Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Major Field | Electives | Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s) | Research Track | Honors | Summary of Requirements for the Major | Reading and Research Courses | Petitioning for Outside Credit | Grading | Minor in History | Course Numbering | Double Major | Study Abroad | History Courses

Department Website: https://history.uchicago.edu/content/undergraduate-programs

Program of Study

For decades the University of Chicago has been a leader in the study of history, through its pioneering civilization studies programs, its intensive research-based undergraduate curriculum, and its training of academic historians as both researchers and teachers. Majoring in history not only enables you to become a consumer of academic knowledge, it also prepares you to become a producer of knowledge. Undergraduate history courses first train you to explore large-scale social, cultural, and political processes by defining concrete, researchable questions. Subsequently, as a history major, you are taught how to locate the primary and secondary sources necessary to develop answers to these questions. Finally, faculty assist you in transforming your research into historical arguments that shed light on the multiple ways in which our world, our very reality, has transformed over time. History is excellent preparation for a wide field of endeavors—from law, government, and public policy to the arts and business.

Students interested in a history major should consult the associate director before the end of their second year; it is, however, possible to join the major as a third-year student.

Program Requirements

In addition to the civilization sequences, students can choose from more than eighty history courses that are offered each year to undergraduates. Some of these are introductory lectures ("Gateway courses"), others are small seminars devoted to the intense study of a particular historical moment, theme, or event. Students must take twelve courses for the history major, one of which must be a history colloquium (HIST 29600s).

History majors have the option of pursuing one of two tracks: the Regular Track or the Research Track. Students in the Research Track complete a BA thesis during two BA seminars HIST 29801-29802 BA Thesis Seminar I-II. Students in the Regular Track take two elective courses in lieu of the BA seminars. Students wishing to pursue the Research Track must officially declare their intention to do so with the associate director by sixth week of Winter Quarter during their third year. Only students in the Research Track are eligible for honors.

Courses without a "HIST" number may be used only with departmental permission; students should submit a petition to the associate director to have them considered (see Petitioning for Outside Credit below). Students may use one civilization sequence (up to three courses in the same sequence) to count toward history major requirements, but only if these courses are not also being used to count toward general education requirements.

Major Field

Students in both the Research Track and the Regular Track are required to take six courses in, or directly related to, their chosen main field. Students construct the main field and choose their other courses in close consultation with the associate director, subject to final approval by the faculty chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee.

The major field is usually defined by time and space. Examples are nineteenth- or twentieth-century US history, colonial Africa, the Atlantic world in the early modern or modern period, ancient Greece, or medieval Europe. Thematic major fields are also possible; for example, African American, Jewish, or gender history. Major fields may also be methodologically defined: for example, intellectual, economic, gender, political, or urban history. Students pursuing a major field in urban history, for example, might take courses ranging from "Jewish Spaces and Places: Imagined and Real" to "Cities from Scratch: The History of Urban Latin America"; a focus on economic history might include "Economic Change in China" and "The History of US Capitalism." In the case of thematically or methodologically defined major fields, it is particularly important to consult closely with the associate director to ensure coherence.

Electives

In addition to the six courses in the main field, students must also take a number of elective courses. Students pursuing the Regular Track take six electives, while students pursuing the Research Track take four electives and complete the major with two seminars for the BA thesis (See Research Track below). Electives should complement the main field, extend the range of your historical awareness, and explore varying approaches to historical analysis and interpretation. You are encouraged to take courses that introduce significant civilizational or chronological breadth into your studies, or a different methodology or theme than you are studying in your major field.

Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s)

Students who are majoring in history must take at least one history colloquium (HIST 29600s), though they are welcome to take more than one. Depending on the topic, the colloquium may count as one of the six courses comprising the student's major field or as one of the history electives, depending on the relevance of the colloquium to the student's major field. Students interested in pursuing the Research Track should take a colloquium prior to Spring Quarter of their third year, while those pursuing the Regular Track can take a colloquium at any point prior to graduation. The colloquia are offered on a variety of topics each year and enable advanced College students to pursue research projects. 

These courses expose students to the methods and practice of historical research and writing. Students are required to compose an original research paper that is at least fifteen pages in length. For students who are planning to begin graduate study the year following graduation, the colloquium provides them with the opportunity to produce a writing sample based on primary sources that they can use for their applications.

Research Track

Students admitted to the Research Track are required to complete twelve courses for the major: six in a major field, four electives, and two BA seminars. The research colloquium may count toward either the major field or the elective field requirement. Students planning to pursue graduate study in history or those wishing to go into a research-intensive career, such as journalism, law, or policy analysis, are encouraged to pursue the Research Track.

Application to Research Track

Students wishing to pursue the Research Track must submit a major form indicating their plans as well as a short description of their proposed BA thesis topic to the associate director by sixth week of Winter Quarter during their third year. With the approval of the faculty chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee, the committee places students into a Spring Quarter BA thesis seminar before the end of Winter Quarter. In the seminar students develop a research proposal, which they submit at the end of Spring Quarter. The committee also assigns each student a BA thesis advisor from among the Department of History's faculty.

BA Thesis Seminars (HIST 29801 and 29802)

Students pursuing the Research Track are required to complete a BA thesis and the two BA thesis seminars. The BA thesis is a three-quarter-long research project in which students develop a significant and original interpretation of a historical issue of their choosing. Theses are the culmination of the history program and range from forty to sixty pages in length. The BA thesis seminars assist students in formulating approaches and developing their research and writing skills, while providing a forum for group discussion and critiques.

Students formally register for two quarters, during the Spring Quarter of their third year (HIST 29801 BA Thesis Seminar I) and Winter Quarter of their fourth year (HIST 29802 BA Thesis Seminar II), though they are also expected to be actively engaged during the intervening Autumn Quarter. Students who are out of residence in Spring Quarter of their third year, take BA Seminar I in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year (see Study Abroad below). BA Thesis Seminar I meets weekly in the Spring Quarter of the third year, but only every other week during the autumn and winter terms of the fourth year. Throughout the period of researching and writing the thesis, students benefit from the company of their peers and the guidance of their preceptor, who is an advanced history graduate student, serves as the seminar instructor, and is the second reader of the thesis. You must receive a B grade in BA Seminar I to continue in the research track and enroll in BA Seminar II.

BA Thesis

The deadline for submission of the BA thesis is the second Friday of Spring Quarter. Students who wish to complete their papers in a quarter other than Spring Quarter must petition the department through the associate director. Students graduating in a quarter other than Spring Quarter must turn in their theses by Friday of seventh week of their final quarter. When circumstances justify it, the department establishes individual deadlines and procedures.

With approval from the undergraduate faculty chairs in two departments, history students may be able to write a BA thesis that meets requirements for a dual major. Students must consult with both chairs before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Students are eligible to apply for research funding for summer research from the Department of History and the PRISM (Planning Resources and Involvement for Students in the Majors) program. Students are also encouraged to take advantage of funding that is available for language study abroad through the Foreign Language Acquisition Grant (FLAG) program. For details on available funding, students should consult the associate director.

Honors

Students pursuing the Research Track who have done exceptionally well in their course work and have written an outstanding BA thesis are recommended for honors. Candidates must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and a GPA of 3.7 or higher in the twelve courses counting towards the major. Readers submit BA theses for departmental honors that they judge to be of particular distinction. If the department concurs, the student is awarded honors. Students who fail to meet the deadline for submission of the BA thesis are not eligible for honors consideration. 

Summary of Requirements for the Major

Regular Track

Six courses in a major field600
Six electives600
One of the 12 courses above must be a Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s)
Total Units1200

Research Track

Six courses in a major field600
Four electives400
One of the 10 courses above must be a Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s)§
HIST 29801BA Thesis Seminar I100
HIST 29802BA Thesis Seminar II100
Total Units1200

Reading and Research Courses

Students interested in pursuing a program of study that cannot be met by means of regular courses have the option of devising a reading and research course (HIST 29700 Readings in History) that is taken individually and supervised by a member of the Department of History faculty. Such a course requires the approval of the associate director and the prior consent of the instructor with whom the student would like to study. Note: Enrollment in HIST 29700 is open only to students who are doing independent study that is not related to the research or writing of the BA thesis. As a general rule, only one reading and research course can be counted towards the history major.

