Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Major Field | Electives | Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s) | Research Track | Honors | Summary of Requirements for the Major | Reading and Research Courses | Petitioning for Outside Credit | Grading | Minor in History | Course Numbering | Double Major | Study Abroad | Courses

Department Website: http://history.uchicago.edu/page/undergraduate

Program of Study

For decades the University of Chicago has been a leader in the study of history, through its pioneering civilization studies programs, its intensive research-based undergraduate curriculum, and its training of academic historians as both researchers and teachers. Majoring in history not only enables you to become a consumer of academic knowledge, it also prepares you to become a producer of knowledge. Undergraduate history courses first train you to explore large-scale social, cultural, and political processes by defining concrete, researchable questions. Subsequently, as a history major, you are taught how to locate the primary and secondary sources necessary to develop answers to these questions. Finally, faculty assist you in transforming your research into historical arguments that shed light on the multiple ways in which our world, our very reality, has transformed over time. History is excellent preparation for a wide field of endeavors—from law, government, and public policy to the arts and business.

Students interested in a history major ideally should consult the undergraduate program coordinator before the end of their second year; it is, however, generally possible to join the major as a third-year student.

Program Requirements

In addition to the civilization sequences, students can choose from more than eighty history courses that are offered each year to undergraduates. Some of these are introductory lectures, others are small seminars devoted to the intense study of a particular historical moment, theme, or event. In some you will find only other undergraduates, while in others you will rub shoulders with graduate students.

Students must take twelve courses for the history major, one of which must be a history colloquium (HIST 29600s). Beginning with the 2017–18 academic year, history majors have the option of pursuing one of two tracks: the Regular Track or the Research Track, with the primary difference being that students in the Research Track complete a BA thesis and students in the Regular Track do not. Students wishing to pursue the Research Track must officially declare their intention to do so with the undergraduate program coordinator by sixth week of Winter Quarter during their third year. For students in the Research Track, the twelve courses for the major include the two-quarter HIST 29801-29802 BA Thesis Seminar I-II. Only students in the Research Track are eligible for honors.

Courses without a "HIST" number may be used only with departmental permission; students should submit a petition to the undergraduate program coordinator to have them considered (see Petitioning for Outside Credit below). Students may use one civilization sequence (up to three courses in the same sequence) to count toward history major requirements, but only if these courses are not also being used to count toward general education requirements.

Major Field

Students in both the Research Track and the Regular Track are required to take six courses in, or directly related to, their chosen main field. Students construct the main field and choose their other courses in close consultation with the undergraduate program coordinator, subject to final approval by the faculty chair of the Collegiate Affairs Committee.

The major field is usually defined by time and space. Examples are nineteenth- or twentieth-century US history, colonial Africa, the Atlantic world in the early modern or modern period, ancient Greece, or medieval Europe. Thematic major fields are also possible; for example, African American, Jewish, or gender history. Major fields may also be methodologically defined: for example, intellectual, economic, political, or urban history. Students pursuing a major field in urban history, for example, might take courses ranging from "Jewish Spaces and Places: Imagined and Real" to "Cities from Scratch: The History of Urban Latin America"; a focus on economic history might include "Economic Change in China" and "The History of US Capitalism." In the case of thematically or methodologically defined major fields, it is particularly important to consult closely with the undergraduate program coordinator to ensure coherence.

Electives

In addition to the six courses in the main field, students must also take a number of elective courses. Students pursuing the Regular Track take six electives, while students pursuing the Research Track take four electives and complete the major with two seminars for the BA thesis (See Research Track below). Electives should complement the main field, extend the range of your historical awareness, and explore varying approaches to historical analysis and interpretation. You are encouraged to take courses that introduce significant civilizational or chronological breadth into your studies, or a different methodology or theme than you are studying in your major field.

Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s)

Students who are majoring in history must take at least one history colloquium (HIST 29600s), though they are welcome to take more than one. Depending on the topic, the colloquium may count as one of the six courses comprising the student's major field or as one of the history electives. Students interested in pursuing the Research Track should take a colloquium prior to Spring Quarter of their third year, while those pursuing the Regular Track can take a colloquium at any point prior to graduation. The colloquia are offered on a variety of topics each year and enable advanced College students to pursue research projects. 

These courses expose students to the methods and practice of historical research and writing. Students are required to compose an original research paper that is at least fifteen pages in length. For students who are planning to begin graduate study the year following graduation, the colloquium provides them with the opportunity to produce a writing sample based on primary sources that they can use for their applications.

Research Track

Students admitted to the Research Track are required to complete twelve courses for the major: six in a major field, four electives, and two BA seminars. The research colloquium may count toward either the major field or the elective field requirement. Students planning to pursue graduate study in history or those wishing to go into a research-intensive career, such as journalism, law, or policy analysis, are encouraged to pursue the Research Track.

Application to Research Track

Students wishing to pursue the Research Track must submit a major form indicating their plans as well as a short description of their proposed BA thesis topic to the undergraduate program coordinator by sixth week of Winter Quarter during their third year. With the approval of the faculty chair of the Collegiate Affairs Committee, the committee places students into a Spring Quarter BA thesis seminar before the end of Winter Quarter. In the seminar students develop a research proposal, which they submit at the end of Spring Quarter. The committee also assigns each student a BA thesis advisor from among the Department of History's faculty.

BA Thesis Seminars (Hist 29801 and 29802)

Students pursuing the Research Track are required to complete a BA thesis and the two BA thesis seminars. The BA thesis is a three-quarter-long research project in which students develop a significant and original interpretation of a historical issue of their choosing. Theses are the culmination of the history program and range from forty to sixty pages in length, but there is neither a minimum nor a maximum requirement. The BA thesis seminars assist students in formulating approaches and developing their research and writing skills, while providing a forum for group discussion and critiques.

Students formally register for two quarters, during the Spring Quarter of their third year (HIST 29801 BA Thesis Seminar I) and Winter Quarter of their fourth year (HIST 29802 BA Thesis Seminar II), though they are also expected to be actively engaged during the intervening Autumn Quarter. Students who are out of residence in Spring Quarter of their third year, take BA Seminar I in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year (see Study Abroad below). BA Thesis Seminar I meets weekly in the Spring Quarter of the third year, but only every other week during the autumn and winter terms of the fourth year. Throughout the period of researching and writing the thesis, students benefit from the company of their peers and the guidance of their preceptor, who is an advanced history graduate student, serves as the seminar instructor, and is the second reader of the thesis.

BA Thesis

The deadline for submission of the BA thesis is the second Friday of Spring Quarter. Students who wish to complete their papers in a quarter other than Spring Quarter must petition the department through the undergraduate program coordinator. Students graduating in a quarter other than Spring Quarter must turn in their theses by Friday of seventh week of their final quarter. When circumstances justify it, the department establishes individual deadlines and procedures.

With approval from the undergraduate faculty chairs in two departments, history students may be able to write a BA thesis that meets requirements for a dual major. Students must consult with both chairs before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Students are eligible to apply for research funding for summer research from the Department of History and the PRISM (Planning Resources and Involvement for Students in the Majors) program. Students are also encouraged to take advantage of funding that is available for language study abroad through the Foreign Language Acquisition Grant (FLAG) program. For details on available funding, students should consult the undergraduate program coordinator.

