Contacts | Philosophy Undergraduate Wiki | Program of Study | Program Requirements | The Standard Major | The Intensive Track | Philosophy and Allied Fields | Grading | Honors | Transfer Students | Advising | Minor Program in Philosophy | Philosophy Courses

Department Website: http://philosophy.uchicago.edu

Philosophy Undergraduate Wiki

https://wiki.uchicago.edu/display/phildr/Philosophy+Wiki+Home+Page

Email Lists

All majors and minors in philosophy should immediately subscribe to two Department of Philosophy email lists: philugs@lists.uchicago.edu and philosophy@lists.uchicago.edu. These lists are the department’s primary means of disseminating information on the undergraduate program, deadlines, prizes, fellowships, and events. Information on how to subscribe can be found here: https://coral.uchicago.edu:8443/display/phildr/Philosophy+Email+Lists.

Program of Study

Philosophy covers a wide range of historical periods and fields. The BA program in philosophy is intended to acquaint students with some of the classic texts of the discipline and with the different areas of inquiry, as well as to train students in rigorous methods of argument. In addition to the standard major, the department offers two tracks. The intensive track option is for qualified students interested in small group discussions of major philosophical problems and texts. The option in philosophy and allied fields is designed for students who wish to pursue an interdisciplinary program involving philosophy and some other field. All three options are described in the next section.

The course offerings described include both 20000-level courses (normally restricted to College students) and 30000-level courses (open to graduate students and advanced College students). There is room for a good deal of flexibility in individual planning of programs. Most of the requirements allow some choice among options. Course prerequisites may be relaxed with the consent of the instructor, and College students may take 40000- and 50000-level courses (normally restricted to graduate students) under special circumstances. Students should work out their program under the guidance of the director of undergraduate studies.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in Philosophy. Information follows the description of the major.

Program Requirements

All majors will be required to meet with the assistant to the director of undergraduate studies during Winter Quarter of their third year to review their program of study and discuss the possibility of writing the senior essay.

The Standard Major

The following basic requirements for the standard major in philosophy are intended to constitute a core philosophy curriculum and to provide some structure within an extremely varied collection of course offerings that changes from year to year.

The Department of Philosophy offers a three-quarter sequence in the history of philosophy (PHIL 25000 Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1, PHIL 26000 History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy, and PHIL 27000 History of Philosophy III: Kant and the 19th Century), which begins in the first quarter with ancient Greek philosophy and ends in the third quarter with nineteenth-century philosophy. Students are required to take two courses from this sequence (any two are acceptable) and are encouraged to take all three. Students are also encouraged to take these courses early in their program because they make an appropriate introduction to more advanced courses.

Students may bypass PHIL 20100 Elementary Logic for a more advanced course if they can demonstrate to the instructor that they are qualified to begin at a higher level.

Standard majors are welcome to apply to write senior essays. For more information, please see The Senior Essay (below).

Distribution

At least two courses in one of the following two fields and at least one course in the other field: (A) practical philosophy and (B) theoretical philosophy.

Courses that may be counted toward these requirements are indicated in the course descriptions by boldface letters in parentheses. Other courses may not be used to meet field distribution requirements.

Summary of Requirements: Standard Major       

Two of the following:200
Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1
History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
History of Philosophy III: Kant and the 19th Century
PHIL 20100Elementary Logic (or approved alternative course in logic)100
One of the following:300
One from field A and two from field B
Two from field A and one from field B
Four additional courses in philosophy *400
Total Units1000

The Intensive Track

Admission to the intensive track requires an application, which must be submitted by the middle of the Spring Quarter in the student's second year. The application form is on the department wiki. The director of undergraduate studies and the assistant to the director of undergraduate studies will have "interview" meetings following the application deadline. (The departmental website lists the office hours of the director of undergraduate studies and the assistant to the director of undergraduate studies.)

