Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Summary of Requirements | Honors | Grading | Minor in History | Course Numbering | Courses

Department Website: http://history.uchicago.edu/page/undergraduate

Program of Study

Studying history enables students to learn the importance of both time and space to human experience. It will enable you to engage a fundamental paradox: The past really is a "foreign country" and yet the present is a product of that past. You will learn how people have not always been as they are in the here and now, and also to make sense of the present in terms of the past and of the past in terms of the present. Fields of study may be defined by geography (e.g., China, the Caribbean, the United States, Europe), time period (e.g., ancient, medieval, modern), or by thematic approaches (e.g., legal, cultural, environmental, gender). The fourth-year BA thesis will afford you the opportunity to pursue an original research project on a topic of your choosing. Students have worked on topics in subfields as varied as the history of revolution, slavery, diplomacy, the Enlightenment, religion, colonialism, race, war, and work. Involving the analysis of evidence, the formulation of arguments, and extensive writing, studying history is excellent preparation for a wide range of endeavors from law, government, and public policy to the arts and business.

Students interested in a history major ideally should consult the undergraduate program coordinator before the end of their second year; it is, however, generally possible to join the major as a third-year student. You will be assigned to a faculty advisor who will act as your individual program advisor. Students who wish to study abroad should see the undergraduate program coordinator during their second year.

Students construct their course of study in consultation with their faculty advisor, the undergraduate program coordinator, preceptors, and other appropriate faculty members.

Program Requirements

There are no special prerequisites for a history major. However, students are strongly encouraged to fulfill College civilization and language requirements with courses most relevant to their main field of interest. A typical course of study in the Department of History would commence with surveys or courses that introduce a problem or approach and move on to more advanced and specialized courses. History colloquia (HIST 29600s) are offered on a variety of topics each year and enable advanced undergraduates to write an extended research project based on primary sources.

Courses

Students must take twelve courses in history. Students must submit a petition to receive History credit for courses that do not have a History course number assigned. Students who wish to submit a petition should consult with the undergraduate program coordinator in advance about the process and required documentation.

Students are required to take six courses in, or directly related to, their chosen main field. Two additional courses are reserved for HIST 29801 BA Thesis Seminar I and HIST 29802 BA Thesis Seminar II. The four secondary courses are chosen to complement the main field, extend the range of the student's historical awareness, and explore varying approaches to historical analysis and interpretations. Students are urged to take courses that introduce significant civilizational or chronological breadth. As part of their course work, students are required to take a history colloquium (HIST 29600s) by the end of their third year. The colloquium counts toward the twelve courses needed to complete the major and requires students to do independent research and writing as preparation for the BA thesis.

Students construct the main field and choose their other courses in close consultation with the undergraduate program coordinator, subject to final approval by the chair of the Collegiate Affairs Committee.

Students are typically expected to take at least four history courses, including three in their main field, by the end of their third year.

Courses in the Main Field

The Department of History offers a number of standard major fields, including, but not limited to, the following:

  • Africa                                                                                                             
  • Ancient                                                                                             
  • Britain                                                                  
  • Byzantium                                    
  • Caribbean                                                             
  • East Asia                                                           
  • Europe (Medieval, Early Modern, and Modern)
  • International and Transnational
  • Jewish
  • Latin America
  • Middle East
  • Russia
  • Science
  • Sexuality and Gender
  • South Asia
  • United States

Students should work with the undergraduate program coordinator to ensure appropriate focus and breadth in both the major field and the elective courses. In choosing courses, there are two important goals: broad knowledge of the main field and more detailed knowledge of one or several of its major aspects.

Junior Colloquium

Students who are majoring in history must take a history colloquium (HIST 29600s) by the end of their third year of study. The colloquia are offered on a variety of topics each year and enable advanced College students to pursue research projects. These courses expose students to the methods and practice of historical research and writing prior to enrollment in the BA Thesis Seminar. Students will be required to compose an original research paper that is at least fifteen pages in length. For students who are planning to begin graduate study the year following graduation, the Junior Colloquium requirement provides them with the opportunity to produce a writing sample based on primary sources that they can use for their applications.

Students who will not be on campus their third year should consult with the undergraduate program coordinator about filling this requirement.

BA Thesis Seminar

The BA thesis is a three-quarter research project in which students develop a significant and original interpretation of a historical issue of their choosing. Theses are the culmination of the history program and range from forty to sixty pages in length, but there is neither a minimum nor a maximum requirement. The BA Thesis Seminars assist students in formulating approaches and developing their research and writing skills, while providing a forum for group discussion and critiques. In addition to working closely with their faculty director, who is the first reader of their thesis, students are also required to participate in the BA Thesis Seminars. Although students will benefit from the guidance of their preceptor and the company of their peers for three quarters beginning in the spring of their third year and running through the winter of their fourth, they only formally register for two quarters, during the Spring Quarter of their third year (HIST 29801 BA Thesis Seminar I) and Winter Quarter of their fourth year (HIST 29802 BA Thesis Seminar II). The BA Thesis Seminar will meet weekly in the spring of the third year, but only every other week during autumn and winter terms of the fourth year. The preceptor serves as the seminar instructor and the second reader of the thesis.

The final deadline for submission of the BA thesis is second week of Spring Quarter, when two copies of the BA thesis must be submitted to the undergraduate program coordinator in the Social Science Research Building, room 225. Students who wish to complete their papers in a quarter other than Spring Quarter must petition the department through the undergraduate program coordinator. Students graduating in a quarter other than Spring Quarter must turn in their theses by Friday of seventh week of their final quarter. When circumstances justify it, the department establishes individual deadlines and procedures.

With approval from the undergraduate program chairs in two departments, history students may be able to write a BA thesis that meets requirements for a dual major. Students must consult with both chairs before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Students are eligible to apply for research funding for summer research from the Department of History and the PRISM (Planning Resources and Involvement for Students in the Majors) program. Students are also encouraged to take advantage of funding that is available for language study abroad through the Foreign Language Acquisition Grant (FLAG) program. For details on available funding, students should consult the undergraduate program coordinator.

Reading and Research Courses

Students interested in pursuing a program of study that cannot be met by means of regular courses have the option of devising a reading and research course that is taken individually and supervised by a member of the History faculty. Such a course requires the approval of the undergraduate program coordinator and the prior consent of the instructor with whom the student would like to study. Note: Enrollment in HIST 29700 Readings in History is open only to students who are doing independent study that is not related to the BA thesis or BA research. As a general rule, only one reading and research course can be counted towards the history major.

Summary of Requirements

Six courses in main field600
HIST 29801-29802BA Thesis Seminar I-II200
Four electives400
One Junior Colloquium (HIST 29600s): May be in main field or an elective
Total Units1200

Honors

Students who have done exceptionally well in their course work and have written an outstanding BA thesis are recommended for honors. Candidates must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher, and a GPA of 3.7 or higher in the major. BA theses judged to be of particular distinction are submitted by the readers to the department for honors. If the department concurs, the student is awarded honors. Students who fail to meet the final deadline for submission of the BA thesis are not eligible for honors consideration.

Grading

Courses counting towards the history major are normally taken for quality grades. The History Colloquium (HIST 29600s), HIST 29801 BA Thesis Seminar I, and HIST 29802 BA Thesis Seminar II must be taken for quality grades. In exceptional circumstances, students who are majoring in history may petition to allow a history course taken for a pass/fail grade to count towards the requirements of the major. Students wishing to do so should consult with the undergraduate program coordinator. A pass grade is to be given only for work of C– quality or higher. Students should also consult with their College adviser about the place of pass/fail grading options in their larger program of study.

Minor in History

Students specializing in all disciplines are welcome to minor in history. Majors in such fields as international studies, political science, public policy, economics, and philosophy will find that a history minor can complement their major by providing a historical understanding of social, cultural, political, and economic issues, while those majoring in such disciplines as mathematics and the sciences can use the minor to explore a different area of interest and develop their humanistic understanding of the world. Students may choose to take courses in a variety of fields, time periods, and thematic topics, with the aim of developing a broad understanding of historical change across time and space, or they may choose to focus specifically on a more narrowly defined field of interest.

Students wishing to pursue the minor should contact the undergraduate program coordinator and complete the minor declaration form no later than the end of the third year.

The Department of History welcomes the minors to participate in all departmental events organized for the majors. 

Requirements

The minor in history requires a total of six courses chosen in consultation with the undergraduate program coordinator. Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors; (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements; and (3) may not be petitioned in from other departments. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers. 

In addition to the course-work requirement, students wishing to pursue the minor must submit a two- to three-page essay that describes the rationale for the minor in relation to their choice of major and/or future career plans and explains the intellectual trajectory that has or will guide their choice of courses. 

Course Numbering

History courses numbered 10000 to 29900 are intended primarily for College students. Some 20000-level courses have 30000-level equivalents if they are also open to graduate students. To register for courses that are cross listed as both undergraduate and graduate (20000/30000), undergraduates must use the undergraduate number (20000). History courses numbered 40000 to 49900 are intended primarily for graduate students, but are open to advanced College students with the consent of the instructor. Undergraduates registered for 40000-level courses will be held to the graduate-level requirements. Courses rarely open to College students are not listed in this catalog.

History Courses

HIST 10101-10102. Introduction to African Civilization I-II.

African Civilization introduces students to African history and anthropology in a two-quarter sequence and meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

HIST 10101. Introduction to African Civilization I. 100 Units.

Part one considers literary, oral, and archeological sources to investigate African societies and states from the early Iron Age through the emergence of the Atlantic world. Case studies include the empires of Ghana, Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also treats the diffusion of Islam, the origins and effects of European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended.