Honors

Students pursuing the Research Track who have done exceptionally well in their course work and have written an outstanding BA thesis are recommended for honors. Candidates must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and a GPA of 3.7 or higher in the twelve courses counting towards the major. Readers submit BA theses for departmental honors that they judge to be of particular distinction. If the department concurs, the student is awarded honors. Students who fail to meet the deadline for submission of the BA thesis are not eligible for honors consideration. 

Summary of Requirements for the Major

Regular Track

Six courses in a major field600
Six electives600
One of the 12 courses above must be a Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s)
Total Units1200

Research Track

Six courses in a major field600
Four electives400
One of the 10 courses above must be a Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s)§
HIST 29801BA Thesis Seminar I100
HIST 29802BA Thesis Seminar II100
Total Units1200
§

Students on the Research Track should complete their Research Colloquium before Spring Quarter of their third year.

Reading and Research Courses

Students interested in pursuing a program of study that cannot be met by means of regular courses have the option of devising a reading and research course (HIST 29700 Readings in History) that is taken individually and supervised by a member of the Department of History faculty. Such a course requires the approval of the undergraduate program coordinator and the prior consent of the instructor with whom the student would like to study. Note: Enrollment in HIST 29700 is open only to students who are doing independent study that is not related to the research or writing of the BA thesis. As a general rule, only one reading and research course can be counted towards the history major.

Petitioning for Outside Credit

The Department of History offers a wide variety of courses each quarter, and majors are encouraged to take history courses to fulfill the requirements of the major. In some instances, courses that originate outside the department can be used to fulfill the course requirements of the major. To receive history credit for nondepartmental courses, you must petition the Collegiate Affairs Committee for approval. A few things to keep in mind:

  • Petitions must include a course description, a syllabus, and a statement of purpose that addresses the value of the course for your proposed course of study.
  • Allow sufficient time for committee review and to enable you to take one or more additional history course(s) should your petition be denied.
  • You should give your petition to the undergraduate program coordinator, who shares it with the chair of the Collegiate Affairs Committee.
  • Courses taken abroad may also be used towards the major, pending approval of the petition, however more than half of the requirements for the major must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.
  • Petitions for courses abroad must include course syllabi, descriptions, and course work.
  • Generally, no more than two petitions per student will be approved.
  • Documentation of approved petitions must be provided to the College adviser in a timely fashion for processing.

Grading

Courses counting towards the history major are normally taken for quality grades. The History Research Colloquium (HIST 29600s), HIST 29801 BA Thesis Seminar I, and HIST 29802 BA Thesis Seminar II must be taken for quality grades. In exceptional circumstances, students who are majoring in history may petition to allow a course taken for a pass/fail grade to count towards the requirements of the major. Students wishing to do so should consult with the undergraduate program coordinator. A pass grade is to be given only for work of C– quality or higher. Students should also consult with their College adviser about the appropriateness of pass/fail grading options in their larger program of study.

Minor in History

Students specializing in all disciplines are welcome to minor in history. Majors in such fields as international studies, political science, public policy, economics, and philosophy find that a history minor complements their major by providing a historical understanding of social, cultural, political, and economic issues, while those majoring in such disciplines as mathematics and the sciences use the minor to explore a different area of interest and to develop their humanistic understanding of the world. Students may choose to take courses in a variety of fields, time periods, and thematic topics, with the aim of developing a broad understanding of historical change across time and space, or they may choose to focus specifically on a more narrowly defined field of interest.

Students wishing to pursue the minor should contact the undergraduate program coordinator and complete the minor declaration form no later than the end of the third year. The program coordinator's approval for the minor program should be submitted to a student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

Requirements

The history minor requires a total of six courses chosen in consultation with the undergraduate program coordinator. Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors; (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements; (3) may not be petitioned in from other departments; (4) must be taken for quality grades; and (5) must consist of more than half of the courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Course Numbering

History courses numbered 10000 to 29999 are intended primarily for College students; 10000-level courses are introductory. Some 20000-level courses have 30000-level equivalents when they are open to graduate students. To register for 20000/30000 cross-listed courses, undergraduates must use the undergraduate number (20000). History courses numbered 40000 to 49999 are intended primarily for graduate students, but are open to advanced College students with the consent of the instructor. Undergraduates registered for 40000-level courses are held to the graduate-level requirements.

Double Major

Students planning to double major in history and another discipline are encouraged to do so, with the following stipulations:

  • Double counting: Courses that are cross-listed with another department may be used for both majors.
  • BA thesis and seminar: Double majors pursuing the Research Track must fulfill the requirements pertaining to the BA thesis, including taking part in the BA seminar.

Study Abroad

The Department of History strongly supports study abroad. We have arranged the course work requirement to make that possible, but a little prior planning is required, especially for those pursuing the Research Track. If at all possible, it is best to study abroad during Autumn and/or Winter Quarters of the third year. However, if a full-year study abroad experience is desired, that is still compatible with the Research Track history major. One section of the BA seminar (combining requirements of BA Seminar I and II in an accelerated manner) meets in Autumn Quarter to accommodate fourth-year students who have been abroad third year; these students register for BA Seminar II with the rest of their third-year cohort. All Research Track history majors are required to be on campus for Autumn and Winter Quarters of their fourth year in order to complete the BA thesis.

History Courses

HIST 10101-10102. Introduction to African Civilization I-II.

African Civilization introduces students to African history and anthropology in a two-quarter sequence and meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

HIST 10101. Introduction to African Civilization I. 100 Units.

Part one considers literary, oral, and archeological sources to investigate African societies and states from the early Iron Age through the emergence of the Atlantic world. Case studies include the empires of Ghana, Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also treats the diffusion of Islam, the origins and effects of European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended.

Instructor(s): E. Fretwell     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. CHDV Distribution: C
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20701,CRES 20701,CHDV 21411

HIST 10102. Introduction to African Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second segment of the African Civilizations sequence uses anthropological perspectives to investigate colonial and postcolonial encounters in West and East Africa. The course objective is to show that while colonialism was brutal and oppressive, it was by no means a unidirectional process of domination in which Europeans plundered the African continent and enforced a wholesale adoption of European culture. Rather, scholars today recognize that colonial encounters were complex culture, political, and economic fields of interaction. Africans actively adopted, reworked, and contested colonizers' policies and projects, and Europeans drew heavily from these encounters to form liberal conceptions of self, nation, and society. Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about forms of personhood, political economy, and everyday life in the twentieth century. Course themes will include social reproduction, kinship practices, medicine, domesticity, and development.

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. CHDV Distribution C.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20702,CHDV 21401,CRES 20802

HIST 10800-10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II.

This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 10800. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I. 100 Units.

The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia’s early encounters with Europe.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24101,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000,SALC 20100

HIST 10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II. 100 Units.

The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India.

