Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Grading | Advising | BA Paper Seminar | Honors | Minor Program in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations | Course Listings for Academic Year 2016–17 by Subject | Courses

Department Website: http://nelc.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The BA degree programs in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations (NELC) are as varied as the wide subject matter they embrace. Areas of specialization within NELC include:

  • Archaeology and Art of the Ancient Near East
  • Classical Hebrew Language and Civilization
  • Cuneiform Studies (including Assyriology, Hittitology, and Sumerology)
  • Egyptology/Egyptian Languages and Civilization
  • Islamic and Modern Middle Eastern Studies (including Arabic, Armenian, Modern Hebrew, Kazakh, Persian, Turkish, and Uzbek)
  • Near Eastern Judaica

Students who major in NELC learn one or more of the primary native languages as a means of access to the cultures of the ancient Near East and the modern Middle East. Students who plan to do advanced work in Near Eastern studies are strongly encouraged also to develop a reading knowledge of German and French. In consultation with the counselor for undergraduate studies, each student chooses an area of specialization and devises a program of study that provides a sound basis for graduate work in that area or for a career in museology, business, government, or other disciplines.

Students who major in other fields of study may wish to minor in NELC. The minor program is described below, after the description of the major.

Program Requirements

Thirteen courses and a BA paper are required for a NELC major.  

Two or three quarters of one of the following civilization sequences: *200-300
Archaeology of the Ancient Near East I-II-III-IV-V-VI
Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I-II-III
Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I-II-III
Ancient Empires I-II-III
Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I-II-III
Islamic History and Society I-II-III
Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III
Six courses in one of the Near Eastern languages (e.g., Akkadian, Arabic, Armenian, Egyptian, Hebrew, Kazakh, Persian, Turkish, Uzbek). Credit for language courses may not be granted by examination or petition.600
Three or four elective courses in the student’s area of specialization. These courses must be chosen in consultation with the counselor for undergraduate studies. They may consist of additional NELC language courses, an additional NELC civilization sequence, or approved courses in areas such as archaeology, art, literature in translation, history, and religion.300-400
NEHC 29800BA Paper Seminar **100
Total Courses in the Major1300
*

In addition to the above sequences, students may opt to take two or three courses from the Jewish civilization courses with course codes in the ranges JWSC 20120–20199 and JWSC 20220–20299, which are cross-listed with NEHC numbers. Jewish civilization courses may be taken in any order and may be used to fulfill the College’s general education requirement in civilization studies. To fulfill the general education civilization requirement, at least one course must pertain to the ancient or medieval periods (in the range JWSC 20120–20199), and at least one course must pertain to the modern period (in the range JWSC 20220–20299). Note that the course sequences NEAA 20001-20002-20003-20004-20005-20006 Archeology of the Ancient Near East does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies and is not offered in sequential order. All of the other NELC civilization sequences do meet the general education requirement.

**

Required of all NELC majors. It is to be taken in the Autumn Quarter of the year in which the student expects to graduate. The seminar and BA paper are described below.

Summary of Requirements

Six courses in one Near Eastern language at any level600
Two or three courses in one approved civilization sequence *200-300
Four or three approved electives relating to the Near East **300-400
NEHC 29800BA Paper Seminar100
Total Courses in the Major1300
*

If a Near Eastern civilization sequence is used to meet the College general education requirement, a second Near Eastern civilization sequence is required for the NELC major.

**

May include NEHC 29999 BA Paper Preparation.

Grading

All courses used to meet requirements in the major must be taken for quality grades with the exception of the NEHC 29800 BA Paper Seminar, which is taken for P/F grading.

Advising

As soon as they declare their major in NELC, students must consult the counselor for undergraduate studies to plan their programs of study. In autumn quarter of their fourth year, all NELC students must see the counselor for undergraduate studies with an updated degree program and transcript.

BA Paper Seminar

Candidates for the BA degree in NELC are required to write a substantial BA paper. The paper gives the student the opportunity to research a topic of interest and to improve writing and presentation skills.

It is the student's responsibility, in his or her third year, to approach a NELC faculty member with a request to serve as the student's faculty research adviser. The student and the faculty adviser together decide on a topic for the BA paper. The topic must be registered in the NELC department office by Monday of tenth week in Spring Quarter of the student's third year. Forms to register the topic are available at: nelc.uchicago.edu/sites/nelc.uchicago.edu/files/BAPaperProposal_1.pdf.

Students are required to register for the NEHC 29800 BA Paper Seminar in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. A passing grade (P) for the seminar depends on full attendance and participation throughout the quarter. The BA Paper Seminar is a workshop course designed to survey the fields represented by NELC and to assist students in researching and writing their BA papers. Students continue working on their BA papers during the following quarters, meeting at intervals with their faculty research advisers. They may register for NEHC 29999 BA Paper Preparation during the Winter Quarter to devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of the paper; the paper grade, reported in the Spring Quarter, will be the grade for the course NEHC 29999 BA Paper Preparation. See the course description below.

Students taking a double major may, with the permission of the NELC counselor for undergraduate studies, write a single BA paper that is designed to meet the requirements of both majors, provided that the faculty research adviser is a member of the NELC faculty. Approval from both program chairs is required. A consent form, to be signed by the chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

The completed BA paper with the BA Paper Completion Form (from the NELC office) must be submitted to the NELC office by Monday of third week in Spring Quarter. The faculty research adviser will grade the paper and then will submit it to the NELC counselor for undergraduate studies by Monday of fifth week in Spring Quarter. Students who fail to meet the deadline will not be eligible for honors and may not be able to graduate in that quarter.

The above information assumes a Spring Quarter graduation. Students who expect to graduate in other quarters must consult the NELC counselor for undergraduate studies prior to the quarter in which they expect to graduate.

Honors

Students who complete their course work and their BA papers with distinction are considered for honors. To be eligible for honors, students must have an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher, they must have a NELC GPA of 3.5 or higher, and they must have earned a grade of A on the BA paper.

Minor Program in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations

The minor in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations requires a total of six courses. Students may choose one of two tracks: (1) a language track that includes three courses of one NELC language at any level, or (2) a culture track that replaces language study with courses in such topics as archaeology, history, religion, or literature in translation. Both tracks require a two- or three-quarter NELC civilization sequence.

Students who wish to take a minor in NELC must meet with the counselor for undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Courses must be chosen in consultation with the counselor. Students must submit the counselor's approval for the minor program to their College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

Courses in the minor may not be double counted with a student's major(s) or with other minors, and they may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades. More than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Listed below are sample sets of courses that meet the requirements of the NELC minor.

Language Track Sample Minor

AKKD 10101-10102-10103Elementary Akkadian I-II-III *300
NEHC 20001-20002-20003Ancient Near Eastern History and Society I-II-III300
Total Units600

Language Track Sample Minor

ARAB 20101-20102-20103Intermediate Arabic I-II-III *300
NEHC 20601-20602-20603Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III300
Total Units600

Culture Track Sample Minor

NEHC 20011-20012-20013Ancient Empires I-II-III300
NEHC 20004-20005-20006Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature I-II-III300
Total Units600
*

Consult the counselor for undergraduate studies about the level of the language (introductory, intermediate, or advanced) required to meet the language track requirement. Students may not petition for credit to meet the language requirement for the minor program.


Course Listings for Academic Year 2016–17 by Subject

All undergraduate courses being offered in the 2016–17 academic year are listed below, by subject. Upper-level courses and the most up-to-date course information can be found in the NELC section of the quarterly class schedules

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Akkadian Courses

AKKD 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Akkadian I-II-III.

The first two quarters of this sequence cover the elements of Babylonian grammar and the cuneiform writing system, with reading exercises in Old Babylonian texts (ca. 1900 to 1600 B.C.), such as the Laws of Hammurabi. The third quarter introduces Standard Babylonian, the literary language of ca. 1200 to 600 B.C., with readings in royal inscriptions and literary texts.

AKKD 10101. Elementary Akkadian I. 100 Units.

Introduction to the grammar of Akkadian, specifically to the Old Babylonian dialect.

Instructor(s): Reculeau, Hervé     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing

AKKD 10102. Elementary Akkadian II. 100 Units.

Readings from the Code of Hammurapi, in the Old Babylonian dialect of Akkadian.