Instructor(s): E. Osborn     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20701,CRES 20701

HIST 10102. Introduction to African Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second segment of the African Civilizations sequence uses anthropological perspectives to investigate colonial and postcolonial encounters in West and East Africa. The course objective is to show that while colonialism was brutal and oppressive, it was by no means a unidirectional process of domination in which Europeans plundered the African continent and enforced a wholesale adoption of European culture. Rather, scholars today recognize that colonial encounters were complex culture, political, and economic fields of interaction. Africans actively adopted, reworked, and contested colonizers' policies and projects, and Europeans drew heavily from these encounters to form liberal conceptions of self, nation, and society. Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about forms of personhood, political economy, and everyday life in the twentieth century. Course themes will include social reproduction, kinship practices, medicine, domesticity, and development.

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. CHDV Distribution C*.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20702,CHDV 21401,CRES 20802

HIST 10301. The Haitian Revolution. 100 Units.

This course explores the Haitian revolution and the origins of the second politically independent polity in the American hemisphere as critical to the examination of slave emancipation, colonialism, comparative revolutions, and postcolonial governance and sovereignty. Interpretive debates that link the problems of slave emancipation to the contradictions of modern freedom are emphasized.

Instructor(s): J. Saville     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 10301

HIST 10800-10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II.

This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 10800. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I. 100 Units.

The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia’s early encounters with Europe.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24101,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000,SALC 20100

HIST 10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II. 100 Units.

The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India.

Instructor(s): D. Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SALC 20100,ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24102,SASC 20100,SOSC 23100,SALC 20200

HIST 12101. Comparative Kingship: Rulers in Twelfth-Century Europe. 100 Units.

The purpose of this course is to examine the different forms that kingship took in the Latin Christian kingdoms of Europe during the twelfth century. In the first half of the course we will read and discuss a broad range of primary and secondary sources that will give us the opportunity to analyze critically kingship in England, France, and Germany (the Holy Roman Empire). In the second half of the course we will broaden our discussion to consider how other kingdoms in Europe, including Scotland, Norway, Denmark, Poland, Hungary, Sicily, Aragon, and Castile, do and do not conform to more general models of twelfth-century European kingship.

Instructor(s): J. Lyon     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): First-year students welcome.

HIST 12700-12800. Music in Western Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

HIST 12700. Music in Western Civilization I: To 1750. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Robertson     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 21100,MUSI 12100

HIST 12800. Music in Western Civilization II: 1750 to the Present. 100 Units.


,This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 21200,MUSI 12200

HIST 13001-13002-13003. History of European Civilization I-II-III.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13001. History of European Civilization I. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): F. Albritton Jonsson, C. Fasolt, J. Lyon, J. Padgett, A. Palmer, N. Ristuccia, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13002. History of European Civilization II. 100 Units.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): J. Goldstein, F. Hillis, N. Ristuccia, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13003. History of European Civilization III. 100 Units.

The two-quarter History of European Civilization sequence may be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. Topics in this third quarter of the sequence may include women in European history, religion and society, Church and State, the Enlightenment, the transformation of the Roman World, or other focused topics on cultural, economic, social, political, or religious aspects of European history.

Instructor(s): N. Ristuccia, Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13001 and HIST 13002
Note(s): Students who plan to complete a three-quarter sequence register for HIST 13003 in Spring Quarter after completing HIST 13001-13002. Students may not combine HIST 13003 with one other quarter of European Civilization to construct a two-quarter sequence.

HIST 13100-13200-13300. History of Western Civilization I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. The purpose of this sequence is threefold: (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of Western civilization since the sixth century BC, and (3) to assist them in discovering connections between the various epochs. The purpose of the course is not to present a general survey of Western history. Instruction consists of intensive investigation of a selection of original documents bearing on a number of separate topics, usually two or three a quarter, occasionally supplemented by the work of a modern historian. The treatment of the selected topics varies from section to section. This sequence is currently offered twice a year. The amount of material covered is the same whether the student enrolls in the Autumn-Winter-Spring sequence or the Summer sequence. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13100. History of Western Civilization I. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Autumn; J. Boyer, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13200. History of Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Winter, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13300. History of Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Spring; D. Koehler, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Spring
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13500-13600-13700. America in World Civilization I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence uses the American historical experience, set within the context of Western civilization to (1) introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) probe the ways political and social theory emerge within specific historical contexts, and (3) explore some of the major issues and trends in American historical development. This sequence is not a general survey of American history.

HIST 13500. America in World Civilization I. 100 Units.

This quarter examines the basic order of early colonial society; the social, political, and intellectual forces for a rethinking of that order; and the experiences of the Revolution and of making a new polity.

Instructor(s): E. Cook, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13600. America in World Civilization II. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): A. Green, A. Lippert, A. Stanley, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13500; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13700. America in World Civilization III. 100 Units.

This quarter focuses on the definitions of Americanism and social order in a multicultural society; Taylorism and social engineering; culture in the shadow of war; the politics of race, ethnicity, and gender; and the rise of new social movements.

Instructor(s): K. Belew, J. Dailey, J. Sparrow     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13600; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13802. The Russian Empire. 100 Units.

Empire is back in contemporary Russia. Old imperial insignia have replaced hammers and sickles on government buildings, the bodies of the last tsar and his family have been exhumed and venerated, and Putin's foreign policy stakes imperial claims on the nations on Russia's border. This course examines what the Russian empire was, how it worked, and the legacies that it left behind. Themes to be considered include the culture of the autocracy and the tradition of reform from above; imperial expansion and multiethnic society; the construction of class, ethnic, and estate identities; and the causes and consequences of the Old Regime's collapse. Mondays and Wednesdays are reserved for lectures, Fridays for discussion.

Instructor(s): F. Hillis     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): First-year students warmly welcomed; no prior Russian history, culture, or language assumed.
Equivalent Course(s): REES 13802

HIST 13900-14000. Introduction to Russian Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence, which meets the general education requirement in civilization studies, provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

HIST 13900. Introduction to Russian Civilization I. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): E. Gilburd, W. Nickell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24000,REES 26011

HIST 14000. Introduction to Russian Civilization II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): R. Bird, E. Gilburd     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24100,REES 26012

HIST 14801. History of the People's Republic of China. 100 Units.

Until quite recently, historians left the study of socialist China to sociologists and political scientists. Now, 40 years after Mao's death, Chinese socialism has definitely passed into history, and historians have begun to reassess the legacy of the Chinese revolution and the Mao years. Our course begins with the introduction of Marxist thought and Leninist organization techniques in the 1920s and the early stages of the revolution in Jiangxi and Yan'an. In the following weeks, we will discuss land reform and collectivization in the countryside, the socialist transformation of urban society, and the establishment of the basic institutions of socialism since the 1950s: the work units (danwei) that structured urban life, the rural collectives, and the hukou system that tied most people to their place of registration. While we will discuss political campaigns from the Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries to the Cultural Revolution and its aftermath, the focus will be on the factors that shaped the everyday life of urban and rural people: such things as the rationing of consumer goods and the politicization of interpersonal relations. One central theme in this course will be the legacy of state socialism and the impact of structures built in the Mao years on developments in postsocialist China. Depending on enrollment, the course will be held as a seminar or with alternating lectures and discussions. All readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 14801

HIST 15002. Whales and Whaling in American History. 100 Units.

This course examines American intellectual, social, and cultural history through one of its most tremendous and least understood foils: whales. Since early in the history of European colonial incursions in North America, whales—along with smaller cetaceans such as dolphins and porpoises—have figured in American culture variously as natural resources to be exploited, sentient beings to be protected, and, more broadly, as the bases for ruminations on aesthetics and grandeur, self and other, economics and social organization, and science and power. From our vantage point between two of America's earliest and most prosperous of whaling communities, New Bedford and Nantucket, this course will think through the conjoined histories of whales and (North American) humans, from the early days of whaling in the nascent United States through the rise of America's industrial power and the decline of its whaling industry to its emergence as a leader in whale conservation and cetological science.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second-year students and beyond preferred. Good academic standing. Application and acceptance into the quarter-long program at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 15002

HIST 15100-15200-15300. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

HIST 15100. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Summer,Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10800,EALC 10800,SOSC 23500

HIST 15200. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia II. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10900,EALC 10900,SOSC 23600

HIST 15300. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia III. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 11000,EALC 11000,SOSC 23700

HIST 15602-15603-15604. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 15602. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

The first course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Hittite Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25700,NEHC 30011,NEHC 20011

HIST 15603. Ancient Empires II: The Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

The second course of this three-course sequence focuses on the Ottoman Empire.

Instructor(s): H. Karateke     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25800,NEHC 30012,NEHC 20012

HIST 15604. Ancient Empires III: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550–1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25900,NEHC 30013,NEHC 20013

HIST 15702-15703-15704. Semitic Languages Cultures and Civilizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 15702. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I. 100 Units.

This course looks at the earliest attestation of East Semitic as a language: Akkadian which was first written in the 3rd millennium BC in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq).  Akkadians were in close contact with Sumerians, the other important language of Mesopotamia, and adapted their script (cuneiform) to write a Semitic language. This class critically examines the connection between script, language, peoples and ethnos. Furthermore, this course explores the political expansion of Akkadian in connection with the development of an early “empire” and the emergence of historical, legal and literary traditions in Akkadian and its influence for the Ancient Near East and beyond. Texts covered included historical inscriptions, the Law Code of Hammu-râpi, Flood Stories and divination texts (omina). Visits to the Oriental Institute Museum will complement the exploration of the Akkadian culture. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): S. Paulus     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30416,NEHC 20416

HIST 15703. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations II. 100 Units.