Instructor(s): D. Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SALC 20100,ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24102,SASC 20100,SOSC 23100,SALC 20200

HIST 12700-12800. Music in Western Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence explores musical works of broad cultural significance in Western civilization. We study pieces not only from the standpoint of musical style but also through the lenses of politics, intellectual history, economics, gender, cultural studies, and so on. Readings are taken both from our music textbook and from the writings of a number of figures such as St. Benedict of Nursia and Martin Luther. In addition to lectures, students discuss important issues in the readings and participate in music listening exercises in smaller sections.

HIST 12700. Music in Western Civilization I: To 1750. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): A. Robertson     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 21100,MUSI 12100

HIST 12800. Music in Western Civilization II: 1750 to the Present. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Prior music course or ability to read music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This two-quarter sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies; it does not meet the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 21200,MUSI 12200

HIST 13001-13002-13003. History of European Civilization I-II-III.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by “Europe” and “civilization.” Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13001. History of European Civilization I. 100 Units.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by "Europe" and "civilization." Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): F. Albritton Jonsson, R. Fulton Brown, A. Palmer, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13002. History of European Civilization II. 100 Units.

History of European Civilization is a two-quarter sequence designed to use close readings of primary sources to enrich our understanding of Europeans of the past. As we examine the variety of their experiences, we will often call into question what we mean in the first place by "Europe" and "civilization." Rather than providing a narrative of high politics, the sequence will emphasize the contested geographic, religious, social, and racial boundaries that have defined and redefined Europe and its people over the centuries. We will read and discuss sources covering the period from the early Middle Ages to the present, from a variety of genres: saga, biography, personal letters, property records, political treatises, memoirs, and government documents, to name only a few. Individual instructors may choose different sources and highlight different aspects of European civilization, but some of the most important readings will be the same in all sections. The two-quarter sequence may also be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): R. Fulton Brown, A. Goff, Staff     Terms Offered: Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must take a minimum of two quarters of Civ. to fulfill general education requirement; register for same section each quarter.

HIST 13003. History of European Civilization III. 100 Units.

The two-quarter History of European Civilization sequence may be supplemented by a third quarter, in which students will have the opportunity to explore in greater depth a particular topic in the history of European civilization. Topics in this third quarter of the sequence may include women in European history, religion and society, Church and State, the Enlightenment, the transformation of the Roman World, or other focused topics on cultural, economic, social, political, or religious aspects of European history.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 13001 and HIST 13002
Note(s): Students who plan to complete a three-quarter sequence register for HIST 13003 in Spring Quarter after completing HIST 13001-13002. Students may not combine HIST 13003 with one other quarter of European Civilization to construct a two-quarter sequence.

HIST 13100-13200-13300. History of Western Civilization I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. The purpose of this sequence is threefold: (1) to introduce students to the principles of historical thought, (2) to acquaint them with some of the more important epochs in the development of Western civilization since the sixth century BC, and (3) to assist them in discovering connections between the various epochs. The purpose of the course is not to present a general survey of Western history. Instruction consists of intensive investigation of a selection of original documents bearing on a number of separate topics, usually two or three a quarter, occasionally supplemented by the work of a modern historian. The treatment of the selected topics varies from section to section. This sequence is currently offered twice a year. The amount of material covered is the same whether the student enrolls in the Autumn-Winter-Spring sequence or the Summer sequence. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13100. History of Western Civilization I. 100 Units.

This first course of the History of Western Civilization sequence focuses on the history of classical civilization, beginning with the world of Homer and ending with the world of St. Augustine. Key topics covered through discussions of texts include the development of the Greek Polis and the Peloponnesian War; the Roman Republic and Empire; and the development of Christianity in the Roman Empire.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Autumn; J. Boyer, Summer     Terms Offered: Autumn,Summer
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13200. History of Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

This second course of the History of Western Civilization Sequences explores major themes in the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, and the Reformation. Key topics explored through discussions of texts include the development of monasticism; the structures of manorialism and feudalism; the consolidation of the papacy and the Holy Roman Empire; and the challenges to these structures seen in the ideas of the humanists and reformers. 

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Winter, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13300. History of Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

This third course of the History of Western Civilization undertakes a detailed study of the French Revolution and charts the rise of liberal, anti-liberal, and post-liberal states and societies in nineteenth- and twentieth-century European history.  The sequence closes with an appraisal of the condition of European politics, culture, and society at the end of the twentieth century.

Instructor(s): K. Weintraub, Spring; D. Koehler, Summer     Terms Offered: Spring,Summer
Prerequisite(s): These courses must be taken in sequence.

HIST 13500-13600-13700. America in World Civilization I-II-III.

The America in World Civilization sequence is nothing like your high school history class, for here we examine America as a contested idea and a contested place by reading and writing about a wide array of primary sources. In the process, students gain a new sense of historical awareness and of the making of America. The course is designed both for history majors and non-majors who want to deepen their understanding of the nation's history, encounter some enlightening and provocative voices from the past, and develop the qualitative methodology of historical thinking. It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 13500. America in World Civilization I. 100 Units.

America in World Civilization I examines foundational texts and moments in American culture, society, and politics, from early European incursions into the New World through the early republic of the United States, roughly 1500-1800. We will examine encounters between Native Americans and representatives of imperial powers (Spain, France, and England) as well as the rise of African slavery in North America before 1700. We will consider the development of Anglo-American society and government in the eighteenth century, focusing especially on the causes and consequences of the American Revolution.

Instructor(s): E. Cook, J. Knight, A. Lippert, E. Slauter, A. Stanley     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III).

HIST 13600. America in World Civilization II. 100 Units.

The nineteenth-century segment of America in World Civilizations asks: What happens when democracy confronts inequality? We focus on themes that include indigenous-US relations; religious revivalism and reform; slavery, the Civil War, and emancipation; the intersection between women's rights and antislavery; the development of industrial capitalism; urbanism and social inequality.

Instructor(s): M. Briones, A. Green, A. Lippert, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III).

HIST 13700. America in World Civilization III. 100 Units.

What conditions have shaped inclusion and exclusion from the category "American" in the twentieth century? Who has claimed rights, citizenship, and protection, and under what conditions? The third quarter of America in World Civilization focuses on multiple definitions of Americanism in a period characterized by empire, transnational formations, and America's role in the world. We explore the construction of social order in a multicultural society; culture in the shadow of war; the politics of race, ethnicity, and gender; the rise and fall of new social movements on the left and the right; the emergence of the carceral state and militarization of civil space; and the role of climate change and the apocalyptic in shaping imagined futures.

Instructor(s): K. Belew & J. Dailey     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): It is recommended that students take this course in chronological sequence: HIST 13500–13600 (I and II) or HIST 13600–13700 (II and III).

HIST 13900-14000. Introduction to Russian Civilization I-II.

This two-quarter sequence, which meets the general education requirement in civilization studies, provides an interdisciplinary introduction to Russian civilization. The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

HIST 13900. Introduction to Russian Civilization I. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): W. Nickell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24000,REES 26011

HIST 14000. Introduction to Russian Civilization II. 100 Units.