Instructor(s): Wee, John     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): AKKD 10101 or equivalent

AKKD 10103. Elementary Akkadian III. 100 Units.

Selected readings of Akkadian texts in the Standard Babylonian dialect of the 1st millennium BC.

Instructor(s): Paulus, Susanne     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): AKKD 10102 or equivalent

AKKD 20601. Intermediate Akkadian: Myths of Creation and Destruction. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Wee, John     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 1 Year of Akkadian

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Ancient Anatolian Languages Courses

AANL 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Hittite I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence covers the basic grammar and cuneiform writing system of the Hittite language. It also familiarizes students with the field’s tools (i.e., dictionaries, lexica, sign list). Readings come from all periods of Hittite history (1650 to 1180 BC).

AANL 10101. Elementary Hittite I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second Year Standing

AANL 10102. Elementary Hittite II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): AANL 10101 or equivalent

AANL 10103. Elementary Hittite III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): AANL 10102 or equivalent

AANL 20127. Advanced Readings: Hittite Historical Texts. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Goedegebuure, Petra     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): AANL 10103

AANL 20128. Advanced Readings: Hittite Wisdom Literature. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is the close reading and analysis of selected Hittite texts; specific texts and topics may vary from year to year.

Instructor(s): Goedegebuure, Petra     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): AANL 10103

AANL 20301. Hieroglyphic Luwian I. 100 Units.

This course introduces the student to the grammar and writing system of the Hieroglyphic Luwian language of the first millennium BC (1000 to 700). Once the grammar is discussed, older and younger texts of that period are read, including the Karatepe Bilingual.

Instructor(s): Goedegebuure, Petra     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor

AANL 20302. Hieroglyphic Luwian II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the Hieroglyphic Luwian inscriptions of the second millennium BC. Since Hieroglyphic Luwian I (AANL 20301) is required this course will not offer a grammatical overview but start with the texts immediately.

Instructor(s): Goedegebuure, Petra     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): AANL 20301 and consent of Instructor.

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Arabic Courses

ARAB 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Arabic I-II-III.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic. The class meets for six hours a week.

ARAB 10101. Elementary Arabic I. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic. The class meets for six hours a week.

Instructor(s): N. Forster, O. abu-Eledam, L. Choudar     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): The class meets for six hours a week

ARAB 10102. Elementary Arabic II. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Instructor(s): L. Choudar, O. abu-Eledam, N. Forster     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 10101 or equivalent
Note(s): The class meets for six hours a week

ARAB 10103. Elementary Arabic III. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on the acquisition of speaking, reading, and aural skills in modern formal Arabic.

Instructor(s): O. abu-Eledam, L. Choudar, N. Forster     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 10102 or equivalent
Note(s): The class meets for six hours a week

ARAB 10250. Colloquial Levantine Arabic. 100 Units.

Spoken Levantine Arabic is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions and grammar, the course will build the students’ competence in spoken Arabic. Students will also be introduced to the Levantine culture of Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, and Palestine.

Instructor(s): O. abu-Eledam     Terms Offered: Winter

ARAB 10254. Egyptian Colloquial Arabic. 100 Units.

Colloquial Arabic is a proficiency-based course designed to develop the linguistic skills necessary for personal day-to-day life. The course focuses on spoken rather than Standard written Arabic, and will therefore target primarily the oral/aural skills. Through the knowledge of Modern Standard Arabic and the introduction of colloquial vocabulary, expressions, and grammar, the course will build the students’ competence in spoken Arabic.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 10102 or equivalent

ARAB 19999. Skills Review for Intermediate Arabic. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy     Terms Offered: Autumn

ARAB 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Arabic I-II-III.

This sequence concentrates on speaking, reading, and aural skills at the intermediate level of modern formal Arabic.

ARAB 20101. Intermediate Arabic I. 100 Units.

This sequence concentrates on speaking, reading, and aural skills at the intermediate level of modern formal Arabic.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy, L. Choudar, K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 10103 or equivalent

ARAB 20102. Intermediate Arabic II. 100 Units.

ARAB 20102 is the winter quarter continuation of the Intermediate Arabic course that began with ARAB 20101 last fall. We are working through the central chapters of Al-Kitaab Part 2. As in any language class, we address all four of the fundamental skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking. A particular focus this quarter is making sure that students have a solid, comprehensive understanding of the rules of Arabic syntax. In addition to readings and exercises from the textbook, we often look at articles from Arabic-language news media.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy, L. Choudar, K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20101 or equivalent

ARAB 20103. Intermediate Arabic III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy, K. Heikkinen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARAB 20102 or equivalent

ARAB 20351. Maghribi Colloquial & Culture. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Choudar, Lakhdar     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): One year of MSA.
Equivalent Course(s): ARAB 30351

ARAB 20390. Arabic in Social Context. 100 Units.

Designed for the advanced student of MSA, this course aims to improve listening comprehension and instill an awareness of the social associations accompanying different speech/writing styles. Students will intensively listen to audio/video materials clustered around the themes of diglossia and code-switching; gendered discourse; urban-rural; class. A heavily aural course, class activities will involve student presentations (group and solo), discussion groups, and, to a lesser degree, textual analysis.

Instructor(s): N. Forster
Prerequisite(s): Three years of Arabic

ARAB 20588. Media Arabic. 100 Units.

Media Arabic is a course designed for the advanced student of Modern Standard Arabic. The course objective is to improve students' listening comprehension skills. Students will advance toward this goal through listening to a variety of authentic materials from Arabic TV (on politics, literature, economics, education, women, youth, etc.).

Instructor(s): H. Abdel Mobdy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): At least two years of Modern Standard Arabic
Equivalent Course(s): ARAB 30588

ARAB 29001. Arabic through Film. 100 Units.

This course immerses the student in Arabic through the genre of film, specifically, Egyptian film, a potent and pervasive medium since Arabs started making films in the 1920s, but more pervasive with the advent of television in the early 1960s. Proceeding chronologically, we examine the Egyptian film through distinct stages, from the early musicals and romantic comedies of the forties and fifties, to the slew of post-1952 films offering new notions of the nation, of citizens, of womanhood, to the films of the 1970s with their commentary on the new capitalist society Sadat espoused, to the nuanced realism and focus on individual angst of the 1980s and 90s, to the gritty realism of the pre and post Arab Spring period.

Instructor(s): N. Forster     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: 2 years of MSA or equivalent

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Aramaic Courses

ARAM 10101-10102-10103. Biblical Aramaic; Old Aramaic Inscriptions; Imperial Aramaic.

Three quarter sequence in Aramaic spanning Biblical Aramaic (Autumn), Old Aramaic (Spring), and Imperial Aramaic (Winter).

ARAM 10101. Biblical Aramaic. 100 Units.

Course in Biblical Aramaic

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing and knowledge of Classical Hebrew
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 11000

ARAM 10102. Old Aramaic Inscriptions. 100 Units.

Course in Old Aramaic Inscriptions

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing and ARAM 10101
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 11100

ARAM 10103. Imperial Aramaic. 100 Units.

Course in Imperial Aramaic

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing and ARAM 10102
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 11200

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Armenian Courses

ARME 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Modern Armenian I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and basic grammatical structures and to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

ARME 10101. Elementary Modern Armenian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EEUR 21100

ARME 10102. Elementary Modern Armenian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARME 10101
Equivalent Course(s): EEUR 21200

ARME 10103. Elementary Modern Armenian III. 100 Units.

The course utilizes the most advanced computer technology and audio-visual aids enabling the students to master a core vocabulary, the alphabet and basic grammatical structures and to achieve a reasonable level of proficiency in modern formal and spoken Armenian (one of the oldest Indo-European languages). A language competency exam is offered at the end of spring quarter for those taking this course as college language requirement. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARME 10102
Equivalent Course(s): EEUR 21300

ARME 10501. Introduction to Classical Armenian. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the basic structure and vocabulary of the Classical Armenian language of Grabar, which is one of the oldest Indo-European languages. Course work enables students to acquire the alphabet, phonology, and grammar to achieve basic reading skills in the Classical Armenian language. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature. This course is recommended for students who intend to conduct research in Armenian studies, Indo-European studies, or general linguistics.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARAM 10103

ARME 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Modern Armenian I-II-III.