This course explores the historical evidence for several Semitic peoples who dwelled in Syria and Northern Iraq in the third to first millennia BCE (Eblaites, Amorites, Ugariteans, Assyrians). These peoples' languages belong either to the larger group of Northwest Semitic, that comprises languages such as Aramaic and Canaanite (including Biblical Hebrew), or to the northern dialects of East Semitic. The shared characteristic of these people is to have recorded their cultural legacy on clay tablets, using Mesopotamian cuneiform or an alphabetic script adapted from it, noting either their own language or several aspects of their history, culture and religion through a borrowed language (Akkadian). The class will focus on major cultural traditions that have echoes in younger records that came to be influential for the modern Middle East and for the Western world – especially the Hebrew Bible, but also some traditions of Pre-Islamic Arabia. This includes a close examination and discussion of representative ancient sources, as well as readings in modern scholarship. Ancient sources include literary, historical, and legal documents. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): H. Reculeau     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30417,NEHC 20417

HIST 15704. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations III. 100 Units.

This course explores the histories and literatures of Aramaic- and Arabic-writing Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities in the first millennium CE. Beginning with the reception of Ancient Mesopotamian culture in late antiquity, the class will focus on the development of Syriac Christian, Rabbinic, and early Muslim sacred literatures in relation to the social, political, and economic contexts of the Roman and Iranian empires and inter-imperial Arabia. It will then turn to the literary and intellectual revival of the early Islamic caliphates, in which representatives of all three religions participated. Among the works to be read in translation are the Acts of Thomas, the Babylonian Talmud, the Qur’ān, and early Arabic poetry.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Not open to first-year students.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30418,NEHC 20418

HIST 15801. Introduction to the Middle East. 100 Units.

Prior knowledge of the Middle East not required. This course aims to facilitate a general understanding of some key factors that have shaped life in this region, with primary emphasis on modern conditions and their background, and to provide exposure to some of the region's rich cultural diversity. This course can serve as a basis for the further study of the history, politics, and civilizations of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26005,NEHC 10101

HIST 16101-16102-16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

HIST 16101. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.

Instructor(s): A. Kolata     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23101,CRES 16101,HIST 36101,LACS 34600,SOSC 26100,LACS 16100

HIST 16102. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23102,CRES 16102,HIST 36102,LACS 34700,SOSC 26200,LACS 16200

HIST 16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.

Instructor(s): B. Fischer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23103,CRES 16103,HIST 36103,LACS 34800,SOSC 26300,LACS 16300

HIST 16601. The Ancient City: The Greek World. 100 Units.

This annually offered course focuses on the development and transformation of cities in the ancient Mediterranean world. Among the issues to be discussed are how one defines a city and whether ancient cities satisfy those definitional criteria; what factors account for the emergence of cities; and what elements give rise to a particularly urban way of life. Theoretical reflections will be interspersed with specific case-studies. This year the focus will be on the cities of the Greek world and will consider topics such as the relationship between the city and the polis and the degree to which Athens was a typical Greek city.

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 26601

HIST 16700-16800-16900. Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and late antiquity (27 BC to the fifth century AD).

HIST 16700. Ancient Mediterranean World I. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the development of the institutions of the Greek city-state, the Persian Wars and the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the social and economic consequences of the Peloponnesian War, and the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians.

Instructor(s): J. Hall, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20700

HIST 16800. Ancient Mediterranean World II. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community.

Instructor(s): C. Ando, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20800

HIST 16900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. 100 Units.

This quarter introduces problems and changes from the late second to sixth century. Lectures and discussion. Principal aspects of change and historical interpretation of the ancient world. Readings from selected primary sources and modern scholarship. Assignments include Peter Brown's "The World of Late Antiquity" and primary sources. Midterm and final examination, with a short paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20900

HIST 17300-17400-17402-17501-17502-17503. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization I-II-II-III-IV-III.

This group of courses consists of two three-quarter sequences: HIPS 17300-17400-17501 or 17502, and HIPS 17400-17402-17503 or 17502. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. Each sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Each three-quarter sequence focuses on the origins and development of science in the West. Our aim is to trace the evolution of the biological, psychological, natural, and mathematical sciences as they emerge from the cultural and social matrix of their periods and, in turn, affect culture and society.

HIST 17300. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization I. 100 Units.

The first quarter examines the sources of Greek science in the diverse modes of ancient thought and its advance through the first centuries of our era. We look at the technical refinement of science, its connections to political and philosophical movements of fifth- and fourth-century Athens, and its growth in Alexandria.

Instructor(s): J. Wee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17300

HIST 17400. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second quarter is concerned with the period of the scientific revolution: the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. The principal subjects are the work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Vesalius, Harvey, Descartes, and Newton.

Instructor(s): R. Richards     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17400

HIST 17402. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: History of Medicine 1. 100 Units.

This course examines the history of medicine from the Renaissance through the end of the eighteenth century, when many features of medicine that we now consider "modern" were coming into being. Topics include the history of anatomy and physiology, including Vesalius and Harvey; the history of relations between doctors and patients, including traditional medical practitioners and midwives; and the changing nature of the hospital.

Terms Offered: Not offered in 2016–17
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17402

HIST 17501. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: Medicine since the Renaissance. 100 Units.

This course is an examination of various themes in the history of medicine in Western Europe and America since the Renaissance. Topics include key developments of medical theory (e.g., the circulation of the blood and germ theory), relations between doctors and patients, rivalries between different kinds of healers and therapists, and the development of the hospital and laboratory medicine.

Terms Offered: Not offered 2016-17
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17501

HIST 17502. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization IV: Modern Science. 100 Units.

The advances science has produced have transformed life beyond anything that a person living in 1833 (when the term "scientist" was first coined) could have anticipated. Yet science continues to pose questions that are challenging and, in some instances, troubling. How will our technologies affect the environment? Should we prevent the cloning of humans? Can we devise a politically acceptable framework for the patenting of life? Such questions make it vitally important that we try to understand what science is and how it works, even if we never enter labs. This course uses evidence from controversies (e.g., Human Genome Project, International Space Station) to throw light on the enterprise of science itself.

Instructor(s): J. Evans     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17502

HIST 17503. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: History of Medicine 2. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Not offered in 2016-17
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17503

HIST 17604. The Declaration of Independence. 100 Units.

This course explores important intellectual, political, philosophical, legal, economic, social, and religious contexts for the Declaration of Independence. We begin with a consideration of the English Revolution, investigating the texts of the Declaration of Rights of 1689 and Locke’s Second Treatise and their meanings to American revolutionaries. We then consider imperial debates over taxation in the 1760s and 1770s, returning Benjamin Franklin’s Autobiography to its original context. Reading Paine’s Common Sense and the letters of Abigail Adams and John Adams we look at the multiple meanings of independence. We study Jefferson’s drafting process, read the Declaration over the shoulders of people on both sides of the Atlantic, and consider clues to contemporary meanings beyond the intentions of Congress. Finally, we briefly engage the post-revolutionary history of the place and meaning of the Declaration in American life. (F)

Instructor(s): E. Slauter     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 27950,HMRT 17950,LLSO 27950,ENGL 17950

HIST 17807. The American South Since 1890. 100 Units.

Historical narratives about the American South since the Civil War are so cloven, its stories of oppression and liberation so oppositional and racially encoded, that it is difficult to reconcile, either narratively or analytically, divergent versions of the southern past. This course will engage that past from 1890 to the present through historical scholarship, fiction, and film. We will pay particular attention to competing narratives about specific historical events, such as emancipation and Reconstruction.

Instructor(s): J. Dailey     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 17807

HIST 18201. The History of American Capitalism. 100 Units.

This lecture course offers a broad overview of American capitalism from colonial times up to the present. It introduces students to the economic transformation of America from a rural colonial outpost of the British Empire to the largest industrially developed economic power in the world. The course will consider the political, social, cultural, geographical, legal, moral, environmental, and technological dimensions of economic life—thus attempting to provide a total picture of the historical characteristics and dynamics of American capitalism. No prior course work in economics is either required or assumed.

Instructor(s): J. Levy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 18201

HIST 18301-18302-18303. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

HIST 18301. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 24001,ANTH 24001,SOSC 24001

HIST 18302. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 24002,ANTH 24002,SOSC 24002

HIST 18303. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 24003,ANTH 24003,SALC 20702,SOSC 24003

HIST 18805. Nineteenth-Century American Mass Entertainment. 100 Units.

Popular culture filters, reflects, and occasionally refracts many of the central values, prejudices, and preoccupations of a given society. From the Industrial Revolution to the advent of feature films in the early twentieth century, American audiences sought both entertainment and reassurance from performers, daredevils, amusement parks, lecturers, magicians, panoramas, athletes, and photographers. Amidst the Civil War, they paid for portraits that purportedly revealed the ghosts of lost loved ones; in an age of imperialism, they forked over hard-earned cash to relive the glories of western settlement, adventure, and conquest in Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Mass entertainment not only echoed the central events of the age it helped shape them: from phrenology as the channel for antebellum convictions about outward appearance (and racial identity), to the race riots following Jack Johnson's boxing ring victory over Jim Jeffries. Many of these entertainment forms became economic juggernauts in their own right, and in the process of achieving unprecedented popularity, they also shaped collective memory, gender roles, race relations, and the public's sense of acceptable beliefs and behaviors. This lecture course will examine the history of modern American entertainment over the course of the long nineteenth century. Requirements include careful reading, active and thoughtful participation, and written assignments.

Instructor(s): A. Lippert     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 18805,CRES 18805,GNSE 18805

HIST 20209. An Environmental History of Africa, 1800–2016. 100 Units.

