Contacts | Program of Study | Forms | Grading | Timeline | Program Requirements | Summary of Requirements | Honors | Minor Program in South Asian Languages and Civilizations | Summary of Requirements for the Minor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations | SALC Language Courses | Courses

Department Website: http://salc.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The Department of South Asian Languages and Civilizations (SALC) offers an undergraduate major leading to a BA in the Humanities Collegiate Division. The social sciences are integrated into our program through the civilization sequence, and courses in the social sciences and religious studies are usually included in a student's program of study. Students majoring in SALC will gain a broad knowledge of the literature and history of the South Asian subcontinent (i.e., Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka), and proficiency in at least one South Asian language that is equivalent to one year of study or more. Students currently can study Bangla (Bengali), Hindi, Malayalam, Marathi, Pali, Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu, Tibetan, or Urdu. As part of their course of study, students are encouraged to participate in a study abroad program in South Asia, such as the South Asian Civilizations in India sequence (Pune program). The SALC curriculum will develop the student's skills in formulating analyses of various types of texts (i.e., historical, literary, filmic), and students will also engage with social scientific approaches to South Asian cultures. The thorough area knowledge of South Asian arts, culture, history, and politics, and the critical and linguistic skills developed through the SALC degree may prepare a student for any number of careers.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in SALC. Information on the minor follows the description of the major below.

Forms

Students who intend to join the SALC undergraduate program should fill out the appropriate form below and schedule a meeting with the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies. Additional information about the timeline for completing these forms can be found in the corresponding section below.

Major form: http://salc.uchicago.edu/sites/salc.uchicago.edu/files/SALC_majorform.pdf

Honors form: http://salc.uchicago.edu/sites/salc.uchicago.edu/files/SALC_honorsform.pdf

Minor form: http://salc.uchicago.edu/sites/salc.uchicago.edu/files/SALC_minorform.pdf

Grading

Students pursuing a major or minor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations must take a quality grade in all courses used to meet department requirements. More than half of the requirements must be met by courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Timeline

First and Second Year

  • Contact SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies and collect the form for intended minor/major.
  • Start taking language, South Asia civilization, and other introductory classes.

Third Year

  • Winter Quarter: If pursuing honors in SALC, find SALC faculty member who will act as your BA adviser to begin discussion of a research topic and schedule reading courses to be taken in the Autumn–Winter Quarters of the fourth year (SALC 29800-29801 BA Paper).

Fourth Year

  • Autumn Quarter: Update form for departmental records. Submit a copy of the finalized form to your College adviser.
  • Autumn-Winter Quarters: Take reading courses with SALC BA adviser.
  • Spring Quarter: First week, submission of the BA thesis.

Program Requirements

Ideally, students will begin their study with the two-quarter sequence SALC 20100-20200 Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II. All SALC majors must take this sequence or the equivalent program taught in Pune, SOSC 23004-23005 South Asian Civilizations in India I-II. If this sequence is not used to satisfy the civilization studies general education requirement, then it will count toward the major.

The major requires three courses in a South Asian language at the second-year level or above. These courses must be taken at the University of Chicago, and credit cannot be granted by examination. Students with prior knowledge of one or the languages offered by SALC may take a placement test in order to determine the right level for them to enroll. The College's language competency requirement may be satisfied by demonstrated proficiency equivalent to one year of study of a South Asian language offered through SALC.

Students are also required to take six courses related to South Asia. In addition to SALC offerings, courses with significant South Asian content that originate in other departments may be eligible, subject to the approval of the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies. Three of these six courses may be language courses, either further courses in the same language or courses in another South Asian language. Students should choose courses in consultation with the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies and fill out a form indicating what they intend to list for their major requirements.

Summary of Requirements

One of the following two-quarter sequences: *200
Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II
South Asian Civilizations in India I-II
Three courses in a South Asian language at second-year level or above **300
Six courses related to South Asia ***600
Total Units1100
*

All SALC majors must take one of these two sequences. If the sequence is being used to satisfy the general education requirement in civilization studies, two additional courses related to South Asia must be substituted into the major.

**

Credit may not be granted by examination. Courses must be taken at the University of Chicago.

