Contacts | Program of Study | Major Requirements | Summary of Requirements | Grading | Advising | BA Paper  | Minor Program in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Program Requirements for the Minor | Courses

Department Website: http://nelc.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

Majors in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (NELC) at the University of Chicago pursue rigorous knowledge about a region of the world that is known as “the cradle of civilization” and the home of several important religious and cultural traditions, as well as one of the most important geopolitical areas of our contemporary world. NELC majors acquire languages; learn how archaeologists, economists, historians, linguists, literary scholars, and careful readers of legal, religious, economic, and other kinds of texts critically evaluate evidence; and acquire, largely in small class settings, analytical writing, thinking, and research skills that will help prepare them for a variety of careers.

Geographically centered on the Nile to Oxus and Danube to Indus region, NELC also embraces North Africa and Islamic Spain, as well as Central Asia and the Balkans in its ambit, from the early Bronze Age to the recent era of revolutions.  Students can gain expertise in a wide variety of languages, including the living spoken tongues of the modern Middle East and Central Asia (Arabic, Armenian, modern Hebrew, Kazakh, Persian, Turkish, and Uzbek) or languages that open gateways onto the ancient past (Akkadian, Aramaic, Biblical Hebrew, Coptic, Egyptian Hieroglyphics, Elamite, Ge’ez, Hittite, Middle and Old Persian, Ottoman, Syriac, Ugaritic, etc.).

In an interdisciplinary area studies department like NELC, majors learn about the region through primary sources (material, oral, or textual) and scholarly analysis, structuring their curriculum around various disciplines and methodologies, including stratigraphy and paleobotany, comparative literature, cultural and civilizational studies, economics and numismatics, gender studies, history (economic, political, religious, and social), human rights, public policy, and digital humanities approaches. 

Areas of specialization within NELC include:

  • Arabic Studies
  • Armenian Studies
  • Archaeology and Art of the Ancient Near East
  • Classical Hebrew Language and Civilization
  • Cuneiform Studies (including Assyriology, Hittitology, and Sumerology)
  • Egyptian Languages and Civilization
  • History (Ancient Near East, Islamic History, Modern Middle Eastern History)
  • Islamic Thought (including Law, Sufism)
  • Israeli and Jewish Studies (including Biblical and Modern Hebrew, Aramaic, Syriac)
  • Persian and Iranian Studies (Culture, Language, Literature, History, Religion)
  • Semitic Languages and Literatures (Comparative Semitics, Northwest Semitics)
  • Turkish and Ottoman Studies (Culture, History, Languages, Literatures)

Students who major in NELC learn one or more of the primary native languages as a means of access to the cultures of the ancient Near East and/or the modern Middle East. In consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies, each student chooses an area of specialization and devises a program of study that provides a sound basis for graduate work in that area or for a career in business, education, government, journalism, law, museology, public policy, public service, or a variety of other disciplines and professions.

Major Requirements

Requirements for the NELC major are described below. The Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Department Coordinator are available to answer questions, discuss programs of study, and support students as they make their way through the major in NELC. Students are encouraged to track their progress through requirements by using our major worksheet (available on the department website). NELC strongly encourages students to study abroad if they are able. 

Thirteen courses and a BA paper are required for a NELC major.

Summary of Requirements

Two or three quarters of one of the following civilization sequences: *200-300
Archaeology of the Ancient Near East I-II-III-IV-V-VI
Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I-II-III
Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I-II-III
Ancient Empires I-II-III
Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I-II-III
Islamic History and Society I-II-III
Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III
Jewish Civilization +
Six courses in one of the Near Eastern languages (e.g., Akkadian, Arabic, Armenian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Kazakh, Persian, Turkish, Uzbek) **600
Three or four elective courses in the student’s area of specialization §300-400
NEHC 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Units in the Major1300
*

Note that the course sequence on “Archaeology of the Ancient Near East” does not fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies. All of the other NELC civilization sequences do fulfill the general education requirement. If a Near Eastern civilization sequence is used to meet the College general education requirement, a second Near Eastern civilization sequence is required for the NELC major.

+

Students may also opt to take two or three courses from the Jewish Civilization course clusters. These have course codes in the ranges JWSC 20120–20199 (ancient/medieval) and JWSC 20220–20299 (modern), and are cross-listed with varying NEHC numbers. Jewish civilization courses may be taken in any order and may be used to fulfill the College’s general education requirement in civilization studies. In this sequence, to fulfill the general education civilization requirement, at least one course must pertain to the ancient or medieval periods (JWSC 20120–20199) and at least one course must pertain to the modern period (JWSC 20220–20299). 

**

Credit for language courses may not be granted by examination or petition.

§

These courses must be chosen in consultation with the Counselor for Undergraduate Studies. They may consist of additional NELC language courses, an additional NELC civilization sequence, or approved courses in areas such as archaeology, art, literature in translation, history, and religion. NEHC 29999 may be counted towards the elective requirement.

Grading

All courses used to meet requirements in the major must be taken for quality grades with the exception of the NEHC 29800 BA Paper Seminar, which is taken for P/F grading.

Advising

As soon as they declare their major in NELC, students must consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies to plan their programs of study. In Autumn Quarter of their fourth year, all NELC students must see the Director of Undergraduate Studies with an updated degree program and transcript.

BA Paper 

NELC majors are required to write a substantial BA paper during their fourth year. The BA paper should be an original academic paper/research project of approximately 30 to 50 pages. The BA paper provides majors the opportunity to develop research, writing, and presentation skills while working closely with a faculty adviser. The BA paper can be used in graduate school applications or as part of job application portfolios, and some recent NELC graduates have been able to publish their papers. The process of declaring a paper topic and choosing an adviser begins in the third year. 

The timeline below assumes a Spring Quarter graduation. Students who expect to graduate in other quarters should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Year 3: Spring Quarter

NELC majors in their third year should discuss possible BA paper topics with NELC faculty members with whom they have worked or who have expertise in their topic. This may grow out of a paper written from a course or may be an entirely new project.

After choosing a topic and narrowing down its focus, students are responsible to request a member of the NELC faculty to serve as their research adviser, who will help them further conceive the scope and aims of the project and provide guidance about methods and sources for carrying out their research. Students must formally file their proposed BA paper topic with their faculty adviser’s signature in the NELC department office before the end of their third year (by Monday of tenth week of Spring Quarter). Forms to register the topic are available on our website.

Year 4: Autumn Quarter

Students are required to register for NEHC 29800 BA Paper Seminar in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year on a P/F basis. The BA Paper Seminar is a workshop course designed to survey the fields represented by NELC and to assist students in researching and writing their BA papers. The course is run by a BA preceptor, typically an advanced PhD student in NELC. Preceptors work closely with students and their faculty advisers to assist in all aspects of conceiving, researching, and writing. A passing grade (P) for the BA Paper Seminar depends on full attendance and participation throughout the quarter.

Year 4: Winter Quarter

NELC majors are strongly encouraged to register for an optional one-quarter independent study course NEHC 29999 BA Paper Preparation with their BA preceptor that will allow time in their schedules over Winter Quarter to write and revise their papers. Students will receive a quality grade for this course, equivalent to the final BA paper grade, reported in the Spring Quarter.

Year 4: Spring Quarter

The completed BA paper must be submitted to the Department Coordinator by Monday of third week in Spring Quarter. Students should submit two bound hard copies and one pdf of the paper. The Department Coordinator will distribute the BA papers to the faculty adviser. Students who fail to meet the deadline will not be eligible for honors and may not be able to graduate in that quarter.

The faculty adviser will grade the paper and submit grades and honors recommendations to the Director of Undergraduate Studies by Monday of fifth week in Spring Quarter.