The goal of this three-quarter sequence is to enable students to reach an advanced level of proficiency in the Armenian language. This sequence covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media.

ARME 20101. Intermediate Modern Armenian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARME 10103

ARME 20102. Intermediate Modern Armenian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARME 20101

ARME 20103. Intermediate Modern Armenian III. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence enables the students to reach an Intermediate level of proficiency in the Armenian language. The course covers a rich vocabulary and complex grammatical structures in modern formal and colloquial Armenian. Reading assignments include a selection of original Armenian literature and excerpts from mass media. A considerable amount of historical-political and social-cultural issues about Armenia are skillfully built into the course for students who have intention to conduct research in Armenian Studies or to pursue work in Armenia.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARME 20102

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Egyptian Courses

EGPT 10101-10102. Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs I-II.

This sequence examines hieroglyphic writing and the grammar of the language of classical Egyptian literature.

EGPT 10101. Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): R. Ritner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 30500

EGPT 10102. Introduction to Middle Egyptian Hieroglyphs II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): R. Ritner     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101 or consent of the instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 30501

EGPT 10103. Middle Egyptian Texts I. 100 Units.

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

Instructor(s): J. Johnson     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102 or consent of the instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 30502

EGPT 10201. Introduction to Coptic. 100 Units.

This course introduces the last native language of Egypt, which was in common use during the late Roman, Byzantine, and early Islamic periods (fourth to tenth centuries CE). Grammar and vocabulary of the standard Sahidic dialect are presented in preparation for reading biblical, monastic, and Gnostic literature, as well as a variety of historical and social documents.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing required; knowledge of earlier Egyptian language phases or Classical Greek or Koine Greek helpful but not required
Equivalent Course(s): HCHR 30601

EGPT 10202. Coptic Texts. 100 Units.

This course builds on the basics of grammar learned in EGPT 10201 and provides readings in a variety of Coptic texts (e.g., monastic texts, biblical excerpts, tales, Gnostic literature).

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10201
Equivalent Course(s): HCHR 30602

EGPT 20101. Middle Egyptian Texts II. 100 Units.

This course features readings in a variety of genres, including historical, literary, and scientific texts.

Instructor(s): J. Johnson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or consent of the instructor

EGPT 20102. Introduction to Hieratic. 100 Units.

This course introduces the cursive literary and administrative script of Middle Egyptian (corresponding to the Middle Kingdom period in Egypt) and is intended to provide familiarity with a variety of texts written in hieratic (e.g., literary tales, religious compositions, wisdom literature, letters, accounts, graffiti).

Instructor(s): B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or equivalent required; EGPT 20101 recommended

EGPT 20110. Introduction to Old Egyptian. 100 Units.

This course examines the hieroglyphic writing and grammar of the Old Kingdom (Egypt's "Pyramid Age"), focusing on monumental readings from private tombs, royal and private stelae, administrative decrees, economic documents, and Pyramid texts. Some attention is given to Old Egyptian texts written in cursive Hieratic.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or equivalent required; EGPT 20101 recommended

EGPT 20210. Introduction to Late Egyptian. 100 Units.

This course is a comprehensive examination of the grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles of the nonliterary vernacular of New Kingdom Egypt (Dynasties XVII to XXIV), as exhibited by administrative and business documents, private letters, and official monuments. We also study the hybrid "literary Late Egyptian" used for tales and other compositions. Texts from the various genres are read and analyzed in EGPT 20211.

Instructor(s): J. Johnson     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 10101-10102-10103 or equivalent required; EGPT 20101 recommended

EGPT 20211. Late Egyptian Texts. 100 Units.

Building on the basics of grammar, vocabulary, and orthographic styles learned in EGPT 20210, this course focuses on the reading and analysis of Late Egyptian texts from the various genres.

Instructor(s): B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): EGPT 20210
Equivalent Course(s): ANCM 34200

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Ge'ez Courses

GEEZ 10101-10102. Elementary Ge'ez I-II.

This is a two quarter sequence introducing the fundamental grammar and writing structure of Ge'ez (Classical Ethiopic).

GEEZ 10101. Elementary Ge'ez I. 100 Units.

This course introduces the fundamentals of Ge’ez (Classical Ethiopic) with an overview of grammar and the writing system, as well as exercises in reading early monumental and simple narrative texts.

Instructor(s): R. Hasselbach     Terms Offered: Spring

GEEZ 10102. Elementary Ge'ez II. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction to the grammar and script of Classical Ethiopic (Ge'ez).

Instructor(s): R. Hasselbach     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GEEZ 10101

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Hebrew Courses

HEBR 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Classical Hebrew I-II-III.

The purpose of this three-quarter sequence is to enable the student to read biblical Hebrew prose with a high degree of comprehension. The course is divided into two segments: (1) the first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis); and (2) the third quarter is spent examining prose passages from the Hebrew Bible and includes a review of grammar.

HEBR 10101. Elementary Classical Hebrew I. 100 Units.

The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis).

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This class meets 5 times a week
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22000

HEBR 10102. Elementary Classical Hebrew II. 100 Units.

The first two quarters are devoted to acquiring the essentials of descriptive and historical grammar (including translation to and from Hebrew, oral exercises, and grammatical analysis).

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10101 or equivalent
Note(s): This class meets 5 times a week
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22100

HEBR 10103. Elementary Classical Hebrew III. 100 Units.

The third quarter is spent examining prose passages from the Hebrew Bible and includes a review of grammar.

Instructor(s): S. Creason     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10102
Note(s): This class meets 5 times a week
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22200

HEBR 10501-10502-10503. Introductory Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

This three quarter course introduces students to reading, writing, and speaking modern Hebrew. All four language skills are emphasized: comprehension of written and oral materials; reading of nondiacritical text; writing of directed sentences, paragraphs, and compositions; and speaking. Students learn the Hebrew root pattern system and the seven basic verb conjugations in both the past and present tenses, as well as simple future. At the end of the year, students can conduct short conversations in Hebrew, read materials designed to their level, and write short essay.

HEBR 10501. Introductory Modern Hebrew I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25000

HEBR 10502. Introductory Modern Hebrew II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10501 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25100

HEBR 10503. Introductory Modern Hebrew III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10502 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25200

HEBR 20104-20105-20106. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I-II-III.

A continuation of Elementary Classical Hebrew. The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts. The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

HEBR 20104. Intermediate Classical Hebrew I. 100 Units.

The first quarter consists of reviewing grammar, and of reading and analyzing further prose texts.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10103 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22300

HEBR 20105. Intermediate Classical Hebrew II. 100 Units.

The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20104 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22400

HEBR 20106. Intermediate Classical Hebrew III. 100 Units.

The last two quarters are devoted to an introduction to Hebrew poetry with readings from Psalms, Proverbs, and the prophets.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20105 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 22500

HEBR 20501-20502-20503. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I-II-III.

The main objective of this sequence is to provide students with the skills necessary to approach modern Hebrew prose, both fiction and nonfiction. In order to achieve this task, students are provided with a systematic examination of the complete verb structure. Many syntactic structures are introduced (e.g., simple clauses, coordinate and compound sentences). At this level, students not only write and speak extensively but are also required to analyze grammatically and contextually all of material assigned.

HEBR 20501. Intermediate Modern Hebrew I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 10503 or equivalent
Note(s): The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25300

HEBR 20502. Intermediate Modern Hebrew II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20501or equivalent
Note(s): The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25400

HEBR 20503. Intermediate Modern Hebrew III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Almog     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HEBR 20502 or equivalent
Note(s): The course is devised for students who have previously taken either modern or biblical Hebrew courses.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 25500

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Kazakh Courses

KAZK 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Kazakh I-II-III.

This sequence introduces students to Kazakh, a Turkic language spoken in Kazakhstan and neighboring countries. The course teaches the fundamentals of grammar and it enables students to read, write, and speak Kazakh. Students will be exposed to the history and culture of Kazakhstan through modern and 19th-century literature, as well as to current events through mass media. The second and third quarters of this sequence and the Intermediate Kazakh sequence (KAZK 20101-20102-20103) are offered based on interest.

KAZK 10101. Elementary Kazakh I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn

KAZK 10102. Elementary Kazakh II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): STAFF     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 10101 or equivalent

KAZK 10103. Elementary Kazakh III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 10102 or equivalent

KAZK 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Kazakh I-II-III.