The first quarter covers the ninth century to the 1870s; the second quarter continues on through the post-Soviet period. Working closely with a variety of primary sources—from oral legends to film and music, from political treatises to literary masterpieces—we will track the evolution of Russian civilization over the centuries and through radically different political regimes. Topics to be discussed include the influence of Byzantine, Mongol-Tataric, and Western culture in Russian civilization; forces of change and continuity in political, intellectual and cultural life; the relationship between center and periphery; systems of social and political legitimization; and symbols and practices of collective identity.

Instructor(s): F. Hillis     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 24100,REES 26012

HIST 14204. History of the Present. 100 Units.

This course takes a reverse approach to the study of history, defining issues relevant to the current moment—some determined by the students—and exploring the long stories required to understand the present. We might examine the election of 2016, social movements, climate change, debt, gun ownership, statelessness, and other issues. Each topic will occupy one week of the course. Students will learn historical thinking skills, critical reading, and argumentation, and will complete a final assignment geared towards providing historical context for an ongoing debate in the public sphere. This lecture course is an elective open to non-majors and to first- and second-year students, although upper-year students and History majors and minors are welcome. No previous history course work is required.

Instructor(s): K. Belew     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): To ensure registration after pre-registration, consider picking a W or F disc section other than sect 1 or 2. Or, after registration is complete, add the course and pick an open discussion section
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26019

HIST 15100-15200-15300. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

HIST 15100. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I. 100 Units.

East Asian Civilizations I covers China.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10800,EALC 10800,SOSC 23500

HIST 15200. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia II. 100 Units.

East Asian Civilizations II covers Japan.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Autumn,Summer
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10900,EALC 10900,SOSC 23600

HIST 15300. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia III. 100 Units.

East Asian Civilizations III covers Korea.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 11000,EALC 11000,SOSC 23700

HIST 15602-15603-15604. Ancient Empires I-II-III.

This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered. Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 15602. Ancient Empires I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence introduces three great empires of the ancient world. Each course in the sequence focuses on one empire, with attention to the similarities and differences among the empires being considered. By exploring the rich legacy of documents and monuments that these empires produced, students are introduced to ways of understanding imperialism and its cultural and societal effects—both on the imperial elites and on those they conquered.

Instructor(s): H. Haroutunian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25700,NEHC 30011,NEHC 20011

HIST 15603. Ancient Empires II: The Ottoman Empire. 100 Units.

no course description available at this time

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25800,NEHC 30012,NEHC 20012

HIST 15604. Ancient Empires III: The Egyptian Empire of the New Kingdom. 100 Units.

For most of the duration of the New Kingdom (1550–1069 BC), the ancient Egyptians were able to establish a vast empire and becoming one of the key powers within the Near East. This course will investigate in detail the development of Egyptian foreign policies and military expansion which affected parts of the Near East and Nubia. We will examine and discuss topics such as ideology, imperial identity, political struggle and motivation for conquest and control of wider regions surrounding the Egyptian state as well as the relationship with other powers and their perspective on Egyptian rulers as for example described in the Amarna letters.

Instructor(s): N. Moeller     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25900,NEHC 30013,NEHC 20013

HIST 15702-15703-15704. Semitic Languages Cultures and Civilizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

HIST 15702. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations I. 100 Units.

This course looks at the earliest attestation of East Semitic as a language: Akkadian which was first written in the third millennium BC in Mesopotamia (modern Iraq). Akkadians were in close contact with Sumerians, the other important language of Mesopotamia, and adapted their script (cuneiform) to write a Semitic language. This course critically examines the connection between script, language, peoples, and ethnos. Furthermore, this course explores the political expansion of Akkadian in connection with the development of an early “empire” and the emergence of historical, legal, and literary traditions in Akkadian and its influence for the Ancient Near East and beyond. Texts covered included historical inscriptions, the Law Code of Hammu-râpi, Flood Stories, and divination texts (omina). Visits to the Oriental Institute Museum will complement the exploration of the Akkadian culture. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): S. Paulus     Terms Offered: Not offered 2017-18
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30416,NEHC 20416

HIST 15703. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations II. 100 Units.

This course explores the historical evidence for several Semitic peoples who dwelled in Syria and Northern Iraq in the third to first millennia BCE (Eblaites, Amorites, Ugariteans, Assyrians). These peoples’ languages belong either to the larger group of Northwest Semitic, which comprises languages such as Aramaic and Canaanite (including Biblical Hebrew), or to the northern dialects of East Semitic. The shared characteristic of these people is to have recorded their cultural legacy on clay tablets, using Mesopotamian cuneiform or an alphabetic script adapted from it, noting either their own language or several aspects of their history, culture, and religion through a borrowed language (Akkadian). The course will focus on major cultural traditions that have echoes in younger records that came to be influential for the modern Middle East and for the Western world—especially the Hebrew Bible, but also some traditions of Pre-Islamic Arabia. This includes a close examination and discussion of representative ancient sources, as well as readings in modern scholarship. Ancient sources include literary, historical, and legal documents. Texts in English.

Instructor(s): H. Reculeau     Terms Offered: Not offered 2017-18
Note(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30417,NEHC 20417

HIST 15704. Semitic Languages, Cultures, and Civilizations III. 100 Units.

This course explores the histories and literatures of Aramaic- and Arabic-writing Jewish, Christian, and Muslim communities in the first millennium CE. Beginning with the reception of Ancient Mesopotamian culture in late antiquity, the course will focus on the development of Syriac Christian, Rabbinic, and early Muslim sacred literatures in relation to the social, political, and economic contexts of the Roman and Iranian empires and inter-imperial Arabia. It will then turn to the literary and intellectual revival of the early Islamic caliphates, in which representatives of all three religions participated. Among the works to be read in translation are the Acts of Thomas, the Babylonian Talmud, the Qur’ān, and early Arabic poetry.

Instructor(s): R. Payne     Terms Offered: Not offered 2017-18
Note(s): Not open to first-year students.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30418,NEHC 20418

HIST 15801. Introduction to the Middle East. 100 Units.

Prior knowledge of the Middle East not required. This course aims to facilitate a general understanding of some key factors that have shaped life in this region, with primary emphasis on modern conditions and their background, and to provide exposure to some of the region's rich cultural diversity. This course can serve as a basis for the further study of the history, politics, and civilizations of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 10101

HIST 16101-16102-16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

HIST 16101. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

May be taken in sequence or individually. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.

Instructor(s): E. Kourí     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23101,CRES 16101,HIST 36101,LACS 34600,SOSC 26100,LACS 16100

HIST 16102. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

May be taken in sequence or individually. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23102,CRES 16102,HIST 36102,LACS 34700,SOSC 26200,LACS 16200

HIST 16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands). The third quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on economic development and its political, social, and cultural consequences.

Instructor(s): B. Fischer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 23103,CRES 16103,HIST 36103,LACS 34800,SOSC 26300,LACS 16300

HIST 16700-16800-16900. Ancient Mediterranean World I-II-III.

Available as a three-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter-Spring) or as a two-quarter sequence (Autumn-Winter or Winter-Spring). This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece to the death of Alexander the Great (323 BC), the Roman Republic (509 to 27 BC), and late antiquity (27 BC to the fifth century AD).