Double Majors

Students taking a double major may, with the permission of the NELC Director of Undergraduate Studies, write a single BA paper that is designed to meet the requirements of both majors, provided that the faculty research adviser is a member of the NELC faculty. Approval from both program chairs is required. A consent form, to be signed by the chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student’s year of graduation.

Research Funding

Students are encouraged to begin the reading/research for the BA paper in the summer before their fourth year. Research grants are available to undergraduates. Please discuss the availability of grants with the Department Coordinator and/or Director of Undergraduate Studies early in the third year and visit the department website for updated information.

NELC is a participant in the PRISM program and majors are encouraged to apply for PRISM grants.

Honors

Students who complete their course work and their BA papers with distinction are considered for honors. To be eligible for honors, students must have an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher, they must have a NELC GPA of 3.5 or higher, and they must have earned a grade of A on the BA paper.

Prizes

The department awards the Justin Palmer Prize annually to the BA paper judged to be the most outstanding. The Director of Undergraduate Studies makes this determination in consultation with the department chair and faculty members. This monetary prize is made possible by a generous gift from the family of Justin Palmer, AB’04, who completed a minor in NELC.


Minor Program in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

Students in the College with an interest in the languages and cultures of the Middle East or of the ancient Near East may pursue a minor in NELC. Completion of this minor certifies that your undergraduate course work at the University of Chicago has prepared you with language skills and cultural competency that can give you an advantage on the job market for a wide variety of careers—in business, in medicine or law, or in the public sector.

Students who wish to take a minor in NELC must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Students must submit the Consent to Complete a Minor Program form to their College adviser by the deadline above. The Director of Undergraduate Studies and the Department Coordinator are available to answer questions, discuss programs of study, and support students as they make their way through the minor in NELC. Students are encouraged to track their progress through requirements by using our minor worksheet, which can be found on our website

Program Requirements for the Minor

Students may choose one of two tracks: language or culture. Both tracks require a two- or three-quarter NELC civilization sequence (see Major Requirements for more detail on civilization sequences). In addition, the Language Track requires three courses of one NELC language at any level. Students using a NELC sequence to satisfy the general education requirement in civilization studies may seek approval from the department to substitute additional language course work in place of the civilization requirement in the minor. The Culture Track allows students to focus on topics such as archaeology, history, religion, or literature in translation and does not have a language requirement.

The six courses in the minor may not be double counted with a student's major(s) or with other minors, and they may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades.

Language Track Sample Minor

AKKD 10101-10102-10103Elementary Akkadian I-II-III *300
NEHC 20001-20002-20003Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I-II-III300
Total Units600

Language Track Sample Minor

ARAB 20101-20102-20103Intermediate Arabic I-II-III300
NEHC 20601-20602-20603Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III300
Total Units600

Culture Track Sample Minor

NEHC 20011-20012-20013Ancient Empires I-II-III300
NEHC 20004-20005-20006Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I-II-III300
Total Units600

All undergraduate courses being offered in the 2017–18 academic year are listed below, by subject. Upper-level courses and the most up-to-date course information can be found in the NELC section of Class Search

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Akkadian Courses

AKKD 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Akkadian I-II-III.

The first two quarters of this sequence cover the elements of Babylonian grammar and the cuneiform writing system, with reading exercises in Old Babylonian texts (ca. 1900 to 1600 B.C.), such as the Laws of Hammurabi. The third quarter introduces Standard Babylonian, the literary language of ca. 1200 to 600 B.C., with readings in royal inscriptions and literary texts.

AKKD 10101. Elementary Akkadian I. 100 Units.

Introduction to the grammar of Akkadian, specifically to the Old Babylonian dialect.

Instructor(s): John Wee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing

AKKD 10102. Elementary Akkadian II. 100 Units.

Readings from the Code of Hammurapi, in the Old Babylonian dialect of Akkadian.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): AKKD 10101 or equivalent

AKKD 10103. Elementary Akkadian III. 100 Units.

Selected readings of Akkadian texts in the Standard Babylonian dialect of the 1st millennium BC.

Instructor(s): Herve Reculeau     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): AKKD 10102 or equivalent

AKKD 20602. Intermediate Akkadian. 100 Units.

This course is Intermediate Akkadian: NB and NA Letters

Instructor(s): Martha Roth     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 1 year of Akkadian

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Ancient Anatolian Languages Courses

AANL 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Hittite I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes students with the field’s tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 BC).

AANL 10101. Elementary Hittite I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second Year Standing

AANL 10102. Elementary Hittite II. 100 Units.

This is the second in a sequence that covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): AANL 10101 or equivalent

AANL 10103. Elementary Hittite III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): AANL 10102 or equivalent

AANL 20125. Advanced Readings in Hittite. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is the close reading and analysis of selected Hittite texts; specific texts and topics may vary from year to year.

Instructor(s): Theo Van Den Hout     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Elementary Hittite

AANL 20401. Lydian and Carian. 100 Units.

We will look at the grammar of Lydian and Carian and read several texts.

Instructor(s): Theo van den Hout     Terms Offered: Spring

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Arabic Courses

ARAB 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Arabic I-II-III.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic. The class meets for six hours a week.

ARAB 10101. Elementary Arabic I. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Instructor(s): N. Forster, O. abu-Eledam, L. Choudar     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): The class meets for six hours a week

ARAB 10102. Elementary Arabic II. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Instructor(s): L. Choudar, O. abu-Eledam, N. Forster     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 10101 or equivalent
Note(s): The class meets for six hours a week

ARAB 10103. Elementary Arabic III. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Instructor(s): O. abu-Eledam, L. Choudar, N. Forster     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 10102 or equivalent
Note(s): The class meets for six hours a week

ARAB 10123. Summer Intensive Arabic Level 1. 300 Units.

Summer Intensive Arabic Level I is an eight-week course designed to introduce complete novices to the fundamentals of Arabic in the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Classes are small and use the Alif Baa' and al-Kitaab textbook (2nd edition), supplemented by authentic materials, both to learn the language and to experience the culture. Cultural proficiency is an integral part of the language instruction (forms of address, youth phrases, phrases used among intimate friends,etc.). Students will spend 4–5 hours per day practicing using Arabic in classroom activities and should plan on studying an additional 3–4 hours most afternoons and evenings. In addition to class time, a full day trip to an Arab neighborhood in Chicago provides an opportunity to use Arabic in an authentic cultural context. Cultural exposure will also be supplemented through guest speakers, songs, and films. At the conclusion of the course, students can expect to have mastered the sounds and shapes of the Arabic alphabet and to be able to speak about themselves and their world in Modern Standard Arabic, as well as to engage in conversations about familiar topics with native speakers, to comprehend basic texts, and to use some common phrases in colloquial Egyptian and Shaami. After the eight-week course, students can expect to advance to the Intermediate Low level on the ACTFL scale.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

ARAB 10250. Colloquial Levantine Arabic. 100 Units.

Spoken Levantine Arabic is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions and grammar, the course will build the students’ competence in spoken Arabic. Students will also be introduced to the Levantine culture of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine.

Instructor(s): O. abu-Eledam     Terms Offered: Winter

ARAB 10257. Colloquial Levantine Arabic II. 100 Units.

Colloquial Levantine Arabic is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions, and grammar, the course will build the students’ competence in spoken Arabic. Students will also be introduced to the Levantine culture.

Instructor(s): Osama Abu-Eledam     Terms Offered: Spring

ARAB 10456. Summer Intensive Arabic Level 1.5. 300 Units.