Second-Year Kazakh.

KAZK 20101. Intermediate Kazakh I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): First Year Kazakh at the University of Chicago, or equivalent coursework AND placement test with proficiency evaluation.

KAZK 20102. Intermediate Kazakh II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 20101

KAZK 20103. Intermediate Kazakh III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KAZK 20102

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern Art and Archaeology Courses

NEAA 10630. Islamic Art and Architecture, 1100 to 1500. 100 Units.

This course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world from 1100-1500. In that period, political fragmentation into multiple principalities challenged a deeply rooted ideology of unity of the Islamic world. The courts of the various principalities competed not only in politics, but also in the patronage of architectural projects and of arts such as textiles, ceramics, woodwork, and the arts of the book. While focusing on the central Islamic lands, we will consider regional traditions from Spain to India and the importance for the arts of contacts with China and the West.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 16709,ARTH 16709

NEAA 10631. Islamic Art and Architecture, 1500–1900. 100 Units.

This course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world from 1500–1900. This was the period of the three great Islamic empires: the Ottomans, the Safavids, and the Mughals. Each of these multi-religious, multi-linguistic, multi-ethnic empires developed styles of art and architecture that expressed their own complex identities. Further, they expressed their complex relations with each other through art and architecture. The various ways in which contact with regions beyond the Islamic world throughout this period impacted the arts will also be considered.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 16809

NEAA 20001-20002-20003-20004-20005-20006. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East I-II-III-IV-V-VI.

This sequence surveys the archaeology and art of the Near East from prehistoric times to the Hellenistic and Roman periods. Taking these courses in sequence is not required; each course in the sequence focuses on a particular cultural region. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEAA 20001. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East I: Mesopotamia. 100 Units.

This course surveys the archaeology and art of the Mesopotamia.

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: This course will not be offered in AY 2016-2017
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30001

NEAA 20002. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East II: Anatolia. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): J. Osborne     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30002

NEAA 20003. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East III: Levant. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: This course is not offered AY 2016-2017
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30003

NEAA 20004. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East IV: Pre-Islamic Arabia. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: This course is not offered AY 2016-2017
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30004

NEAA 20005. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East V: Islamic Period. 100 Units.

This survey of the regions of the Middle East presents the urban systems of each region. The focus is a comparative stratigraphy of the archaeological evidence and the contribution of this material towards an understanding of Islamic history and ancient archaeological periods in the Near East.

Instructor(s): D. Whitcomb     Terms Offered: This course is not offered AY 2016-2017
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30005

NEAA 20006. Archaeology of the Ancient Near East VI: Egypt. 100 Units.

This sequence provides a thorough survey in lecture format of the art and archaeology of ancient Egypt from the late Pre-dynastic era through the Roman period.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence does not meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30006

NEAA 20045. Economic Organization of Ancient Complex Societies. 100 Units.

This course provides undergraduate and graduate students with an overview of some of the basic theoretical and methodological issues involved in the study of ancient complex societies, primarily through archaeological evidence supplemented by textual data.

Instructor(s): G. Stein     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 26740,ANTH 36740,NEAA 30045

NEAA 20051. Method and Theory in Near Eastern Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course introduces the main issues in archaeological method and theory with emphasis on the principles and practice of Near Eastern archaeology. Topics include: (1) the history of archaeology, (2) trends in social theory and corresponding modes of archaeological interpretation, (3) the nature of archaeological evidence and issues of research design, (4) survey and excavation methods and associated recording techniques, (5) the analysis and interpretation of various kinds of excavated materials, and (6) the presentation and publication of archaeological results. This course is offered in alternate years.

Instructor(s): D. Schloen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): An introductory course in archaeology
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30051

NEAA 20061-20062. Ancient Landscapes I-II.

The landscape of the Near East contains a detailed and subtle record of environmental, social, and economic processes that have obtained over thousands of years. Landscape analysis is therefore proving to be fundamental to an understanding of the processes that underpinned the development of ancient Near Eastern society. This sequence provides an overview of the ancient cultural landscapes of this heartland of early civilization from the early stages of complex societies in the fifth and sixth millennia B.C. to the close of the Early Islamic period around the tenth century A.D.

NEAA 20061. Ancient Landscapes I. 100 Units.

No course description available.

Instructor(s): E. Hammer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30061,ANTH 36710,GEOG 25400,GEOG 35400,ANTH 26710

NEAA 20062. Ancient Landscapes II. 100 Units.

No course description available.

Instructor(s): E. Hammer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NEAA 20061: Ancient Landscapes I
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 26711,GEOG 25800,GEOG 35800,ANTH 36711

NEAA 20070. Intro to the Archaeology of Afghanistan. 100 Units.

Afghanistan is the quintessential “crossroads of cultures” where the civilizations of the Near East, Central Asia, South Asia and China interacted over the millennia in a constantly shifting mixture of trade, emulation, migration, imperial formations, and periodic conflict. This complex history of contacts gave rise to some of the most important archaeological, artistic, architectural, and textual treasures in world cultural heritage – encompassing cultures as diverse as the Bronze Age cities of Bactria, the Persian Empire, the easternmost colonies founded by Alexander the Great and his Hellenistic successors, the Kushan empire astride the Silk Road, and the monumental Buddhas of Bamiyan. This course presents an introduction to the archaeology of Afghanistan from the Neolithic through the Medieval Islamic periods, focusing on sites in Afghanistan and the region’s cultural linkages to neighboring areas such as Iran, Central Asia, and South Asia. The final portion of the course will discuss the threats to Afghan cultural heritage, and current effort to preserve this patrimony. The course is intended for both graduate and undergraduate students who have had at least one introductory course in archaeology.

Instructor(s): G. Stein     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): At least one course in archaeology
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30070

NEAA 20071. Texts in Context: Documents and Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course investigates public and private buildings in which ancient records have been found in situ, seeking to find correlations based on architecture, artifacts, and the contents of texts. Often, in the past, the findspots of texts have not been meticulously recorded, resulting in the loss of valuable information on the function of specific buildings or even rooms in buildings; the layout of a building can also give information that can add significantly to the interpretation of the texts.

Instructor(s): M. Gibson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Requires at least a year of Akkadian and NEAA 20001: Intro to Mesopotamian Archaeology, and consent of Instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30071

NEAA 20250. The Archaeology of the Amarna Period in Egypt. 100 Units.

This seminar will focus on the ancient city of Tell el-Amarna, a famous and short-lived royal capital dating to the end of the 18th Dynasty in Egypt. The aim is to explore the rich archaeological data from old and new fieldwork projects at the site and to analyse the results within the wider perspective of political and cultural changes. This includes the evidence for the monumental and domestic architecture but also the corresponding cemeteries. In addition, we will evaluate whether we can consider Amarna as a source for the study of urban society in Egypt.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Suitable for undergraduates who have taken either NEHC 20013 Ancient Empires: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom or NEAA 20006 Archaeology of the Ancient Near East VI: Egypt
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30250

NEAA 20310. The Pre-History of the Levant. 100 Units.

Students explore prehistoric and earliest proto-historic archaeology chronologically and examine topics such as evidence for the first hominids and humans in the region, the transition from small scale bands of hunter-gatherers to more complex hunter-gatherers, increasing sedentism and the Neolithic Revolution, and the rise in social inequality. Reference to other contiguous areas of the Eastern Mediterranean is included. Our objective is to survey human society through the Palaeolithic, Neolithic, Chalclolithic, and Early Bronze Ages. The latter section highlights particular topics for the major methodological and theoretical concerns for Levantine archaeology.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Introductory course in archaeology
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 26735

NEAA 20330. The Neo-Hittite and Aramaean City-States. 100 Units.

This graduate-level seminar is an in-depth exploration of archaeology, history, and iconography of the city-state culture that surrounded the northeast corner of the Mediterranean Sea during the Iron Age, ca. 1200-600 BCE. Questions to be discussed include ethnicity, the role of language in identity formation, interregional interactions with the Neo-Assyrian Empire and with the Aegean world, political economy, and conceptions of space and place. In addition to these larger themes, students will be responsible for individual projects on specific city-states of their choice.