HIST 16700. Ancient Mediterranean World I. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Greece from prehistory to the Hellenistic period. The main topics considered include the development of the institutions of the Greek city-state, the Persian Wars and the rivalry of Athens and Sparta, the social and economic consequences of the Peloponnesian War, and the eclipse and defeat of the city-states by the Macedonians.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20700

HIST 16800. Ancient Mediterranean World II. 100 Units.

This quarter surveys the social, economic, and political history of Rome, from its prehistoric beginnings in the twelfth century BCE to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 CE. Throughout, the focus is upon the dynamism and adaptability of Roman society, as it moved from a monarchy to a republic to an empire, and the implications of these political changes for structures of competition and cooperation within the community.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20800

HIST 16900. Ancient Mediterranean World III. 100 Units.

This quarter introduces problems and changes from the late second to sixth century. Lectures and discussion. Principal aspects of change and historical interpretation of the ancient world. Readings from selected primary sources and modern scholarship. Assignments include Peter Brown's "The World of Late Antiquity" and primary sources. Midterm and final examination, with a short paper.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 20900

HIST 17300-17400-17402-17403-17501-17502-17503-17504. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization.

This group of courses consists of two three-quarter sequences: HIST 17300-17400 (or 17403)-17504 (or 17502), and HIST 17300-17402-17503. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. Each sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Each three-quarter sequence focuses on the origins and development of science in the West. Our aim is to trace the evolution of the biological, psychological, natural, and mathematical sciences as they emerge from the cultural and social matrix of their periods and, in turn, affect culture and society.

HIST 17300. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization I. 100 Units.

The first quarter examines the sources of Greek science in the diverse modes of ancient thought and its advance through the first centuries of our era. We look at the technical refinement of science, its connections to political and philosophical movements of fifth- and fourth-century Athens, and its growth in Alexandria.

Instructor(s): J. Wee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17300

HIST 17400. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second quarter is concerned with the period of the scientific revolution: the sixteenth to eighteenth centuries. The principal subjects are the work of Copernicus, Kepler, Galileo, Vesalius, Harvey, Descartes, and Newton.

Instructor(s): A. Johns, R. Richards     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17400

HIST 17402. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: History of Medicine 1. This course examines the history of medicine from the Renaissance through the end of the eighteenth century, when many features of medicine that we now consider "modern" were coming into being. Topics include the history of anatomy and physiology, including Vesalius and Harvey; the history of relations between doctors and patients, including traditional medical practitioners and midwives; and the changing nature of the hospital.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17402

HIST 17403. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization II: Early Modern Period. This three-quarter sequence focuses on the origins and development of science in the West. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended, but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.

Instructor(s): Robert J. Richards     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17403

HIST 17501. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: Medicine since the Renaissance. This course is an examination of various themes in the history of medicine in Western Europe and America since the Renaissance. Topics include key developments of medical theory (e.g., the circulation of the blood and germ theory), relations between doctors and patients, rivalries between different kinds of healers and therapists, and the development of the hospital and laboratory medicine.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17501

HIST 17502. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization IV. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization IV: Modern Science. The advances science has produced have transformed life beyond anything that a person living in 1833 (when the term "scientist" was first coined) could have anticipated. Yet science continues to pose questions that are challenging and, in some instances, troubling. How will our technologies affect the environment? Should we prevent the cloning of humans? Can we devise a politically acceptable framework for the patenting of life? Such questions make it vitally important that we try to understand what science is and how it works, even if we never enter labs. This course uses evidence from controversies (e.g., Human Genome Project, International Space Station) to throw light on the enterprise of science itself.

Instructor(s): J. Evans     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17502

HIST 17503. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: History of Medicine 2. This three-quarter sequence focuses on the origins and development of science in the West. Our aim is to trace the evolution of the biological, psychological, natural, and mathematical sciences as they emerge from the cultural and social matrix of their periods and, in turn, affect culture and society. This course examines the history of modern medicine from the time of the "clinic," in the late-eighteenth century through the present. Topics include the changing character of the hospital, the development of new medical technologies such as the stethoscope, the impact of laboratory techniques (especially microscopy) for the understanding of disease, the history of public health movements in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and the history of specific areas of medical practice such as childbirth, mental health, and surgery.

Instructor(s): Michael Paul Rossi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17503

HIST 17504. Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III. 100 Units.

Full course title: Science, Culture, and Society in Western Civilization III: The Environment. This course will chart the development of modern science and technology with special reference to the environment and energy. Major themes include empire and environmental change, romanticism and conservation, science in the industrial revolution, energy in science and industry, the debates about the limits to growth, the rise of ecology, the Cold War development of climate science, and the emergence of modern environmentalism. We end with the science of the Anthropocene.

Instructor(s): Fredrik Albritton Jonsson     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 17504

HIST 18301-18302-18303. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

HIST 18301. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24001,SOSC 24001,CRES 24001

HIST 18302. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Spring,Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24002,SOSC 24002,CRES 24002

HIST 18303. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24003,SALC 20702,SOSC 24003,CRES 24003

HIST 18500. Politics of Film in Twentieth-Century American History. 100 Units.

This course examines selected themes in twentieth-century American political history through both the literature written by historians and filmic representations by Hollywood and documentary filmmakers. We will read one historical interpretation and view one film on themes like the following: Woodrow Wilson and World War I, the emergence of Pacific Rim cities like Los Angeles, Roosevelt's New Deal, the Japanese-American experience in World War II, McCarthyism and the Korean War, the Cold War and the nuclear balance of terror, radical movements of the 1960s, and multiculturalism in the 1990s.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): View films on Mondays prior to class.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 21200

HIST 20307. The Spartan Divergence. 100 Units.

Sparta was a Greek city, but of what type? The ancient tradition, or at least the larger part of it, paints the portrait of an ideal city-state. The city was supposed to be stable and moderately prosperous. Its citizens were allegedly models of virtue. For many centuries the city did not experience revolutions and its army was invincible on the battlefield. This success was attributed to its perfect institutions. Following the track opened by Ollier's Spartan Mirage, modern scholarship has scrupulously and successfully deconstructed this image of an ideal city. But what do we find if we go beyond the looking glass? Was Sparta really a city "like all the others"? This class will show that we must go deeper into our evidence in order to make sense of the extraordinary success followed by the brutal collapse of this very special city-state.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 34017,HIST 30307,CLAS 24017

HIST 20308. Gods and God in Imperial Asia Minor (1–300 CE) 100 Units.

Roman Asia Minor in the Imperial period provides an extraordinary case of religious plurality and creativity. Pagans, Jews, Christians, even already Christian heretics, interacted in the same space. The frontiers between Jewish and Christian communities were, at least at the beginning, more fluid than was long thought. But even the frontiers between paganism and Judaism or Christianity were certainly not as rigid as was later imagined. This does not mean, however, that there were no tensions between the various groups. This class will examine the various aspects of this religious diversity as well as the social and political factors that may explain the religious equilibrium prevailing at that time in Asia Minor.

Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 26017,HIST 30308,CLAS 36017

HIST 20403. Greek Comedy: Aristophanes. 100 Units.