Summer Arabic Level 1.5 is designed for the student who has begun studying Arabic, but who is not yet fully comfortable in speaking, listening, and/or writing on a wide range of common topics. In this eight-week course, students will consolidate and advance their Arabic language skills (reading, writing, speaking, and listening) to move confidently into the Intermediate range. The class materials (al-Kitaab Part 1, 2nd edition, children’s stories, popular songs, film excerpts) as well as a number of extra activities (a field trip to an Arab neighborhood, guest lecturers) will be geared to integrating language and culture and encouraging students to communicate in culturally rich ways. At the conclusion of the sequence, students should be able to speak about themselves and their world in Modern Standard Arabic, as well as to engage in conversations about familiar topics with native speakers, to comprehend basic texts, and to use some common phrases in colloquial Egyptian and Shaami. At the end of the sequence, students should advance to the Intermediate Low/Intermediate Mid level on the ACTFL scale.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

ARAB 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Arabic I-II-III.

This sequence concentrates on speaking, reading, and aural skills at the intermediate level of modern formal Arabic.

ARAB 20101. Intermediate Arabic I. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on speaking, reading, and aural skills at the intermediate level of modern formal Arabic.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy, L. Choudar, K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 10103 or equivalent

ARAB 20102. Intermediate Arabic II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy, L. Choudar, K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20101 or equivalent

ARAB 20103. Intermediate Arabic III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy, K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20102 or equivalent

ARAB 20123. Summer Intensive Arabic Level 2. 300 Units.

Summer Intensive Arabic Level 2 is designed for students who have completed the equivalent of Alif Baa' and al-Kitaab part 1, or attained a minimum Novice High proficiency on the ACTFL scale. In this eight-week summer course in Arabic, students will improve and refine their language skills using al-Kitaab part 2 (2nd edition), along with authentic stories, poems, and articles. Cultural proficiency is an integral part of the language instruction, as students immerse themselves in readings (literary and journalistic) and engage in conversations with their classmates, with the Arabic-speaking community in Chicago, and with guest lecturers/presenters. Students will also extend their language and cultural skills by working on songs and film extracts. The class will help students develop their ability to initiate and sustain discussion on topics of general interest and to present information and simple narratives in Modern Standard Arabic; to understand a wide range of written genres in Arabic, including formal writing, journalistic texts, and less formal styles; to write and speak with increasing accuracy and fluency; and to carry out basic research with non-technical texts. After the eight-week course, students can expect to reach the Intermediate Mid or Intermediate High level on the ACTFL scale.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Aramaic Courses

ARAM 10401-10402-10403. Elementary Syriac I-II-III.

Elementary Syriac I-II-III

ARAM 10401. Elementary Syriac I. 100 Units.

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read Syriac literature with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments. The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of Syriac grammar and vocabulary. The third quarter is spent reading a variety of Syriac prose and poetic texts and includes a review of grammar.

Instructor(s): Stuart Creason     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing

ARAM 10402. Elementary Syriac II. 100 Units.

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read Syriac literature with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments. The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of Syriac grammar and vocabulary. The third quarter is spent reading a variety of Syriac prose and poetic texts and includes a review of grammar.

Instructor(s): Stuart Creason     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAM 10401

ARAM 10403. Elementary Syriac III. 100 Units.

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read Syriac literature with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments. The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of Syriac grammar and vocabulary. The third quarter is spent reading a variety of Syriac prose and poetic texts and includes a review of grammar.

Instructor(s): Stuart Creason     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAM 10402

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Armenian Courses

ARME 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Modern Armenian I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and basic grammatical structures and to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

ARME 10101. Elementary Modern Armenian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EEUR 21100

ARME 10102. Elementary Modern Armenian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARME 10101
Equivalent Course(s): EEUR 21200

ARME 10103. Elementary Modern Armenian III. 100 Units.

Elementary Modern Armenian I, II, III. The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and basic grammatical structures and to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARME 10102
Equivalent Course(s): EEUR 21300

ARME 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Modern Armenian I-II-III.

The goal of this three-quarter sequence is to enable students to reach an advanced level of proficiency in the Armenian language. This sequence covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media.

ARME 20101. Intermediate Modern Armenian I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia. 

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARME 10103

ARME 20102. Intermediate Modern Armenian II. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia. 

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARME 20101

ARME 20103. Intermediate Modern Armenian III. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies and related area studies or to pursue work in Armenia. 

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARME 20102

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Egyptian Courses

EGPT 10101-10102. Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs I-II.

This sequence examines hieroglyphic writing and the grammar of the language of classical Egyptian literature.

EGPT 10101. Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): R. Ritner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 30500

EGPT 10102. Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): R. Ritner     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101 or consent of the instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 30501

EGPT 10103. Middle Egyptian Texts I. 100 Units.

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

Instructor(s): Robert Ritner     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102 or consent of the instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 30502

EGPT 10201. Introduction to Coptic. 100 Units.

This course introduces the last native language of Egypt, which was in common use during the late Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods (fourth to tenth centuries CE). Grammar and vocabulary of the standard Sahidic dialect are presented in preparation for reading biblical, monastic, and Gnostic literature, as well as a variety of historical and social documents.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing required; knowledge of earlier Egyptian language phases or Classical Greek or Koine Greek helpful but not required
Equivalent Course(s): HCHR 30601

EGPT 10202. Coptic Texts. 100 Units.

This course builds on the basics of grammar learned in EGPT 10201 and provides readings in a variety of Coptic texts (e.g., monastic texts, biblical excerpts, tales, Gnostic literature).

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10201
Equivalent Course(s): HCHR 30602

EGPT 20101. Middle Egyptian Texts II. 100 Units.

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

Instructor(s): Robert Ritner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or consent of the instructor

EGPT 20102. Introduction to Hieratic. 100 Units.

This course introduces the cursive literary and administrative script of Middle Egyptian (corresponding to the Middle Kingdom period in Egypt) and is intended to provide familiarity with a variety of texts written in hieratic (e.g., literary tales, religious compositions, wisdom literature, letters, accounts, graffiti).

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or equivalent required; EGPT 20101 recommended

EGPT 20110. Introduction to Old Egyptian. 100 Units.

This course examines the hieroglyphic writing and grammar of the Old Kingdom (Egypt's "Pyramid Age"), focusing on monumental readings from private tombs, royal and private stelae, administrative decrees, economic documents, and Pyramid texts. Some attention is given to Old Egyptian texts written in cursive Hieratic.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or equivalent required; EGPT 20101 recommended

EGPT 20210. Introduction to Late Egyptian. 100 Units.

This course is a comprehensive examination of the grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles of the nonliterary vernacular of New Kingdom Egypt (Dynasties XVII to XXIV), as exhibited by administrative and business documents, private letters, and official monuments. We also study the hybrid "literary Late Egyptian" used for tales and other compositions. Texts from the various genres are read and analyzed in EGPT 20211.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or equivalent required; EGPT 20101 recommended

EGPT 20211. Late Egyptian Texts. 100 Units.

Building on the basics of grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles learned in EGPT 20210, this course focuses on the reading and analysis of Late Egyptian texts from the various genres.

Instructor(s): B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 20210
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 34200

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Ge'ez Courses

GEEZ 10101-10102. Elementary Ge'ez I-II.

This is a two quarter sequence introducing the fundamental grammar and writing structure of Ge'ez (Classical Ethiopic).

GEEZ 10101. Elementary Ge'ez I. 100 Units.

This course introduces the fundamentals of Ge’ez (Classical Ethiopic) with an overview of grammar and the writing system, as well as exercises in reading early monumental and simple narrative texts.

Instructor(s): R. Hasselbach     Terms Offered: Spring

GEEZ 10102. Elementary Ge'ez II. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the grammar and script of Classical Ethiopic (Ge'ez).

Instructor(s): R. Hasselbach     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GEEZ 10101

GEEZ 10103. Readings: Classical Ethiopic. 100 Units.

