATH 22000 or PHYS 22100
Equivalent Course(s): MENG 34100

MENG 24200. Selected Topics in Molecular Engineering: Molecular/Materials Modelling II. 100 Units.

This course provides a continuation of the topics covered in Molecular Modelling I. It seeks to introduce students to electronic structure methods for modelling molecular and condensed systems. The topics covered will include an introduction to quantum mechanical descriptions of ground and excited state properties of molecules and solids. The course will focus on simulations based on the numerical solution of the Schrödinger equation using different approximations, including wavefunctions methods (e.g., Hartree Fock), and density functional theory, and various integration techniques and basis sets.

Instructor(s): Giulia Galli, Juan de Pablo     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MENG 24100
Equivalent Course(s): MENG 34200

MENG 24300. Selected Topics in Molecular Engineering: The Engineering and Biology of Tissue Repair. 100 Units.

In this course, students will gain an understanding of the science and application of tissue engineering, a field that seeks to develop technologies for restoring lost function in diseased or damaged tissues and organs. The course will first introduce the underlying cellular and molecular components and processes relevant to tissue engineering: extracellular matrices, cell/matrix interactions such as adhesion and migration, growth factor biology, stem cell biology, inflammation, and innate immunity. The course will then discuss current approaches for engineering a variety of tissues, including bone and musculoskeletal tissues, vascular tissues, skin, nerve, and pancreas. Students will be assessed through in-class discussions, take-home assignments and exams, and an end-of-term project on a topic of the student’s choice.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Hubbell     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the first three quarters of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals Sequence
Equivalent Course(s): BIOS 21507

MENG 24310. Cellular Engineering. 100 Units.

Cellular engineering is a field that studies cell and molecule structure-function relationships. It is the development and application of engineering approaches and technologies to biological molecules and cells. This course is intended to be a bridge between engineers and biologists, to quantitatively study cells and molecules and develop future clinical applications.  Topics include “Fundamental Cell & Molecular Biology”, “Immunology and Biochemistry, Receptors, ligands and their interactions”, “Nanotechnology/biomechanics”, “Enzyme kinetics”, “Molecular probes”, “Cellular and molecular imaging”, “Single-cell genomics and proteomics”, “Genetic and protein engineering”, and “Drug delivery & gene delivery”.

Instructor(s): Jun Huang     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): MENG 34310

MENG 25000. Introduction to the Design Process. 100 Units.

Design is as much a way of thinking as it is a process for creating anything new. This course introduces design methods for the early-stage of an innovation process. It will cover problem framing, contextual and user research, mining qualitative information for insights and unmet needs, concept generation, prototyping, and communications for innovation. Classes will be a combination of lectures, hands-on learning, and a quarter-long design project focused on a real-world challenge.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MENG 20000 and completion of the general education requirements in mathematics and physical or biological sciences.

MENG 26010. Engineering Principles of Conservation. 100 Units.

This course is a precursor to both the thermodynamics and transport sequences. Students will be introduced to the mathematical framework of Reynold’s transport theorem from a general perspective and in different forms (algebraic, integral and differential), and apply that framework to a wide variety of problems that involve changes in mass, energy, and momentum. Using scaling approximations and dimensional analysis to obtain an intuitive understanding of the mathematical framework will also be emphasized throughout. These concepts will then be carried over to, and reinforced in, the transport and thermodynamics courses that follow sequentially.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MATH 20100, 20500 or PHYS 22100, plus CHEM 11300 or PHYS 13300

MENG 26020. Engineering Electrodynamics. 100 Units.

This is an advanced course in electromagnetism with an engineering focus. Requires good preparation in freshman-level, calculus-based, electrostatics and magnetostatics; also preparation in vector calculus.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 13300 or PHYS 14300 and MATH 20100 or PHYS 22100 or concurrent enrollment in MATH 20500 or MATH 20900.

MENG 26030. Introduction to Engineering Analysis. 100 Units.

This course will expose students to enabling numerical algorithms and computational methods for molecular engineering. These include solution of systems of linear and non-linear systems of equations, general minimization techniques, and optimization strategies. They also include finite-difference and finite-element methods for numerical treatment of time-dependent differential equations encountered in engineering problems such as mass, momentum, or energy transport across different classes of materials. Students will also be exposed to introductory techniques used to simulate fluids and materials by relying on quantum-mechanical and classical molecular-level descriptions of matter.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): MENG 26010 or MENG 26020

MENG 26101-26102. Transport Phenomena I: Forces + Flows; Transport Phenomena II.

The sequence will expose students to basic topics in continuum mechanics, with a focus on momentum transfer (part I) and energy and mass transfer (part II)

MENG 26101. Transport Phenomena I: Forces and Flows. 100 Units.

This course will expose students to basic topics in continuum mechanics, with a focus on momentum transfer. Course topics include an overview of tensor mathematics, forces and inertia, Bernoulli’s Equation, Navier-Stokes Equations, and standard examples of Navier-Stokes flows, including Poiseuille flow, falling films, and flow around a sphere. For each of these topics, examples will be provided with dimensionless and scaling analysis to accompany problem solution. Analysis will include computation of approximate solutions, determination of when an approximate solution is adequate and, given the assumptions made, what the limitations of any solution are. Laboratory exercises in microfluidics will be included.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): MENG 26010

MENG 26102. Transport Phenomena II. 100 Units.