The intensive track is designed to acquaint students with the problems and methods of philosophy in more depth than is possible for students in the standard major. It differs from the standard program mainly by offering the opportunity to meet in the following very small discussion groups: the intensive track seminar in the Autumn Quarter of the third or fourth year (PHIL 29601 Intensive Track Seminar), PHIL 29200 Junior Tutorial, and PHIL 29300 Senior Tutorial.

Note on the pacing and scheduling of the intensive track: Intensive track majors take PHIL 29601 Intensive Track Seminar in Autumn Quarter of their third year. Students fulfill the tutorial requirement by selecting one junior tutorial (PHIL 29200) in any quarter of their third year and one senior tutorial (PHIL 29300) in any quarter of their fourth year. Finally, intensive track students must write a senior essay. The essay process includes participation in the Senior Seminar over the three quarters of their fourth year; students must register for PHIL 29901 Senior Seminar I and PHIL 29902 BA Essay Preparation,Senior Seminar II in two of these three quarters.

Summary of Requirements: Intensive Track

Two of the following:200
Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1
History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
History of Philosophy III: Kant and the 19th Century
PHIL 20100Elementary Logic (or approved alternative course in logic)100
One of the following:300
One from field A and two from field B
Two from field A and one from field B
PHIL 29200Junior Tutorial100
PHIL 29300Senior Tutorial100
PHIL 29601Intensive Track Seminar100
PHIL 29901
  &  29902
Senior Seminar I
   and BA Essay Preparation,Senior Seminar II
200
Two additional courses in philosophy *200
Total Units1300

Philosophy and Allied Fields

This variant of the major is a specialist option for students with a clear and detailed picture of a coherent interdisciplinary course of study, not available under the standard forms of major and minor. Examples of recent programs devised by students electing this track are philosophy and mathematics, philosophy and biology, and philosophy and economics. Students in this program must meet the first three of the basic requirements for the standard major (a total of six courses) and take six additional courses that together constitute a coherent program; at least one of these six additional courses must be in the Department of Philosophy. Students must receive approval for the specific courses they choose to be used as the allied fields courses. Admission to philosophy and allied fields requires an application to the director of undergraduate studies, which should be made by the middle of Spring Quarter of their second year. To apply, students must submit a sample program of courses as well as a statement explaining the nature of the interdisciplinary area of study and the purpose of the proposed allied fields program. Applicants must also have the agreement of a member of the Department of Philosophy to serve as their sponsor in the program. Interested students should consult with the assistant to the director of undergraduate studies before applying; for office hours and the application form, visit the departmental wiki or website.

Summary of Requirements: Philosophy and Allied Fields

Two of the following:200
Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1
History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
History of Philosophy III: Kant and the 19th Century
PHIL 20100Elementary Logic (or approved alternative course in logic)100
One of the following:300
One from field A and two from field B
Two from field A and one from field B
Six additional courses, at least one of which must be in the Department of Philosophy *600
Total Units1200

The Senior Essay

Students who have been admitted to the intensive track are required to write a senior essay (also called the “BA essay”). Standard majors and philosophy and allied fields majors may also apply to write an essay. The proposal should be formulated in consultation with a faculty adviser who has expertise in the topic area. Potential advisers can be approached directly, but the assistant to the director of undergraduate studies can help pair students with suitable advisers as needed. BA essay applications are due middle of Spring Quarter. Applications are available from the shelves outside the Philosophy Department office (Stuart 202) as well as on the wiki.

Students writing a BA essay in philosophy are normally expected to have maintained a GPA of 3.25 in their philosophy courses. A 3.25 is also the minimum GPA for departmental honors in philosophy. Students should submit, along with their application to write a BA essay, a record of their grades in the College. If a student who wishes to write a BA essay in philosophy has a GPA in philosophy courses below 3.25, the student should also submit a petition in writing to the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

In their fourth year, students writing BA essays must participate in the senior seminar. The seminar runs all three quarters, and though attendance during all three is required, participants will only register for two of the three quarters. Students should register for PHIL 29901 Senior Seminar I in Autumn (or Winter) Quarter and for PHIL 29902 BA Essay Preparation,Senior Seminar II in Winter (or Spring) Quarter. These two courses are among the requirements for the intensive track. For essay writers who are in the standard track or the allied fields track, both courses must be taken; however, only PHIL 29902 will be counted toward the track's total-units requirement. 