In this course, we will finish the grammar of Classical Ethiopic (Ge'ez) and start readings in Classical Ethiopic literature.

Instructor(s): R. Hasselbach     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GEEZ 10101-10102 or equivalent

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Hebrew Courses

HEBR 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Classical Hebrew I-II-III.

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read biblical Hebrew prose with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments: (1) the first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis); and (2) the third quarter is spent examining prose passages from the Hebrew Bible and includes a review of grammar.

HEBR 10101. Elementary Classical Hebrew I. 100 Units.

The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis).

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This class meets 5 times a week
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22000

HEBR 10102. Elementary Classical Hebrew II. 100 Units.

The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis).

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10101 or equivalent
Note(s): This class meets 5 times a week
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22100

HEBR 10103. Elementary Classical Hebrew III. 100 Units.

The third quarter is spent examining prose passages from the Hebrew Bible and includes a review of grammar.

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10102
Note(s): This class meets 5 times a week
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22200

HEBR 10501-10502-10503. Introductory Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

This three quarter course introduces students to reading, writing, and speaking modern Hebrew. All four language skills are emphasized: comprehension of written and oral materials; reading of nondiacritical text; writing of directed sentences, paragraphs, and compositions; and speaking. Students learn the Hebrew root pattern system and the seven basic verb conjugations in both the past and present tenses, as well as simple future. At the end of the year, students can conduct short conversations in Hebrew, read materials designed to their level, and write short essay.

HEBR 10501. Introductory Modern Hebrew I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25000

HEBR 10502. Introductory Modern Hebrew II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10501 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25100

HEBR 10503. Introductory Modern Hebrew III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10502 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25200

HEBR 20001. Hebrew Letters and Inscriptions. 100 Units.

This course involves reading and analysis of the inscriptional material from Palestine written during the first millennium BC (including texts from Transjordan).

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10103 or equivalent
Note(s): This course is offered in alternate years.

HEBR 20002. Phoenician Inscriptions. 100 Units.

This course involves reading and analysis of the inscriptions, primarily on stone and primarily from the Phoenician homeland, that belong to the early and middle first millennium BC.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20001
Note(s): This course is offered in alternate years.

HEBR 20003. Punic Inscriptions. 100 Units.

This course is a continuation of HEBR 20002. Texts resulting from the Phoenician expansion into the Western Mediterranean (primarily North Africa) are studied.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20002
Note(s): This course is offered in alternate years.

HEBR 20104-20105-20106. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I-II-III.

A continuation of Elementary Classical Hebrew. The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts. The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

HEBR 20104. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I. 100 Units.

The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10103 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22300

HEBR 20105. Intermediate Classical Hebrew II. 100 Units.

The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20104 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22400

HEBR 20106. Intermediate Classical Hebrew III. 100 Units.

The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20105 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22500

HEBR 20501-20502-20503. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

The main objective of this sequence is to provide students with the skills necessary to approach modern Hebrew prose, both fiction and nonfiction. In order to achieve this task, students are provided with a systematic examination of the complete verb structure. Many syntactic structures are introduced (e.g., simple clauses, coordinate and compound sentences). At this level, students not only write and speak extensively but are also required to analyze grammatically and contextually all of material assigned.

HEBR 20501. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10503 or equivalent
Note(s): The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25300

HEBR 20502. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20501 or equivalent
Note(s): The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25400

HEBR 20503. Intermediate Modern Hebrew III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20502 or equivalent
Note(s): The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25500

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Kazakh Courses

KAZK 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Kazakh I-II-III.

This sequence introduces students to Kazakh, a Turkic language spoken in Kazakhstan and neighboring countries. The course teaches the fundamentals of grammar and it enables students to read, write, and speak Kazakh. Students will be exposed to the history and culture of Kazakhstan through modern and 19th-century literature, as well as to current events through mass media. The second and third quarters of this sequence and the Intermediate Kazakh sequence (KAZK 20101-20102-20103) are offered based on interest.

KAZK 10101. Elementary Kazakh I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn

KAZK 10102. Elementary Kazakh II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): STAFF     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 10101 or equivalent

KAZK 10103. Elementary Kazakh III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 10102 or equivalent

KAZK 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Kazakh I-II-III.

Second-Year Kazakh.

KAZK 20101. Intermediate Kazakh I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): First Year Kazakh at the University of Chicago, or equivalent coursework AND placement test with proficiency evaluation.

KAZK 20102. Intermediate Kazakh II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 20101

KAZK 20103. Intermediate Kazakh III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 20102

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern Art and Archaeology Courses

NEAA 10630. Islamic Art and Architecture, 1100 to 1500. 100 Units.

This course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world from 1100-1500. In that period, political fragmentation into multiple principalities challenged a deeply rooted ideology of unity of the Islamic world. The courts of the various principalities competed not only in politics, but also in the patronage of architectural projects and of arts such as textiles, ceramics, woodwork, and the arts of the book. While focusing on the central Islamic lands, we will consider regional traditions from Spain to India and the importance for the arts of contacts with China and the West.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 16709,ARTH 16709

NEAA 20001-20002-20003-20004-20005-20006. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East I-II-III-IV-V-VI.

This sequence surveys the archaeology and art of the Near East from prehistoric times to the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Taking these courses in sequence is not required; each course in the sequence focuses on a particular cultural region. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEAA 20001. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East I: Mesopotamia. 100 Units.

This course surveys the archaeology and art of the Mesopotamia.

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30001

NEAA 20002. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East II: Anatolia. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): J. Osborne     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18
Prerequisite(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30002

NEAA 20003. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East III: Levant. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30003

NEAA 20004. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East IV: Pre-Islamic Arabia. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30004

NEAA 20005. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East V: Islamic Period. 100 Units.

This survey of the regions of the Middle East presents the urban systems of each region. The focus is a comparative stratigraphy of the archaeological evidence and the contribution of this material towards an understanding of Islamic history and ancient archaeological periods in the Near East.

Instructor(s): D. Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30005

NEAA 20006. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East VI: Egypt. 100 Units.

This sequence provides a thorough survey in lecture format of the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the late Pre-dynastic era through the Roman period.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2017-18
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30006

NEAA 20123. Mesopotamian Archaeology III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): NEAA 20122 or Consent of the Instructor

NEAA 20373. Forensic Archaeology. 100 Units.

What is forensic science and how do archaeologists fit into the equation? Where forensics generally refers to the application of scientific principles to matters of criminal justice, forensic archaeology is the application of archaeological methods and theories to questions of medicolegal significance. In this course, we will explore the history and development of the role of the archaeologist in forensic investigations of ancient and modern origin, on both local and global scales. We will follow the processes undertaken by forensic archaeologists during their inquiries and examine the methods utilized in a number of cases ranging from mass graves and mass disasters, to crime scenes and crimes against humanity. We will explore the role of the forensic archaeologist in the study of warfare, examine forgeries like the Piltdown Man, and analyze the process of investigation from identification and survey, to recovery, and the analysis and reporting of evidence. Finally, we will consider the ethical responsibilities and standards of archaeologists in their methodologies and the legal implications of their findings. This class is intended for both archaeologists who want to understand how their methods finds purpose and meaning in modern contexts and for students who are more generally interested in the impact of forensic archaeology on contemporary medical and legal landscapes.  

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter

NEAA 20522. Archaeology of Islamic Syria-Palestine. 100 Units.

This course is an exploration of the cultural patterns in the Levant from the late Byzantine period down to modern times, a span of some 1,500 years. While the subject matter will be archaeological sites of this period in Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Israel, the focus will be on the role of medieval archaeology in amplifying the history of economic and social systems. It is this connective quality of Islamic archaeology which contributes to an understanding of the earlier history and archaeology of this region.