Petitioning for Outside Credit

The Department of History offers a wide variety of courses each quarter, and majors are strongly encouraged to take history courses to fulfill the requirements of the major. In some instances, courses that originate outside the department can be used to fulfill the course requirements of the major. To receive history credit for nondepartmental courses, you must petition the Undergraduate Studies Committee for approval. A few things to keep in mind:

  • Petitions must include a course description, a syllabus, and a statement of purpose that addresses the value of the course for your proposed course of study.
  • Allow sufficient time for committee review and to enable you to take one or more additional history course(s) should your petition be denied.
  • You should give your petition to the associate director, who shares it with the chair of the Undergraduate Studies Committee.
  • Courses taken abroad may also be used towards the major, pending approval of the petition, however more than half of the requirements for the major must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.
  • Petitions for courses abroad must include course syllabi, descriptions, and course work.
  • Generally, no more than two petitions per student will be approved.
  • Documentation of approved petitions must be provided to the College adviser in a timely fashion for processing.

Grading

Courses counting towards the history major are normally taken for quality grades. The History Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s), HIST 29801 BA Thesis Seminar I, and HIST 29802 BA Thesis Seminar II must be taken for quality grades. In exceptional circumstances, students who are majoring in history may petition to allow a course taken for a pass/fail grade to count towards the requirements of the major. Students wishing to do so should consult with the associate director. A pass grade is to be given only for work of C– quality or higher. Students should also consult with their College adviser about the appropriateness of pass/fail grading options in their larger program of study.

Minor in History

Students specializing in all disciplines are welcome to minor in history. Majors in such fields as international studies, political science, public policy, economics, and philosophy find that a history minor complements their major by providing a historical understanding of social, cultural, political, and economic issues, while those majoring in such disciplines as mathematics and the sciences use the minor to explore a different area of interest and to develop their humanistic understanding of the world. Students may choose to take courses in a variety of fields, time periods, and thematic topics, with the aim of developing a broad understanding of historical change across time and space, or they may choose to focus specifically on a more narrowly defined field of interest.

Students wishing to pursue the minor should contact the associate director and complete the minor declaration form no later than the end of the third year. The associate director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to a student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

Requirements

The history minor requires a total of six courses chosen in consultation with the associate director. Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors; (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements; (3) may not be petitioned in from other departments; (4) must be taken for quality grades; and (5) must consist of more than half of the courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Course Numbering

History courses numbered 10000 to 29999 are intended primarily for College students; 10000-level courses are introductory. Some 20000-level courses have 30000-level equivalents when they are open to graduate students. To register for 20000/30000 cross-listed courses, undergraduates must use the undergraduate number (20000). History courses numbered 40000 to 49999 are intended primarily for graduate students, but are open to advanced College students with the consent of the instructor. Undergraduates registered for 40000-level courses are held to the graduate-level requirements.

Double Major

Students planning to double major in history and another discipline are encouraged to do so, with the following stipulations:

  • Double counting: Courses that are cross-listed with another department may be used for both majors.
  • BA thesis and seminar: Double majors pursuing the Research Track must fulfill the requirements pertaining to the BA thesis, including taking part in the BA seminar.

Study Abroad

The Department of History strongly supports study abroad. We have arranged the course work requirement to make that possible, but a little prior planning is required, especially for those pursuing the Research Track. If at all possible, it is best to study abroad during Autumn and/or Winter Quarters of the third year. However, if a full-year study abroad experience is desired, that is still compatible with the Research Track history major. One section of the BA seminar (combining requirements of BA Seminar I and II in an accelerated manner) meets in Autumn Quarter to accommodate fourth-year students who have been abroad third year; these students register for BA Seminar II with the rest of their third-year cohort. All Research Track history majors are required to be on campus for Autumn and Winter Quarters of their fourth year in order to complete the BA thesis.

History Courses

HIST 10101-10102-10103. Introduction to African Civilization I-II-III.

Introduction to African Civilization introduces students to African history in a three-quarter sequence. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 10101. Introduction to African Civilization I. 100 Units.

Part one of the sequence takes a historical approach. We consider how different types of historical evidence-documentary, oral, and material-can be used to investigate processes of change and transformation in Africa from the early Iron Age through the emergence of the Atlantic world in the fifteenth century. We will investigate state formation in comparative perspective and examine case studies from the Swahili coast, the empires of Ghana and Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also examines the diffusion of Islam, European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Instructor(s): E. Osborn     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20701, CRES 20701

HIST 10102. Introduction to African Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second segment of the African Civilizations sequence uses anthropological perspectives to investigate colonial and postcolonial encounters in West and East Africa. The course objective is to show that while colonialism was brutal and oppressive, it was by no means a unidirectional process of domination in which Europeans plundered the African continent and enforced a wholesale adoption of European culture. Rather, scholars today recognize that colonial encounters were complex culture, political, and economic fields of interaction. Africans actively adopted, reworked, and contested colonizers' policies and projects, and Europeans drew heavily from these encounters to form liberal conceptions of self, nation, and society. Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about forms of personhood, political economy, and everyday life in the twentieth century. Course themes will include social reproduction, kinship practices, medicine, domesticity, and development. Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. CHDV Distribution C*. Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20702,CRES 20802,HIST 10102

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, C
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20702, CHDV 21401, CRES 20802

HIST 10103. Introduction to African Civilization III. 100 Units.

Part Three investigates the long nineteenth century. It considers the Egyptian conquest of Sudan, Omani colonialism on the Swahili coast, and Islamic reform movements across the Sahara. It will also explore connections between the end of the transatlantic slave trade and the formal colonization of the African continent.

Instructor(s): K. Hickerson     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20303, SOCI 20213, ANTH 20703

HIST 10800-10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II.

This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 10800. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I. 100 Units.

The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia's early encounters with Europe.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24101, SOSC 23000, SALC 20100

HIST 10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II. 100 Units.

The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India.

Instructor(s): Dipesh Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SALC 20100,ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24102, SOSC 23100, SALC 20200

HIST 12001. Medieval History: Theories & Methods. 100 Units.

This course will introduce students to research methods and historical theories that are central to the field of medieval European history (500-1500 AD). The first section of the course is designed to give students a grounding in some of the most important historical narratives (political, social, economic, religious, intellectual, cultural) about the medieval period. Students will then spend the middle weeks of the quarter exploring the different types of original sources (written and non-written) that historians use to conduct research on the Middle Ages. This section of the course will include class time at the Regenstein Library's Special Collections Research Center. In the final weeks, we will concentrate on some of the scholarly debates that have shaped the modern field of medieval history. Grades will be determined on the basis of a midterm exam, a final exam, two short papers, and classroom discussion.

Instructor(s): J. Lyon     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): No prior knowledge of medieval European history is required; the course is open to all undergraduates.

HIST 12203. Italian Renaissance: Dante, Machiavelli, and the Wars of Popes and Kings. 100 Units.

This course will consider Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250-1600), with a focus on literature, philosophy, primary sources, the revival of antiquity, and the papacy's entanglement with pan-European politics. We will examine humanism, patronage, politics, corruption, assassination, feuds, art, music, magic, censorship, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Writing assignments focus on higher-level writing skills, with a creative writing component linked to our in-class live-action-role-played (LARP) reenactment of a Renaissance papal election. This is a Department of History Gateway course.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Graduate students by consent only; register for the course as HIST 90000 (sect 53) Reading and Research: History.
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 16000, RLST 22203, CLCV 22216, SIGN 26034, KNOW 12203

HIST 12700-12800. Music in Western Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

HIST 12700. Music In Western Civilization I: To 1750. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): A. Robertson     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): MUSI 12100, SOSC 21100

HIST 12800. Music In Western Civ II. 100 Units.

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): MUSI 12200, SOSC 21200

HIST 13001-13002-13003. History of European Civilization I-II-III.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13001. History of European Civilization I. 100 Units.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by "Europe" and "civilization." Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): J. Niermeier-Dohoney, A. Palmer, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13002. History of European Civilization II. 100 Units.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by "Europe" and "civilization." Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): J. Goldstein, A. Goff, S. Pincus, Staff     Terms Offered: Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13003. History of European Civilization III. 100 Units.

The two-quarter History of European Civilization sequence may be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. Topics in this third quarter of the sequence may include women in European history, religion and society, Church and State, the Enlightenment, the transformation of the Roman World, or other focused topics on cultural, economic, social, political, or religious aspects of European history. The spring 2019 topics will be "The Crusades: History and Imagination" (section 2) and "Crossing the Channel: England and France" (section 4). Refer to https://history.uchicago.edu/content/spring-2019-college-courses for course descriptions.

Instructor(s): A. Locking     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13001 and HIST 13002
Note(s): Students who plan to complete a three-quarter sequence register for HIST 13003 in Spring Quarter after completing HIST 13001-13002. Students may not combine HIST 13003 with one other quarter of European Civilization to construct a two-quarter sequence.