Grading

All courses for all tracks must be taken for a quality grade. The one exception is for students in the Intensive Track: PHIL 29901 is graded on a Pass/Fail basis. Accordingly, students in other tracks taking PHIL 29901-29902 will only be able to count PHIL 29902 in the major.

Honors

The main requirement for honors is a senior essay of distinction. A GPA in the major of 3.25 or higher typically also is required.

Transfer Students

Requirements for students transferring to the University of Chicago are the same as for other students. Up to (but typically no more than) three courses from another institution may be counted toward major requirements. All such courses must be approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

Advising

Students should contact the director of undergraduate studies with questions concerning program plans, honors, and so forth.

Minor Program in Philosophy

The minor program in philosophy provides a basic introduction to some central figures and themes in both the history of philosophy and in current philosophical controversies. The minor requires six courses: students must take: either two courses from the history of philosophy sequence and one course from field A or field B, along with three additional courses in philosophy; or one course from the history of philosophy sequence and one course from each of fields A and B, along with three additional courses in philosophy.

No courses in the minor can be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors; nor can they be counted toward general education requirements. They must be taken for quality grades.

Students who elect the minor program should meet with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the program. The approval of the director of undergraduate studies for the minor should be submitted to the student's College adviser, on a form obtained from the College adviser, no later than the end of the student's third year.

Samples follow of two groups of courses that would comprise a minor:

SAMPLE 1
Two of the following:200
Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1
History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
History of Philosophy III: Kant and the 19th Century
One from either field A or field B100
Three additional courses in philosophy300
Total Units600
SAMPLE 2
One of the following:100
Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1
History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy
History of Philosophy III: Kant and the 19th Century
One from field A100
One from field B100
Three additional courses in philosophy300
Total Units600

Philosophy Courses

PHIL 20000. Introduction to Philosophy of Science. 100 Units.

An introductory exploration of some of the central questions in the philosophy of science. These will include: What is (the definition of) a science--such that the natural, formal, and social sciences all count as sciences, but (for example) philosophy and literary criticism do not? How, in the natural sciences, do theory-building and observation relate to each other? Can some of the sciences be reduced to other sciences? (What is reduction of this kind supposed to involve?) What is evidence? What are the old and new problems of induction? What is a scientific (or indeed any other form of) explanation? What is a law of nature? Do the sciences make real progress? (B)

Instructor(s): B. Callard     Terms Offered: Spring

PHIL 20100. Elementary Logic. 100 Units.

An introduction to the concepts and principles of symbolic logic. We learn the syntax and semantics of truth-functional and first-order quantificational logic, and apply the resultant conceptual framework to the analysis of valid and invalid arguments, the structure of formal languages, and logical relations among sentences of ordinary discourse. Occasionally we will venture into topics in philosophy of language and philosophical logic, but our primary focus is on acquiring a facility with symbolic logic as such.

Instructor(s): K. Davey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Course not for field credit.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 20700, PHIL 30000, CHSS 33500

PHIL 20102. Changing, Resting, Living: Aristotle's Natural Philosophy. 100 Units.

How can many things be one thing? Aristotle's answer to this question treats living things--plants and animals--as the paradigm cases of unified multiplicities. In this course, we will investigate how such things are held together and what makes it possible for them to change over time. Readings will be from Aristotle's Physics, Metaphysics, De Anima, Parts of Animals, On Generation and Corruption, and De Motu Animalium. (B)

Instructor(s): A. Callard     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students who are not enrolled by the start of term but wish to enroll must (a) email the instructor before the course begins and (b) attend the first class.
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 30118, PHIL 30102, CLCV 20118

PHIL 20210. Kant's Ethics. 100 Units.