For much of the twentieth century the African environment has been a story of decline and degradation—a narrative of how Africans have consistently destroyed their pristine environments. Images of soil erosion, desiccation, deforestation, and famines have, in part, shaped Western perceptions of Africa. This course will consider an alternative perspective of Africa's environment by focusing on the dynamic and complex processes of environmental change from the precolonial period to the present. We will draw on historical texts, novels, and films from multiple regions on the continent to explore how Africans understood, exploited, and managed their natural environments. By adopting an African "point of view," this course will attempt to address some of the grave misconceptions that have lead so many to believe that Africa was and continues to be a "Dark Continent." Students will be encouraged to think critically about the meaning of "environmental crisis" and how that trope has served various political and cultural projects over time. But we will also seriously consider the ways in which human beings have taxed natural resources in ways that have produced profound short- and long-term consequences.

Instructor(s): J. Cooper     Terms Offered: TBD
Equivalent Course(s): ENSC 20209

HIST 20403. Greek Comedy: Aristophanes. 100 Units.

We will read in Greek Aristophanes' Frogs, a play widely admired as an early instance of clever literary criticism and creative metatheatricality that brings its audience into the underworld and suggests several fantasies of salvation, a play whose production marks the end of the great century of Greek drama. Reading will include translation as well as secondary readings.

Terms Offered: Will be offered 2017-18
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 22400,GREK 32400,HIST 30403

HIST 20506. Temple State to People of the Book: Judeans/Jews in History. 100 Units.

From Temple State to People of the Book: On Judeans and Jews in Antiquity. A survey course on ancient Jewish history, from the sixth century BCE to the fourth century CE, from the construction of the Second Temple to the Christianization of the Roman Empire. It will focus on the major dichotomies that were played out in the period, between religion and state, priestly religion and rabbinic religion, nature and law, East and West — processes that eventually issued in the transformation of Judeans into Jews, the rise of Christianity and of rabbinic Judaism, and the shift of the center of Jewish culture from the Greek-speaking West, and from Palestine, to the Aramaic-speaking East. The course will also introduce students to the relevant historical sources and to the philological-historical methods that can allow us to read the sources, interpret their words and their messages, assess their testimony, and determine what questions they can allow us to answer.

Instructor(s): Daniel Schwartz (Greenberg Visiting Professor)     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): BIBL 30151,HIJD 30151,RLST 21203,NEHC 30410,JWSC 20151

HIST 20701. Who Were the Greeks? 100 Units.

If the current resurgence of interest in ethnic studies is a direct reflection of a contemporary upsurge in ethnic conflict throughout the world, it remains the case that notions of peoplehood and belonging have been of periodic importance throughout history. This course will study the various expressions of Greek identity within shifting political, social, and cultural contexts from prehistory to the present day, though with a strong emphasis on classical antiquity. Particular attention will be given to theoretical issues such as anthropological definitions of ethnicity, the difference between ethnic and cultural identities, methods for studying ethnicity in historical societies, and the intersection of ethnicity with politics.

Instructor(s): J. Hall     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 30400,CLCV 20400,HIST 30701,ANCM 30400

HIST 21007. The Roman Republic in Law and Literature. 100 Units.

The class will study the history of the Roman republic in light of contemporary normative theory, and likewise interrogate the ideological origins of contemporary republicanism in light of historical concerns. The focus will be on sovereignty, public law, citizenship, and the form of ancient empire.

Instructor(s): C. Ando     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 38716,HIST 31007,CLCV 28716

HIST 21701. Byzantine Empire, 330–610. 100 Units.

A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the formation of early Byzantine government, society, and culture. Although a survey of events and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. There will be some discussion of relevant archaeology and topography. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Midterm and final examination.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 34306,CLCV 24306,HIST 31701,ANCM 34306

HIST 21702. Byzantine Empire, 610–1025. 100 Units.

A lecture course, with limited discussion, of the principal developments with respect to government, society, and culture in the Middle Byzantine Period. Although a survey of events and changes, including external relations, many of the latest scholarly controversies will also receive scrutiny. Readings will include some primary sources in translation and examples of modern scholarly interpretations. Midterm, final examination, and a short paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Graduate students may register for grade of R (audit) or P (Pass) instead of a letter grade, except for History graduate students taking this as a required course.
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 34307,CLCV 24307,HIST 31702,NEHC 21702,NELC 31702,ANCM 34307

HIST 22900. The Italian Renaissance. 100 Units.

Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250–1600), with a focus on literature and primary sources, the recovery of lost texts and technologies of the ancient world, and the role of the Church in Renaissance culture and politics. Humanism, patronage, translation, cultural immersion, dynastic and papal politics, corruption, assassination, art, music, magic, censorship, religion, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Assignments include creative writing, reproducing historical artifacts, and a live reenactment of a papal election. First-year students and non-history majors welcome.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32900,CLCV 22914,CLAS 32914,ITAL 22914,ITAL 32914,HCHR 32900

HIST 23304. Emergence of Capitalism. 100 Units.

This course investigates the emergence of capitalism in Europe and the world as a whole between the early sixteenth and the late eighteenth centuries. We discuss the political and cultural as well as the economic, sources of capitalism, and explore Marxist, neoclassical, and cultural approaches.

Instructor(s): W. Sewell     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 23415,PLSC 32815,HIST 33304,PLSC 23415

HIST 23410. Jewish Spaces and Places, Real and Imagined. 100 Units.

What makes a ghetto, a ghetto? What defines a Jewish neighborhood? What determined the architectural form of synagogues? Making extensive use of Jewish law and customary practice, cookbooks, etiquette guides, prints, films, novels, maps, memoirs, architectural drawings and photographs, and tourist guides, this course will analyze how Jews (in all their diversity) and non-Jews defined Jewish spaces and places. The focus will be on Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, but we will also venture back into the early modern period and across the Mediterranean to Palestine/Israel and North Africa, and across the Atlantic to the Caribbean and the Americas. We will study both actually existing structures—synagogues, ritual baths, schools, kosher (and kosher-style) butcher shops, bakeries and restaurants, social and political clubs, hospitals, orphanages, old age homes, museums, and memorials—but also texts and visual culture in which Jewish places and spaces are imagined or vilified. Parallel to our work with primary sources we will read in the recent, very rich, scholarly literature on this topic. This is not a survey course; we will undertake a series of intensive case-studies through which we will address the larger issues. This is a limited-enrollment, discussion-based course in which both undergraduates and graduate students are welcome. No previous knowledge of Jewish history is expected.

Instructor(s): Leora Auslander     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20224

HIST 23704. War and Peace. 100 Units.

Tolstoy’s novel is at once a national epic, a treatise on history, a spiritual meditation, and a masterpiece of realism. This course presents a close reading of one of the world’s great novels, and of the criticism that has been devoted to it, including landmark works by Victor Shklovsky, Boris Eikhenbaum, Isaiah Berlin, and George Steiner. (B, G)

Instructor(s): William Nickell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): REES 30001,CMLT 22301,CMLT 32301,FNDL 27103,ENGL 28912,ENGL 32302,REES 20001

HIST 24307. Twentieth-Century China through Great Trials. 100 Units.

This course begins in the late nineteenth century and concludes at the present day. From international political negotiations to show trials, from struggle sessions to investigative journalism, the course will trace China's turbulent twentieth century through a series of trials, occurring at pivotal historical junctures. Students will witness public and private "justice" in action both in and beyond the courtroom and across the century's radically different governmental regimes. Readings and lectures will address the broader historical context as well as details of the various trials featured in the course.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24306

HIST 24308. Republican China. 100 Units.

Increasingly historians of modern China have begun to turn to the complex decades between the fall of China's last dynasty and the establishment of the People's Republic of China, not merely to better understand the emergence of Communism or the fate of imperial traditions, but as a significant period in its own right. In addition to examining the major social and political changes of this period, this seminar course will explore the emergence of new cultural, artistic, and literary genres in a time notorious for its turbulence. Readings explore both new and classic interpretations of the period, as well as recent scholarship, which benefits from expanding access to Chinese archives. Students should expect regular short writing assignments. The course will culminate with each student choosing either a historiographical final paper or a close reading of a primary source in light of the issues explored in the course.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34308,EALC 24308,EALC 34308

HIST 24500. Reading Qing Documents. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Third-year Chinese level or approval of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24500,EALC 34500,HIST 34500

HIST 24507. Everyday Maoism: Work, Daily Life, and Material Culture in Socialist China. 100 Units.

The history of Maoist China is usually told as a sequence of political campaigns: land and marriage reform, nationalization of industry, anti-rightist campaign, Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, etc. Yet for the majority of the Chinese population, the revolution was as much about material changes as about politics: about the two-story brick houses, electric lights, and telephones (loushang louxia, diandeng dianhua) that socialism promised; about new work regimes and new consumption patterns—or, in many cases, about the absence of positive change in their material lives. If we want to understand what socialism meant for different groups of people, we have to look at the "beautiful new things" of socialist modernity, at changes in dress codes and apartment layouts, at electrification and city planning. We have to analyze workplaces and labor processes in order to understand how socialism changed the way people worked. We also have to look at the rationing of consumer goods and its effects on people's daily lives. The course has a strong comparative dimension: we will look at the literature on socialism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe to see how Chinese socialism differed from its cousins. Another aim is methodological. How can we understand the lives of people who wrote little and were rarely written about? To which extent can a focus on material artifacts and daily work routines help us to understand people's life experiences?

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34255,HIST 34507,EALC 24255

HIST 24510. Gender and Sexuality in Modern China. 100 Units.

This course explores changing ideas about gender and sexuality in modern China. "Modern" in the context of this course signifies a period in which China faced radical new paradigms for the role of sex and the meaning of gender. Although much that we will read describes the twentieth century, we will also discover that innovations in gender roles are not unique to the past hundred years. Nor, despite long-standing stereotypes to the contrary, has it only been the privilege of the elites to disrupt the traditional male-female binary. Readings will address such themes as the ways in which gender defines patterns in family life, in politics and under the law; marriage and homosexuality; prostitution and trafficking; performance and cross dressing; the implementation of the one child policy; gender roles in minority communities; and China's handling of HIV/AIDS. We will consider the role of old Confucian hierarchies and scrutinize the links between industrialization, women's liberation, nationalism, and the communist movement. Through these diverse topics, this seminar aims to expand students' conception of the areas in which gender plays a relevant and influential role.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34510,EALC 24510,EALC 34510,GNSE 24510,GNSE 34510

HIST 24601. Japanese History through Film and Other Texts. 100 Units.