***

May include SALC 29801 BA PaperSOSC 23006 South Asian Civilizations in India III, and up to three additional language courses (either further study in the same language or courses in another South Asian language). Courses from other departments with significant South Asian content require approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Sample Major Programs

The following groups of courses would comprise a major.

I. Emphasis on language(s)
SALC 20100-20200Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II200
TBTN 20100-20200-20300Second-Year Tibetan I-II-III300
ANTH 25500Cultural Politics of Contemporary India100
SALC 20800Music of South Asia100
SALC 28700The State in India100
URDU 10100-10200-10300First-Year Urdu I-II-III300
Total Units1100
II. Emphasis on civilization
SALC 20100-20200Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II200
BANG 30100-30200-30300Third-Year Bangla (Bengali) I-II-III300
ANTH 21401Logic and Practice of Archaeology100
SALC 20400The Mahabharata in English Translation100
SALC 20901
  &  20902
Indian Philosophy I: Origins and Orientations
   and Indian Philosophy II: The Classical Traditions
200
SALC 25302Slavery in South Asia100
SALC 23104Problems in the Study of Gender: Gender, Citizenship, Violence100
Total Units1100

Honors

To be eligible for honors, students must:

  1. maintain an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher
  2. maintain a GPA of 3.3 or higher in courses satisfying major requirements
  3. complete a BA thesis of superior quality

In order to be eligible to write a BA thesis in SALC, students must meet the civilization studies sequence and language requirements by the end of their third year. By then, they must also have completed the honors form and returned it to the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies. In Winter Quarter of their third year, the student will arrange to work with a SALC faculty member for the Autumn and Winter Quarters of the following year. It is the student's responsibility to find and make an arrangement with an appropriate faculty member who will be in residence during the student's fourth year. In consultation with the BA thesis adviser, the student must also suggest the name of a faculty member who will act as a second reader.

Students will research, discuss, and write the BA thesis in the context of SALC 29800-29801 BA Paper, for which they will register in the Autumn and Winter Quarters of their fourth year. Students may use SALC 29801 as one of their six content courses in the major. SALC 29800 will be for general elective credit only.

Two hard copies of the thesis must be submitted to the SALC departmental office, and a PDF version must be sent electronically to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The deadline for the submission of the thesis is Friday at 5 p.m. in the first week of Spring Quarter.

Minor Program in South Asian Languages and Civilizations

The minor program in South Asian Languages and Civilizations requires a total of seven or six courses, broken down into three categories.

Civilization Studies

All students in the minor are required to take two quarters of SALC 20100-20200 Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II or SOSC 23004-23005 South Asian Civilizations in India I-II (taught in Pune). These two quarters will count toward either the general education requirement in civilization studies or the minor itself. If SALC 20100-20200 Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II or SOSC 23004-23005 South Asian Civilizations in India I-II are not used to meet the general education requirement, both courses in the sequence must be included in the minor, for a total of seven courses. If they are counting toward the general education requirement instead, students must seek approval from the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies to fulfill the requirement in the minor with one additional course related to South Asian civilizations, for a total of six courses.

Language

Three courses in a South Asian language at any level. Credit may not be granted by examination.

Electives

Two additional courses that may either be (a) listed as SALC courses or as one of the SALC languages (e.g., Bangla, Hindi, etc.), or (b) courses focused on South Asia that originate in other departments (subject to the approval of the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies).

Students choose courses in consultation with the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Summary of Requirements for the Minor in South Asian Languages and Civilizations

One of the following two-quarter sequences: *200
Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II
South Asian Civilizations in India I-II
Three courses in a South Asian language at any level **300
Two courses related to South Asia ***200
Total Units700
*

All students in the minor are required to take one of these two-quarter sequences. Students using one of the sequences to satisfy the general education requirement in civilization studies may not also use it toward the minor. In that case, students must seek approval from the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies to fulfill the requirement in the minor with one additional course related to South Asian civilizations, for a total of six courses.

**

Credit may not be granted by examination. Courses must be taken at the University of Chicago.

***

Two additional courses that may either be (a) listed as SALC courses or as one of the SALC languages (e.g., Bangla, Hindi, etc.), or (b) courses focused on South Asia that originate in other departments (subject to the approval of the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies).

Students must receive the approval of the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies on a form obtained from their College adviser and return it by the Spring Quarter of their third year. Students must also indicate their intent to minor in SALC with a form obtained from the SALC Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Courses in the minor (1) may not be counted double with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted double toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

SALC Sample Minors

The following groups of courses would comprise a minor.