HIST 13100-13200-13300. History of Western Civilization I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. The purpose of this sequence is threefold: (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of Western civilization since the sixth century BC, and (3) to assist them in discovering connections between the various epochs. The purpose of the course is not to present a general survey of Western history. Instruction consists of intensive investigation of a selection of original documents bearing on a number of separate topics, usually two or three a quarter, occasionally supplemented by the work of a modern historian. The treatment of the selected topics varies from section to section. This sequence is currently offered twice a year. The amount of material covered is the same whether the student enrolls in the Autumn-Winter-Spring sequence or the Summer sequence. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13100. Western Civilization-1. 100 Units.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. The purpose of this sequence is threefold: (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of Western civilization since the sixth century BC, and (3) to assist them in discovering connections between the various epochs. The purpose of the course is not to present a general survey of Western history. Instruction consists of intensive investigation of a selection of original documents bearing on a number of separate topics, usually two or three a quarter, occasionally supplemented by the work of a modern historian. The treatment of the selected topics varies from section to section. This sequence is currently offered twice a year. The amount of material covered is the same whether the student enrolls in the Autumn-Winter-Spring sequence or the Summer sequence. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Autumn; J. Boyer, Summer     Terms Offered: Autumn,Summer
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13200. Western Civilization-2. 100 Units.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. The purpose of this sequence is threefold: (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of Western civilization since the sixth century BC, and (3) to assist them in discovering connections between the various epochs. The purpose of the course is not to present a general survey of Western history. Instruction consists of intensive investigation of a selection of original documents bearing on a number of separate topics, usually two or three a quarter, occasionally supplemented by the work of a modern historian. The treatment of the selected topics varies from section to section. This sequence is currently offered twice a year. The amount of material covered is the same whether the student enrolls in the Autumn-Winter-Spring sequence or the Summer sequence. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Winter, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13300. History of Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

This third course of the History of Western Civilization undertakes a detailed study of the French Revolution and charts the rise of liberal, anti-liberal, and post-liberal states and societies in nineteenth- and twentieth-century European history. The sequence closes with an appraisal of the condition of European politics, culture, and society at the end of the twentieth century

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Spring; D. Koehler, Summer     Terms Offered: Spring Summer
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13500-13600-13700. America in World Civilization I-II-III.

The America in World Civilization sequence is nothing like your high school history class, for here we examine America as a contested idea and a contested place by reading and writing about a wide array of primary sources. In the process, students gain a new sense of historical awareness and of the making of America. The course is designed both for history majors and non-majors who want to deepen their understanding of the nation's history, encounter some enlightening and provocative voices from the past, and develop the qualitative methodology of historical thinking. It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13500. America In World Civilization I. 100 Units.

America in World Civilization I examines foundational texts and moments in American culture, society, and politics, from early European incursions into the New World through the early republic of the United States, roughly 1500-1800. We will examine encounters between Native Americans and representatives of imperial powers (Spain, France, and England) as well as the rise of African slavery in North America before 1700. We will consider the development of Anglo-American society and government in the eighteenth century, focusing especially on the causes and consequences of the American Revolution.

Instructor(s): E. Cook, M. Kruer, A. Lippert, A. Rowe, E. Slauter     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III).

HIST 13600. America in World Civilization II. 100 Units.

The nineteenth-century segment of America in World Civilizations asks: What happens when democracy confronts inequality? We focus on themes that include indigenous-US relations; religious revivalism and reform; slavery, the Civil War, and emancipation; the intersection between women's rights and antislavery; the development of industrial capitalism; urbanism and social inequality.

Instructor(s): J. Dailey, J. Levy, A. Lippert, R. Rubin     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III).

HIST 13700. America in World Civilization-III. 100 Units.

What conditions have shaped inclusion and exclusion from the category "American" in the twentieth century? Who has claimed rights, citizenship, and protection, and under what conditions? The third quarter of America in World Civilization focuses on multiple definitions of Americanism in a period characterized by empire, transnational formations, and America's role in the world. We explore the construction of social order in a multicultural society; culture in the shadow of war; the politics of race, ethnicity, and gender; the rise and fall of new social movements on the left and the right; the emergence of the carceral state and militarization of civil space; and the role of climate change and the apocalyptic in shaping imagined futures.

Instructor(s): K. Belew & J. Dailey     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III).

HIST 13803. The Soviet Union. 100 Units.

This lecture course surveys the making and unmaking of the Soviet Union as a society, culture, economy, superpower, and empire from 1917 to 1991. The Soviet Union began as an unprecedented radical experiment in remaking society and economy, ethnic and gender relations, personal identities, even human nature. In the course of its history, it came to resemble other (capitalist) societies, sharing, in turn, their violence, welfare provisions, and consumerism. The story of this transformation--from being unique and exhilarating to being much like everyone else, only poorer and more drab--will be at the center of our exploration. The main themes of the course include social and cultural revolutions; ideology and the role of Marxism; political violence from the birth of the socialist state to the end of the Stalin terror; Stalinism, its origins, practices, aesthetics, legacies, and critiques; law, dissent, and human rights; nationality policies and the role of ethnic minorities; the economy of shortages and the material culture it created; institutions of daily life (communal apartments, courtyards, peasant markets, dachas, and boiler rooms); socialist realism and the Soviet dreamworld.

Instructor(s): E. Gilburd     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages.
Equivalent Course(s): REES 13803

HIST 13900-14000. Introduction to Russian Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence, which meets the general education requirement in civilization studies, provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

HIST 13900. Intro to Russian Civilization-1. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources-from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces-we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): E. Gilburd, W. Nickell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24000, REES 26011

HIST 14000. Intro Russian Civilization-2. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources-from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces-we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual, and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): R. Bird, E. Gilburd     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): REES 26012, SOSC 24100

HIST 14204. History of the Present. 100 Units.

This Gateway course takes a reverse approach to the study of history, defining issues relevant to the current moment--some determined by the students--and exploring the long stories required to understand the present. We might examine the election of 2016, social movements, climate change, debt, gun ownership, statelessness, and other issues. Each topic will occupy one week of the course. Students will learn historical thinking skills, critical reading, and argumentation, and will complete a final assignment geared towards providing historical context for an ongoing debate in the public sphere. This lecture course is an elective open to non-majors and to first- and second-year students, although upper-year students and History majors and minors are welcome. No previous history course work is required.

Instructor(s): K. Belew     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): To ensure registration after pre-registration, consider picking a W or F disc section other than sect 1 or 2. Or, after registration is complete, add the course and pick an open discussion section.
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages.
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26019

HIST 14701. Human Rights in Chinese History. 100 Units.

This Gateway course will introduce students to China's contentious rights environment and both domestic and international ideas of human rights. The course will consider social movements, dissent, the role of the press, environmentalism, and debates over "Asian values." While the course surveys the modern period we will also discuss legacies of China's philosophical traditions.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 14701, HMRT 14701

HIST 15100-15200-15300. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

HIST 15100. Intro To East Asian Civilization I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn Summer
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only; all students attend the MW lecture and register for one F discussion section.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 10800, CRES 10800, SOSC 23500

HIST 15200. Intro to East Asian Civilization II. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a three-quarter sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Summer Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only; all students attend the MW lecture and register for one F discussion section.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10900, SOSC 23600, EALC 10900

HIST 15300. Intro to East Asian Civilization III. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): K. H. Choi     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only; all students attend the MW lecture and register for one F discussion section.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 23700, EALC 11000, CRES 11000

HIST 15602-15603-15604. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 15602. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

The first course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Hittite Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25700, NEHC 20011

HIST 15603. Ancient Empires-II. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects-both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

Instructor(s): Hakan Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25800, NEHC 20012

HIST 15604. Ancient Empires-3. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550-1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25900, NEHC 20013

HIST 16101-16102-16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

HIST 16101. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.

Instructor(s): A. Kolata     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36101, CRES 16101, LACS 34600, ANTH 23101, LACS 16100, SOSC 26100

HIST 16102. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 16200, LACS 34700, HIST 36102, SOSC 26200, ANTH 23102, CRES 16102

HIST 16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 26300, HIST 36103, CRES 16103, LACS 34800, LACS 16300, ANTH 23103

HIST 16700-16800-16900. Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and late antiquity (27 BC to the fifth century AD).

HIST 16700. Anc Mediterr World-1: Greece. 100 Units.

This course surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the development of the institutions of the Greek city-state, the Persian Wars and the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the social and economic consequences of the Peloponnesian War, and the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians.