This course will expose students to basic topics in continuum mechanics, with a focus on energy and mass transfer. Course topics include and overview of the physical and mathematical basis of Diffusion, Fick’s law and definition of fluxes for description in the form of differential equations, a reminder of the Reynolds Transport Theorem and differential forms for mass and energy transfer, mass balances in non-reacting systems (with multiple examples), mass balances with chemical reactions, energy balances, and combined energy and mass balances with chemical reactions. Laboratory exercises in microfluidics will be included.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MENG 26101

MENG 26201-26202. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I-II.

This sequence covers Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics.

MENG 26201. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics I. 100 Units.

This course will include an introduction to postulates of thermodynamics, thermodynamic properties of pure substances, and engineering applications relying on thermodynamic cycles (including engines, heat pumps, and refrigeration). An introduction to statistical mechanics and its connection to molecular thermodynamics will also be included among the course topics.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MENG 26030

MENG 26202. Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics II. 100 Units.

This course will address the thermodynamics of mixtures. It will include an introduction to phase transformations in mixtures and engineering applications (including separation processes), an introduction to molecular models and simple statistical mechanical theories of mixtures, and prediction of thermodynamic properties from molecular models.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MENG 26201

MENG 27100. Biological Materials. 100 Units.

In this course, students will gain an understanding of the science and application of biomaterials, a field that utilizes fundamental principles of materials science with cell biology for applications in therapeutics and diagnostics. The course will introduce the basic classes of biomaterials, considering metals used in medicine, ceramic and biological inorganic materials such as hydroxyapatite, and polymers used in medicine. The basis of protein adsorption modulating biological interactions with these materials will be elaborated. Examples to be covered in the course will include polymers used in drug delivery, polymers used in protein therapeutics, polymers used in degradable biomaterial implants, polymers used in biodiagnostics, and hybrid and polymeric nanomaterials used as bioactives and bioactive carriers. An emphasis in the course will be placed on bioactive materials development. Students will be assessed through in-class discussions, take-home assignments and exams, and an end-of-term project on a topic of the student’s choice.

Terms Offered: TBD. Not offered 2016-17
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must have completed BIOS 20186 and BIOS 20187.
Equivalent Course(s): BIOS 29328

MENG 27200. Quantum Materials. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: TBD. Not offered 2016-17
Prerequisite(s): MENG 26030 and PHYS 13300

MENG 27300. Polymer Physics and Engineering. 100 Units.

This course is an advanced introduction to polymer physics and engineering taught at a level suitable for senior undergraduates and graduate students in STEM fields. Topics that will be covered include the statistics and conformations of linear chain molecules, thermodynamics and dynamics of polymers, polymer blends and polymer solutions, phase equilibria, networks, gels, and rubber elasticity, linear viscoelasticity, thermal and mechanical properties. A laboratory component will supplement the lectures.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 19700 or CHEM 26100 (or concurrent registration)

MENG 29500. Engineering Design. 300 Units.

This 300 unit “immersion” design course teaches students how to bring combinations of the fundamental science and engineering pieces of the curriculum together to solve open-ended and challenging engineering problems. It also serves as a vehicle to teach other equally important non-technical skills.

Terms Offered: Winter. Offered 2017-18.
Prerequisite(s): MENG 26202 and MENG 29501

MENG 29501. Undergraduate Research Colloquium. 000 Units.

Required research colloquium for all 4th year Molecular Engineering majors. Meeting once per week, colloquium topics will include problem identification and exploration, experimental design, data analysis, project planning, professional and ethical responsibilities in scientific research, and the impact of engineering solutions in a societal context.

Terms Offered: Autumn

MENG 29600. Practice of Research. 100 Units.

Through lectures and discussions, this course provides experience in pursuing academic and industrial careers within science and engineering. Course components include proposal development, funding opportunities, publication and peer review, effective presentations, intellectual property, ethics, evolution of ideas to products, venture funding and partnership. Recommended to be taken concurrently with MENG 29700 Undergraduate Research in Molecular Engineering.

Instructor(s): David Awschalom     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MENG 29700 or Concurrent

MENG 29700. Undergraduate Research for Molecular Engineering. 100 Units.

IME faculty will offer one-quarter research experiences for all students enrolled in the minor. A quality grade will be given based on performance in this course. In order to assign a quality grade, an agreement between the sponsoring IME faculty member and each student will be made that includes: (1) the content and scope of the project, (2) expectations for time commitment, (3) a well-defined work plan with timelines for particular experiments or calculations to be accomplished (in a true research experience of the sort we intend to offer, of course, timelines for results can’t be constructed in advance), and (4) a summary of academic goals—such as demonstrating knowledge of the literature and developing communication skills (e.g., though presentations at group meetings).

Instructor(s): IME Faculty     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Faculty Consent
Note(s): If a student cannot engage an IME faculty research sponsor on their own, the student should consult with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, Institute for Molecular Engineering, Professor Paul Nealey.


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contacts

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Paul Nealey
ERC 229
773-702-9143
Email

Biology Track
Melody Swartz


Email

Chemical & Soft Materials Track
Mark Stoykovich


Email


Quantum Track


Email