I. Seven-Course SALC Sample Minor

SALC 20100-20200Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II200
TAML 20100-20200-20300Second-Year Tamil I-II-III300
SALC 27701Mughal India: Tradition and Transition100
SALC 23000Gender Critique to Gay Marriage: South Asian Texts & Events100
Total Units700

II. Six-Course SALC Sample Minor

SALC 20700Critics of Colonialism100
BANG 10100-10200-10300First-Year Bangla (Bengali) I-II-III300
SALC 20701Postcolonial Theory100
SALC 23900Philosophical Education in Indo-Tibetan Buddhism100
Total Units600

Pune Program: SOSC 23004-23005-23006 South Asian Civilizations in India I-II-III

One of the College's study abroad programs that meet the general education requirement in civilization studies, the Autumn Quarter program in Pune (Poona) is devoted to the study of South Asian history and culture. It is built upon a three-course civilizations sequence examining the history, culture, and society of the South Asian subcontinent through course work, field studies, and direct experience. During the first seven weeks of the quarter, the program will be based in the city of Pune, where students will complete two courses and participate in expeditions to nearby cultural and historical sites.

Students participating in the Pune Program receive three credits for the civilizations sequence, which meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students who have already met the civilization studies requirement may use these SALC credits as electives. Two South Asian civilizations courses are required for students in the major or minor, as described above. The additional civilizations course, SOSC 23006 South Asian Civilizations in India III, can be used toward other SALC requirements. Course titles, units of credit, and grades will be placed on the Chicago transcript.

In addition to the civilizations sequence, students take a fourth course in Hindi during the first seven weeks of the quarter. For students with no prior experience in South Asian languages, this course is designed to facilitate their access to local culture and to provide a basis for further study. Advanced sections will be held for those students with prior course work or experience in Hindi.

Pune is a city of some four million inhabitants, situated on the eastern foothills of the Indian western coastal mountains, or ghats, about 100 miles southeast of Mumbai. Labeled famously by India's first prime minister, Jawaharlal Nehru, as "the Oxford and Cambridge of India," it is a major center for Indian art, religion, and higher education, and an ideal site for cultural immersion.

For further details, consult the Study Abroad website (study-abroad.uchicago.edu/programs/pune-south-asian-civilization-india). For more information about this and other study abroad programs, contact Lauren Schneider, Pune Project Coordinator, at lschneider12@uchicago.edu. For information on other study abroad programs in South Asia, contact the SALC undergraduate adviser.

SALC Language Courses

SALC language courses at all levels are open to undergraduates. Additional advanced courses in all SALC languages are also offered, either on a regular basis or by arrangement with the instructors.

Graduate-Level Language Courses

Graduate-level language courses that may be open to qualified undergraduates can be found in the Graduate Announcements.

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Bangla Courses

BANG 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Bangla (Bengali) I-II-III.

This sequence concentrates on developing skills in speaking, listening, reading and writing Bangla at the novice and intermediate low levels. It is designed both for scholars who want to do research on Bengal and for those who want to gain proficiency in elementary Bangla for communication purposes. Evaluation will be based on classroom performance, attendance, homework assignments, projects, quizzes and final examination.

BANG 10100. First-Year Bangla (Bengali) I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

BANG 10200. First-Year Bangla (Bengali) II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BANG 10100 or consent of instructor

BANG 10300. First-Year Bangla (Bengali) III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BANG 10200 or consent of instructor

BANG 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Bangla (Bengali) I-II-III.

This sequence is a continuation of First-Year Bangla and aims at gaining intermediate high proficiency in the language. Students who have prior knowledge of elementary Bengali can join the course. The course concentrates equally on speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. At the end of the course the learner is supposed to have a command of Bengali language and culture that allows him/her to communicate with native speakers with ease. He/she will have sufficient reading abilities to comprehend non-technical modern texts. Evaluation will be based on classroom performance, homework assignments, projects, tests, and final examination.

BANG 20100. Second-Year Bangla (Bengali) I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BANG 10300 or consent of instructor

BANG 20200. Second-Year Bangla (Bengali) II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BANG 20100 or consent of instructor

BANG 20300. Second-Year Bangla (Bengali) III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BANG 20200 or consent of instructor

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Hindi Courses

HIND 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Hindi I-II-III.