Instructor(s): J. Hall, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20700

HIST 16800. Anc Mediterr World-2: Rome. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community. Instructor(s): C. Ando, Staff Terms Offered: Winter Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): C. Ando, M. Andrews, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20800

HIST 16900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. 100 Units.

This course will survey the social, political, and cultural history of the late antique Mediterranean from Constantine I to Charlemagne. Through close reading and discussion of primary sources, we will examine (among other topics) the rise and spread of Christianity and Islam, changing conceptions of Roman identity, and the inheritance of the classical world, as well as some implications of these topics for subsequent European history.

Instructor(s): R. Payne, staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20900

HIST 17300-17310, HIST 17400-17410, HIST 17500-17510 Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization

These courses focus on the origins and development of science in the West. They aim to trace the evolution of the biological, psychological, natural, and mathematical sciences as they emerge from the culture and social matrix of their periods and, in turn, affect culture and social. In order to satisfy the general education requirement in civilization studies, students must take a course in two or three of the following chronological periods: ancient (numbered HIPS 17300-17310), early modern (HIPS 17400-17410), and modern (HIPS 17500-17510). Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. Only one course per category may count toward the requirement unless special approval is granted.

HIST 17300. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization I. 100 Units.

This undergraduate core course represents the first quarter of the Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization sequence. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This quarter will focus on aspects of ancient Greek and Roman intellectual history, their perceived continuities or discontinuities with modern definitions and practices of science, and how they were shaped by the cultures, politics, and aesthetics of their day. Topics surveyed include history-writing and ancient science, the cosmos, medicine and biology, meteorology, ethnography and physiognomics, arithmetic and geometry, mechanics, taxonomy, optics, astronomy, and mechanical computing.

Instructor(s): J. Wee     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17300

HIST 17400. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

This course addresses one of the great transformations in Western history. During the period from the early sixteenth century to the late seventeenth, European understandings of the natural world - and ways of achieving such understandings - underwent a series of radical and far-reaching transformations. The process affected every aspect of life as it was then lived, and as it has been lived since. It is often called the Scientific Revolution. Many people think that it was the central process in the development of modern culture itself.

Instructor(s): A. Johns     Terms Offered: TBD
Note(s): Not Offered in 2018-2019 academic year.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17400

HIST 17402. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: History of Medicine I. 100 Units.

This course examines the theory and practice of medicine between 1500 and 1900. Topics include traditional early modern medicine; novel understandings of anatomy, physiology, and disease from the Renaissance on; and new forms of medical practice, training, and knowledge-making that developed in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: TBD. Not offered in 2018-2019
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17402

HIST 17403. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: Early Modern Period. 100 Units.

Section 1, offered by Robert J. Richards - "Renaissance Enlightenment." This lecture-discussion course examines the development science and scientific philosophy from the mid-fifteenth to the mid-nineteenth centuries. The considerations begin with the recovery of an ancient knowledge in the works of Leonardo, Vesalius, Harvey, and Copernicus. Thereafter the course will focus on Enlightenment science, as represented by Galileo, Descartes, Newton, and Hume. The course will culminate with the work of Darwin, who utilized traditional concepts to inaugurate modern science. For each class, the instructor will provide a short introductory lecture on the texts, and then open discussion to pursue with students the unexpected accomplishments of the authors under scrutiny. Section 2, offered by Margaret Carlyle - "Revolutions in Astronomy Anatomy." This course explores scientific developments in Western Europe from the sixteenth-century Scientific Revolution to the eighteenth-century Enlightenment. During this period, European understandings of the natural world-and ways of achieving such understandings-underwent a series of radical and far-reaching transformations that are often called the Scientific Revolution.

Instructor(s): Robert J. Richards, Margaret Carlyle     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Note(s): Offered by Robert J. Richards in Fall 2018, and by Margaret Carlyle in Winter 2019.
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 17403, HIPS 17403

HIST 17500. Sci/Culture/Society In W Civ-3. 100 Units.

No description available

Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17500

HIST 17501. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: Medicine since the Renaissance. This course is an examination of various themes in the history of medicine in Western Europe and America since the Renaissance. Topics include key developments of medical theory (e.g., the circulation of the blood and germ theory), relations between doctors and patients, rivalries between different kinds of healers and therapists, and the development of the hospital and laboratory medicine.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17501

HIST 17502. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

The course is organized around a series of broad questions about science. These questions are addressed by means of examples drawn from both the past and the present. The historical cases arise in chronological sequence, ranging from the development of experimental methods in the late seventeenth century to the advent of biotechnology in the modern era. They furnish a selective set of materials for a history of scientific practice. Their other purpose here, however, is to highlight the depth and importance of many problems still confronting the world of science today - problems that are cultural as well as scientific, and that demand of us an understanding of what science is and how it works.

Instructor(s): A. Johns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17502

HIST 17503. Sci/Cult/Soc in Western Civilization III - The History of Medicine Part II: 1900 -Present. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: History of Medicine 2. This three-quarter sequence focuses on the origins and development of science in the West. The twentieth century is sometimes called the "golden age" of medicine: a period in which medicine broke free of tradition and combined with science to provide powerful new ways of understanding disease, and spectacular new technologies for fighting sickness. Along with amelioration of suffering, however, came new diseases, new medical systems, and new ways of thinking about the relationship between medical bodies, political bodies, and the nature and scope of human misery. This course examines some of the many transformations of (predominantly Euro-American) medicine in the twentieth century, looking not only at advances in medical knowledge and technologies, but also at the social, political, moral and affective ramifications of new ways of thinking about the promise - and perils - of (bio)medical practice.

Instructor(s): Michael Paul Rossi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17503

HIST 17504. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: The Environment. 100 Units.

This course charts the development of modern science and technology with special reference to the environment. Major themes include natural history and empire, political economy in the Enlightenment, the discovery of deep time and evolutionary theory, the dawn of the fossil fuel economy, Malthusian anxieties about overpopulation, the birth of ecology, the Cold War development of climate science, the postwar debates about the limits to growth, and the emergence of modern environmentalism. We will end with the new science of the Anthropocene.

Instructor(s): Fredrik Albritton Jonsson     Terms Offered: TBD. Not offered in 2018-2019 Academic Year
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17504

HIST 17704. The Old History of Capitalism. 100 Units.

What is the relationship between race and capitalism? This course introduces students to the concept of "racial capitalism," which rejects treatments of race as external to a purely economic project and counters the idea that racism is an externality, acultural overflow, or an aberration from the so-called real workings of capitalism. Spanning the colonization of North America to the era of mass incarceration, topics include the slave trade, indigenous dispossession, antebellum slavery, the Mexican-American War, "new imperialism," the welfare state, and civil rights. This course neither presumes a background in economics nor previous coursework in history.

Instructor(s): D. Jenkins     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 17704

HIST 17805. America in the Twentieth Century. 100 Units.

This is a thematic lecture course on the past 115 years of US history. The main focus of the lectures will be politics, broadly defined. The readings consist of novels and nonfiction writing, with a scattering of primary sources.

Instructor(s): J. Dailey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages.
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 17805, LLSO 25904

HIST 18101. Democracy in America? 100 Units.

This course will explore the unlikely career of democracy in US history. Throughout its past, the United States has been defined by endless and unpredictable struggles to establish and extend self-government of one kind or another--even as those struggles have encountered great resistance and relied on the exclusion or subordination of some portion of society to underwrite expanding freedom and equality for those enjoying the fullest benefits of citizenship. American democracy has also relied on a conceptual separation between state and society that has necessarily broken down in practice, as political institutions produced and sustained economic forms like slavery or the corporation, social arrangements like the family, and cultural values such as freedom--even as private interests worked their reciprocal influence over public institutions. Over the course of the quarter we will explore this contested history of democracy in America through a close reading of classic texts (including Tocqueville's famous study), contextualized by the most current historical scholarship. Small, incremental writing assignments and individual presentations will culminate in a final essay that can emphasize philosophical/theoretical or historical/empirical questions according to students' interests. Students will also have the option of conducting their own original research to satisfy some portion of the course work, which may lead to subsequent internship opportunities with relevant faculty.

Instructor(s): J. Sparrow     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): History in the World courses use history as a valuable tool to help students critically exam our society, culture, and politics. Preference given to 1st- and 2nd-yr students.

HIST 18301-18302-18303. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

HIST 18301. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world. Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter. Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24001, CRES 24001, SOSC 24001

HIST 18302. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24002, CRES 24002, SOSC 24002

HIST 18303. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24003, SALC 20702, CRES 24003, ANTH 24003

HIST 18702. Race, Politics, and Sports in the United States. 100 Units.