Instructor(s): J. Osborne     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergrads should be advanced with a NEAA course background
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30330

NEAA 20501. Introduction to Islamic Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course is intended as a survey of the regions of the Islamic world from Arabia to North Africa, from Central Asia to the Gulf. The aim will be a comparative stratigraphy for the archaeological periods of the last millennium. A primary focus will be the consideration of the historical archaeology of the Islamic lands, the interaction of history and archaeology, and the study of patterns of cultural interaction over this region, which may also amplify understanding of ancient archaeological periods in the Near East.

Instructor(s): D. Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30501

NEAA 20533. Problems in Islamic Archaeology: Regional Studies. 100 Units.

This seminar will consider the development of Islamic archaeology in various aspects revealed in a new publication, The Archaeology of the Early Islamic Settlement in Palestine by Jodi Magness (Winona Lake IN: Eisenbrauns, 2003). This volume began with concerns raised in Magness’s dissertation, particularly misperceptions in the transition from Late Antiquity to Early Islam and the utilization of archaeological evidence for this problem. The specific region is southern Palestine and the Negev, where a critical mass of archaeological evidence is now available; the broader patterns of historical archaeology are implicit in research on this material.

Instructor(s): D. Whitcomb     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor
Note(s): This sequence does NOT meet the general education requirements in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 30533

NEAA 26712. Archaeological Approaches to Settlement and Landscape Survey. 100 Units.

Archaeological field survey has been instrumental in the recovery of ancient settlements and the exploration of forgotten political geographies and historical landscapes. This course covers methodology for survey archaeology through discussion of case studies and hands-on exercises. We will discuss the relationship between research questions, field conditions, and methodology as well as the various goals of survey—such as settlement pattern analysis, site catchment analysis, demographic reconstruction, and landscape archaeology—in the context of both “classical” and recent case studies drawn from the archaeology of China, the Near East, the Mediterranean, and Mesoamerica. Hands-on exercises will include training in the use of a total station, training in the use of a hand-held GPS receiver in combination with freeware mapping tools, and practice designing hypothetical archaeology surveys and data recording systems.

Instructor(s): A. Yao, E. Hammer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): One course in archaeology in any department
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 36712,NEAA 36712,ANTH 26712

NEAA 29700. Reading and Research Course: Near Eastern Art and Archaeology. 100 Units.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of faculty adviser and counselor for undergraduate studies

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern History and Civilization Courses

NEHC 10101. Introduction to the Middle East. 100 Units.

Prior knowledge of the Middle East not required. This course aims to facilitate a general understanding of some key factors that have shaped life in this region, with primary emphasis on modern conditions and their background, and to provide exposure to some of the region's rich cultural diversity. This course can serve as a basis for the further study of the history, politics, and civilizations of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15801,SIGN 26005

NEHC 16709. Islamic Art and Architecture, 1100 to 1500. 100 Units.

This course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world from 1100-1500. In that period, political fragmentation into multiple principalities challenged a deeply rooted ideology of unity of the Islamic world. The courts of the various principalities competed not only in politics, but also in the patronage of architectural projects and of arts such as textiles, ceramics, woodwork, and the arts of the book. While focusing on the central Islamic lands, we will consider regional traditions from Spain to India and the importance for the arts of contacts with China and the West.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 10630,ARTH 16709

NEHC 20003. Ancient Near Eastern History and Society III: Anatolia and Levant. 100 Units.

This course surveys the political, social, and economic history of ancient Anatolia and the Levant (Syria-Palestine) from ca. 2300 BC until the conquest of the region by Alexander that inaugurated the Hellenistic period in the Near East.

Instructor(s): P. Goedegebuure     Terms Offered: Spring. Not offered 2016-17

NEHC 20006. Ancient Near Eastern Thought and Literature III: Egypt. 100 Units.

This course employs English translations of ancient Egyptian literary texts to explore the genres, conventions and techniques of ancient Egyptian literature. Discussions of texts examine how the ancient Egyptians conceptualized and constructed their equivalent of literature, as well as the fuzzy boundaries and subtle interplay between autobiography, history, myth and fiction.

Instructor(s): B. Muhs     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30006

NEHC 20011-20012-20013. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEHC 20011. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

The first course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Hittite Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25700,HIST 15602,NEHC 30011

NEHC 20012. Ancient Empires II: The Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

The second course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Ottoman Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25800,HIST 15603,NEHC 30012

NEHC 20013. Ancient Empires III: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550–1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25900,HIST 15604,NEHC 30013

NEHC 20030. Introduction to the Qur'an. 100 Units.

This course introduces the historical context, thematic and literary features, major biblical figures, and exegetical literature on the Qur'an, with a focus on the early (8th-10th century CE) and medieval periods (11th - 15th century CE). We will read select English translations from the Qur'an and its commentators, accompanied by academic secondary literature that emphasize the Qur'an’s literary structure, theological underpinnings, historical, geographical, social, political and cultural contexts in early and medieval Islamic civilization, and the role of the Qur'an as both a fixed and a living and dynamic text in Muslim devotional life.

Instructor(s): Yousef Casewit     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Arabic is not a prerequisite, but general knowledge about Islam or an "Introduction to Islam" course is highly recommended.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30030,RLST 11030,ISLM 30030

NEHC 20037. Introduction to Islamic and Jewish Law. 100 Units.

This comparative course on Jewish and Islamic law is co-taught by Ahmed El Shamsy (Chicago, Islamic law) and Evyatar Marienberg (University of North Carolina, Jewish law). It brings together students on both campuses in one virtual classroom using videoconferencing technology. We explore the nature, structure, development, and significance of the legal system of each of these two religions. Covered topics might include laws about food, holidays, prayer, finances, relations with other groups, sexuality, the status of women, medical treatment, and more. No background knowledge of Judaism or Islam or familiarity with Hebrew or Arabic is required; all texts are provided in English.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30037

NEHC 20050. The Origins of Empire. 100 Units.

The course will examine the emergence and evolution of empire in the Ancient Near East, from Sargon of Akkad in the twenty-fourth century BCE to the collapse of the Iranian Empire in the seventh century CE. It will focus on the institutions, ideologies, and strategies ancient imperialists devised to establish and maintain control across culturally and geographically disparate populations, as well as the ways in which successive imperial systems built on the foundations of their predecessors. As a historiographical seminar, the course will debate recent scholarly works on Ancient Near Eastern empires against the backdrop of comparative historical, political-theoretical, and sociological studies of empires.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30050

NEHC 20075. The Exotic and the Exotified: Gender in the Ancient Near East. 100 Units.

This course aims to bring modern theories of gender into conversation with the study of the ancient Middle East by exploring the diverse social and religious roles of women in the ancient world. The subject has been marginalized in ancient Near Eastern studies, due in part to antiquated conceptions of ‘women and ‘the orient.’ As a result, myths of cloistered women and sacred prostitution still abound. However, a serious study of the ancient Near East will undermine these myths and show that women across the ANE held numerous different positions in society, some of which were quite influential. The course will begin with the oldest textual sources from the third millennium BCE and end with the conquest of Alexander the Great in 333 BCE, and will cover the relevant textual materials from Mesopotamia, Anatolia, the Northern and Southern Levant, and Egypt.

Instructor(s): M. E. Buck     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30075

NEHC 20085. Big: Monumental Buildings and Sculptures Past and Present. 100 Units.

Why are so many societies – including our own – obsessed with building monumental things like pyramids and palaces? What do we learn about cultures past and present from the monuments they create? This course explores famous monuments from around the world to answer these questions through the lens of archaeology, architecture, and art history.

Instructor(s): James Osborne     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26000

NEHC 20121. The Bible and Archaeology. 100 Units.

In this course we will look at how interpretation of evidence unearthed by archaeologists contributes to a historical-critical reading of the Bible, and vice versa. We will focus on the cultural background of the biblical narratives, from the stories of Creation and Flood to the destruction of the Jerusalem temple by the Romans in the year 70. No prior coursework in archaeology or biblical studies is required, although it will be helpful for students to have taken JWSC 20120 (Introduction to the Hebrew Bible).

Instructor(s): David Schloen     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the College’s general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30121,RLST 20408,JWSC 20121

NEHC 20223. Narratives of Assimilation. 100 Units.