This five-day-a-week sequence presents an introduction to the world’s second most spoken language through reading, writing, listening, memorizing, and speaking. We begin with the Devanagari script, and we then introduce the Urdu script in Winter Quarter.

HIND 10100. First-Year Hindi I. 100 Units.

This five-day-a-week introductory sequence presents a dynamic, fun, and lively introduction to the world’s second most spoken language through intensive conversation, reading, writing, and listening. No prior Hindi knowledge necessary.

Instructor(s): J. Grunebaum     Terms Offered: Autumn

HIND 10200. First-Year Hindi II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): J. Grunebaum     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIND 10100 or consent of instructor

HIND 10300. First-Year Hindi III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): J. Grunebaum     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIND 10200 or consent of instructor

HIND 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Hindi I-II-III.

This intermediate Hindi sequence presupposes knowledge of the basic grammar of Hindi and requires substantial reading and translating of Hindi prose, alongside exposure to advanced Hindi grammar topics. Regular attention is given to conversation and composition. Texts in Hindi.

HIND 20100. Second-Year Hindi I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): J. Grunebaum     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HIND 10300 or consent of instructor

HIND 20200. Second-Year Hindi II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIND 20100 or consent of instructor

HIND 20300. Second-Year Hindi III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): J. Grunebaum     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIND 20200 or consent of instructor

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Marathi Courses

MARA 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Marathi I-II-III.

This sequence follows the textbook Marathi in Context (with its online supplement Marathi Online) in its focus on developing the basic skills—comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing—of Marathi language use. It covers all the fundamentals of Marathi grammar, but only as they are encountered in context, within a wide array of social and conversational “situations.”

MARA 10100. First-Year Marathi I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom     Terms Offered: Autumn

MARA 10200. First-Year Marathi II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MARA 10100 or consent of instructor

MARA 10300. First-Year Marathi III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MARA 10200 or consent of instructor

MARA 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Marathi I-II-III.

This sequence significantly extends both the breadth and the depth of the social and conversational situations introduced in the first year and includes numerous readings, largely from An Intermediate Marathi Reader. It covers all the grammar required for reading most kinds of modern Marathi prose texts.

MARA 20100. Second-Year Marathi I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): MARA 10300 or consent of instructor

MARA 20200. Second-Year Marathi II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MARA 20100 or consent of instructor

MARA 20300. Second-Year Marathi III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): P. Engblom     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MARA 20200 or consent of instructor

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Pali Courses

PALI 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Pali I-II-III.

This sequence introduces the language of the Theravada Buddhist tradition. Essentials of grammar are emphasized, with readings in simpler texts by the end of the first quarter.

PALI 10100. First-Year Pali I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18

PALI 10200. First-Year Pali II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18
Prerequisite(s): PALI 10100 or consent of instructor

PALI 10300. First-Year Pali III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18
Prerequisite(s): PALI 10200 or consent of instructor

PALI 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Pali I-II-III.

Students in this intermediate Pali sequence read Pali texts that are chosen in accordance with their interests. The texts read in the introductory course are usually taken from a single, early stratum of Pali literature. The intermediate course takes examples of Pali from different periods and in different styles. Texts in Pali.

PALI 20100. Second-Year Pali I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PALI 10300 or consent of instructor

PALI 20200. Second-Year Pali II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PALI 20100 or consent of instructor

PALI 20300. Second-Year Pali III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18
Prerequisite(s): PALI 20200 or consent of instructor

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Sanskrit Courses

SANS 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Sanskrit I-II-III.

The first half (about fifteen weeks) of this sequence is spent mastering the reading and writing of the Devanagari script and studying the grammar of the classical Sanskrit language. The remainder of the sequence is devoted to close analytical reading of simple Sanskrit texts, which are used to reinforce the grammatical study done in the first half of this course. The aim is to bring students to the point where they are comfortably able, with the help of a dictionary, to read simple, narrative Sanskrit. Texts in Sanskrit.

SANS 10100. First-Year Sanskrit I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

SANS 10200. First-Year Sanskrit II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SANS 10100 or consent of instructor

SANS 10300. First-Year Sanskrit III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SANS 10200 or consent of instructor

SANS 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Sanskrit I-II-III.