This course deals with theories of time, history, and representation while making those ideas and problems concrete through a study of the way in which history in Japan has been mediated by the cinema. It explores the "timefulness" of cinematic images without assuming their automatic relation to the world or dismissing films for their invention, compression, and elision of historical facts. A close reading of a wide range of films produced in and about Japan in tandem with primary and secondary materials on theories of time, images, and national history will highlight the historicity and history of both film and Japan.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): All readings are in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24606,SIGN 26008

HIST 24700. Histories of Japanese Religion. 100 Units.

An examination of select texts, moments, and problems to explore aspects of religion, religiosity, and religious institutions of Japan's history.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34700,EALC 24700,EALC 34700,RLST 22505,HREL 34705

HIST 24706. Edo/Tokyo: Society and the City in Japan. 100 Units.

This course will explore the cultural and cultural history of Edo/Tokyo from its origins in the early seventeenth century through circa 1945. Issues to be explored include the configuration of urban space and its transformation over time in relation to issues of status, class, and political authority; the formation of the "city person" as a form of identity; and the tensions between the real city of lived experience and the imagined city of art and literature. We will pay particular attention to two periods of transformation, the 1870s when the modernizing state made Tokyo its capital, and the period of reconstruction after the devastating earthquake of 1923. Assignments include a final research paper of approximately 15 to 18 pages.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34706,CRES 34706,EALC 34706,CRES 24706,EALC 24706

HIST 25014. Introduction to Environmental History. 100 Units.

How have humans interacted with the environment over time? This course introduces students to the methods and topics of environmental history by way of classic and recent works in the field: Crosby, Cronon, Worster, Russell, and McNeill, et al. Major topics of investigation include preservationism, ecological imperialism, evolutionary history, forest conservation, organic and industrial agriculture, labor history, the commons and land reform, energy consumption, and climate change. Our scope covers the whole period from 1492 with case studies from European, American, and British imperial history.

Instructor(s): F. Albritton Jonsson     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35014,HIPS 25014,CHSS 35014

HIST 25109. Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. (=PHIL 32000, CHSS 33300, HIPS 22000, HIST 25109, HIST 35109) We will begin by trying to explicate the manner in which science is a rational response to observational facts. This will involve a discussion of inductivism, Popper’s deductivism, Lakatos and Kuhn. After this, we will briefly survey some other important topics in the philosophy of science, including underdetermination, theories of evidence, Bayesianism, the problem of induction, explanation, and laws of nature. (II) (B)

Instructor(s): T. Pashby     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Undergrads enroll in sections 01 & 02. Graduates enroll in section 03.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35109,PHIL 32000,PHIL 22000

HIST 25414. Scientists & the Political Sphere in Six Germanys 1871-Present. 100 Units.

This course will examine the odd-couple relationship between science, scientists, politicians, and the political sphere, using the tumultuous political history of Germany from 1871 to the present as its backdrop. With a slight emphasis on the natural sciences—but broadening out our view when necessary—we will examine how German scientists chose to interact with six (or seven, depending on how you count) Germanys—the German Empire (1871-1918), the Weimar Republic (1919-1933), the Third Reich (1933-1945), occupied Germany (1945-1949), West and East Germany (1949-1990), and the reunified Germany of today (1990-present). How did these scientists build relationships with the various governments? What were their reactions to the various forms of government (i.e. democracy vs. fascist dictatorship vs. ‘real existing socialism’)? How did emerging concepts of ethics in science play into scientists’ relations with the political sphere? Why the constant claims of science as ‘apolitical’?

Instructor(s): R. Dahn     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 29623

HIST 25420. Catastrophic Thinking: Extinction in Culture and Science. 100 Units.

The course will examine the history of extinction through a consideration not only of relevant scientific literature, but also through the diverse forms of cultural production through which the scientific ideas have refracted: fiction and science fiction, film, political discourse, journalism and popular science, philosophy, religion, and more.  From the apocalyptic visions of religious movements and cults, to protest movements of the ‘60s, ‘70s, and ‘80s, to fascination with zombies and world-ending plagues and catastrophes, we will consider the many ways in which “catastrophic thinking” about extinction has come to permeate the modern condition in science and society.

Instructor(s): D. Sepkoski     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 38305,HIST 35420,HIPS 28305

HIST 25503. Junior Seminar: My Favorite Readings in the History and Philosophy of Science. 100 Units.

This course introduces some of the most important and influential accounts of science to have been produced in modern times. It provides an opportunity to discover how philosophers, historians, anthropologists, and sociologists have grappled with the scientific enterprise, and to assess critically how successful their efforts have been. Authors likely include Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn, Robert Merton, Steven Shapin, and Bruno Latour.

Instructor(s): R. Richards     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 29800

HIST 25506. Science and Aesthetics in the Eighteenth to the Twenty-First Centuries. 100 Units.

One can distinguish four ways in which science and aesthetics are related during the period since the Renaissance. First, science has been the subject of artistic representation, in painting and photography, in poetry and novels (e.g., in Byron’s poetry, for example). Second, science has been used to explain aesthetic effects (e.g., Helmholtz’s work on the way painters achieve visual effects or musicians achieve tonal effects). Third, aesthetic means have been used to convey scientific conceptions (e.g., through illustrations in scientific volumes or through aesthetically affective and effective writing). Finally, philosophers have stepped back to consider the relationship between scientific knowing and aesthetic comprehension (e.g., Kant, Bas van Fraassen); much of the discussion of this latter will focus on the relation between images and what they represent. In this lecture-discussion course we will consider all of these aspects of the science-aesthetic connection.

Instructor(s): R. Richards     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 35506,HIPS 25506,HIST 35506,PHIL 24301,PHIL 34301,SIGN 26003

HIST 25610. Islamic Thought and Literature I. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 950, concentrating on the career of the Prophet Muhammad; Qur‘an and Hadith; the Caliphate; the development of Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical discourses; sectarian movements; and Arabic literature.

Instructor(s): A. El Shamsy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30601,RLST 20401,SOSC 22000,HIST 35610,ISLM 30601,NEHC 20601

HIST 25613. Saints and Sinners: Christianity in the Ancient Near East. 100 Units.

Between the third and seventh centuries, Christian communities came to flourish throughout the Near East and neighboring regions, in the Roman and Iranian empires as well as the kingdoms of the Caucasus, Central Asia, and Ethiopia. This course will examine development of Christian institutions and ideologies in relation to the distinctive social structures, political cultures, economies, and environments of the Near East, with a focus on the Fertile Crescent. The makers of Near Eastern Christianities were both saints and sinners. Holy men and women, monks, and sometimes bishops withdrew from what they often called “the world” with the intention of reshaping its societies through prayer, asceticism, writing, and more direct forms of intervention in social, political, and economic relations. But the work of these saints depended on the cooperation of the worldly men and women, including aristocrats, merchants, and rulers, that formed the ranks of their communities to establish enduring institutions. To explore the dialectical relationship between saints and sinners, we will read inscriptions, histories, and lives of saints in various Near Eastern languages in translation and consider the insights of recent archaeology.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35613,NEHC 20600,NEHC 30600

HIST 25701. North Africa, Late Antiquity to Islam. 100 Units.

Examination of topics in continuity and change from the third through ninth centuries CE, including changes in Roman, Vandalic, Byzantine, and early Islamic Africa. Topics include the waning of paganism and the respective spread and waning of Christianity, the dynamics of the seventh-century Muslim conquest and Byzantine collapse. Transformation of late antique North Africa into a component of Islamic civilization. Topography and issues of the autochthonous populations will receive some analysis. Most of the required reading will be on reserve, for there is no standard textbook. Readings in translated primary sources as well as the latest modern scholarship. Midterm and final paper.

Instructor(s): W. Kaegi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 30200,CLCV 20200,CMES 30634,CRES 25701,HIST 35701,NEHC 20634,NEHC 30634

HIST 25704-25804-25904. Islamic History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the main trends in the political history of the Islamic world, with some attention to economic, social, and intellectual history. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

HIST 25704. Islamic History and Society I: The Rise of Islam and the Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general eduation requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30501,HIST 35704,ISLM 30500,RLST 20501,NEHC 20501

HIST 25804. Islamic History and Society II: The Middle Period. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30502,HIST 35804,ISLM 30600,NEHC 20502

HIST 25904. Islamic History and Society III: The Modern Middle East. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Instructor(s): A. Shissler     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35904,ISLM 30700,NEHC 30503,NEHC 20503

HIST 26005. Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Islamic History. 100 Units.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamic history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36005,NEHC 20605,NEHC 30605

HIST 26116. Music and Globalization in Modern Latin America. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the cultural history of Latin America as a region and the history of the region's globalization, from the perspective of the history of Latin American modern music. Lectures, group work, readings, and individual assignments deal with the role of music in producing Latin America's modern culture from a global perspective. It deals with the histories of folk, classical, and urban musical traditions, diasporic music styles, entertainment corporations, state policies in the realm of music, music pedagogy, music and cinema, Latin American musicology, musical nationalism, and musical diplomacy. The emphasis is on the late 19th and the 20th centuries, but students interested in colonial music are welcome to take the course.

Instructor(s): P. Palomino     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): MUSI 23416,LACS 36412,LACS 26412

HIST 26117. Progress, Development, and the Future in Latin America. 100 Units.