Engaging the concept of liminality—of a community at the threshold of radical transformation—the course analyzes how East Central European Jewry, facing economic uncertainties and dangers of modern anti-Semitism, seeks another diasporic space in North America. Projected against the historical backdrop of the end of the nineteenth century and the twentieth century, the immigration narratives are viewed through the lens of assimilation, its trials and failures; in particular, we investigate why efforts of social, cultural and economic inclusion cannot be mistaken with imposing on a given minority the values of majority. One of the main points of interests is the creative self ‘s reaction to the challenges of radical otherness, such as the new environment, its cultural codes and language barriers. We discuss the manifold strategies of artistic (self)-representations of the Jewish writers, many of whom came from East Central European shtetls to be confronted again with economic hardship and assimilation to the American metropolitan space and life style. During this course, we inquire how the condition called assimilation and its attendants—integration, secularization, acculturation, cosmopolitanism, etc.—are adapted or resisted according to the generational differences, a given historical moment or inherited strategies of survival and adaptation. The course draws on the writings of Polish-Jewish, Russian-Jewish, and American-Jewish authors in English translation.

Instructor(s): Bożena Shallcross     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): REES 27003,REES 37003,RLST 26623,NEHC 30223,JWSC 20223

NEHC 20226. Jewish Literature in a Century of Transformation: 1880-1980. 100 Units.

A survey of Jewish Literature written by Jews around the globe in different languages (including Hebrew, Yiddish, Arabic, Russian, English, Polish, German) in an era of upheaval and transformation. We will discuss the literary representation of phenomena such as: the national movement and the foundation of the State of Israel; persecutions, pogroms, and the Holocaust; waves of migration, acculturation, and assimilation; the involvement of Jews in political movements, such as communism and anarchism; changing gender roles and changing ideas about the Jewish family. And we will ask: How have these events—and the modern era that they are a part of—influenced ideas about literary representation and the relationship between literature and history?

Instructor(s): Na'ama Rokem     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 20226,CMLT 30226,NEHC 30226,JWSC 20226

NEHC 20287. Egypt in Late Antiquity. 100 Units.

Egypt in Late Antiquity was a melting pot of cultures, languages, and religions. With the native Egyptians subject to a series of foreign masters (Greek and Roman), each with their own languages and religious practices, Egyptian society was marked by a rich and richly documented diversity. In this course we will pay special attention to the contact of languages and of religions, discussing on the basis of primary sources in translation different aspects characteristic of this period: the crises of the Roman Empire and their effects in Egypt, the emergence of Christianity and the decline of paganism, the development of monastic communities. The course will end at the Islamic conquest.

Instructor(s): S. Torallas-Tovar     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30287

NEHC 20416-20417-20418. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

NEHC 20416. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I. 100 Units.

This course looks at the earliest attestation of East Semitic as a language: Akkadian which was first written in the 3rd millennium BC in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq).  Akkadians were in close contact with Sumerians, the other important language of Mesopotamia, and adapted their script (cuneiform) to write a Semitic language. This class critically examines the connection between script, language, peoples and ethnos. Furthermore, this course explores the political expansion of Akkadian in connection with the development of an early “empire” and the emergence of historical, legal and literary traditions in Akkadian and its influence for the Ancient Near East and beyond. Texts covered included historical inscriptions, the Law Code of Hammu-râpi, Flood Stories and divination texts (omina). Visits to the Oriental Institute Museum will complement the exploration of the Akkadian culture. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): S. Paulus     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15702,NEHC 30416

NEHC 20417. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations II. 100 Units.

This course explores the historical evidence for several Semitic peoples who dwelled in Syria and Northern Iraq in the third to first millennia BCE (Eblaites, Amorites, Ugariteans, Assyrians). These peoples' languages belong either to the larger group of Northwest Semitic, that comprises languages such as Aramaic and Canaanite (including Biblical Hebrew), or to the northern dialects of East Semitic. The shared characteristic of these people is to have recorded their cultural legacy on clay tablets, using Mesopotamian cuneiform or an alphabetic script adapted from it, noting either their own language or several aspects of their history, culture and religion through a borrowed language (Akkadian). The class will focus on major cultural traditions that have echoes in younger records that came to be influential for the modern Middle East and for the Western world – especially the Hebrew Bible, but also some traditions of Pre-Islamic Arabia. This includes a close examination and discussion of representative ancient sources, as well as readings in modern scholarship. Ancient sources include literary, historical, and legal documents. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): H. Reculeau     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15703,NEHC 30417

NEHC 20418. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations III. 100 Units.

This course explores the histories and literatures of Aramaic- and Arabic-writing Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities in the first millennium CE. Beginning with the reception of Ancient Mesopotamian culture in late antiquity, the class will focus on the development of Syriac Christian, Rabbinic, and early Muslim sacred literatures in relation to the social, political, and economic contexts of the Roman and Iranian empires and inter-imperial Arabia. It will then turn to the literary and intellectual revival of the early Islamic caliphates, in which representatives of all three religions participated. Among the works to be read in translation are the Acts of Thomas, the Babylonian Talmud, the Qur’ān, and early Arabic poetry.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Not open to first-year students.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15704,NEHC 30418

NEHC 20501-20502-20503. Islamic History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the main trends in the political history of the Islamic world, with some attention to economic, social, and intellectual history. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

NEHC 20501. Islamic History and Society I: The Rise of Islam and the Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general eduation requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30501,HIST 25704,HIST 35704,ISLM 30500,RLST 20501

NEHC 20502. Islamic History and Society II: The Middle Period. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30502,HIST 25804,HIST 35804,ISLM 30600

NEHC 20503. Islamic History and Society III: The Modern Middle East. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Instructor(s): A. Shissler     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25904,HIST 35904,ISLM 30700,NEHC 30503

NEHC 20504. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. 100 Units.

The Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) is a complex anthology of disparate texts and reflects a diversity of religious, political, and historical perspectives from ancient Israel, Judah, and Yehud. Because this collection of texts continues to play an important role in modern religions, new meanings are often imposed upon it. In this course, we will attempt to read biblical texts apart from modern preconceptions about them. We will also contextualize their ideas and goals through comparison with texts from ancient Mesopotamia, Syro-Palestine, and Egypt. Such comparisons will demonstrate that the Hebrew Bible is fully part of the cultural milieu of the Ancient Near East. To accomplish these goals, we will read a significant portion of the Hebrew Bible in English, along with representative selections from secondary literature. We will also spend some time thinking about the nature of biblical interpretation.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Stackert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the College’s general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): BIBL 31000,JWSC 20120,NEHC 30504,RLST 11004

NEHC 20550. Global Encounters: Travelers & Perceptions in pre-Modern World. 100 Units.

This course is designed around the close-reading of travelogues as primary sources, and the weekly primary sources are supported with secondary material. After a two-week introduction to the issues of travel-writing, encounters with the others and Orientalism, each class will be based on one or two travelogues and different questions they raise. The selected primary sources are examples of travelers going to the “East” — not as a geographical destination but as an indication of unknown and foreign lands. The primary sources cover a wide geographical scope, from India to the new world, with special emphasis on the Middle East. Chronologically, the course covers a time-span from the fourteenth to the eighteenth century, thus, it focuses on the early modern period before the age of “colonialism” and “orientalism.” By discovering the encounters in the pre-nineteenth-century world on a global scale, the course aims both to contribute to and to challenge the discussions around the question of Orientalism and the East-West divide.

Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30550

NEHC 20568. Balkan Folklore. 100 Units.

Vampires, fire-breathing dragons, vengeful mountain nymphs. 7/8 and other uneven dance beats, heart-rending laments, and a living epic tradition. This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from historical, political, and anthropological perspectives. We seek to understand folk tradition as a dynamic process and consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition firsthand through visits of a Chicago-based folk dance ensemble, “Balkan Dance.”

Instructor(s): A. Ilieva     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 25908,ANTH 35908,CMLT 23301,CMLT 33301,NEHC 30568,REES 39009,REES 29009

NEHC 20583. Jewish Thought in the Medieval Islamic World. 100 Units.

Jewish thinkers participated actively in the multicultural Islamic world of the ninth to thirteenth centuries. This course explores the impact of diverse cultural currents on the development of medieval Jewish thought. Specifically, the course will focus on such aspects of Jewish thought as philosophy, theology, and pietism, through the examination of individual thinkers in their cultural contexts.