Kneeling or standing for the national anthem? Breaking the glass ceiling, coming out of the closet, or crossing the color line in sports? This course will take up the question of why sports are so central to American identity and what historic role sports and athletes have played in American political life. Muhammad Ali, Billie Jean King, Jackie Robinson, and Bill Russell are only a few of the athletes who fought for freedom, inclusion, and equality in sports and American life. Through close critical readings of popular and scholarly writing, memoirs, and visual culture (film and television), we will examine the seminal overlapping events in sports history and American history to understand the collision and convergence of our politics and sports culture.

Instructor(s): M. Briones     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): History in the World courses use history as a valuable tool to help students critically exam our society, culture, and politics. Preference given to 1st- and 2nd-yr students.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 18702

HIST 19402. Economic History II: The Early Modern World, circa 1300-1800. 100 Units.

This course both describes preindustrial economic life and weighs the models used to explain fundamental changes to it. We will begin by describing some of the basic structures that determined patterns of production, exchange​,​​ and consumption​​ in a period of low and easily reversible growth. These include agricultural productivity, demographic constraints, modes of transportation, and the social structures that governed the distribution of what little surplus premodern societies produced. Turning to the sources of economic dynamism that may have contributed to later industrialization, we will first examine the growth of long-distance trade networks starting in the late fourteenth century. How were traditional economies characterized by limited movement stimulated by the circulation of people, goods, and money from afar? We will then move to a discussion of the factors leading to (or frustrating) transformational patterns of economic growth: agricultural productivity, institutions, "proto-industrial" production in an era of limited urban growth, and changing norms of consumption. This course is part of the College Course Cluster program: Economic History, from Sumer to the Global World.

Instructor(s): P. Cheney & K. Pomeranz     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages.
Equivalent Course(s): ECON 12210

HIST 20110. Trans-Saharan Africa. 100 Units.

This course will deal with various developments (trade, politics, religion, slavery, voluntary migration) linking the Maghrib/North Africa with the great African desert and the "Sudanic" lands to its south. Along with lectures and discussions of readings we will visit an exhibit, Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Medieval Trans-Saharan Exchange, at the Block Museum of Art in Evanston.

Instructor(s): R. Austen     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 30110, CRES 30110, CRES 20110

HIST 20111. History of Death. 100 Units.

From the treatment of mortal remains to the built environment of cemeteries, tombs, and memorials, the dead have always played a role in the lives of the living. This course examines how beliefs and practices surrounding death have been a source of meaning making for individuals, institutions, religious communities, and modern nations. It will ask students to consider how examining death makes it possible to better understand the values and concerns of societies across time and space. This course will consider case studies from Africa, the Middle East, the Caribbean, North America, Europe, and Asia, from the Middle Ages to the Vietnam War. It introduces students to the methods and debates that animate the historical study of death-coming from histories of the body, social history, and the study of slavery-and ends by asking the question: "Is it possible to have a global history of death?"

Instructor(s): K. Hickerson     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20111, GNSE 20111, RLST 20111

HIST 20210. History Lab: Migration and Mobility in Human History. 100 Units.

This Making History course will explore different episodes of human mobility. We will study forced and voluntary migrations by considering the earliest movements of people out of Africa, the transatlantic slave trade, the displacements in Europe produced by World War II, and the current flows of people from Africa and the Middle East across the Mediterranean. These wide-ranging topics necessarily demand that students use a variety of primary sources and methodologies; assigned readings will thus be supplemented by documentaries, audio recordings, artistic renditions, and material culture. For their final project students will be required to work individually or in teams to investigate an example of human migration. Student may present the results of this research as a formal academic essay, may create a website or video, or use some other medium.

Instructor(s): E. Osborn     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Making History courses forgo traditional paper assignments for innovative projects that develop new skills with professional applications in the working world. Open to students at all levels, but especially recommended for 3rd- and 4th-yr students.

HIST 21006. The Present Past in Greece Since 1769. 100 Units.

This discussion-based course will explore how conceptions of the ancient past have been mobilized and imagined in the political, social, and cultural discourses of modern Greece from the lead up to the War of Independence through to the present day. Among the themes that will be addressed are ethnicity and nationalism, theories of history, the production of archaeological knowledge, and the politics of display.

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 21915, HIST 31006, CLAS 31915, ANCM 31915

HIST 21903. Medieval Christian Mythology. 100 Units.

Heaven and hell, angels and demons, the Virgin Mary and the devil battling over the state of human souls, the world on the edge of apocalypse awaiting the coming of the Judge and the resurrection of the dead, the transubstantiation of bread and wine into body and blood, the great adventures of the saints. As Rudolf Bultmann put it in his summary of the "world picture" of the New Testament, "all of this is mythological talk," arguably unnecessary for Christian theology. And yet, without its mythology, much of Christianity becomes incomprehensible as a religious or symbolic system. This course is intended as an introduction to the stories that medieval Christians told about God, his Mother, the angels, and the saints, along with the place of the sacraments and miracles in the world picture of the medieval church. Sources will range from Hugh of St. Victor's summa on the sacraments to Hildegard of Bingen's visionary "Scivias," the Pseudo-Bonaventuran "Meditations on the Life of Christ," and Jacobus de Voragine's "Golden Legend," along with handbooks on summoning angels and cycles of mystery plays.

Instructor(s): R. Fulton Brown     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 21903, HIST 31903, HCHR 31903

HIST 22102. Medieval Travelers. 100 Units.

Why did Europeans respond as they did to the opportunities opened to them with Columbus's discovery of a "new world" in the late fifteenth century? What precedents and preconceptions did they have for their encounter with this "new world"? This course seeks to answer these questions by looking to the accounts of those who traveled both within and beyond Europe, in fact and in imagination, during the centuries preceding Columbus's voyage. Its argument will be that to understand what Columbus and his contemporaries found when they arrived in the "new world," we must first understand what they thought they were looking for--and that what they were looking for is not necessarily what we might expect. The course gives students the opportunity to write a significant research paper, written in the character of a medieval traveler, whether a merchant, pilgrim, crusader, missionary, geographer, or conquistador.

Instructor(s): R. Fulton Brown     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32102

HIST 22203. The Holy Roman Empire, 800-1500. 100 Units.

During the first seven centuries of its existence the Holy Roman Empire emerged as one of the most politically and culturally heterogeneous states in all of Europe. A vast expanse of central Europe that is today divided among more than a dozen nations was ruled, at least in theory, by the emperors during the central and late Middle Ages. The purpose of this course is to trace some of the major developments in imperial history between 800 (Charlemagne's coronation as emperor) and the early sixteenth century. Topics will include the changing nature of imperial authority from the Carolingians to the Habsburgs, the Church's and the nobility's establishment of quasi-independent lordships inside imperial territory, papal-imperial relations, and the eastward expansion of the empire.

Instructor(s): J. Lyon     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32203

HIST 22610. Paris and the French Revolution. 100 Units.

The French Revolution is one of the defining moments of modern world history. This course will explore the mix of social, political, and cultural factors which caused its outbreak in 1789 and go on to consider the overthrow of the Bourbon monarchy in 1792, the drift towards state-driven Terror in 1793-94, and the ensuing failure to achieve political stability down to the advent of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. We will view these epochal changes through the prism of France's capital city. Paris shaped the revolution in many ways, but the revolution also reshaped Paris. The urbane city of European enlightenment acquired new identities as democratic hub from 1789 and as site of popular democracy after 1793-94. In addition, the revolution generated new ways of thinking about urban living and remodelling the city for the modern age. A wide range of primary sources will be used, including visual sources (notably paintings, political cartoons and caricatures, and maps).

Instructor(s): C. Jones     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students taking FREN 22619/32619 must read French texts in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 32619, FREN 22619, HIST 32610

HIST 23008. Montesquieu's "The Spirit of the Laws" 100 Units.

From its publication in 1748, "The Spirit of the Laws" has been interpreted, among other things, as a foundational work of method in historical jurisprudence; a pæan to the English constitution and an inspiration for that of the future United States; a precocious call for penal reform and the abolition of slavery; a monument to the Enlightenment's capacity for cultural relativism that laid the groundwork for the discipline of sociology; a historical treatise on the rise of globalized commerce and its political effects in Europe; and a manifesto for a reactionary feudal aristocracy. We will read "The Spirit of the Laws" with attention to these and other possible interpretations. This course is mainly an exercise in close reading, but we will also think about the contexts for the writing and reception of this landmark work of Enlightenment social and political thought.

Instructor(s): P. Cheney     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of one of these Core sequences: "Classics of Social and Political Thought," "Power, Identity, Resistance" or "Self, Culture, and Society."
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 23008, LLSO 23008

HIST 23306. Europe, 1914 to Present. 100 Units.