Instructor(s): D. Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Introductory course in archaeology

NEAA 20532. Problems in Islamic Archaeology: The Islamic City. 100 Units.

This course is intended to follow the Introduction to Islamic archaeology, a survey of the regions of the fertile crescent from the 9th to the 19th century.  Beginning with P. Wheatley's Places where Men Pray Together, the institution of the Islamic are examined in light of its beginnings and definitions.  Emphasis is on archaeological remains from the Middle East.

Instructor(s): D. Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent Only
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30532

NEAA 20541. Islamic Pottery as Historical Evidence. 100 Units.

This course is intended to present the dominant typologies of Islamic ceramics, most of which have been studied from an art historical approach. Specific archaeological typologies will be assembled from published reports and presented in seminar meetings. Half of the course will consist of analysis of shred collections, observatory analysis of typological criteria, and training in drawing these artifacts. 

Instructor(s): Donald Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30541

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern History and Civilization Courses

NEHC 10101. Introduction to the Middle East. 100 Units.

Prior knowledge of the Middle East not required. This course aims to facilitate a general understanding of some key factors that have shaped life in this region, with primary emphasis on modern conditions and their background, and to provide exposure to some of the region's rich cultural diversity. This course can serve as a basis for the further study of the history, politics, and civilizations of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15801

NEHC 16709. Islamic Art and Architecture, 1100 to 1500. 100 Units.

This course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world from 1100-1500. In that period, political fragmentation into multiple principalities challenged a deeply rooted ideology of unity of the Islamic world. The courts of the various principalities competed not only in politics, but also in the patronage of architectural projects and of arts such as textiles, ceramics, woodwork, and the arts of the book. While focusing on the central Islamic lands, we will consider regional traditions from Spain to India and the importance for the arts of contacts with China and the West.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 10630,ARTH 16709

NEHC 20001-20002-20003. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement for civilization studies.

NEHC 20001. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I: Egypt. 100 Units.

This course surveys the political, social, and economic history of ancient Egypt from pre-dynastic times (ca. 3400 B.C.) until the advent of Islam in the seventh century of our era.

Instructor(s): J. Johnson, B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30001

NEHC 20002. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society II. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the history of ancient Anatolia and its neighbors from the first historical texts around 2000 BCE to the arrival of Alexander the Great. Some of the famous ancient Near Eastern civilizations that we encounter include the Assyrians, Hittites, Phrygians, Lydians, Persians, and Israelites. We will focus on the information provided by inscriptions - especially political and socioeconomic history - as well as the relevant archaeological and art historical records. No prior knowledge of Anatolian or Near Eastern history is required."

Instructor(s): James Osborne     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30002

NEHC 20003. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society III. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the social, political, and cultural history of Mesopotamia, from the origins of writing and cities in Sumer (ca. 3200 B.C.), through the great empires of Assyria, Babylon, and Persia.

Instructor(s): Herve Reculeau     Terms Offered: Spring

NEHC 20004-20005-20006. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I-II-III.

This sequence surveys the thought and literature of the Near East. Each course in the sequence focuses on a particular culture or civilization. Texts in English. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is not required.

NEHC 20004. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I: Mesopotamian Literature. 100 Units.

This course takes as its topic the literary tradition surrounding Gilgamesh, the legendary king of the Mesopotamian city-state of Uruk.  The course will focus on the Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh and its Sumerian forerunners, and their cultural and historical contexts. We will also read a number of Sumerian and Akkadian compositions that are thematically related to the Gilgamesh tradition, including Atrahasis, the Sumerian Flood story, and the Epics of Enmerkar and Lugalbanda, also of first dynasty of Uruk.

Instructor(s): Chris Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30004

NEHC 20005. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature II: Anatolian Literature. 100 Units.

This course will provide an overview of Anatolian/Hittite literature, as “defined” by the Hittites themselves, in the wider historical-cultural context of the Ancient Near East. In the course of discussions, we will try to answer some important questions about Hittite inscriptions, such as: why were they written down, why were they kept, for whom were they intended, and what do the answers to these questions (apart from the primary content of the texts themselves) tell us about Hittite society? 

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30005

NEHC 20006. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature III: Egypt. 100 Units.

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction. 

Instructor(s): B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30006

NEHC 20009. Jerusalem: The "Holy" City. 100 Units.

What makes a city “holy?" How is religious space created and contested? How can one city be claimed by three faiths? This course will attempt to answer these questions and many others by tracing the religious history of Jerusalem–a religious center for Jews, Christians, and Muslims–from its founding under King David to the modern Israeli/Palestinian conflict. For roughly three thousand years, Jerusalem has served as a site of creation, interaction, and conflict for these traditions and millions of their adherents. Using primary and secondary materials, along with theoretical works, we will analyze Jerusalem as an object of study in relation to common themes of Religious Studies like sacred space, pilgrimage, and myth. 

Instructor(s): Marshall Cunningham     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 26007,JWSC 21230,RLST 20230

NEHC 20011-20012-20013. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEHC 20011. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25700,HIST 15602

NEHC 20012. Ancient Empires II: The Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

no course description available at this time

Instructor(s): Kagan Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25800,HIST 15603,NEHC 30012

NEHC 20013. Ancient Empires III: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550–1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25900,HIST 15604,NEHC 30013

NEHC 20019. Mesopotamian Law. 100 Units.

NEHC 30019. Mesopotamian Law (= LLSO 20019; SIGN 26002). Ancient Mesopotamia -- the home of the Sumerians, Babylonians, and Assyrians who wrote in cuneiform script on durable clay tablets -- was the locus of many of history’s “firsts.” No development, however, may be as important as the formations of legal systems and legal principles revealed in contracts, trial records, and law collections (“codes”), among which “The Laws of Hammurabi” (r. 1792-1750 BC) stands as most important for understanding subsequent legal practice and thought of Mesopotamia’s cultural heirs in the Middle East and Europe until today. This course will explore the rich source materials of the Laws and relevant judicial and administration documents (all in English translations) to investigate topics of legal, social, and economic practice including family formation and dissolution, crime and punishment (sympathetic or talionic “eye for an eye,” pecuniary, corporal), and procedure (contracts, trials, ordeals). 

Instructor(s): Martha Roth     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 20019,SIGN 26022,NEHC 30019

NEHC 20033. Monsters and Magic in the Ancient Near East. 100 Units.

Students in this course will explore and engage two categories frequently deployed in the study of ancient and modern societies—“magic” and “monsters”—through interaction with textual and iconographic material from the ancient 

Instructor(s): Matthew Richey     Terms Offered: Spring

NEHC 20060. The Discovery of Egypt in the Age of European Enlightenment. 100 Units.

The discovery of Egypt in the age of European Enlightenment and its aftermath

Instructor(s): Nadine Moeller     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26032

NEHC 20121. The Bible and Archaeology. 100 Units.

In this course we will look at how interpretation of evidence unearthed by archaeologists contributes to a historical-critical reading of the Bible, and vice versa. We will focus on the cultural background of the biblical narratives, from the stories of Creation and Flood to the destruction of the Jerusalem temple by the Romans in the year 70. No prior coursework in archaeology or biblical studies is required, although it will be helpful for students to have taken JWSC 20120 (Introduction to the Hebrew Bible).

Instructor(s): David Schloen     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the College’s general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30121,RLST 20408,JWSC 20121

NEHC 20160. Central Asia Past and Present. 100 Units.