In this course we will read, write, and think about Kant's ethics. After giving careful attention to the arguments in the Second Critique, portions of the Third Critique, the Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, the Metaphysics of Morals, and several other primary texts, we will conclude by working through some contemporary neo-Kantian moral philosophy, paying close attention to work by Christine Korsgaard, David Velleman, Stephen Engstrom, and others. (A) (V)

Instructor(s): B. Laurence     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 30210, FNDL 20210

PHIL 21000. Introduction To Ethics. 100 Units.

In this course, we will read, write, and think about philosophical work meant to provide a systematic and foundational account of ethics. We will focus on close reading of two books, Immanuel Kant's Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals and John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism, along with a handful of more recent essays. Throughout, our aim will be to engage in serious thought about good and bad in our lives. (A)

Instructor(s): C. Vogler     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 23107, HIPS 21000

PHIL 21002. Human Rights: Philosophical Foundations. 100 Units.

Human rights are claims of justice that hold merely in virtue of our shared humanity. In this course we will explore philosophical theories of this elementary and crucial form of justice. Among topics to be considered are the role that dignity and humanity play in grounding such rights, their relation to political and economic institutions, and the distinction between duties of justice and claims of charity or humanitarian aid. Finally we will consider the application of such theories to concrete, problematic and pressing problems, such as global poverty, torture and genocide. (A) (I)

Instructor(s): B. Laurence     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): MAPH 42002, HIST 29319, LLSO 21002, INRE 31602, HMRT 31002, HMRT 21002, PHIL 31002, HIST 39319

PHIL 21600. Introduction to Political Philosophy. 100 Units.

In this course we will investigate what it is for a society to be just. In what sense are the members of a just society equal? What freedoms does a just society protect? Must a just society be a democracy? What economic arrangements are compatible with justice? In the second portion of the course we will consider one pressing injustice in our society in light of our previous philosophical conclusions. Possible candidates include, but are not limited to, racial inequality, economic inequality, and gender hierarchy. Here our goal will be to combine our philosophical theories with empirical evidence in order to identify, diagnose, and effectively respond to actual injustice. (A)

Instructor(s): B. Laurence     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 22612, PLSC 22600, GNSE 21601

PHIL 21620. The Problem of Evil. 100 Units.

Epicurus's old questions are yet unanswered. Is he [God] willing to prevent evil, but not able? then is he impotent. Is he able, but not willing? then is he malevolent. Is he both able and willing? whence then is evil?" (Hume, Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion) This course will consider the challenge posed by the existence of evil to the rationality of traditional theistic belief. Drawing on both classic and contemporary readings, we will analyze atheistic arguments from evil and attempts by theistic philosophers to construct "theodicies" and "defenses" in response to these arguments, including the "free-will defense," "soul-making theodicies," and "suffering God theodicies." We will also consider critiques of such theodicies as philosophically confused, morally depraved, or both; and we will discuss the problem of divinely commanded or enacted evil (for example, the doctrine of hell). (A)

Instructor(s): M. Kremer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 23620

PHIL 21720. Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. 100 Units.

This course will offer a close reading of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, one of the great works of ethics. Among the topics to be considered are: What is a good life? What is ethics? What is the relation between ethics and having a good life? What is it for reason to be practical? What is human excellence? What is the non-rational part of the human psyche like? How does it ever come to listen to reason? What is human happiness? What is the place of thought and of action in the happy life? (A)

Instructor(s): J. Lear; G. Richardson Lear     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): This course is intended for Philosophy majors and for Fundamentals majors. Otherwise please seek permission to enroll.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 21908

PHIL 21834. Self-Creation as a Literary and Philosophical Problem. 100 Units.

Can we choose who to be? We tend to feel that we have some ability to influence the kind of people we will become; but the phenomenon of 'self-creation' is fraught with paradox: creation ex nihilo, vicious circularity, infinite regress. In this course, we will read philosophical texts addressing these paradoxes against novels offering illustrations of self-creation.