This sequence begins with a rapid review of grammar learned in the introductory course, followed by readings from a variety of Sanskrit texts. The goals are to consolidate grammatical knowledge, expand vocabulary, and gain confidence in reading different styles of Sanskrit independently.

SANS 20100. Second-Year Sanskrit I. 100 Units.

The intermediate-level Sanskrit sequence will equip students to apply the core grammar concepts that they learned in the introductory course to selected narrative, poetic, dramatic, philosophical, and scholastic texts in Sanskrit. In-class activities and selected assignments that develop skills in writing, speaking, listening, and vocabulary retention will support students’ success in reading the text(s) at hand. Students will expand their abilities to apply grammar concepts by bringing increased attention to syntax and morphology. Students will be able to identify major poetic meters. Students will begin to build the skills that they will need to make use of Sanskrit commentarial works. As a whole, the sequence in Intermediate Sanskrit will prepare students to read and analyze Sanskrit texts in a range of literary styles at the advanced level, and to do so with confidence. Prerequisite(s): SANS 10300 or consent of instructor. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SANS 10300 or consent of instructor

SANS 20200. Second-Year Sanskrit II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): W. Doniger     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SANS 20100 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 36000,SALC 48400

SANS 20300. Second-Year Sanskrit III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SANS 20200 or consent of instructor

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - South Asian Languages & Civilizations Courses

SALC 20100-20200. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II.

This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

SALC 20100. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I. 100 Units.

The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia’s early encounters with Europe.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000

SALC 20200. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II. 100 Units.

The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India.

Instructor(s): D. Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SALC 20100,ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24102,HIST 10900,SASC 20100,SOSC 23100

SALC 20702. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24003,HIST 18303,SOSC 24003,CRES 24003

SALC 20900. Cultural Politics of Contemporary India. 100 Units.

Structured as a close-reading seminar, this class offers an anthropological immersion in the cultural politics of urban India today. A guiding thread in the readings is the question of the ideologies and somatics of shifting "middle class" formations; and their articulation through violence, gender, consumerism, religion, and technoscience.

Instructor(s): W. Mazzarella     Terms Offered: TBD
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 42600,SALC 30900,ANTH 25500

SALC 22603. Intro to Premodern South Asian Lit: Courts, Poets, Power. 100 Units.

The Indian subcontinent and the surrounding areas were home to some of the most vibrant literary traditions in world history. The aim of this course is to introduce students to the main trends in the premodern (pre-nineteenth century) literatures of South Asia through a selection of texts translated from a variety of languages (Bengali, Hindi, Marathi, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, etc.). We will discuss issues of literary historiography, the relations between orality and writing, the basic principles of Dravidian, Sanskrit, and Perso-Arabic poetics, the formation of vernacular literary traditions, multilingual literacy, and the role of literature in social interactions and community building in premodern South Asia. Each reading will thus be framed by the systematic exploration of those poetic systems and a close reading of representative texts. Attention will also be given to the original languages in which those texts were composed. The course offers a comprehensive and critical introduction to major non-western knowledge systems and aesthetic theories.

Instructor(s): T. D'Hubert     Terms Offered: Autumn

SALC 23700. How to Do Things with South Asian Texts? Literary Theories. 100 Units.

This course provides an overview of different methods, approaches and themes currently prevalent in the study of South Asian texts from various periods. Topics covered will include translation (theory and practice), book history, literary history, textual criticism, genre theory (the novel in South Asia), literature and colonialism, cultural mobility studies (Greenblatt) and comparative literature/new philologies (Spivak, Ette). Readings will include work by George Steiner, Sheldon Pollock, Meenakshi Mukherjee, Terry Eagleton, Stephen Greenblatt, Gayatri Spivak, Ottmar Ette, and others. We will discuss these different approaches with particular reference to the texts with which participating students are working for their various projects. Students interested in both pre-modern and modern/contemporary texts are welcome. While the course is organized primarily from a literary studies perspective, it will also be of interest to students of history, anthropology and other disciplines dealing with “texts”. The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students (no prior knowledge of literary theory or South Asian writing is assumed).

Instructor(s): Sascha Ebeling     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 33700

SALC 25306. Sex and Censorship in South Asia. 100 Units.