This lecture course will provide an introductory survey to European history in the twentieth century. It aims to provide a critical overview of political, economic, social, and cultural developments. Topics covered will include the rise of mass politics and the conflict between Bolshevism and fascism; the causes, experiences, and effects of the First and Second World Wars in Western and Eastern Europe; the transformation of Eastern Europe's multinational empires into nationalizing states; interwar democratization and economic crisis; ethnic cleansing and population displacement; decolonization and the Cold War; the challenges of postcolonial migration; transformations in society and economy, including changes in class and gender relations; new social and protest movements in the 1960s and 1970s; mass culture and consumption; the collapse of Communism; and European integration at the end of the twentieth century.

Instructor(s): T. Zahra     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Open to first-year students.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 33306

HIST 23610. Modern German History I, 1740-1866. 100 Units.

What is German history before the foundation of the German state? This course introduces students to a broad perspective on this question, taking up the monumental shifts in borders, citizenship, social hierarchies, economic development, and political orientation from the War of Austrian Succession to the Austro-Prussian War. While the course will focus on the cultural, social, political, and intellectual histories of these transformations in the kleindeutsch states, we will be concerned throughout with the larger Habsburg empire and with Germans' place in the world as we consider the relationship of the German lands to eastern and western Europe and German participation in international commerce, imperial networks, and global migration. Course materials will emphasize primary sources, including written documents, music, works of art, literature, and historical artifacts as we approach the central themes of the period from a variety of registers of experience.

Instructor(s): A. Goff
Note(s): No background in German or European history is required.

HIST 23611. Modern German History II, 1866-Present. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to German history from the unification of Germany through the Kaiserreich, the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the East and West German states, and reunification. Throughout, our focus will be on the political, social, economic, cultural, and intellectual life of the period, including such themes as German colonialism, industrialization, the First World War, cultural modernism, the rise of National Socialism, the Holocaust, the Cold War, migration, the environmental movement, the European Union, and the rise of the far right in contemporary German politics. As we approach these themes from a variety of registers of experience, course materials will emphasize primary sources, including written documents, music, works of art, literature, and historical artifacts.

Instructor(s): A. Goff
Note(s): No background in German or European history is required.

HIST 24310. China: Rise or Return? Historical Perspectives on Chinese Culture. 100 Units.

This course addresses the development through time of the Chinese state, society, and culture from its beginning to the present. Only the most general of treatments is possible in addressing such an enormous subject, but the course provides an opportunity for individual research on a specialized topic of the student's choosing within this framework. No background in Chinese studies is required. The class discusses and critiques the weekly readings. Each set of readings centers on a broad historical question of crucial historical significance.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24302

HIST 24500. Reading Qing Documents. 100 Units.

This course introduces Chinese documents of the Qing (1644-1912) and the Republican (1912-1949) periods, with an emphasis upon critical use of these documents and the related historiography. Students read a wide variety of genres, including imperial edicts, secret memorials, local gazetteers, newspapers, funeral essays, as well as selections from the Qing "Veritable Records" (Qing Shilu) and the Draft History of the Qing Dynasty (Qing Shigao). We first translate the documents into English and then analyze them.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Third-year Chinese level or approval of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34500, EALC 34500, EALC 24500

HIST 24612. Chinese Frontier History, circa 1600-Present. 100 Units.

A study of frontier regions, migration, and border policies in Qing (1644-1912) and twentieth-century China, focusing on selected case studies. Cases will include both actual border regions (where the Qing/China was adjacent to some other polity it recognized), ethnically diverse internal frontiers, and places where migrants moved into previously uninhabited regions (e.g., high mountains). Topics include the political economy and geopolitics of migration and frontier regions, the formation of ethnic and national identities in frontier contexts, borderland society (e.g., marriage, social stratification, and social mobility), and the environmental effects of migration.

Instructor(s): K. Pomeranz     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Assignments for undergraduates are two short papers, a midterm (which can be waived under certain circumstances), a final, and class participation; requirements for graduate students are negotiable, but will include roughly twenty pages of writing (and no in-class exams).
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34612, EALC 24712, EALC 34712

HIST 24803. Histories in Japan. 100 Units.

An examination of the discipline of history as practiced in Japan from ancient times to the modern. Readings in translation of works such as the Kojiki, Okagami, Taiheiki, and others will be used to explore both the Japanese past and the manner of interpretation of that past.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24803, HIST 34803, EALC 34803

HIST 25308. Lab, Field, and Clinic: History and Anthropology of Medicine and the Life Sciences. 100 Units.

In this course we will examine the ways in which different groups of people--in different times and places--have understood the nature of life and living things, bodies and bodily processes, and health and disease, among other notions. We will address these issues principally, though not exclusively, through the lens of the changing sets of methods and practices commonly recognizable as science and medicine. We will also pay close attention to the methods through which scholars in history and anthropology have written about these topics, and how current scientific and medical practices affect historical and anthropological studies of science and medicine.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course fulfills part of the KNOW core seminar requirement. PhD students should register for KNOW 40202 to be eligible to apply for the SIFK dissertation fellowship.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 25808, KNOW 25308, HIST 35308, ANTH 34307, CHSS 35308, ANTH 24307, KNOW 40202

HIST 25425. Censorship, Info Control, & Revolutions in Info Technology from the Printing Press to the Internet. 100 Units.

The digital revolution is triggering a wave of new information control efforts and censorship attempts, ranging from monopolistic copyright laws to the "Great Firewall" of China. The print revolution after 1450 was a moment like our own, when the explosive dissemination of a new information technology triggered a wave of information control efforts. Many of today's attempts at information control closely parallel early responses to the printing press, so the premodern case gives us centuries of data showing how diverse attempts to control or censors information variously incentivized, discouraged, curated, silenced, commodified, or nurtured art, thought, and science. This unique course is part of a collaborative research project funded by the Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society and is co-organized with digital information expert Cory Doctorow. The course will bring pairs of experts working on the print and digital revolutions to campus to discuss parallels between their research with the class. Classes will be open to the public, filmed, and shared on the Internet to create an international public conversation. This is also a Department of History "Making History" course: rather than writing traditional papers, students will create web resources and publications (print and digital) to contribute to the ongoing collaborative research project.

Instructor(s): A. Johns & A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Making History courses forgo traditional paper assignments for innovative projects that develop new skills with professional applications in the working world. Open to students at all levels, but especially recommended for 3rd- and 4th-yr students. This course fulfills part of the KNOW core seminar requirement. PhD students should register for KNOW 40103 to be eligible to apply for the SIFK dissertation fellowship.
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26035, KNOW 40103, HREL 35425, HIPS 25425, BPRO 25425, KNOW 25425, CHSS 35425, HIST 35425

HIST 25704-25804-25904. Islamic History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the main trends in the political history of the Islamic world, with some attention to economic, social, and intellectual history. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

HIST 25704. Islamic History and Society I: The Rise of Islam and the Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Instructor(s): Orit Bashkin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20501, HIST 35704, NEHC 30501, CMES 30501, RLST 20501, ISLM 30500

HIST 25804. Islamic History and Society II: The Middle Period. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20502, ISLM 30600, HIST 35804, CMES 30502, NEHC 30502

HIST 25904. Islamic History and Society III:The Modern Middle East. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30503, NEHC 20503, HIST 35904

HIST 26129. Paris Noir: African American Refuge in the City of Light. 100 Units.

This course explores the phenomenal history of Paris as a place of refuge for people of African descent, focusing especially on black Americans during the middle decades of the 20th century. Beginning in the years when the US Jim Crow regime was being consolidated and continuing through the era of the civil rights movement, when that regime was being contested, black Americans considered Paris a place of refuge. Novelists, musicians, and sports and political figures all found opportunity for creativity and freedom of expression in the "city of light," notwithstanding the fact that France had itself been one of the principal slave powers in the Americas and remained a major colonial empire--all of which complicated its image of racial liberalism. How both French people and African American sojourners negotiated that apparent contradiction will be the principal issues addressed in course readings and discussions, which will focus on political activists like W .E. B. Du Bois and Black Panther member Elaine Brown; literary figures like Richard Wright and James Baldwin; and sports and entertainment personalities like Jack Johnson and Josephine Baker. Course readings will be a mix of primary and secondary sources, including James Baldwin, "Notes of a Native Son"; Richard Wright, "I Choose Exile"; Hazel Rowley, "Richard Wright: The Life and Times"; Tyler Stovall, "Paris Noir: African Americans in the City of Light"; Brent Hayes Edwards, "The Practice of Diaspora"; James Campbell,

Instructor(s): T. Holt     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Paris Humanities Program.