Instructor(s): A. Callard     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students who are not enrolled by the start of term but wish to enroll must (a) email the instructor before the course begins and (b) attend the first class.
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26001

PHIL 21901. Feminist Philosophy. 100 Units.

The course is an introduction to the major varieties of philosophical feminism. After studying some key historical texts in the Western tradition (Wollstonecraft, Rousseau, J. S. Mill), we examine four types of contemporary philosophical feminism: Liberal Feminism (Susan Moller Okin, Martha Nussbaum), Radical Feminism (Catharine MacKinnon, Andrea Dworkin), Difference Feminism (Carol Gilligan, Annette Baier, Nel Noddings), and Postmodern "Queer" Gender Theory and trans femism (Judith Butler, Michael Warner and others). After studying each of these approaches, we will focus on political and ethical problems of contemporary international feminism, asking how well each of the approaches addresses these problems. (A)

Instructor(s): M. Nussbaum     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates may enroll only with the permission of the instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 31900, PLSC 51900, HMRT 31900, RETH 41000, GNSE 29600

PHIL 22001. Teaching Precollegiate Philosophy. 100 Units.

This course will consider the practices of philosophy through a critical examination of different approaches to teaching precollegiate philosophy. Philosophy at the precollegiate level is common outside of the United States, and there is a growing movement in the U.S. to try to provide greater opportunities, in both public and private schools, for K-12 students to experience the joys of philosophizing. But what are the different options for teaching precollegiate philosophy and which are best? These are the main questions that this course will address. Students in this course will also have the opportunity to include an experiential learning component by participating in the UChicago Winning Words precollegiate philosophy program. (A)

Instructor(s): B. Schultz     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): MAPH 32001

PHIL 22209. Philosophies of Environmentalism and Sustainability. 100 Units.

Many of the toughest ethical and political challenges confronting the world today are related to environmental issues: for example, climate change, loss of biodiversity, the unsustainable use of natural resources, pollution, and other threats to the well-being of both present and future generations. Using both classic and contemporary works, this course will highlight some of the fundamental and unavoidable philosophical questions presented by such environmental issues. Can a plausible philosophical account of justice for future generations be developed? What counts as the ethical treatment of non-human animals? What do the terms "nature" and "wilderness" mean, and can natural environments as such have moral and/or legal standing? What fundamental ethical and political perspectives inform such positions as ecofeminism, the "Land Ethic," political ecology, ecojustice, and deep ecology? And does the environmental crisis confronting the world today demand new forms of ethical and political philosophizing and practice? Are we in the Anthropocene? Is "adaptation" the best strategy at this historical juncture? Field trips, guest speakers, and special projects will help us philosophize about the fate of the earth by connecting the local and the global. (A)

Instructor(s): B. Schultz     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 22204, HMRT 22201, PLSC 22202, ENST 22209

PHIL 22709. Introduction to Quantum Mechanics,Introduction to Philosophy of Quantum Mechanics. 100 Units.

In this course we examine some of the conceptual problems associated with quantum mechanics. We will critically discuss some common interpretations of quantum mechanics, such as the Copenhagen interpretation, the many-worlds interpretation, and Bohmian mechanics. We will also examine some implications of results in the foundations of quantum theory concerning non-locality, contextuality, and realism.,In this course we examine some of the conceptual problems associated with quantum mechanics. We will critically discuss some common interpretations of quantum mechanics, such as the Copenhagen interpretation, the many-worlds interpretation, and Bohmian mechanics. We will also examine some implications of results in the foundations of quantum theory concerning non-locality, contextuality, and realism. (B)

Instructor(s): T. Pashby     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Prior knowledge of quantum mechanics is not required since we begin with an introduction to the formalism, but familiarity with matrices, freshman calculus and high school geometry will be presupposed.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 22709, KNOW 22709,KNOW 22709, HIPS 22709

PHIL 23000. Intro:Metaphysics/Epistemology. 100 Units.