Instructor(s): Sarah Stroumsa, Greenberg Visiting Professor of Jewish Studies     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 20150,HIJD 30150,NEHC 30583,JWSC 20150

NEHC 20585. Jews and Christians in the Middle East. 100 Units.

Minorities around the world today invite questions about the prospects of pluralism and tolerance in modern societies. This course will explore these long-studied questions by examining the case of Jews and Christians in the Middle East, as well as its tangled histories with Muslims and Jews in Mediterranean Europe. Co-taught by a historian of Jews in Iraq and an anthropologist of Copts in Egypt, we will explore histories and ethnographies to consider the political, social, and religious dimensions of minority communities. Our syllabus also blends various literary genres and forms of media with academic scholarship to explore various voices in the conversation about Jews and Christians in the Middle East—from novels, films, and poetry to theological tracts and political treatises. We raise the following questions throughout our course: What terms for coexistence have governed Jews, Christians, and Muslims in the Mediterranean? How are religious practices and traditions linked to histories of rule? How do ideologies (e.g., nationalism, secularism, communism) shape the way minorities understand themselves and how society understands them?

Instructor(s): O. Bashkin, A. Heo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 26215,RLST 20231,BPRO 25400

NEHC 20600. Saints and Sinners: Christianity in the Ancient Near East. 100 Units.

Between the third and seventh centuries, Christian communities came to flourish throughout the Near East and neighboring regions, in the Roman and Iranian empires as well as the kingdoms of the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Ethiopia. This course will examine development of Christian institutions and ideologies in relation to the distinctive social structures, political cultures, economies, and environments of the Near East, with a focus on the Fertile Crescent. The makers of Near Eastern Christianities were both saints and sinners. Holy men and women, monks, and sometimes bishops withdrew from what they often called “the world” with the intention of reshaping its societies through prayer, asceticism, writing, and more direct forms of intervention in social, political, and economic relations. But the work of these saints depended on the cooperation of the worldly men and women, including aristocrats, merchants, and rulers, that formed the ranks of their communities to establish enduring institutions. To explore the dialectical relationship between saints and sinners, we will read inscriptions, histories, and lives of saints in various Near Eastern languages in translation and consider the insights of recent archaeology.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 25613,HIST 35613,NEHC 30600

NEHC 20601-20602-20603. Islamic Thought and Literature I-II-III.

This sequence explores the thought and literature of the Islamic world from the coming of Islam in the seventh century C.E. through the development and spread of its civilization in the medieval period and into the modern world. Including historical framework to establish chronology and geography, the course focuses on key aspects of Islamic intellectual history: scripture, law, theology, philosophy, literature, mysticism, political thought, historical writing, and archaeology. In addition to lectures and secondary background readings, students read and discuss samples of key primary texts, with a view to exploring Islamic civilization in the direct voices of the people who participated in creating it. All readings are in English translation. No prior background in the subject is required. This course sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

NEHC 20601. Islamic Thought and Literature I. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 950, concentrating on the career of the Prophet Muhammad; Qur‘an and Hadith; the Caliphate; the development of Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical discourses; sectarian movements; and Arabic literature.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30601,RLST 20401,SOSC 22000,HIST 25610,HIST 35610,ISLM 30601

NEHC 20602. Islamic Thought and Literature II. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 950 to 1700, surveying works of literature, theology, philosophy, sufism, politics, history, etc., written in Arabic, Persian and Turkish, as well as the art, architecture and music of the Islamicate traditions. Through primary texts, secondary sources and lectures, we will trace the cultural, social, religious, political and institutional evolution through the period of the Fatimids, the Crusades, the Mongol invasions, and the "gunpowder empires" (Ottomans, Safavids, Mughals).

Instructor(s): F. Lewis     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30602,RLST 20402,SOSC 22100,ISLM 30602,CMES 30602

NEHC 20603. Islamic Thought and Literature III. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1700 to the present, exploring works of Arab intellectuals who interpreted various aspects of Islamic philosophy, political theory, and law in the modern age. We look at diverse interpretations concerning the role of religion in a modern society, at secularized and historicized approaches to religion, and at the critique of both religious establishments and nation-states as articulated by Arab intellectuals. Generally, we discuss secondary literature first and the primary sources later.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30603,RLST 20403,SOSC 22200

NEHC 20605. Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Islamic History. 100 Units.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamic history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36005,NEHC 30605,HIST 26005

NEHC 20634. North Africa, Late Antiquity to Islam. 100 Units.

Examination of topics in continuity and change from the third through ninth centuries CE, including changes in Roman, Vandalic, Byzantine, and early Islamic Africa. Topics include the waning of paganism and the respective spread and waning of Christianity, the dynamics of the seventh-century Muslim conquest and Byzantine collapse. Transformation of late antique North Africa into a component of Islamic civilization. Topography and issues of the autochthonous populations will receive some analysis. Most of the required reading will be on reserve, for there is no standard textbook. Readings in translated primary sources as well as the latest modern scholarship. Midterm and final paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 30200,CLCV 20200,CMES 30634,CRES 25701,HIST 35701,NEHC 30634,HIST 25701

NEHC 20659. The Task of the Self Translator. 100 Units.

We usually think of the translator as a mediator, the figure who allows authors and texts to speak to audiences beyond their original language. Consequently, the questions we tend to ask about translation revolve around the central issue of fidelity. Is the translation adequate to the original? Has it remained faithful? In this model, the origin and the target are both assumed to be monolingual and the translator is the bilingual go-between. But there are very few, if any, truly monolingual cultures, and translations usually circulate in a far more complex manner. In this seminar, we will turn to the self-translator as a figure who challenges conventional models of translation and cross-cultural circulation. Can the author betray herself in the act of translation? To approach this issue, we will read classical texts in translation theory as well as more recent work that thematizes self translation, and we will look at literary texts written by bilingual authors and constituted by self-translation.

Instructor(s): N. Rokem     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30659

NEHC 20765. Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia. 100 Units.

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition, the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Arabic and/or Islamic studies helpful but not required
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 25905,EEUR 23400,EEUR 33400,MUSI 23503,MUSI 33503,NEHC 30765

NEHC 20827. The “Woman Question” & Reformist Thought in the Ottoman Emp. 100 Units.

The course is a one-quarter colloquium open both to graduate students and to advanced undergraduates. The course will focus on reading and discussing literature concerned with the perception among nineteenth- and early-twentieth-century Ottoman reformers and intellectuals, that the “proper” place of women in society was an urgent question. We will examine why this question was regarded as urgent and fundamental, and in what ways it was seen as related to an overall framework of reform.

Instructor(s): H. Shissler     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to advanced undergraduates with consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30827

NEHC 20885. Returning the Gaze: The Balkans and Western Europe. 100 Units.

Aware of being observed. And judged. Inferior... Abject… Angry... Proud… This course provides insight into identity dynamics between the “West,” as the center of economic power and self-proclaimed normative humanity, and the “Rest,” as the poor, backward, volatile periphery. We investigate the relationship between South East European self-representations and the imagined Western gaze. Inherent in the act of looking at oneself through the eyes of another is the privileging of that other’s standard. We will contemplate the responses to this existential position of identifying symbolically with a normative site outside of oneself—self-consciousness, defiance, arrogance, self-exoticization—and consider how these responses have been incorporated in the texture of the national, gender, and social identities in the region. Orhan Pamuk, Ivo Andrić, Nikos Kazantzakis, Aleko Konstantinov, Emir Kusturica, Milcho Manchevski.

Instructor(s): Angelina Ilieva     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): REES 39012,CMLT 23201,CMLT 33201,NEHC 30885,REES 29012

NEHC 21702. Byzantine Empire, 610–1025. 100 Units.

A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the principal developments with respect to government, society, and culture in the Middle Byzantine Period. Although a survey of events and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Midterm, final examination, and a short paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Graduate students may register for grade of R (audit) or P (Pass) instead of a letter grade, except for History graduate students taking this as a required course.
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 34307,CLCV 24307,HIST 31702,NELC 31702,ANCM 34307,HIST 21702

NEHC 26016. The Medieval Persian Romance: Gorgani's Vis and Ramin. 100 Units.