HIST 26515. Political and Cultural History of Modern Mexico. 100 Units.

This course is not a survey of Mexican history but a discussion of the recent contributions to the cultural and political historiography of modern Mexico. It will blend lectures and discussion of such topics as the new meanings of citizenship, peace, war, national culture, violence, avant-garde art, and cinema.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 36515, HIST 36515, LACS 26515

HIST 26516. The United States and Latin America, a History from 1840s to Trump. 100 Units.

Over the second half of the twentieth century, it became a cliché that the United States was an empire and that the so-called Latin America was its backyard, the region where the empire paraded, with largesse, its mighty will. And yet, on one hand, over the last 150 years both the United States and "Latin America" have had variegated forms of interactions, which cannot be easily characterized as one single historical constant; on the other, in today's world the question seems unavoidable: is "Latin America" still a homogenous unique region with which the United States interacts collectively in the same ways whether in political, economic, or military terms? Making use of historical analysis in tandem with constant discussions of current events in the United States and "Latin America," the course seeks to invite students to add a disciplined historical imagination to the historian/political scientist/analyst toolbox. The course will consist of lectures, student presentations, and class discussions. Each student will be required to introduce readings in class at least once, depending on the number of students. In addition, there will be two take-home essays over the semester. The essay questions will be distributed a week in advance of the due dates.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 26516, HIST 36516, LACS 36516

HIST 27006. Not Just the Facts: Telling About the American South. 100 Units.

The great jurist Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. once observed: "The main part of intellectual education is not the acquisition of facts but learning how to make facts live." This course concerns itself with the various ways people have striven to understand the American South, past and present. We will read fiction, autobiography, and history (including meditations on how to write history). Main themes of the course include the difference between historical scholarship and writing history in fictional form; the role of the author in each and consideration of the interstitial space of autobiography; the question of authorial authenticity; and the tension between contemporary demands for truthfulness and the rejection of "truth."

Instructor(s): J. Dailey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to upper-level undergraduates.
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 27006, LLSO 25411

HIST 27508. Conspiracy Theory in American History. 100 Units.

This course examines conspiracy theories in American history--and some actual conspiracies--ranging from the seventeenth century to the 1990s. The alleged conspiracies that we will study include slave uprisings, monarchical plots against liberty, Catholic secret agents, Freemasons and other secret societies, the abolitionist movement and the Southern "Slave Power," the JFK assassination, and the modern fascination with UFOs, among others. What ties these diverse topics together is a sense that hidden forces are pulling the strings behind the scenes, exercising power in secret to control the course of events, invariably with sinister agendas. We will examine these conspiracy theories not to prove or disprove them, but to understand how such beliefs come about, why they become popular, and how even paranoid fantasies can exert a decisive influence on culture and politics in America.

Instructor(s): M. Kruer     Terms Offered: Autumn

HIST 28000. United States Latinos: Origins and Histories. 100 Units.

An examination of the diverse social, economic, political, and cultural histories of those who are now commonly identified as Latinos in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formative historical experiences of Mexican Americans and mainland Puerto Ricans, although some consideration will also be given to the histories of other Latino groups, i.e., Cubans, Central Americans, and Dominicans. Topics include cultural and geographic origins and ties; imperialism and colonization; the economics of migration and employment; legal status; work, women, and the family; racism and other forms of discrimination; the politics of national identity; language and popular culture; and the place of Latinos in US society. Equivalent Course(s): AMER 28001,CRES 28000,GNSE 28202,HIST 38000,LACS 28000,LACS 38000,CRES 38000,GNSE 38202,AMER 38001

Instructor(s): R. Gutiérrez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 28202, GNSE 38202, AMER 38001, CRES 28000, AMER 28001, HIST 38000, LACS 28000, LACS 38000, CRES 38000

HIST 28607. War, Diplomacy, and Empire in US History. 100 Units.

World politics have profoundly shaped the United States from its colonial origins to the war on terror. Yet only recently have US historians made a sustained effort to relate the foreign relations of the country to its domestic history. For a century and a half prior to independence, empire, trade, great-power politics, and violent conflict with Native Americans formed the large structures of power and meaning within which colonists pursued their everyday lives. In violently repudiating the claims of the British Empire, the revolutionaries commenced a political tradition that sought to avoid the perils of great-power statecraft for roughly the next century and a half. Yet even as it lent a distinctive cast to US politics and society, this pursuit of exceptionalism had to reckon with the requirements of state power and geopolitics from the Civil War onward. With its sudden embrace of great-power politics and the "rise to globalism" from WWII onward the United States became increasingly like the European societies it had repudiated at the founding, even as its exceptional military and economic power set it apart as a "unipolar power" by the turn of the millennium. To understand these developments in depth students will write two modest-length "deep-dive" analytical essays and three brief reports on targeted expeditions into primary materials, while reading broadly across the historiography of the new diplomatic and international history.

Instructor(s): J. Sparrow     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 38607

HIST 29000. Latin American Religions, New and Old. 100 Units.

This course will consider select pre-twentieth-century issues, such as the transformations of Christianity in colonial society and the Catholic Church as a state institution. It will emphasize twentieth-century developments: religious rebellions; conversion to evangelical Protestant churches; Afro-diasporan religions; reformist and revolutionary Catholicism; new and New Age religions.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 39000, CRES 29000, HIST 39000, LACS 29000, RLST 21401, MAPS 39200, HCHR 39200, LACS 39000

HIST 29324. Slavery and Capitalism. 100 Units.

The course examines how the interrelated transnational forces of slavery and capitalism shaped our modern world from the 1400s to the present. We will examine the history of this relationship and the living legacy of that history in the narratives of everyday people. Are recent frameworks theorizing a global hegemonic system of "slavery and racial capitalism" really our ultimate horizon? Are there any redemptive possibilities in older renderings committed to a more distinctive and disaggregated parsing of slavery and capitalism? Critical to approaching these questions are how people of African descent have themselves remembered slavery, experienced capitalism, and marshalled those memories in the service of emancipatory political movements. As such this course will focus on primary documents that give voice to enslaved peoples as well as secondary literature written by black historians attempting to shape international thought on this question. The ultimate aim is a wider understanding of the rise of Western modernity and how peoples of the African diaspora navigated and, at times, contested its consequences.

Instructor(s): G. Mount
Prerequisite(s): Prior undergraduate course on the African diaspora.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 29324

HIST 29325. A Transnational History of Reparative Justice. 100 Units.

In light of recent revelations tying the University of Chicago to slavery, this course will explore the long history of reparations as a global, national, and local set of questions. How does a given polity go about repairing the un-repairable and forgiving the unforgivable? Are the discursive norms of reparations irredeemably bound to our current conceptualizations of politics, governance, private-property rights, individualism, and the law or can reparations, and how we talk about them, serve as a means of reimagining these categories? How might the practice and performance of reparations actually be structured to foster both intra-group and inter-group unity while avoiding a potentially divisive backlash? Beginning with ancient forms of restorative justice and proceeding briskly into more recent attempts at truth and reconciliation, this course aims to take a transnational and comparative approach to exploring the history of reparations from an interdisciplinary perspective. The ultimate aim is a greater understanding of the possibilities of reparations as they relate to slavery, Jim Crow, and post-1968 discrimination against people of African descent in the United States, which constitutes the second half of this course.

Instructor(s): G. Mount
Prerequisite(s): Prior or concurrent enrollment in a college-level African American history course; instructor may waive PQ on a case by case basis.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 29325

HIST 29412. The Face in Western Culture from the Mona Lisa to the Selfie. 100 Units.

The course will approach the history of the human face from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, ranging across art history through to the history of science and technology. Topics will include the Mona Lisa and Renaissance portraiture; early modern identity and identity documents; the discipline of physiognomy; Johann Kaspar Lavater and the makings of racial science; the impact of photography; Alphonse Bertillon and the "mug shot"; smiles in advertisements; biometrics to facial recognition technologies; and the art and science of the selfie. The course will draw on specialized readings from secondary literature alongside a wide range of literary and visual primary sources, including scientific texts, paintings, drawings, identity documents, photographs, advertisements, cosmetics, and prosthetic parts. The subject offers a great deal of room for the selection of a topic for a research paper on a subject of students' choices.

Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 29412, ARTH 29412

HIST 29413. The Politics of Memory in Modern France. 100 Units.