In this course we will explore some of the central questions in epistemology and metaphysics. In epistemology, these questions will include: What is knowledge? What facts or states justify a belief? How can the threat of skepticism be adequately answered? How do we know what we (seem to) know about mathematics and morality? In metaphysics, these questions will include: What is time? What is the best account of personal identity across time? Do we have free will? We will also discuss how the construction of a theory of knowledge ought to relate to the construction of a metaphysical theory-roughly speaking, what comes first, epistemology or metaphysics? (B) Note(s): Students should register via discussion section.

Instructor(s): B. Callard     Terms Offered: Autumn

PHIL 23205. Intro to Phenomenology. 100 Units.

The aim of this course is to introduce students to one of the most important and influential traditions in the European Philosophy of the 20th Century: Phenomenology. The main task of this course will be to present Phenomenology's main concepts and the meaning of Phenomenology's transformations from Husserl to Heidegger, Sartre, Levinas and Henry. The fundamental credo of Phenomenology consists in the emphasis laid upon phenomena given to consciousness. This emphasis coincides with the "return to things in themselves" as formulated by Husserl. What can this kind of return actually mean? And what does this claim suggest about philosophical practices prior to phenomenology, idealism or empiricism? In what way, for Husserl, was classical philosophy not able to give access to things such as they are truly given? And what is the meaning of such idea of « givenness »? Does Phenomenology fall into the so-called « myth of the Given Note(s): Students should register via discussion section.

Instructor(s): R. Moati     Terms Offered: Winter

PHIL 24599. Introduction to Frege. 100 Units.

Gottlob Frege is often called the father of analytic philosophy, but the real reason to study him is not his historical significance, but, rather, that in his work one encounters a philosophical intelligence of the very first order. This course is an introductory survey of his most important ideas, in philosophy of mathematics, logic, philosophy of language, and metaphysics. To help us in our project of understanding and assessing these ideas we will read discussions of Frege by Michael Dummett, Tyler Burge, Joan Weiner, Nathan Salmon, Michael Resnik, Danielle Macbeth, Hans Sluga, Patricia Blanchette, John Searle, Crispin Wright, and others. (B)

Instructor(s): B. Callard     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 24599

PHIL 24800. Foucault and The History of Sexuality. 100 Units.

This course centers on a close reading of the first volume of Michel Foucault's "The History of Sexuality", with some attention to his writings on the history of ancient conceptualizations of sex. How should a history of sexuality take into account scientific theories, social relations of power, and different experiences of the self? We discuss the contrasting descriptions and conceptions of sexual behavior before and after the emergence of a science of sexuality. Other writers influenced by and critical of Foucault are also discussed.

Instructor(s): A. Davidson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): One prior philosophy course is strongly recommended.
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 27002, GNSE 23100, HIPS 24300, FNDL 22001, CMLT 25001

PHIL 25000. Ancient Philos/Hist Philos-1. 100 Units.

An examination of ancient Greek philosophical texts that are foundational for Western philosophy, especially the work of Plato and Aristotle. Topics will include: the nature and possibility of knowledge and its role in human life; the nature of the soul; virtue; happiness and the human good.

Instructor(s): G. Richardson Lear     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in humanities.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 22700

PHIL 26000. History of Philosophy II: Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. 100 Units.

A survey of the thought of some of the most important figures of this period, including Anselm, Aquinas, Descartes, Hobbes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, and Hume.

Instructor(s): B. Callard     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in humanities required; PHIL 25000 recommended.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 26000

PHIL 27000. History of Philosophy III: Kant and the 19th Century. 100 Units.