This class is an inquiry into the medieval romance genre through the close and comparative reading of one of its oldest extant representatives, Gorgâni’s Vis & Râmin (c. 1050). With roots that go back to Late Antiquity, this romance is a valuable interlocutor between the Greek novel and the Ovidian erotic tradition, Arabic love theory and poetics, and well-known European romances like Tristan, Lancelot, and Cligès: a sustained exploration of psychological turmoil and moral indecision, and a vivid dramatization of the many contradictions inherent in erotic theory, most starkly by the lovers' faithful adultery. By reading Vis & Râmin alongside some of its generic neighbors (Kallirrhoe, Leukippe, Tristan, Cligès), as well as the love-theories of writers like Plato, Ovid, Avicenna, Jâhiz, Ibn Hazm, and Andreas Cappellanus, we will map out the various kinds of literary work the romance is called upon to do, and investigate the myriad and shifting conceptions of romantic love as performance, subjectivity, and moral practice. An optional section introducing selections from the original text in Persian will be available if there is sufficient student interest.

Instructor(s): C. Cross     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 26106,GNSE 26106,RLLT 26106,FNDL 26106

NEHC 29700. Reading and Research Course. 100 Units.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of faculty adviser and counselor for undergraduate studies

NEHC 29800. BA Paper Seminar. 100 Units.

Required of fourth-year students who are majoring in NELC. This is a workshop course designed to survey the fields represented by NELC and to assist students in researching and writing the BA paper.

Instructor(s): A. El-Shamsy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and counselor for undergraduate studies

NEHC 29999. BA Paper Preparation. 100 Units.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. In consultation with a faculty research adviser and with consent of the counselor for undergraduate studies, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of the BA paper.

Instructor(s): A. El-Shamsy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and counselor for undergraduate studies

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Near Eastern Languages Courses

NELG 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Greek I-II-III.

No description available.

NELG 10100. Elementary Modern Greek I. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the Greek alphabet, Modern Greek pronunciation rules and the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to communicate minimally with formulaic and rote utterances and produce words, phrases and lists.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30100,MOGK 10100

NELG 10200. Elementary Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to handle a variety of tasks and manage an uncomplicated situation using mostly formulaic and rote utterances. They will also be able to express personal meaning forming paragraphs.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10100/30100 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30200,MOGK 10200

NELG 10300. Elementary Modern Greek III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10200/30200 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30300,MOGK 10300

NELG 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Greek I-II-III.

This course builds on the student's knowledge of modern Greek in all four skill areas through the use of authentic cultural materials (short stories, films, newspapers, etc.), with emphasis on grammar, vocabulary building, and fluency in expression and accuracy in writing.

NELG 20100. Intermediate Modern Greek I. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy. They are expected to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks and to express personal meaning by creating with the language; to ask a variety of questions to obtain simple information to satisfy needs, such as directions, prices and services. Overall they are expected to have a significant quantity and quality of language.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10300/30300
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 20100

NELG 20200. Intermediate Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language which they deal effectively and with accuracy. They are able to handle successfully uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information related to their work, school, recreation, particular interests and areas of competence. They can also speak about some topics related to employment, current events and matters of public and community interest. They are able to create with language, ask questions, narrate and describe in all major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 20100
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 20200

NELG 20300. Intermediate Modern Greek III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 20200
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 20300

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Persian Courses

PERS 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Persian I-II-III.

This sequence concentrates on modern written Persian as well as modern colloquial usage. Toward the end of this sequence, students are able to read, write, and speak Persian at an elementary level. Introducing the Iranian culture is also a goal.

PERS 10101. Elementary Persian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Autumn

PERS 10102. Elementary Persian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PERS 10101

PERS 10103. Elementary Persian III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PERS 10102

PERS 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Persian I-II-III.

This sequence deepens and expands students’ knowledge of modern Persian at all levels of reading, writing, and speaking. Grammar is taught at a higher level, and a wider vocabulary enables students to read stories, articles, and poetry. Examples of classical literature and the Iranian culture are introduced.

PERS 20101. Intermediate Persian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PERS 10103 or consent of instructor

PERS 20102. Intermediate Persian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PERS 20101 or consent of the instructor

PERS 20103. Intermediate Persian III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): S. Ghahremani     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PERS 20202 or consent of the instructor

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Sumerian Courses

SUMR 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Sumerian I-II-III.

This sequence typically begins in Winter Quarter and concludes Autumn Quarter of the next academic year. This sequence covers the elements of Sumerian grammar, with reading exercises in Ur III, pre-Sargonic, and elementary literary texts. This sequence is offered in alternate years.

SUMR 10101. Elementary Sumerian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): C. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter. This sequence is offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite(s): AKKD 10101

SUMR 10102. Elementary Sumerian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): C. Woods     Terms Offered: Spring. This sequence is offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite(s): SUMR 10101

SUMR 10103. Elementary Sumerian III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): C. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn. This sequence is offered in alternate years.
Prerequisite(s): SUMR 10102

SUMR 20310. Sumerian Literary Texts I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): C. Woods     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): 1 Year of Sumerian

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Turkish Courses

TURK 10101-10102-10103. Elementary Turkish I-II-III.

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing grammar in modern Turkish. This sequence consists of reading and listening comprehension, as well as grammar exercises and basic writing in Turkish. Modern stories and contemporary articles are read at the end of the courses.

TURK 10101. Elementary Turkish I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): The class meets for five hours a week

TURK 10102. Elementary Turkish II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10101
Note(s): This class meets for five hours a week

TURK 10103. Elementary Turkish III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10102
Note(s): This class meets for five hours a week

TURK 10105-10106-10107. Introduction to Old Turkic I-II-III.

An introductory sequence in the written language of the Orkhon Inscriptions, dating back to the fifth-to-eighth-century Kök Türk State of Central Eurasia, and of related inscriptions from the Yenisei River area, Mongolia, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe. The language of the inscriptions is considered to be the ancestor of the majority of Turkic languages spoken today and uses a distinctive alphabet sometimes known as the Old Turkic Runiform Alphabet. The sequence covers a brief historic overview, basic grammar, reading selections from the inscriptions in the original and in translation, and familiarization with the alphabet itself.

TURK 10105. Introduction to Old Turkic I. 100 Units.

An introductory sequence in the written language of the Orkhon Inscriptions, dating back to the fifth-to-eighth-century Kök Türk State of Central Eurasia, and of related inscriptions from the Yenisei River area, Mongolia, Central Asia, and Eastern Europe. The language of the inscriptions is considered to be the ancestor of the majority of Turkic languages spoken today and uses a distinctive alphabet sometimes known as the Old Turkic Runiform Alphabet. The sequence covers a brief historic overview, basic grammar, reading selections from the inscriptions in the original and in translation, and familiarization with the alphabet itself.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): One year of a Turkic language or the equivalent, and/or consent of the instructor

TURK 10106. Introduction to Old Turkic II. 100 Units.


Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10105

TURK 10107. Introduction to Old Turkic III. 100 Units.


Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10106

TURK 20101-20102-20103. Intermediate Turkish I-II-III.

This sequence features proficiency-based instruction emphasizing speaking and writing skills as well as reading and listening comprehension at the intermediate to advanced levels in modern Turkish.  Modern short stories, novel excerpts, academic and journalistic articles form the basis for an introduction to modern Turkish literature. Cultural units consisting of films and web-based materials are also used extensively in this course, which is designed to bring the intermediate speaker to an advanced level of proficiency.

TURK 20101. Intermediate Turkish I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Anetshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): TURK 10103, or equivalent with intermediate level proficiency test.

TURK 20102. Intermediate Turkish II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Aneshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): TURK 20101

TURK 20103. Intermediate Turkish III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): H. Aneshofer-Karateke     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): TURK 20102

Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations - Ugaritic Courses

UGAR 20101-20102-20103. Ugaritic I-II-III.

Elementary Ugaritic

UGAR 20101. Ugaritic I. 100 Units.

Elementary Ugaritic

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing and one year of Classical Hebrew

UGAR 20102. Ugaritic II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): UGAR 20101

UGAR 20103. Ugaritic III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): D. Pardee     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): UGAR 20102


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Associate Chair of Undergraduate Affairs
Ahmed El Shamsy
NELC
773.702.8380
Email

Administrative Contact

Department Coordinator
Amanda Young
Pick Hall 304
773.702.3183
Email