Most of a nation's past is forgotten, and even momentous, heroic, or villainous events fade from memory within a generation or two. Governments, organized groups, and individuals often do not agree about what should be remembered and what forgotten, nor is there consensus concerning appropriate forms of and audiences for commemoration. Does everyone see commemorations the same? How effective is naming of a street sign or a métro stop? Do people see statues or just walk past? Is it legitimate to shock with graphic representations of violence? What memorial work do histories, novels, poems, films, and museums do? We will analyze French, starting with the heart of state commemoration-the Pantheon-where those deemed of the highest national service are interred. Next, we focus on revolution, such as the Place de la Bastille column, the Mur des Fédérés, or the Sorbonne amphitheater, occupied in 1968. Regarding WW2, while the government and civil society accepted responsibility for the deportation and murder of some 76,000 Jews quite late. There are now, however, numerous monuments to their lives and deaths across Paris. Concerning France's imperial past, we will focus on debates over remembering metropolitan France's long and fraught relationship with North Africa and North Africans. Our approach will be multidisciplinary: secondary readings will be drawn from anthropology, sociology, and history, and primary sources will include poetry, novels, memoirs, film, and site visits.

Instructor(s): L. Auslander     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Paris Social Sciences program.

HIST 29522. Europe's Intellectual Transformations, Renaissance through Enlightenment. 100 Units.

This course will consider the foundational transformations of Western thought from the end of the Middle Ages to the threshold of modernity. It will provide an overview of the three self-conscious and interlinked intellectual revolutions which reshaped early modern Europe: the Renaissance revival of antiquity, the "new philosophy" of the seventeenth century, and the light and dark faces of the Enlightenment. It will treat scholasticism, humanism, the scientific revolution, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Voltaire, Diderot, and Sade.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students taking FREN 29322/39322 must read French texts in French.
Note(s): First-year students and non-History majors welcome.
Equivalent Course(s): HCHR 39522, HIST 39522, SIGN 26036, FREN 29322, FREN 39322, RLST 22605

HIST 29533. Economic History III: The Global Economy from Great Depression to Great Recession. 100 Units.

This is the third part in the economic history sequence. Topics include the second Industrial Revolution and the new imperialism, the Great Depression and World War II, the American postwar world economic order, communism, and third-world development; globalization, growth, inequality, and climate change; the great recession.

Instructor(s): J. Levy     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 39533, ECON 12220

HIST 29663. History Colloquium: The American Vigilante. 100 Units.

From the Regulators to Rambo, the vigilante has played a leading role in the history and culture of the United States. This junior colloquium traces a long history of the American vigilante as a character, as well as episodes of vigilante violence from early America to the present. We will focus on the questions central to this history: What is the relationship between the vigilante and the state? Where can we draw distinctions between vigilantism, terrorism, and rebellion? How has the vigilante contributed to nation-building? We will also explore the predominance of the vigilante in popular culture, focusing on figures such as Jesse James, Dirty Harry, Machete, the Punisher, superheroes, the movies of John Wayne, and the lyrics of Toby Keith. Students will write substantial final papers based on primary sources that explore one element of this discussion.

Instructor(s): K. Belew     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Priority registration is given to History majors.

HIST 29673. History Colloquium: The Politics of Housing. 100 Units.

This course examines the struggle of Americans to find and access housing from the first Gilded Age of the late nineteenth century to the Gilded Age of the present. Conceptualizing housing as more than a place where people live, we address the ways in which shelter is bound up with race, gender, labor, law, consumption, and immigration. Topics include company towns, homelessness, redlining, public housing, suburbanization, and gentrification. This course exposes students to the methodologies of writing history (social, architectural, intellectual, cultural, and political economy). We will also engage with historical documents such as maps, magazines, census records, congressional documents, rental listings, music, and films. Students will be expected to conduct original research and produce a fifteen- to twenty-page research paper.

Instructor(s): D. Jenkins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29674. History Colloquium: American Indian History. 100 Units.

This colloquium will explore the history of the indigenous peoples of North America from the century before contact with Europeans to the present day. Topics will range from early encounters between American Indians and European colonists, the contested creation of a shared world in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the Native struggle for independence in the early United States, the nineteenth-century subjugation of Indian tribes in the west, and the twentieth-century indigenous resurgence of "Red Power" movements and other groups advocating for self-determination. Readings are primarily scholarly monographs, which provide examples for discussion, and guidebooks on project design and writing techniques. Readings will also include theoretical pieces on the development of the field and methodological discussions of scholarly practice, with the aim of "decolonizing" the study of Native American societies and their histories. Students are expected to plan, research, and write an original paper using resources available through the University of Chicago libraries and the special collections of the Newberry Library, a national center for the study of Native American history.

Instructor(s): M. Kruer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29675. History Colloquium: Urban US History. 100 Units.

According to Hank V. Savitch and Paul Kantor, "cities are the crucibles through which radical experiments become convention. They are concentrated environments in which people adapt and their resilience is tested. They are the world's incubators of innovation-made possible by critical mass, diversity, and rich interaction." This undergraduate research colloquium will explore American cities and their influence on United States history, with an emphasis on the nineteenth century. We will discuss a range of secondary historical monographs and will examine primary sources, including print culture, material objects, images, architecture, and the built environment. Requirements include careful reading, active and thoughtful participation, and a fifteen-page work of original research that will be presented in class.

Instructor(s): A. Lippert     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Priority registration is given to History majors; consent of instructor

HIST 29677. History Colloquium: Religion and History. 100 Units.

The study of religion presents an enormous challenge to the historian. On the one hand, religious beliefs typically posit a reality beyond that accessible to the tools of analysis employed by most historians; on the other, such beliefs and their associated practices have given shape and purpose to human society and psyches throughout human history, making them one of the most important drivers of human thought and behavior. In this colloquium, we will wrestle with the question of how, as historians, it is possible to make sense of the role of religion in history. We will explore different methodologies for thinking about religion and test them with specific examples of belief and practice across various religious traditions. To ensure a variety of perspectives, students will be able to choose the tradition they want to focus on for their class presentations and final projects.

Instructor(s): R. Fulton Brown     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Priority registration is given to History majors.

HIST 29678. History Colloquium: Medicine and Society. 100 Units.

How does medical knowledge change? How do medical practices transform over time? What factors influence the ways in which doctors and patients--and scientists, artists, politicians, legislators, activists, and educators, among others--understand matters of health and disease, of proper and improper interventions, of the rights of individuals and the needs of communities? This course treats these questions as a starting point for exploring the interactions of medicine and society from 1800 to the present. Through a combination of primary and secondary sources we will examine changing causes of morbidity and mortality, the development of new medical technologies and infrastructures, shifting patterns of disease and shifting ideas about bodies, and debates about health care policy, among other topics. Students will be expected to conduct original research and produce an original research paper of fifteen to twenty pages.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Priority registration is given to History majors.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 29678

HIST 29700. Readings in History. 100 Units.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and the History undergraduate advisor.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Summer Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and the History undergraduate advisor.

HIST 29801-29802. BA Thesis Seminar I-II.

History students in the research track are required to take HIST 29801-29802. Third-year students in the research track and in residence in Chicago take BA Thesis Seminar I in Spring Quarter. Those who are out of residence take the seminar in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year.

HIST 29801. BA Thesis Seminar I. 100 Units.

History majors are required to take HIST 29801-29802. BA Thesis Seminar I provides a systematic introduction to historical methodology and approaches (e.g., political, intellectual, social, cultural, economic, gender, environmental history), as well as research techniques. It culminates in students' submission of a robust BA thesis proposal that will be critiqued in class. Guidance will also be provided for applications for research funding. Prerequisite(s): All third-year history majors in residence in Chicago take HIST 29801 in Spring Quarter. Those who are out of residence take it in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Autumn Spring
Prerequisite(s): All third-year history students in the research track and in residence in Chicago take HIST 29801 in spring quarter. Those who are out of residence take it in autumn quarter of their fourth year.

HIST 29802. BA Thesis Seminar II. 100 Units.

BA Thesis Seminar II is a forum to discuss and critique BA theses. Ideally, students will have completed most of their research for the thesis and will use this quarter to produce a complete draft. Early weeks of the seminar will be devoted to writing strategies and discussion of the introduction. Sections of the theses will be critiqued in the middle weeks of term, while in the final weeks of the quarter full rough drafts will be read. The final deadline for submission of the BA thesis is second week of Spring Quarter.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 29801


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Chair, Collegiate Affairs Committee
Susan Burns
SS 221
773.702.8934

Administrative Contact

Undergraduate Program Coordinator
TBD
SS 225
773.702.2178
Email

Preceptor/BA Advisor


Preceptors
Foster 4
773.702.3079

Listhost

https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/ugradhistory