The philosophical ideas and methods of Immanuel Kant's "critical" philosophy set off a revolution that reverberated through 19th-century philosophy. We will trace the effects of this revolution and the responses to it, focusing on the changing conception of what philosophical ethics might hope to achieve. We will begin with a consideration of Kant's famous Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, in which the project of grounding all ethical obligations in the very idea of rational freedom is announced. We will then consider Hegel's radicalization of this project in his Philosophy of Right, which seeks to derive from the idea of rational freedom, not just formal constraints on right action, but a determinate, positive conception of what Hegel calls "ethical life". We will conclude with an examination of three very different critics of the Kantian/Hegelian project in ethical theory: Karl Marx, John Stuart Mill, and Friedrich Nietzsche.

Instructor(s): M. Haase     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in humanities.

PHIL 29200. Junior Tutorial. 100 Units.

Junior/Senior Tutorial. For topic and other information, please visit http://philosophy.uchicago.edu/courses.

Instructor(s): R. Eichorn in Autumn 2017 J. Edwards; N. Lipshitz; R. O'Connell in Winter 2018 P. Brixel; T. Hash; C. Kirwin in Spring 2018     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open only to Intensive-Track Majors.
Note(s): Junior and Senior sections meet together. No more than two Tutorials may be used to meet program requirements.

PHIL 29300. Senior Tutorial. 100 Units.

Junior/Senior Tutorial. For topic and other information, please visit http://philosophy.uchicago.edu/courses.

Instructor(s): Dallman, Lawrence (Winter 2019), Fox, Joshua (Winter 2019) & Dupree, Emily (Spring 2019)     Terms Offered: Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open only to Intensive-Track Majors.
Note(s): Junior and Senior sections meet together. No more than two Tutorials may be used to meet program requirements.

PHIL 29411. Consequentialism from Bentham to Singer. 100 Units.

Are some acts wrong "whatever the consequences"? Do consequences matter when acting for the sake of duty, or virtue, or what is right? How do "consequentialist" ethical theories, such as utilitarianism, address such issues? This course will address these questions by critically examining some of the most provocative defenses of consequentialism in the history of philosophy, from the work of the classical utilitarians Bentham, Mill, and Sidgwick to that of Peter Singer, one of the world's most influential living philosophers and the founder of the animal liberation and effective altruism movements. Does consequentialism lend itself to the Panoptical nightmares of the surveillance state, or can it be a force for a genuinely emancipatory ethics and politics?

Instructor(s): B. Schultz     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): PLSC 29411

PHIL 29601. Intensive Track Seminar. 100 Units.

This seminar will explore an advanced topic in philosophy. Its required as part of the intensive track of the Philosophy Major.

Instructor(s): J. Bridges     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open only to third-year students who have been admitted to the intensive track program.

PHIL 29700. Reading and Research. 100 Units.

Reading and Research.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor & Director of Undergraduate Studies. Students are required to submit the college reading and research course form.

PHIL 29901. Senior Seminar I. 100 Units.

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in either the Autumn or Winter Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in either the Winter or Spring Quarter. (Students may not register for both PHIL 29901 and 29902 in the same quarter.) The Senior Seminar meets all three quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Instructor(s): B. Laurence     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Note(s): Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.

PHIL 29902. BA Essay Preparation,Senior Seminar II. 100 Units.

Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in either the Autumn or Winter Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in either the Winter or Spring Quarter. (Students may not register for both PHIL 29901 and 29902 in the same quarter). The Senior Seminar meets all three quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.,Students writing senior essays register once for PHIL 29901, in either the Autumn or Winter Quarter, and once for PHIL 29902, in either the Winter or Spring Quarter. (Students may not register for both PHIL 29901 and 29902 in the same quarter.) The senior seminar meets all three quarters, and students writing essays are required to attend throughout.

Instructor(s): B. Laurence     Terms Offered: Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Undergraduate Studies.
Note(s): Required and only open to fourth-year students who have been accepted into the BA essay program.


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Agnes Callard
Stuart 231-A

Email

Secondary Contact

Assistant to the Director of Undergraduate Studies
Nethanel Lipshitz
Rosenwald 216

Email

Administrative Contact


TBA