“Progress,” and its derived concept of “development” have puzzled Latin Americans throughout their modern history: they were an ambitious goal and a challenge for intellectual and political elites, a reality and an elusive dream for ordinary Latin Americans, and the cause of new challenges and problems wherever they actually or presumably took place. For historians, progress and development used to represent the very sense of universal history, a narrative that sneaked into visions of “Western modernity” and “globalization.” But later on, they became a myth to debunk rather than an object of reflection. What has “progress” meant particularly for Latin Americans? What is, for instance, the meaning of “progress” in the Brazilian flag? How did those notions shape the one of “development” since WWII? In political terms, what ideas of “progress” and “development” animated oligarchic, liberal, populist, military, revolutionary, and democratic projects across the region? Because both concepts involve planning and envisioning the outcome of present actions, the history of progress and development is also, in a certain way, a history of the future.  The goal of this seminar is to help students situate a problem of their choice and trace its history in terms of the political debates that pursued the goal of progress and development in that specific realm.

Instructor(s): P. Palomino     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23091,LACS 26413

HIST 26121. Nature, Science, and Empire in the Early Modern Iberian World. 100 Units.

Full title: "Nature, Science, and Empire in the Early Modern Iberian World, 1400–1800." Historians have often relegated Iberia and its New World domains from accounts of the developments of modern science. They have traditionally claimed that strict censorship and a commitment to orthodox Catholicism prevented Spain, once the most powerful empire of the world, from embarking on the path towards scientific modernity in the eighteenth century. Modern scholars, however, have challenged this narrative by embracing more inclusive concepts of "science" to explain the many ways in which early modern people related to nature. Some of these practices include the writing of natural histories, botanical research, and linguistic studies, all fields that Iberian scholars pioneered in their efforts to govern their vast domains. This course will introduce students to a diversity of scientific practices that flourished in the Hispanic world between 1400 and 1800.

Instructor(s): V. López Fadul     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 26121,HIPS 26121

HIST 26122. Argentine Histories. 100 Units.

This seminar introduces students to current scholarship on modern Argentina, with an emphasis on the 20th century but drawing also on cutting-edge literature from the 19th to understand long-term processes. The themes are diverse: the links between Argentina and global history; social classes, economic regions, and political regimes; urban and domestic spaces; the gendered nature of politics; the history of the state and its elites; the anthropology and economics of food and music; the forms of remembering; human rights; sexual identities; and, of course, football and psychoanalysis. All revolving around the production of, and the challenges to, Argentina's egalitarian ethos.

Instructor(s): P. Palomino     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 34705,HIST 36122,LACS 24705

HIST 26123. Aztecs and Romans: Antiquity in the Making of Modern Mexico. 100 Units.

Modern Mexico stands in the shadow of two vibrant premodern urban societies: the Mexica (commonly known as the Aztecs) and the Romans. In this course, we will examine how Mesoamerican and Mediterranean antiquities overlapped and interacted in shaping the culture, politics, and society of the area we call Mexico from the late colonial period to the twenty-first century. Topics will include creole patriotism, the political thought of the early Mexican Republic and the Mexican Revolution of 1910, nationalist archæology, indigenismo, mestizaje, and neoclassical and neo-Aztec art and architecture. All readings will be in translation.

Instructor(s): S. McManus     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught by Stuart McManus, postdoctoral fellow, Stevanovich Institute on the Formation of Knowledge
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 26916,KNOW 23001,LACS 26123

HIST 26125. Revolution Under Empire: Mexico-U.S. Relations 1900-1945. 100 Units.

As the United States grew to global hegemony in the first half of the twentieth century, Mexico was experiencing a violent process of civil war, institutional reform, and economic modernization. This course examines the way the U.S. positioned itself in relation to its embattled southern neighbor. It is well known U.S. interests and policies determined Mexican developments during these years, how did Mexico’s Revolution affect the course of American Empire?

Instructor(s): Torres, Marco     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 26618

HIST 26219. Colonial Latin American History. 100 Units.

This course studies the indigenous, Iberian, and African interactions that forged Spain's colonial empire in the Americas from the 1492 voyage of Christopher Columbus to the movements of independence at the beginning of the nineteenth century. We will explore the social, political, and economic organization of indigenous societies in the Americas, the impact of the Spanish conquest on these, focusing on the transformations wrought by Christianization and hispanicization, particularly as manifested in the labor, racial, and sex/gender regimes that developed in the colony. The course ends with an analysis of the place of Mexico and Peru in Spain's immense global empire, the empire's over-extension, its fault lines, and the series of European and American events that led to the formation of independent republics in the years after 1808.

Instructor(s): R. Gutiérrez     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36219,LACS 26219,LACS 36219

HIST 26316. Revolutions, Constitutions, and War: A Continent Transformed. 100 Units.

During the central decades of the 19th century (1840–1870), the decentralized political structures that had been set up after independence throughout most of the continent, north and south, were refashioned. Under the banners of nationalism, freedom, and democracy, through war, diplomatic wrangling, and innovative law-making, the American republics—and the continent’s monarchical regimes—took on new shapes. The course will explore the ways in which political and territorial controls were refashioned, as were some of the central—and most contentious—tenets of the political order (sovereignty, property, citizenship) during these turbulent decades.

Instructor(s): Erika Pani, Tinker Visiting Professor     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 35110,HIST 36316,LACS 25110

HIST 26409. Revolution, Dictatorship, and Violence in Modern Latin America. 100 Units.

This course will examine the role played by Marxist revolutions, revolutionary movements, and the right-wing dictatorships that have opposed them in shaping Latin American societies and political cultures since the end of World War II. Themes examined will include the relationship among Marxism, revolution, and nation building; the importance of charismatic leaders and icons; the popular authenticity and social content of Latin American revolutions; the role of foreign influences and interventions; the links between revolution and dictatorship; and the lasting legacies of political violence and military rule. Countries examined will include Guatemala, Cuba, Chile, Argentina, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Peru, Venezuela, Bolivia, and Mexico.

Instructor(s): B. Fischer     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36409,LACS 26409,LACS 36409

HIST 26415. Language, History, and Nation in Latin America. 100 Units.

Since the 1980s the so-called linguistic turn became a cliché in history writing. As a result, cultural history became hegemonic in the discipline, and such words as "discourse," "representation," "meaning," and "rhetoric" became common currency for historians. But has language really become a category of historical analysis in the formation of culture, nation, and state in Latin America? This seminar is organized as an exploratory forum, blending historiographies that do not often talk to each other, in order address the questions.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36415,LACS 26415,LACS 36415

HIST 26509. Law and Citizenship in Latin America. 100 Units.

This course will examine law and citizenship in Latin America from the nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries. We will explore the development of Latin American legal systems in both theory and practice, examine the ways in which the operation of these systems has shaped the nature of citizenship in the region, discuss the relationship between legal and other inequalities, and analyze how legal documents and practices have been studied by scholars in order to gain insight into questions of culture, nationalism, violence, inequality, gender, and race.

Instructor(s): B. Fischer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Some background in either Latin American studies or legal history.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36509,LACS 26509,LACS 36509

HIST 26511. Cities from Scratch: The History of Urban Latin America. 100 Units.

Latin America is one of the world's most urbanized regions, and its urban heritage long predates European conquest. And yet the region's cities are most often understood through the lens of North Atlantic visions of urbanity, many of which fit poorly with Latin America's historical trajectory, and most of which have significantly distorted both Latin American urbanism and our understandings of it. This course takes this paradox as the starting point for an interdisciplinary exploration of the history of Latin American cities in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, focusing especially on issues of social inequality, informality, urban governance, race, violence, rights to the city, and urban cultural expression. Readings will be interdisciplinary, including anthropology, sociology, history, fiction, film, photography, and primary historical texts.

Instructor(s): B. Fischer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Some background in either urban studies or Latin American history.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36511,LACS 26510,LACS 36510

HIST 26602. Mughal India: Tradition and Transition. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is on the period of Mughal rule during the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, especially on selected issues that have been at the center of historiographical debate in the past decades.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing or consent of instructor. Prior knowledge of appropriate history and secondary literature required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36602,SALC 37701,SALC 27701

HIST 26710. Sex and Censorship in South Asia. 100 Units.

There have been many exceptional moments of political intolerance and censorship in South Asia in the last two decades. Bloggers have been murdered in Bangladesh, student activists have been arrested on university campuses across India, books have been banned, theaters and galleries have been vandalized, couples have been attacked across the country on Valentine’s Day as sexuality is supposedly foreign to “Indian Culture”, the Indian judiciary has refused to strike down Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which leaves homosexuality as a criminal activity that is constantly censored in film and literature. Restrictions on speech are a feature of democracies everywhere, from persecuting whistle-blowers in the US, to ban on religious symbols in France, to restrictions on Twitter in Turkey. What sets the South Asian experience apart? This introductory course will interrogate how a nexus of concerns about power, religion and sex, originating in the colonial experience, has shaped the particular dynamics of censorship in South Asia. By looking at a long history of banning and prohibition, we will also examine how censorship has molded South Asian cultural and political lives.

Instructor(s): Ahona Panda     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course should be of interest to students of gender and sexuality studies, cinema and media studies, literature, history, politics, human rights, anthropology and modern South Asian history and culture. It should also appeal to those interested in the past and present of law, censorship and democracy in the Non-West. Students at all stages of undergraduate study are encouraged to take this introductory course.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 25306-01,HREL 35306,SALC 25306

HIST 26818. History in Practice: Musical Multiculturalism in Brazil. 100 Units.