Central Asia Past and Present serves as a multi-disciplinary course, spanning anthropology, history and political science. This course introduces students to the fluid, political-geographic concept of Central Asia as well as to the historical and cultural dimensions of this particular and oft-redefined world.  My understanding of Central Asia comes from studies of ex-Soviet Central Asia, which includes five independent countries (since 1991) within central Eurasia--the former U.S.S.R. Thus the course encompasses Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan in addition to parts of northern Iran, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, and western China (Xinjiang/Sinkiang).  Students will familiarize themselves with universal and divergent factors among the Central Asian peoples based on phenomena such as human migrations, cross-cultural influences, historical events, and the economic organization of peoples based on local ecology and natural boundaries. Working together and as individuals, we will study maps and atlases to gain a fuller understanding of historical movements and settlements of the Central Asian peoples.  In addition to lectures and book discussions, I will present photographs, slides, and video from fieldwork in Central Asia as well as professional documentary and art films about the societies of this area. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): none
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30160

NEHC 20223. Narratives of Assimilation. 100 Units.

Engaging the concept of liminality—of a community at the threshold of radical transformation—the course analyzes how East Central European Jewry, facing economic uncertainties and dangers of modern anti-Semitism, seeks another diasporic space in North America. Projected against the historical backdrop of the end of the nineteenth century and the twentieth century, the immigration narratives are viewed through the lens of assimilation, its trials and failures; in particular, we investigate why efforts of social, cultural and economic inclusion cannot be mistaken with imposing on a given minority the values of majority. One of the main points of interests is the creative self ‘s reaction to the challenges of radical otherness, such as the new environment, its cultural codes and language barriers. We discuss the manifold strategies of artistic (self)-representations of the Jewish writers, many of whom came from East Central European shtetls to be confronted again with economic hardship and assimilation to the American metropolitan space and life style. During this course, we inquire how the condition called assimilation and its attendants—integration, secularization, acculturation, cosmopolitanism, etc.—are adapted or resisted according to the generational differences, a given historical moment or inherited strategies of survival and adaptation. The course draws on the writings of Polish-Jewish, Russian-Jewish, and American-Jewish authors in English translation.

Instructor(s): Bożena Shallcross     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 26623,NEHC 30223,REES 27003,REES 37003,JWSC 20223

NEHC 20501-20502-20503. Islamic History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the main trends in the political history of the Islamic world, with some attention to economic, social, and intellectual history. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

NEHC 20501. Islamic History and Society I: The Rise of Islam and the Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general eduation requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30501,HIST 25704,HIST 35704,ISLM 30500,RLST 20501

NEHC 20502. Islamic History and Society II: The Middle Period. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30502,HIST 25804,HIST 35804,ISLM 30600

NEHC 20503. Islamic History and Society III: The Modern Middle East. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25904,HIST 35904,ISLM 30700,NEHC 30503

NEHC 20601-20602-20603. Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III.

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

NEHC 20601. Islamic Thought and Literature I. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 950, concentrating on the career of the Prophet Muhammad; Qur‘an and Hadith; the Caliphate; the development of Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical discourses; sectarian movements; and Arabic literature.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30601,RLST 20401,SOSC 22000,HIST 25610,HIST 35610,ISLM 30601

NEHC 20602. Islamic Thought and Literature II. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 950 to 1700, surveying works of literature, theology, philosophy, sufism, politics, history, etc., written in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, as well as the art, architecture and music of the Islamicate traditions. Through primary texts, secondary sources and lectures, we will trace the cultural, social, religious, political and institutional evolution through the period of the Fatimids, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, and the "gunpowder empires" (Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals).

Instructor(s): F. Lewis     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30602,RLST 20402,SOSC 22100,ISLM 30602,CMES 30602

NEHC 20603. Islamic Thought and Literature III. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1700 to the present, exploring works of Arab intellectuals who interpreted various aspects of Islamic philosophy, political theory, and law in the modern age. We look at diverse interpretations concerning the role of religion in a modern society, at secularized and historicized approaches to religion, and at the critique of both religious establishments and nation-states as articulated by Arab intellectuals. Generally, we discuss secondary literature first and the primary sources later.

Instructor(s): Franklin Lewis     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30603,RLST 20403,SOSC 22200

NEHC 20605. Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Islamic History. 100 Units.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamic history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36005,NEHC 30605,HIST 26005

NEHC 20630. Introduction to Islamic Philosophy. 100 Units.

This course offers an introduction to the terms and concepts current in Arabic philosophical writings in the classical period of Islamic thought (roughly 9th to 17th century). It begins with the movement to translate Greek texts into Arabic and the debate among Muslims about the validity of philosophy versus revelation. From a close reading of key works (in English) by important philosophers such as al-Kindī, al-Rāzī, al-Sijistānī, al-Fārābī, Ibn Sīnā (Avicenna), al-Ghazzālī, Ibn Bājja, Ibn Tufayl, Ibn Rushd (Averroes), Suhrawardī, and Mullā Ṣadrā, a series of lectures will follow the career of philosophy in the Islamic world, first as a ‘foreign’ science and then, later, as selectively rejected but also substantially accepted as a natural component of sophisticated discourse.

Instructor(s): P. Walker     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ISLM 30630

NEHC 20766. Shamans and Oral Poets of Central Asia. 100 Units.

This course explores the rituals, oral literature, and music associated with the nomadic cultures of Central Eurasia.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): NEHC 20765 and 20766 may be taken in sequence or individually.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30766,ANTH 25906

NEHC 20840. Radical Islamic Pieties, 1200 to 1600. 100 Units.

Some knowledge of primary languages (i.e., Arabic, French, German, Greek, Latin, Persian, Spanish, Turkish) helpful. This course examines responses to the Mongol destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258 and the background to formation of regional Muslim empires. Topics include the opening of confessional boundaries; Ibn Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Ibn Khaldun; the development of alternative spiritualities, mysticism, and messianism in the fifteenth century; and transconfessionalism, antinomianism, and the articulation of sacral sovereignties in the sixteenth century. All work in English. This course is offered in alternate years.

Instructor(s): C. Fleischer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25901,HIST 35901,RLST 20840

NEHC 20921. Arab America. 100 Units.

In this course, we will read a variety of texts that imagine or represent the Arab experience of exile to and diaspora within the United States, focusing on the ways that these texts re-construct and imagine the key dialectic of home/diasporic space, specifically within the framework of the complicated and dynamic relationship between the Arab world and the United States. Throughout the quarter, the readings would enable us to engage with several key concepts related to the Arab (and broader) immigrant experience in the US, including race, memory and nostalgia, language, and second-generational post-memory, as well as the role of the immigrant community in forming the ‘homeland’s’ vision of itself. We would begin with a historical overview of emigration from the Arabic-speaking world, beginning with the vast emigration of Lebanese and Syrians from Mount Lebanon and Syria in the mid-nineteenth century, but will pay particular attention to moments in which this identity has been or become particularly fraught, for example, following such events as the 1967 war, the 9/11 attacks, or the recent Executive Order by the Trump Administration (1/2017). 

Instructor(s): Ghenwa Hayek     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26026,NEHC 30921

NEHC 20944. Who Owns the Past? 100 Units.

Humans across cultures have historically attached great religious, cultural, political, and social value to a variety of cultural artifacts and sites, usually with significant immediate and historical consequences. Political ideologies, such as colonialism and nationalism, wars, poverty, a thriving illicit antiquities market: all of these are entwined with the ways in which the knowledge about the past is manipulated, collected, interpreted, presented, preserved, and destroyed to create meaning in the present. This course explores this relationship between past cultural heritage and the present through a cross-cultural and cross-disciplinary survey of the human obsession with the past. We will consider a variety of topics such as the history of archaeology, the antiquities trade, and disputes over cultural ownership, along with a discussion of the repatriation of artifacts and current controversies surrounding antiquities around the globe.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

NEHC 24800. Jews and Arabs: Three Moralities, Historiographies & Roadmaps. 100 Units.