We will read in Greek Aristophanes' Clouds, considering its portrait of Socrates against the backdrop of fifth-century Athens and Plato’s portrait of him. Our inquiry will include larger questions of the relationship between poetry and philosophy and of the philosopher to the city. Reading will include translation as well as secondary readings.

Instructor(s): E. Austin.     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): GREK 20300 or equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): GREK 32400,HIST 30403,FNDL 22400,GREK 22400

HIST 20505. The First Great Transformation: The Economies of the Ancient W. 100 Units.

This class examines the determinants of economic growth in the ancient world. It covers various cultural areas (especially Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome and China) from ca. 3000 BCE to c. 500 CE. By contrast with the modern world, ancient cultures have long been supposed to be doomed to stagnation and routine. The goal of this class is to revisit the old paradigm with a fresh methodology, which combines a rigorous economic approach and a special attention to specific cultural achievements. We will assess the factors that indeed weighed against positive growth, but we will also discover that far from being immobile the cultures of the ancient world constantly invented new forms of social and economic organization. This was indeed a world where periods of positive growth were followed by periods of brutal decline. But if envisaged on the longue durée, this was a period of decisive achievements, which provided the basis for the future accomplishments of the Early Modern and Modern world.  This course is part of the College Course Cluster program, Economic History.

Instructor(s): A. Bresson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26015,CLCV 20517

HIST 21004. Roman Law. 100 Units.

The course will treat several problems arising in the historical development of Roman law: the history of procedure; the rise and accommodation of multiple sources of law, including the emperor; the dispersal of the Roman community from the environs of Rome to the wider Mediterranean world; and developments in the law of persons. We will discuss problems like the relationship between religion and law from the archaic city to the Christian empire, and between the law of Rome and the legal systems of its subject communities.

Instructor(s): C. Ando     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CLAS 35808,HIST 31004,SIGN 26017,CLCV 25808

HIST 21502. What Was Cultural Studies. 100 Units.

This course examines the origins and development of cultural studies in Britain, between 1956 and 1978. We will be reading texts by Stuart Hall, E. P. Thompson, Angela McRobbie, and Raymond Williams (among others), as well as engaging with art and journalism from the period. The problems that compelled these writers to develop new ways to study culture were political: they were responding to changes in the traditional working-class, the shifting role of the 'mass media' in modern democracies, and the 'moral panic' that many Britons felt when faced with new immigrants and rebellious youth in weird clothes. By the end of the course we may hope to gain both a deeper understanding not only of what cultural studies meant in Britain before Thatcher but also what it might be and become now, in America under Trump. Course intended as an introduction.

Instructor(s): David Gutherz     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): No prior study of British history or cultural studies required.
Equivalent Course(s): ENGL 25850,SCTH 20603

HIST 22407. Medieval England. 100 Units.

How merry was "Olde England"? This course is intended as an introduction to the history of England from the withdrawal of the Roman legions in the early fifth century to the defeat of Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field in AD 1485. Sources will include chronicles, biographies, laws, charters, spiritual and political treatises, romances and parodies. Themes will include the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons to Christianity, the Viking and Norman invasions, the development of the monarchy and parliament, monastic, peasant, and town life, the role of literacy and education in the development of a peculiarly "English" society, and the place of devotion, art, and architecture in medieval English culture. Students will have the opportunity to do a research paper or craft a project of their choice based on the themes of the course.

Instructor(s): R. Fulton Brown     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32407

HIST 22708. Planetary Britain, 1600–1900. 100 Units.

What were the causes behind Britain's Industrial Revolution? In the vast scholarship on this problem, one particularly heated debate has focused on the imperial origins of industrialization. How much did colonial resources and markets contribute to economic growth and technological innovation in the metropole? The second part of the course will consider the global effects of British industrialization. To what extent can we trace anthropogenic climate change and other planetary crises back to the environmental transformation wrought by the British Empire? Topics include ecological imperialism, metabolic rift, the sugar revolution, the slave trade, naval construction and forestry, the East India Company, free trade and agriculture, energy use and climate change.

Instructor(s): F. Albritton Jonsson     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32708,ENST 22708,HIPS 22708,CHSS 32708

HIST 23006. Looting in Modern European History. 100 Units.

At the end of the eighteenth century Europeans recognized the seizure of enemy property to be a time honored practice of warfare and subjugation. At the same time, however, new ideas about human rights, cultural heritage, and international law began to reshape the place of looting in the exercise of power. This course will take up the history of looting in European cultural and political life from the late eighteenth through the twentieth centuries as a tool of nationalism, imperialism, totalitarianism, and scholarship. How was looting defined, who defined it, and what kinds of ethical and legal codes governed its use? How was the seizure of personal property, cultural artifacts, and sacred objects legitimized by its practitioners and experienced by its victims? In what ways did looting change the meaning of objects and why? How do we understand looting in relationship to other forms of violence and destruction in the modern period? While the focus of the course will be on Europe, we will necessarily be concerned with a global frame as we follow cases of looting in colonial contexts, through migration, exploration, and during war. Course materials will including primary texts, images, objects, and historical accounts. Students will be required to write a final historiographical essay.

Instructor(s): A. Goff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 33006

HIST 23007. The Problem of Toleration in the European Reformation. 100 Units.

"Heretics and Martyrs: The Problem of Toleration in the European Reformation" explores toleration, and resistance to it, as a response to religious pluralism and the violence that often accompanied it in the period of reformation in sixteenth-century Europe. Using secondary sources, primary documents, and case studies, this course covers the trajectories of reform in Western Europe in a comparative context. Attention will be paid to popular and state violence and local and state-sponsored toleration. This investigation will combine geographic examples with the experiences of dissenting groups, women, Jews, and Muslims in Europe, as well as the implications of toleration in the New World. It will also address the different ways that this new paradigm of religious toleration has been both blamed and praised for laying the groundwork for modern conceptions of individual rights within a secular state.

Instructor(s): E. Jones     Terms Offered: Spring

HIST 23308. Gender, Sex and Empire. 100 Units.

This course examines the complex and contested relationships between gender, sexuality, social organization and power in histories of (primarily British) imperialism and colonialism from the early conquests in the New World through the twentieth century. Employing insights from gender history, postcolonial studies and feminist theory, we look at a broad range of historical case studies to explore themes such as the intersectionality of race, class and gender; the instability of gender ideologies; how power was articulated through the fields of gender and sexuality; the politics of intimacy; and the regulation and ‘improvement’ of colonial bodies. Our goal is to better understand the ways that gender/sexuality and Western imperialism were co-constitutive in specific imperial and colonial contexts.

Instructor(s): Darcy Heuring     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent required for all undergrads.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 33501,GNSE 25706,MAPS 33501

HIST 23410. Jewish Spaces and Places, Real and Imagined. 100 Units.