There have been many exceptional moments of political intolerance and censorship in South Asia in the last two decades. Bloggers have been murdered in Bangladesh, student activists have been arrested on university campuses across India, books have been banned, theaters and galleries have been vandalized, couples have been attacked across the country on Valentine’s Day as sexuality is supposedly foreign to “Indian Culture”, the Indian judiciary has refused to strike down Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which leaves homosexuality as a criminal activity that is constantly censored in film and literature. Restrictions on speech are a feature of democracies everywhere, from persecuting whistle-blowers in the US, to ban on religious symbols in France, to restrictions on Twitter in Turkey. What sets the South Asian experience apart? This introductory course will interrogate how a nexus of concerns about power, religion and sex, originating in the colonial experience, has shaped the particular dynamics of censorship in South Asia. By looking at a long history of banning and prohibition, we will also examine how censorship has molded South Asian cultural and political lives.

Instructor(s): Ahona Panda     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course should be of interest to students of gender and sexuality studies, cinema and media studies, literature, history, politics, human rights, anthropology and modern South Asian history and culture. It should also appeal to those interested in the past and present of law, censorship and democracy in the Non-West. Students at all stages of undergraduate study are encouraged to take this introductory course.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26710,GNSE 25306-01,HREL 35306

SALC 25310. Extinction/Disaster/Dystopias:Environment/Ecology in Mod India. 100 Units.

This course aims to provide students interested in South Asia (Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Maldives, Pakistan, Nepal and Sri Lanka) an overview of key environmental and ecological issues in the subcontinent. We will investigate the ways the environment, ecology and culture of this region have interacted with pre-colonial, colonial and national histories to shape the peculiar nature of environmental issues. Students will be introduced to these issues via the narrative and disciplinary resources that South Asian studies more broadly provide. Given the time constraint of 10 weeks we will consider three major concepts—“extinction”, “disaster” and “dystopia” to see how they can be used to frame issues of environmental and ecological concern. We will approach each concept as a framing device for issues such as conservation and preservation of wildlife, erasure of adivasi (indigenous) ways of life, environmental justice, water scarcity and climate change. The course will aim to develop students’ ability to assess the specificity of these concepts in different disciplines. For example: What methods and sources will an environmental historian use to write about wildlife? How does this differ from the approach an ecologist or literary writer might take? Students will analyze various textual forms: both literary and visual, such as autobiographies of shikaris (hunters), graphic novels, photographs, documentary films, ethnographic accounts and, histories.

Instructor(s): Joya John     Terms Offered: Winter

SALC 25311. The Harem: Gender, Family and Power in Early Modern and Modern. 100 Units.

Even today, the word “harem” evokes orientalist imaginings of an exotic east. Popular images drawn from colonial-era representations continue to define our understanding of this complex institution. In this course we will work to complicate this understanding through considering the harem as a site of interplay between gender, family ties, and power. Taking into account influences from the larger Islamicate world as well as more local, Indic practices, we will historicize the harem, tracking its changes over the course of this long period, and critiquing its various (mis)representations. We will explore how the harem constituted a diverse space including not only elite women and their male relatives, but also other figures such as slave girls, eunuchs and guards. We will furthermore look at how this space was transformed in the era of European expansionism and colonial rule in the subcontinent, becoming a flash point over questions of social reform and Indian nationalism. Materials will include not just secondary literature but also excerpts from contemporary historical accounts, paintings, short stories, photographs, and films. No prior knowledge of South Asian history required.

Instructor(s): Emma Kalb     Terms Offered: Winter

SALC 27701. Mughal India: Tradition and Transition. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is on the period of Mughal rule during the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, especially on selected issues that have been at the center of historiographical debate in the past decades.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing or consent of instructor. Prior knowledge of appropriate history and secondary literature required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26602,HIST 36602,SALC 37701

SALC 27904. Wives, Widows, Prostitutes: Indian Lit & the Women's Question. 100 Units.