A distinction will be made between mainly three approaches to Zionism: essentialist-proprietary, constructivist-egalitarian, and critical-dismissive. This will be followed by an explication of these approaches’ implications for four issues: pre-Zionist Jewish history; institutional and territorial arrangements in Israel/Palestine concerning the relationships between Jews and the Palestinians; the relationships between Israeli Jews and world Jewry; and the implications of these approaches for the future of Israel/Palestine and the future of Judaism.

Instructor(s): C. Gans     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): PLSC 38510,JWSC 20233,NEHC 34800,PLSC 28510

NEHC 25147. Anthropology of Israel. 100 Units.

This seminar explores the dynamics of Israeli culture and society through a combination of weekly screenings of Israeli fiction and documentary films with readings from ethnographic and other relevant research. Among the (often overlapping) topics to be covered in this examination of the institutional and ideological construction of Israeli identity/ies: the absorption of immigrants; ethnic, class, and religious tensions; the kibbutz; military experience; the Holocaust; evolving attitudes about gender and sexuality; the struggle for minorities’ rights; and Arab-Jewish relations. 

Instructor(s): Morris Fred     Terms Offered: Spring,TBD
Prerequisite(s): Undergrads must be upper division (3rd and 4th years)
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 35150,CMES 35150,NEHC 35147,ANTH 25150,JWSC 25149,MAPS 35150

NEHC 25149. Architecture and the Zionist Imagination. 100 Units.

This course explores the intersection of form and ideology through the example of the built environments (both speculative and realized) that were part of the formation of the Jewish state and its history. We will follow the evolution of Israeli architecture, starting with the interwar period, in which Zionist institutions were built in Palestine under British colonial rule. In this context, debates centered on the question of how different modernist styles developed in Europe and imported to the Middle East can respond to different streams within Zionism. We then move on to the period of nation-building, in which attempts were made to develop an Israeli architectural style that would respond to the waves of immigration and the formation of state institutions. Now, a debate emerged between the modernist style that came to represent an emergent tradition, and a new generation of architects who sought to develop a more local idiom. The current phase of Israeli architecture is influenced by the political turn to the right, the institution of liberal economic policies, the arrival of a large wave of post-Soviet Russian immigrants, and an opening to global commerce, all of which have weakened the nation state. In addition to studying this architectural history, we will engage with cultural texts (literary, filmic, artistic) that imagine and describe Zionist spaces and places, starting with Theodor Herzl’s Zionist Utopia, Altneuland, and all the way through contemporary TV sitco

Instructor(s): A. Nitzan-Shiftan and N. Rokem     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 36510,NEHC 35149,ARTH 26510

NEHC 26150. The Modern Discovery of the Ancient Middle East: Archaeology. 100 Units.

The class studies the ways in which modern archaeology shaped discourses in the Middle East regarding nationalism, colonialism, culture, and modernity; we will likewise explore the rise of the discipline in Europe and the United States. We will begin our class studying Napoleon's occupation of Egypt (1798), and the archaeological activities it inspired and end our discussions with very recent debates about cultural heritage, pertinent to the Iraq War and the battle against the Islamic State. Great emphasis in the class will be placed on how Arab, Turkish, Iranian and Zionist national movements appropriated the ancient past in order to make modern claims about territoriality and ethnicity. 

Instructor(s): Orit Bashkin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 36150

NEHC 26151. The History of Iraq in the 20th Century. 100 Units.

The class explores the history of Iraq during the years 1917-2015. We will discuss the rise of the Iraqi nation state, Iraqi and Pan-Arab nationalism, and Iraqi authoritarianism. The class will focus on the unique histories of particular group in Iraqi society; religious groups (Shiis, Sunnis, Jews), ethnic groups (especially Kurds), classes (the urban poor, the educated middle classes, the landed and tribal elites), Iraqi women, and Iraqi tribesmen. Other classes will explore the ideologies that became prominent in the Iraqi public sphere, from communism to Islamic radicalism. We will likewise discuss how colonialism and imperialism shaped major trends in Iraqi history. The reading materials for the class are based on a combination of primary and secondary sources: we will read together Iraqi novels, memoirs and poems (in translation), as well as British and American diplomatic documents about  to Iraq.

Instructor(s): Orit Bashkin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26028,NEHC 36151

NEHC 27001. Introduction to the History of Central Asia. 100 Units.

This course will explore the narrative history of Central Asia from rise of the nomadism up to the end of the Central Asian Timurids in the fifteenth century. We will discuss the people who lived there, the political entities that ruled, and the region’s role in the pre-modern world. This course assumes that Central Asia can be studied as a cohesive unit of historical inquiry and that its peoples, civilizations, and cultures share common elements that make this approach possible. We will devote considerable effort to problems of historiography and methodology and will explore possible solutions to these problems.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 37001

NEHC 27002. Introduction to the History Central Asia-2. 100 Units.

The focus of this class is on the social and political history of Central Eurasia from the end of the Timurid era to the present day, and will consider themes such as gender, ethnicity, religion, nation-building, nationalism, modernity discourse, language, and literature. Central Eurasia as a region is notoriously difficult to define, but in this course the geographic focus will span regions, which today comprise Mongolia, Xinjiang, Tibet, the former Soviet Republics, and will touch upon neighboring areas, including Anatolia, Iran, Siberia, and India. As a course developed to engage students with the historiographical themes within a specific regional context, we will be able to analyze the historical and cultural developments of a region crucial to Islamic history. There is no prerequisite to enroll in this course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 37002

NEHC 29023. Returning the Gaze: The West and the Rest. 100 Units.

This course provides insight into the existential predicament of internalized otherness. We investigate identity dynamics between the “West,” as the center of economic power and self-proclaimed normative humanity, and the “Rest,” as the poor, backward, volatile periphery. We will focus on self-representational strategies of the “Rest” (primarily Southeastern Europe and Russia), and the inherent internalization of the imagined western gaze whom the collective peripheral selves aim to seduce but also defy. Two discourses on identity will help us understand these self-representations: the Lacanian concepts of symbolic and imaginary identification, and various readings of the Hegelian recognition by the other in the East European context. Identifying symbolically with a site of normative humanity outside oneself places the self in a precarious position. The responses are varied but acutely felt: from self-consciousness to defiance and arrogance, to self-exoticization and self-mythicization, to self-abjection, all of which can be viewed as forms of a quest for dignity. We will also consider how these responses have been incorporated in the texture of the national, gender, and social identities in European and other peripheries. Fyodor Dostoevsky, Orhan Pamuk, Ivo Andrić, Nikos Kazantzakis, Aleko Konstantinov, Emir Kusturica, Milcho Manchevski.

Instructor(s): Angelina Ilieva     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): REES 39023,CMLT 29023,CMLT 39023,HIST 23609,HIST 33609,NEHC 39023,REES 29023

NEHC 29800. BA Paper Seminar. 100 Units.

Required of fourth-year students who are majoring in NELC. This is a workshop course designed to survey the fields represented by NELC and to assist students in researching and writing the BA paper.  Students must get a Reading and Research form from their College Adviser and complete the form in order to be registered. Signatures are needed from the adviser and Director of Undergraduate Studies. Please indicate that you wish to register for NEHC 29800 Section 01. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 4th year NELC majors only. Approval of Director of Undergraduate Studies.

NEHC 29999. BA Paper Preparation. 100 Units.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. In consultation with a faculty research adviser and with consent of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of the BA paper. Please indicate that you wish to register for NEHC 29999 Section 01 with the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): 4th year NELC majors only. Approval of Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern Languages Courses

NELG 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Greek I-II-III.

No description available.