What makes a ghetto, a ghetto? What defines a Jewish neighborhood? What determined the architectural form of synagogues? Making extensive use of Jewish law and customary practice, cookbooks, etiquette guides, prints, films, novels, maps, memoirs, architectural drawings and photographs, and tourist guides, this course will analyze how Jews (in all their diversity) and non-Jews defined Jewish spaces and places. The focus will be on Europe in the 19th and 20th centuries, but we will also venture back into the early modern period and across the Mediterranean to Palestine/Israel and North Africa, and across the Atlantic to the Caribbean and the Americas. We will study both actually existing structures—synagogues, ritual baths, schools, kosher (and kosher-style) butcher shops, bakeries and restaurants, social and political clubs, hospitals, orphanages, old age homes, museums, and memorials—but also texts and visual culture in which Jewish places and spaces are imagined or vilified. Parallel to our work with primary sources we will read in the recent, very rich, scholarly literature on this topic. This is not a survey course; we will undertake a series of intensive case-studies through which we will address the larger issues. This is a limited-enrollment, discussion-based course. No previous knowledge of Jewish history is expected.

Instructor(s): Leora Auslander     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20224

HIST 23414. Central Europe, 1740 to 1914. 100 Units.

The purpose of this course is to provide a general introduction to major themes in the political, social, and international history of Germany and of the Hapsburg Empire from 1740 until 1914. The course will be evenly balanced between consideration of the history of Prussia and later of kleindeutsch Germany, and of the history of the Austrian lands. A primary concern of the course will be to identify and to elaborate key comparative, developmental features common both to the German and the Austrian experience, and, at the same time, to understand the ways in which German and Austrian history manifest distinctive patterns, based on different state and social traditions. There is no language requirement, although students with a command of German will be encouraged to use it.

Instructor(s): J. Boyer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor; third- and fourth-year undergraduates & first-year graduate students who have not yet had a general introduction to eighteenth- & nineteenth-century Central European history.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 33414

HIST 23707. Revolution. 100 Units.

Revolution primarily denotes radical political change, but this definition is both too narrow and too broad. Too broad, because since the late eighteenth century revolution has been associated specifically with an emancipatory politics, from American democracy to Soviet communism. Too narrow, because revolutionary political change is always accompanied by change in other spheres, from philosophy to everyday life. We investigate the history of revolution from 1776 to the present, with a particular focus on the Bolshevik revolution of 1917, in order to ascertain how social revolutions have been constituted, conducted, and enshrined in political and cultural institutions. We also ask what the conditions and prospects of revolution are today. Readings will be drawn from a variety of fields, from philosophy to social history. Most readings will be primary documents, from Rousseau and Marx to Bill Ayers, but will also include major statements in the historiography of revolution.

Instructor(s): Robert Bird and Sheila Fitzpatrick     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): REES 36064,HIST 33707,REES 26064

HIST 24213. Contact Zones: Japan's Treaty Ports, 1854–1899. 100 Units.

A series of treaties signed by the Tokugawa shogunate with Western powers in the 1850s designated port towns such as Nagasaki, Yokohama, Hakodate, and Kobe "treaty ports." Semicolonial sites in which Western citizens benefited from rights, such as extraterritoriality, the treaty ports were complicated places that both challenged Japan's sovereignty while also becoming conduits of economic, social, and cultural change. This seminar will explore the evolution of the treaty ports. The main assignment will be an original research paper on a topic of the student's choice.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34213,EALC 24213,EALC 34213,GLST 26806

HIST 24300. History of Modern China 1. 100 Units.

This lecture course presents the main intellectual, political, economic, and social trends in modern China. The course covers ideological and organization structures, as well as the social movements that define a process variously described in Western literature as modernization, reform, and revolution (or political development). Emphasis is on institutional and intellectual developments during this period, especially in the twentieth century. Some attention is paid to historiographic analysis and criticism. Readings are in the English-language secondary literature.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 29100

HIST 24310. China: Rise or Return? Hist Perspectives on Chinese Culture. 100 Units.

This course addresses the development through time of the Chinese state, society, and culture from its beginning to the present. Only the most general of treatments is possible in addressing such an enormous subject, but the course provides an opportunity for individual research on a specialized topic of the student's choosing within this framework. No background in Chinese studies is required. The class discusses and critiques the weekly readings. Each set of readings centers on a broad historical question of crucial historical significance.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24302

HIST 24500. Reading Qing Documents. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third-year Chinese level or approval of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24500,EALC 34500,HIST 34500

HIST 24609. A History of Japanese Visual Culture. 100 Units.

This course will examine the rich and nuanced material history of Japan, drawing upon religious art, architecture, theater, fine arts, and crafts, as well as creations made through the technologies of photography, cinema, manga, and anime. Note that most of the materials examined will be from the pre-twentieth century. We will also use the Art Institute of Chicago, the Field Museum, and the Smart Museum as resources and some of the classes will be held off campus.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24610,ARTH 24605

HIST 24611. Economic Change in China, circa 1800–2000. 100 Units.

An overview of Chinese economic development since the end of the eighteenth century, with attention to its social, political, and environmental ramifications. Topics in the first part of the course include the Qing property-rights system and its implications for rural society; merchant organization; internal trade; migration; and the imperial political economy. This section of the course concludes with explanations of the economic and other crises that caused late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth- century China to be called the "land of famine." Part two covers changes in China's relationship to the outside world, the beginnings of industrialization, and the complex patterns of regional growth and stagnation up through the victory of the Communist Party in 1949. Part three looks at both Maoist (1949–1976) and post-Maoist development, emphasizing the economic consequences of institutional changes, industrialization and urbanization (especially since 1978), and the evolving tensions with a so-called "socialist market economy." Mostly lecture, with some class time for discussions, plus an online discussion board; midterm, final, and two short papers (5–7 pages each).

Instructor(s): K. Pomeranz     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Some acquaintance with economics or with modern Chinese history may be helpful, but neither is required.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 24621,ECON 22020

HIST 24809. Japan and the Japanese: Society, Identity, History. 100 Units.

In this course, we will explore the shifting meanings of the terms “Japan” and “Japanese” focusing primarily on the early modern and modern periods as a way to trace the dynamics of identity formation. Using primary source excerpts from Japanese and foreign official and personal accounts, secondary texts, and visual materials, we will discuss the questions of nationalism, anti-foreignness, exceptionalism, and how the “Japanese” defined themselves against others and within their own society. The critical analysis of various communities, groups, individuals, and ideologies will help us delineate the key factors that shaped society, culture, and politics. Further, the course will train students in analyzing, comparing, and evaluating textual materials and in presenting their ideas orally and in writing. Topics covered: myths, power and status, individualism and collective identity, honor and shame, print culture and information, social networks and outcasts, foreign relations. No Japanese knowledge is required. Open to both BA and MA students.

Instructor(s): Aliz Horvath     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Grad number only open to MAPH or MAPS students, not PhD students.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34422,EALC 24422

HIST 24905. Darwin's "On the Origin of Species" and "The Descent of Man" 100 Units.

This lecture-discussion class will focus on a close reading of Darwin's two classic texts. An initial class or two will explore the state of biology prior to Darwin's Beagle voyage, and then consider the development of his theories before 1859. Then we will turn to his two books. Among the topics of central concern will be the logical, epistemological, and rhetorical status of Darwin's several theories, especially his evolutionary ethics; the religious foundations of his ideas and the religious reaction to them; and the social-political consequences of his accomplishment.