From the early 19th century onward, the debate on the status of Indian women was an integral part of the discourse on the state of civilization, Hindu tradition, and social reform in colonial India. This course will explore how Indian authors of the late 19th and early 20th centuries engaged with the so-called “women’s question.” Caught between middle-class conservatism and the urge for social reform, Hindi and Urdu writers addressed controversial issues such as female education, child marriage, widow remarriage, and prostitution in their fictional and discursive writings. We will explore the tensions of a literary and social agenda that advocated the ‘uplift’ of women as a necessary precondition for the progress of the nation, while also expressing patriarchal fears about women’s rights and freedom. The course is open to both undergraduate and graduate students. Basic knowledge of Hindi and/or Urdu is preferable, but not required. We will read works by Nazir Ahmad, Premcand, Jainendra Kumar, Mirza Hadi Ruswa, and Mahadevi Varma in English translation, and also look at texts used in Indian female education at the time.

Instructor(s): U. Stark     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 43800,GNSE 27902,GNSE 47900

SALC 29503. Deccan Days: Exploring South Indian Frontiers. 100 Units.

This SALC seminar, open to both undergraduates and graduate students, attempts a cultural-historical overview of the great Deccan plateau and its major languages, cultures, literary and artistic monuments, and driving historical forces and themes. It follows a broad chronological order but also seeks to juxtapose thematic and generic topics from distinct historical periods. Each class presents at least one major text in translation, keyed to the period and the topics examined. Given the wide scope of Deccani history, the seminar seeks to make good use of expertise in many fields by SALC faculty and can be classed as a Faculty Seminar. 

Instructor(s): David Shulman     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Grades: On the basis of seminar papers and oral presentations.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 39503

SALC 29700. Introduction to Buddhism. 100 Units.

This course will be an introduction to the ideas and meditative practices of the Theravada school of South and Southeast Asian Buddhism, from ancient to modern times. It will study both classical texts and modern ethnography.

Instructor(s): S. Collins     Terms Offered: TBD
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 26150,CHDV 29701

SALC 29800-29801-29802. BA Paper.

Students register for this sequence for two quarters. One quarter is for directed reading; and the second quarter is for writing and submission of the BA paper, which can be credited toward the SALC major requirements.

SALC 29800. BA Paper. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for honors, and consent of faculty supervisor and SALC adviser

SALC 29801. BA Paper. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for honors, and consent of faculty supervisor and SALC adviser

SALC 29802. BA Paper. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Eligibility for honors, and consent of faculty supervisor and SALC adviser

SALC 29900-29901-29902. Informal Reading Course.

This individual reading course with faculty may be used for topics not requiring use of a South Asian language, for independent study, and by nonmajors who wish to explore a South Asian topic.

SALC 29900. Informal Reading Course. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

SALC 29901. Informal Reading Course. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

SALC 29902. Informal Reading Course. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Tamil Courses

TAML 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Tamil I-II-III.

The grammar of modern Tamil, in its manifestation both in colloquial and formal styles, and a good amount of vocabulary needed for referring to the immediate environment and using in day today transactions will be acquired. The four language skills acquired will be at different levels of proficiency with listening and speaking at the top followed by reading of formal texts and ending with basic writing skills in the formal style. The gradual progression in listening will be from teacher–student to speaker-speaker; in speaking it will be from articulation of sounds and intonation to expressing personal needs and interests, performing practical tasks, narrating experience and expressing emotions; in reading it will be from alphabet and spelling in the two styles to sign boards, controlled texts, factual news stories, interpretive reports and jokes; in writing from conversion of colloquial style into conventional style to personal letters, paraphrasing and translation of sentences. The tools used are classroom conversations, conversational tapes, videos, graded print materials, select materials from the print media including tales, which are complemented by exercises and quizzes.

TAML 10100. First-Year Tamil I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Autumn

TAML 10200. First-Year Tamil II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TAML 10100 or consent of instructor

TAML 10300. First-Year Tamil III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TAML 10200 or consent of instructor

TAML 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Tamil I-II-III.

This sequence is structured in a similar fashion as in the first year to develop the higher order of the four language skills. All materials, aural and visual, will be uncontrolled and unedited. The student will be introduced to web sources and dictionaries for self-reference and to using Unicode for writing. The student also will be exposed to dialects to have a taste of them. At the end of the course, the student will be able to converse in Tamil about specific topics of interest, to understand programs in the visual media including lyrics, to ask questions in field work situations, to read and understand texts on current events in newspapers and magazines, to understand and appreciate modern fiction and poetry, to read and understand public communications such as pamphlets, invitations, announcements, advertisements, and public speeches, and to write short essays and reports. If there is interest, web pages will be added to printed pages for reading and email and chat groups will be added for practicing writing.