NELG 10100. Elementary Modern Greek I. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the Greek alphabet, Modern Greek pronunciation rules and the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to communicate minimally with formulaic and rote utterances and produce words, phrases and lists.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30100,MOGK 10100

NELG 10200. Elementary Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to handle a variety of tasks and manage an uncomplicated situation using mostly formulaic and rote utterances. They will also be able to express personal meaning forming paragraphs.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10100/30100 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30200,MOGK 10200

NELG 10300. Elementary Modern Greek III. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10200/30200 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30300,MOGK 10300

NELG 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Greek I-II-III.

This course builds on the student's knowledge of modern Greek in all four skill areas through the use of authentic cultural materials (short stories, films, newspapers, etc.), with emphasis on grammar, vocabulary building, and fluency in expression and accuracy in writing.

NELG 20100. Intermediate Modern Greek I. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy. They are expected to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks and to express personal meaning by creating with the language; to ask a variety of questions to obtain simple information to satisfy needs, such as directions, prices and services. Overall they are expected to have a significant quantity and quality of language.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10300/30300
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 20100

NELG 20200. Intermediate Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy. They are able to handle successfully uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information related to their work, school, recreation, particular interests and areas of competence. They can also speak about some topics related to employment, current events and matters of public and community interest. They are able to create with language, ask questions, narrate and describe in all major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 20100
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 20200

NELG 20300. Intermediate Modern Greek III. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 20200
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 20300

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Persian Courses

PERS 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Persian I-II-III.

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Toward the end of this sequence, students are able to read, write, and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal.

PERS 10101. Elementary Persian I. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Towards the end of the sequence the students will be able to read, write and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal. The class meets three hours a week with the instructor and two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Autumn

PERS 10102. Elementary Persian II. 100 Units.

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PERS 10101

PERS 10103. Elementary Persian III. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Towards the end of the sequence the students will be able to read, write and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal. The class meets three hours a week with the instructor and two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PERS 10102

PERS 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Persian I-II-III.

This sequence deepens and expands students’ knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing, and speaking. Grammar is taught at a higher level, and a wider vocabulary enables students to read stories, articles, and poetry. Examples of classical literature and the Iranian culture are introduced.

PERS 20101. Intermediate Persian I. 100 Units.

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PERS 10103 or consent of instructor

PERS 20102. Intermediate Persian II. 100 Units.

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PERS 20101 or consent of the instructor

PERS 20103. Intermediate Persian III. 100 Units.

This sequence deepens and expands the students' knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing and speaking. Grammar will be taught at a higher level and a wider vocabulary will enable the students to read stories, articles and poetry and be introduced to examples of classical literature towards the end of the sequence. Introducing the Iranian culture will be continued. Class meets three hours a week with the instructor and (with enough students) two hours with a native informant who conducts grammatical drills and Persian conversation.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PERS 20202 or consent of the instructor

PERS 20123. Summer Intensive Intermediate Persian. 300 Units.

This course is designed for students with some previous background in the language, typically a year of elementary Persian at the college level (at the University of Chicago or another school), and who have speaking proficiency at the Novice High/Intermediate Low level on the ACTFL scale. At the conclusion of this course, students can expect to continue to develop their abilities in all aspects of the Persian language (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and to begin to access authentic Persian-language materials, such as newspaper articles, short fiction, and film. Students should also improve their speaking proficiency to the Intermediate Mid/High level on the ACTFL scale (or above). The course will introduce more complex grammatical structures, with focus on contemporary written Persian, but gradually other levels of language (colloquial, literary) are introduced. Texts include selected articles, stories, and poetry, starting with contemporary texts and introducing some classical examples towards the end of the course. All students enrolled in Summer Intensive Intermediate Persian will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/4/17
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of PERS 10103 or equivalent placement.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Sumerian Courses

SUMR 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Sumerian I-II-III.

This sequence typically begins in Winter Quarter and concludes Autumn Quarter of the next academic year. This sequence covers the elements of Sumerian grammar, with reading exercises in Ur III, pre-Sargonic, and elementary literary texts. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

SUMR 10101. Elementary Sumerian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): C. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter. This sequence is offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite(s): AKKD 10101

SUMR 10102. Elementary Sumerian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): C. Woods     Terms Offered: Spring. This sequence is offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite(s): SUMR 10101

SUMR 10103. Elementary Sumerian III. 100 Units.

This sequence covers the elements of Sumerian grammar, with reading exercises in Ur III, pre-Sargonic, and elementary literary texts.

Instructor(s): C. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn. This sequence is offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite(s): SUMR 10102

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Turkish Courses

TURK 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Turkish I-II-III.

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

TURK 10101. Elementary Turkish I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): The class meets for five hours a week

TURK 10102. Elementary Turkish II. 100 Units.

no description available

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10101
Note(s): This class meets for five hours a week

TURK 10103. Elementary Turkish III. 100 Units.

no description available

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10102
Note(s): This class meets for five hours a week

TURK 10105-10106-10107. Introduction to Old Turkic I-II-III.

An introductory sequence in the written language of the Orkhon Inscriptions, dating back to the fifth-to-eighth-century Kök Türk State of Central Eurasia, and of related inscriptions from the Yenisei River area, Mongolia, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe. The language of the inscriptions is considered to be the ancestor of the majority of Turkic languages spoken today and uses a distinctive alphabet sometimes known as the Old Turkic Runiform Alphabet. The sequence covers a brief historic overview, basic grammar, reading selections from the inscriptions in the original and in translation, and familiarization with the alphabet itself.

TURK 10105. Introduction to Old Turkic I. 100 Units.

An introductory sequence in the written language of the Orkhon Inscriptions, dating back to the fifth-to-eighth-century Kök Türk State of Central Eurasia, and of related inscriptions from the Yenisei River area, Mongolia, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe. The language of the inscriptions is considered to be the ancestor of the majority of Turkic languages spoken today and uses a distinctive alphabet sometimes known as the Old Turkic Runiform Alphabet. The sequence covers a brief historic overview, basic grammar, reading selections from the inscriptions in the original and in translation, and familiarization with the alphabet itself.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): One year of a Turkic language or the equivalent, and/or consent of the instructor

TURK 10106. Introduction to Old Turkic II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10105

TURK 10107. Introduction to Old Turkic III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10106

TURK 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Turkish I-II-III.

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish.  Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

TURK 20101. Intermediate Turkish I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Anetshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test.

TURK 20102. Intermediate Turkish II. 100 Units.

no description available

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 20101

TURK 20103. Intermediate Turkish III. 100 Units.

no description available

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TURK 20102

TURK 20123. Summer Intensive Intermediate Turkish. 300 Units.

Summer Intensive Intermediate Turkish enables students to develop strong intermediate speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills and further solidify their foundation in grammar and vocabulary. Students study Turkish as it is used in authentic media, literature, and film, and gain familiarity with Turkish culture and civilization. The course will also address the needs of those preparing to study Ottoman. The first half of the course emphasizes completing skills acquired in Beginning Turkish and improving competency, while the second half supplements this with an introductory sampling of excerpts from Turkish literature and texts, ranging from late Ottoman and early Republican period to the present time. Students will meet for 25 hours per week, including class time with the instructor and time spent with native language assistants. Several hours will be allocated each week to cultural activities such as films, presentations, and conversation tables organized around Turkish lunches and tea time. Intensive Intermediate Turkish is the equivalent of the 20100-20200-20300 sequence offered during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago. All students enrolled in Summer Intensive Intermediate Turkish will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-7/28/17
Prerequisite(s): Successful completion of TURK 10300 or equivalent placement.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Uzbek Courses

There are currently no courses offered in this subject.


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Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
James Osborne
OR 230
773.702.0568
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Department Coordinator
Amanda Young
Pick Hall 304
773.702.3183
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Department Assistant
Amina Dreessen
Pick Hall 301
773.702.9512
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