Brazil is a country uniquely identified with its musical history. This course is designed to describe how Indigenous, African, and European influences merged over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries to create Brazil’s rich and complex musical tradition. We will focus especially on the interaction of erudite and popular influences, and on the musical and social processes that gave birth to distinctly Brazilian genres such as Samba, Choro, Maracatu, and Frevo. Taught by a renowned Brazilian composer and guitarist, this course will explore Brazil’s musical history through live musical performance as well as lectures, readings, recordings, and discussion.

Instructor(s): Sergio Assad     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 35112,HIST 36218,MUSI 23817,MUSI 33817,LACS 25112

HIST 26904. Colonialism and Female Iconography: Bengal and Britain. 100 Units.

The course offers a socio-historical approach to the construction, flow, and exchange of literary images of colonial and imperial women between Bengal and Britain in the nineteenth-century. The course will provide the students an overview of the comparative socio-cultural exchange between Bengal and Britain through the writings of secondary stakeholders of colonialism—namely women. Classes will include textual case studies.

Instructor(s): Sukla Chatterjee     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 28001,GLST 28001

HIST 27001. Law and Society in Early America, 1600–1800. 100 Units.

This colloquium considers law, legal institutions, and legal culture within the lived experience of colonial and revolutionary America. It will emphasize the interaction of social development and legal development and will explore the breadth of everyday experience with legal institutions like the jury, with courts as institutions for resolving disputes, and with the prosecution of crime.

Instructor(s): E. Cook     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level undergraduates and early state graduate students.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 37001,LLSO 26000

HIST 27006. Not Just the Facts: Telling About the American South. 100 Units.

The great jurist Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr. once observed: "The main part of intellectual education is not the acquisition of facts but learning how to make facts live." This course concerns itself with the various ways people have striven to understand the American South, past and present. We will read fiction, autobiography, and history (including meditations on how to write history). Main themes of the course include the difference between historical scholarship and writing history in fictional form; the role of the author in each and consideration of the interstitial space of autobiography; the question of authorial authenticity; and the tension between contemporary demands for truthfulness and the rejection of "truth."

Instructor(s): J. Dailey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level undergraduates
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 25411,AMER 27006

HIST 27102. Lincoln: Slavery, War, and the Constitution. 100 Units.

This course is a study of Abraham Lincoln’s view of the Constitution, based on close readings of his writings, plus comparisons to judicial responses to Lincoln’s policies.

Instructor(s): D. Hutchinson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 24711,FNDL 24711

HIST 27207. The North American West, 1500–1900. 100 Units.

"Go west, young man, go west!" newspaper editor Horace Greeley allegedly proclaimed. Although he only visited the region himself, his proclamation referred to the host of opportunities thought to be lying in wait among the uncharted territories out yonder. The West has embodied both the American dream and an American nightmare. This co-taught class will examine the changing delineations, demographics, conceptualizations, and significance of the North American West across four centuries and several empires.

Instructor(s): R. Gutiérrez, A. Lippert     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 37207,AMER 27207,AMER 37207,CRES 27207,CRES 37207,GNSE 27207,GNDR 37207

HIST 27306. US Women and Gender. 100 Units.

This course studies the history of women, gender relations, and ideas of sex difference from the emergence of the women's rights movement in the 1840s to the rise of women's liberation in the 1960s. Issues of work, rights, citizenship, race, and sexuality take center stage as we explore the social, political, and cultural forces that shaped women's lives and the aspirations and agency of women who sought to transform the rules and relations of gender in the United States. Readings include primary sources as well as classic and recent historical scholarship.

Instructor(s): A. Stanley     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HMRT 27306,LLSO 27306,CRES 23700,GNSE 27306

HIST 27406. Civil Rights Movement. 100 Units.

This course is designed to explore selected topics in the history and historiography of the Civil Right Movement of the 1950s and 1960s, with a special focus on the lived experience of movement activists. Our principal objectives will be identifying the roots and causes of the movement, putting it in context of, as well as distinguishing it from, earlier political mobilizations, and tracing the countervailing social, political, and international forces that shaped its evolution from the mid-1950s to the late 1960s.

Instructor(s): T. Holt     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 37406,CRES 27406,CRES 37406,LLSO 28712

HIST 27506. Changing America in the Twentieth Century. 100 Units.

This course explores the regional organization of U.S. society and its economy during the pivotal twentieth century, emphasizing the shifting dynamics that explain the spatial distribution of people, resources, economic activity, human settlement patterns, and mobility. We put special focus on the regional restructuring of industry and services, transportation, city growth, and cultural consumption. Two-day weekend field trip to the Mississippi River required.

Instructor(s): M. Conzen     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course offered odd years.
Equivalent Course(s): GEOG 22100,GEOG 32100,HIST 37506

HIST 27705. Introduction to Black Chicago, 1893 to 2010. 100 Units.

This course surveys the history of African Americans in Chicago, from before the twentieth century to the near present. In referring to that history, we treat a variety of themes, including migration and its impact, the origins and effects of class stratification, the relation of culture and cultural endeavor to collective consciousness, the rise of institutionalized religions, facts and fictions of political empowerment, and the correspondence of Black lives and living to indices of city wellness (services, schools, safety, general civic feeling). This is a history class that situates itself within a robust interdisciplinary conversation. Students can expect to engage works of autobiography and poetry, sociology, documentary photography, and political science as well as more straightforward historical analysis. By the end of the class, students should have grounding in Black Chicago's history and an appreciation of how this history outlines and anticipates Black life and racial politics in the modern United States.

Instructor(s): A. Green     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 22209,AMER 27705,AMER 37705,CRES 37705,HIST 37705,CRES 27705

HIST 27708. Complete Lives: Elderly Memory and Black Well-Being in Chicago. 100 Units.

This course will introduce students to the literature of memoir and autobiography in Black Chicago, as well as the growing contemporary craft of personal history among older Black Chicagoans. The premise of this course is to consider the relation of elder memory to public health, human flourishing, and community cohesion through reference to policy, relevant ethical norms, and institutions of public history.

Instructor(s): A. Green     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Study Chicago Program; Friday afternoons will be reserved for excursions.

HIST 28000. United States Latinos: Origins and Histories. 100 Units.

An examination of the diverse social, economic, political, and cultural histories of those who are now commonly identified as Latinos in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formative historical experiences of Mexican Americans and mainland Puerto Ricans, although some consideration will also be given to the histories of other Latino groups, i.e., Cubans, Central Americans, and Dominicans. Topics include cultural and geographic origins and ties; imperialism and colonization; the economics of migration and employment; legal status; work, women, and the family; racism and other forms of discrimination; the politics of national identity; language and popular culture; and the place of Latinos in US society.

Instructor(s): R. Gutiérrez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 28001,CRES 28000,GNSE 28202,HIST 38000,LACS 28000,LACS 38000,CRES 38000,GNSE 38202,AMER 38001

HIST 28703. Baseball and American Culture, 1840 to Present. 100 Units.

This course will examine the rise and fall of baseball as America's national pastime. We will trace the relationship between baseball and American society from the development of the game in the mid-nineteenth century to its enormous popularity in the first half of the twentieth century to its more recent problems and declining status in our culture. The focus will be on baseball as a professional sport, with more attention devoted to the early history of the game rather than to the recent era. Emphasis will be on using baseball as a historical lens through which we will analyze the development of American society and culture rather than on the celebration of individuals or teams. Crucial elements of racialization, ethnicity, class, gender, nationalism, and masculinity will be in play as we consider the Negro Leagues, women's leagues, the Latinization and globalization of the game, and more.

Instructor(s): M. Briones     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 28703,HIST 38703,CRES 38703

HIST 28800. Historical Geography of the United States. 100 Units.

This course examines the spatial dynamics of empire, the frontier, regional development, the social character of settlement patterns, and the evolution of the cultural landscapes of America from pre-European times to 1900. All-day northern Illinois field trip required.

Instructor(s): M. Conzen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course offered in even years.
Equivalent Course(s): GEOG 21900,GEOG 31900,HIST 38800

HIST 28805. World's Fairs, 1851–1937: Chicago and Paris. 100 Units.

The great era of world's fairs (or universal expositions) lasted about ninety years. Although this golden age originated in London and took expression on every continent, two of its most significant hosts were Paris and Chicago. This course will examine the character and impact of expositions in these two cities, concentrating on Paris expositions held between 1855 and 1937 and the two Chicago fairs of 1893 and 1933. Particular attention will be given to the art, design, and architecture featured, stimulated, and sometimes ignored by the fairs. But technological, racial, political, institutional, and social themes will be examined as well. This colloquium is meant to encourage creation of research papers. It will meet once a week and there will be heavy reliance upon images at each session.

Instructor(s): N. Harris     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 28815

HIST 28900. Roots of the Modern American City. 100 Units.

This course traces the economic, social, and physical development of the city in North America from pre-European times to the mid-twentieth century. We emphasize evolving regional urban systems, the changing spatial organization of people and land use in urban areas, and the developing distinctiveness of American urban landscapes. All-day Illinois field trip required.

Instructor(s): M. Conzen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course offered in odd years.
Equivalent Course(s): GEOG 26100,ENST 26100,GEOG 36100,HIST 38900

HIST 29102. The Global Abolition of Slavery, 1750 - 1900. 100 Units.

In 1750 slavery was the dominant form of labor regime in the Atlantic world. One hundred fifty years later it had been legally abolished in Europe, North America, Latin America, and most of Africa. This course studies the transnational movements that abolished first the slave trade and later the labor regime of slavery itself. The course will put the more familiar story of American anti-slavery in context of struggles against slavery in the Caribbean, in Latin America, and in the British Empire. A study of both reformers and revolutionaries, this class will emphasize the profound political consequences of the end of slavery. It will discuss debates about race, democracy, human rights, and gender that the abolitionist struggle evoked. The class will emphasize that slave resistance played a central role in the end of slavery.

Instructor(s): P. Wirzbicki     Terms Offered: Autumn

HIST 29408. Human Rights in Mexico. 100 Units.