TAML 20100. Second-Year Tamil I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TAML 10300 or consent of instructor

TAML 20200. Second-Year Tamil II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TAML 20100 or consent of instructor

TAML 20300. Second-Year Tamil III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Annamalai     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TAML 20200 or consent of instructor

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Tibetan Courses

TBTN 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Tibetan I-II-III.

The Tibetan language, with a history going back more than one thousand years, is one of Asia’s major literary languages. At the present time, it is the first language of close to seven million people in Tibet, as well as in India, Nepal, and Bhutan. The textbook is The Manual of Standard Tibetan by Nicolas Tournade and Sangda Dorje. This introductory sequence covers the script and pronunciation, the grammar of the modern Lhasa dialect, as well as basic reading and speaking skills.

TBTN 10100. First-Year Tibetan I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Ngodup     Terms Offered: Autumn

TBTN 10200. First-Year Tibetan II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Ngodup     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 10100 or consent of instructor

TBTN 10300. First-Year Tibetan III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Ngodup     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 10200 or consent of instructor

TBTN 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Tibetan I-II-III.

This intermediate sequence covers second-level pronunciation and grammar of the modern Lhasa dialect, as well as intermediate-level reading and speaking skills.

TBTN 20100. Second-Year Tibetan I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Ngodup     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 10300 or consent of instructor

TBTN 20200. Second-Year Tibetan II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Ngodup     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 20100 or consent of instructor

TBTN 20300. Second-Year Tibetan III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): D. Tomlinson     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TBTN 20200 or consent of instructor

South Asian Languages & Civilizations - Urdu Courses

URDU 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Urdu I-II-III.

These courses must be taken in sequence. This three-quarter sequence covers basic grammar and vocabulary. Spoken by thirty-five million people in South Asia, Urdu is the national language of Pakistan and one of the official languages of India. Our text is C. M. Naim’s Introductory Urdu, Volumes I and II. Students learn to read and write the Urdu script, as well as to compose/write in Urdu. We also emphasize aural and oral skills (i.e., listening, pronunciation, speaking). These courses must be taken in sequence. Prospective students should contact the instructor, Elena Bashir.

URDU 10100. First-Year Urdu I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Bashir     Terms Offered: Autumn

URDU 10200. First-Year Urdu II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Bashir     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): URDU 10100 or consent of instructor

URDU 10300. First-Year Urdu III. 100 Units.

Spoken by over thirty-five million people in South Asia, Urdu is the national language of Pakistan and one of the official languages of India. It is written in the Perso-Arabic script, which facilitates learning to read and write several other South Asian languages. This three-quarter sequence covers basic grammar and vocabulary. Our text is C. M. Naim’s Introductory Urdu, Volumes I and II. Students learn to read and write the Urdu script, as well as to compose/write in Urdu. By the end of three quarters students have covered all the major grammatical structures of the language. We also emphasize aural and oral skills (i.e., listening, pronunciation, speaking). These courses must be taken in sequence, since the script is introduced in the Autumn Quarter. Students should also be aware that they need to contact the instructor ahead of time to discuss scheduling if they are planning to take this course. Prospective students should contact instructor: ebashir@uchicago.edu.

Instructor(s): E. Bashir     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): URDU 10200 or consent of instructor.

URDU 20100-20200-20300. Second-Year Urdu I-II-III.

This sequence is a continuation of URDU 10100-10200-10300. There is increased emphasis on vocabulary building. Depending on ability levels and interests of the students, readings can include selections from various original sources. Prospective students should contact the instructor, Elena Bashir.

URDU 20100. Second-Year Urdu I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Bashir     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): URDU 10300 or consent of instructor

URDU 20200. Second-Year Urdu II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): E. Bashir     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): URDU 20100 or consent of instructor

URDU 20300. Second-Year Urdu III. 100 Units.

This sequence is a continuation of URDU 10100-10200-10300. There is increased emphasis on vocabulary building and reading progressively more complex texts. Depending on ability levels and interests of the students, readings can include selections from various original sources. Prospective students should contact instructor: ebashir@uchicago.edu.

Instructor(s): E. Bashir     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): URDU 20200 or consent of instructor.


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Tyler Williams


Email

Administrative Contact

Department Administrator
Tracy L. Davis
F 212
773.702.8373
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