This course is intended to give the student a foundation in understanding human rights as both concept and reality in contemporary Mexico. Subject matter includes an overview of key periods in Mexican history in which concepts of individual and group rights, the relationship between citizens and the state, and the powers of the Church and the state were subject to change. This historical review will form the foundation for understanding human rights issues in contemporary Mexico. The course will also examine modern social movements which frame their demands as human rights.

Instructor(s): S. Gzesh     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2016-17.
Prerequisite(s): A reading knowledge of Spanish and at least one course on Latin American history or culture are required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 39408,HMRT 34501,LACS 24501,LACS 34501,HMRT 24501

HIST 29630. Hist Coll: Amer Twilight—Dual Birth of Realism & Human Rights. 100 Units.

This course explores the simultaneous emergence of human-rights politics and its nemesis, "realism," in the United States between the late 1930s and the mid-1950s. Virtually all scholars treat these two political traditions as historical matter and antimatter—that is, when they acknowledge the other camp at all. Despite this mutual avoidance by academics (which dates to these same years), the transitional decades around the middle of the century saw the institutionalization of both kinds of politics in the UN and NATO, the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the Truman Doctrine, refugee relief and the Marshall Plan. By exploring the overlaps and interconnections, continuities and ruptures that marked American international politics and thought in these years, we will attempt to exhume the dual birth of modern human-rights politics and "the American Century." To go beyond the well-entrenched interpretive positions of the human-rights and realist literatures, classes will center on student expeditions into the rich trove of primary historical documents available in the Special Collections Research Center and regular stacks at Regenstein Library.

Instructor(s): J. Sparrow     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): History majors must take a History colloquium in their third year.

HIST 29632. History Colloquium: The CIA and American Democracy. 100 Units.

This colloquium will examine all aspects of American intelligence and its influence on history, politics, society, and academe since the inception of the Office of Strategic Services during World War II. Particular attention will be paid to how intelligence is gathered and interpreted, intelligence failures and why they happened, the close association between top Ivy League universities and origins of US intelligence, the penetration of the early Central Intelligence Agency by British individuals spying for the Soviets, the wide influence of the CIA in the 1950s and 1960s on major aspects of American life, the crisis of US intelligence in the late 1960s and through the 1970s, the revival of intelligence vigor in the 1980s, and the uses and misuses of intelligence in the recent wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Students will be required to read six or seven books during the course of the colloquium, to see a few films outside of class time, to turn in a paper of roughly fifteen pages in the seventh week of the term, and to take a final exam mixing essay questions with questions on the reading. Outstanding participation in colloquium will merit an increment in the final grade, which otherwise will be determined equally by the outside paper and final exam.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring

HIST 29642. History Coll: Cross-cultural Encounters in and Beyond Europe. 100 Units.

Full Title: "History Colloquium: Cross-cultural Encounters in and Beyond Europe from the Renaissance to Globalization" This course explores the ways Europeans have crossed borders to learn, take pleasure, marry, loot, possess, classify, and convert. We will consider the physical and virtual spaces of exchanges from the early modern embassies and bazaars to transnational intimacy within the context of imperial bureaucracies, the go-betweens and the perilous rewards of cultural mediation for translators, ambassadors, missionaries, merchants, exiles, and tourists, and the objects that were often at the center of exchanges. Students will be required to participate actively in class discussions and to produce an original paper of approximately fifteen pages by the end of class.

Instructor(s): E. Gilburd     Terms Offered: Spring

HIST 29651. History Colloquium: Writing Historical Fiction. 100 Units.

"History," as Isidore of Seville put it in his Etymologies, "is a narration of things done, through which those things which were done in the past are discerned." In Greek, it is called historia, apo tou istorein, that is "to see," or "to learn by inquiring." For among the ancients no one would write history unless he had been present and had seen those things which ought to be written down. But what if you weren't there to see? The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the practice of historical research as an exercise in imagining what it was like to "see" the events of the past as if one were present and to narrate them so that others might "see." We will consider problems of plot, character, setting, and style, as well as practice finding and interpreting the textual, architectural, geographical, and material sources at our disposal for writing "realistic" accounts of "things done."

Instructor(s): R. Fulton Brown     Terms Offered: Spring

HIST 29652. History Colloquium: Migration and Citizenship. 100 Units.

Looking through a broad interdisciplinary lens, this colloquium will examine the history of migration and citizenship. The focus will largely be on the United States, but, given its topic, the course will necessitate transnational and comparative histories. How did nineteenth- and early twentieth-century "sojourners" become "citizens"? What constituted the public's perception of some immigrants as inassimilable aliens and others as an ostensible "model minority"? We will interrogate not only what it means to have been and to be an immigrant in America but also what it means to be a citizen in a multiracial democracy. As a junior history colloquium, the course's main purpose is to help students learn to write a long research paper based on primary sources in preparation for writing the BA thesis.

Instructor(s): M. Briones     Terms Offered: Autumn

HIST 29663. History Colloquium: The American Vigilante. 100 Units.

From the Regulators to Rambo, the vigilante has played a leading role in the history and culture of the United States. This junior colloquium traces a long history of the American vigilante as a character, as well as episodes of vigilante violence from early America to the present. We will focus on the questions central to this history: What is the relationship between the vigilante and the state? Where can we draw distinctions between vigilantism, terrorism, and rebellion? How has the vigilante contributed to nation-building? We will also explore the predominance of the vigilante in popular culture, focusing on figures such as Jesse James, Dirty Harry, Machete, the Punisher, superheroes, the movies of John Wayne, and the lyrics of Toby Keith. Students will write substantial final papers based on primary sources that explore one element of this discussion.

Instructor(s): K. Belew     Terms Offered: Winter

HIST 29665. Hist Coll: Worldly Goods—Commodities in Historical Contexts. 100 Units.

This colloquium explores the webs of production and consumption through which selected raw materials (such as sugar, cotton, coffee) become available for use in daily life. Readings address the commodity's "career" as an object of work, leisure, social mobilization, and cultural experience in comparative transnational contexts.

Instructor(s): J. Saville     Terms Offered: Winter

HIST 29666. Hist Coll: Political & Cultural History of Mexico, 1850–1950. 100 Units.

Full title: "History Colloquium: Selected Topics in the Political and Cultural History of Mexico, 1850–1950." This course is not a survey of Mexican history but a discussion of the recent contributions to the cultural and political historiography of modern Mexico. It will blend lectures and discussion of such topics as the new meanings of citizenship, peace, war, national culture, violence, avant-garde art, and cinema.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Spring

HIST 29700. Readings in History. 100 Units.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Terms Offered: Summer,Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and the History undergraduate advisor.

HIST 29801-29802. BA Thesis Seminar I-II.

History majors are required to take HIST 29801-29802. All third-year history majors in residence in Chicago take BA Thesis Seminar I in Spring Quarter. Those who are out of residence take the seminar in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year.

HIST 29801. BA Thesis Seminar I. 100 Units.

History majors are required to take HIST 29801–29802. BA Thesis Seminar I provides a systematic introduction to historical methodology and approaches (e.g., political, intellectual, social, cultural, economic, gender, environmental history), as well as research techniques. It culminates in students' submission of a robust BA thesis proposal that will be critiqued in class. Guidance will also be provided for applications for research funding.

Instructor(s): M. Briones     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring
Prerequisite(s): All third-year history majors in residence in Chicago take HIST 29801 in Spring Quarter. Those who are out of residence take it in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year.

HIST 29802. BA Thesis Seminar II. 100 Units.

BA Thesis Seminar II is a forum to discuss and critique BA theses. Ideally, students will have completed most of their research for the thesis and will use this quarter to produce a complete draft. Early weeks of the seminar will be devoted to writing strategies and discussion of the introduction. Sections of the theses will be critiqued in the middle weeks of term, while in the final weeks of the quarter full rough drafts will be read. The final deadline for submission of the BA thesis is second week of Spring Quarter.

Instructor(s): M. Briones     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 29801

HIST 29902. Tolkien: Medieval and Modern. 100 Units.

J. R. R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings is one of the most popular works of imaginative literature of the twentieth century. This course seeks to understand its appeal by situating Tolkien's creation within the context of Tolkien's own work as both artist and scholar and alongside its medieval sources and modern parallels. Themes to be addressed include the problem of genre and the uses of tradition; the nature of history and its relationship to place; the activity of creation and its relationship to language, beauty, evil, and power; the role of monsters in imagination and criticism; the twinned challenges of death and immortality, fate and free will; and the interaction between the world of "faerie" and religious belief.

Instructor(s): R. Fulton     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students must have read "The Lord of the Rings" prior to first day of class.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 24901,RLST 22400

HIST 29906. Art and Human Rights. 100 Units.

This seminar-style course will explore historical and contemporary interventions in visual and performative artistic practices with human rights. Co-taught by a historian and theater-maker, the course will consider various paradigms for looking at how artists work on human rights. Course work will include critical readings, viewings of artistic work, and direct conversations with artists. Students will also participate in a multi-day summit on campus (April 29-May 2) that will bring distinguished artists from throughout the world to address the question “What is an artistic practice of human rights, conceptually, aesthetically and pragmatically?” Students will be given the option to produce either an academic or artistic final project.

Instructor(s): M. Bradley, L. Buxbaum-Danzig     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 20009,HMRT 25502,TAPS 25510,BPRO 25500


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Chair, Collegiate Affairs Committee
Matthew Briones, Associate Professor in History
SS 204B
773.702.1590
Email

Secondary Contact

Undergraduate Program Coordinator
Jake Smith
SS 225
773.702.2178
Email

Preceptor/BA Advisor


Preceptors
F 4
773.702.3079

Listhost

http://listhost.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/ugradhistory