Instructor(s): R. Richards     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 24901,PHIL 23015,HIST 34905,CHSS 38400,PHIL 33015,FNDL 24905

HIST 25109. Introduction to the Philosophy of Science. 100 Units.

We will begin by trying to explicate the manner in which science is a rational response to observational facts. This will involve a discussion of inductivism, Popper’s deductivism, Lakatos and Kuhn. After this, we will briefly survey some other important topics in the philosophy of science, including underdetermination, theories of evidence, Bayesianism, the problem of induction, explanation, and laws of nature. (B) (II)

Instructor(s): T. Pashby     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Undergrads enroll in sections 01 & 02. Graduates enroll in section 03.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35109,PHIL 32000,CHSS 33300,HIPS 22000,PHIL 22000

HIST 25114. Natural History and Empire, circa 1500–1800. 100 Units.

This course will examine natural history—broadly defined as a systematic, observational body of knowledge devoted to describing and understanding the physical world of plants, animals, natural environments, and (sometimes) people—in the context of European imperial expansion during the early modern era. Natural history was upended by the first European encounters with the New World. The encounter with these new lands exposed Europeans for the first time to unknown flora and fauna, which required acute empirical observation, collection, cataloguing, and circulation between periphery and metropole in order to understand their properties and determine their usefulness. As the Spanish, Portuguese, British, French, and Dutch competed with one another to establish overseas trade and military networks in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, they also competed over and shared information on natural resources. The course will combine lecture and discussion and mix primary source readings on natural history in the early modern world with modern historical writings. Though the readings skew a bit toward Britain and the British Atlantic world, every effort has been made to include texts and topics from multiple European and colonial locales. Topics and themes will include early modern sources of natural history from antiquity and their (re)interpretation in imperial context; early modern collecting cultures and cabinets of curiosities; Linnaeus and the origins of

Instructor(s): J. Niermeier-Dohoney     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 25114

HIST 25300. American Revolution, 1763 to 1789. 100 Units.

This lecture and discussion course explores the background of the American Revolution and the problem of organizing a new nation. The first half of the course uses the theory of revolutionary stages to organize a framework for the events of the 1760s and 1770s, and the second half of the course examines the period of constitution making (1776–1789) for evidence on the ways in which the Revolution was truly revolutionary.

Instructor(s): E. Cook     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35300,LLSO 20601

HIST 25309. History of Perception. 100 Units.

Knowing time. Feeling space. Smelling. Seeing. Touching. Tasting. Hearing. Are these universal aspects of human consciousness, or particular experiences contingent upon time, place, and culture? How do we come to know about our own perceptions and those of others? This course examines these and related questions through detailed readings of primary sources, engagement in secondary scholarship in the history and anthropology of sensation, and through close work with participants' own sensations and perceptions of the world around them.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level undergraduate
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35309,HIPS 25309,CHSS 35309,KNOW 21404,KNOW 31404,ANTH 24308,ANTH 34308

HIST 25415. History of Information. 100 Units.

"Information" in all its forms is perhaps the defining phenomenon of our age. But although we tend to think of it as something distinctively modern, in fact it came into being through a long history of thought, practice, and technology. This course will therefore suggest how to think historically about information. Using examples that range from the Middle Ages to the twenty-first century, we shall explore how different societies have conceptualized the subject, and how they have sought to control it. We shall address how information has been collected, classified, circulated, contested, and destroyed. The aim is to provide a different kind of understanding of information practices—one that can be put to use in other historical inquiries, as well as casting an unfamiliar light on our own everyday lives.

Instructor(s): A. Johns     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 35415,HIST 35415,LLSO 23501,HIPS 25415

HIST 25421. Censorship from the Inquisition to the Present. 100 Units.

Collaborative research seminar on the history of censorship and information control, with a focus on the history of books and information technologies. The class will meet in Special Collections, and students will work with the professor to prepare an exhibit, The History of Censorship, to be held in the Special Collections exhibit space in the spring. Students will work with rare books and archival materials, design exhibit cases, write exhibit labels, and contribute to the exhibit catalog. Half the course will focus on censorship in early modern Europe, including the Inquisition, the spread of the printing press, and clandestine literature in the Renaissance and Enlightenment. Special focus on the effects of censorship on classical literature, both newly rediscovered works like Lucretius and lost books of Plato, and authors like Pliny the Elder and Seneca who had been available in the Middle Ages but became newly controversial in the Renaissance. The other half of the course will look at modern and contemporary censorship issues, from wartime censorship, to the censorship of comic books, to digital-rights management, to free speech on our own campus. Students may choose whether to focus their own research and exhibit cases on classical, early modern, modern, or contemporary censorship.  This course is part of the College Course Cluster, The Renaissance.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer & S. McManus     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Admission by consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 25417,CLAS 35417,HIST 35421,HIPS 25421,CHSS 35421,KNOW 21403,KNOW 31403,RLST 22121,HREL 34309,SIGN 26010

HIST 25422. Global Environmental Humanities. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities, which calls on us to study the global environment, and the threats posed by globalization and climate change, using the tools of history, cultural studies, philosophy, and literature. Reading texts from these and other disciplines, we will attend to the ways that “environment” registers in political, aesthetic, and social life across the globe.  Sample authors: Fernand Braudel, William Cronon, Dipesh Chakrabarty, Amitav Ghosh, Ursula Heise, Joseph Masco, Jed Purdy, Anna Tsing.

Instructor(s): Gabel, Isabel     Terms Offered: Autumn. Autumn 2017
Prerequisite(s): 2nd year undergrads or later
Note(s): Seminar.
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 38307,HIPS 28307

HIST 25423. Science and Selfhood in Modern Europe. 100 Units.

This course explores the role of the sciences in changing ideas of selfhood in 19th- and 20th-century Europe. How did the proliferation of new forms of knowledge about humans (biological, psychiatric, evolutionary, sociological, anthropological) transform peoples’ understandings of themselves as biological beings, as bearers of consciousness, as subjects and citizens? This course pairs primary sources with secondary texts from European history, history of science, and history of the human sciences.

Instructor(s): Gabel, Isabel     Terms Offered: Winter. Winter 2018
Prerequisite(s): 2nd year undergraduates or later.
Note(s): Seminar
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 38308,HIPS 28308

HIST 25424. The Nuclear Age. 100 Units.

Seventy-five years ago a group of scientists launched the first sustained nuclear chain reaction, commonly known as CP-1, at the University of Chicago under Stagg Field. This course will be part of the commemoration and reflection taking place across the University this fall. Its goal will be to explore the ensuing Nuclear Age from different disciplinary perspectives by organizing a ring-lecture. Each week’s lecture, delivered by faculty from fields across the university (for instance, Physics, Biomedicine, Anthropology, and English), will be followed by a discussion section to synthesize and integrate not only the material from the weekly lectures, but the many events happening at the University this fall. CP-1 was not only a scientific achievement of the highest magnitude, but also a civilization-changing event that remains at the boundary of the thinkable.

Instructor(s): D. L. Nelson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Second, third, or fourth-year standing.
Equivalent Course(s): ENGL 26030,SIGN 26031,BPRO 26030

HIST 25503. Junior Seminar: My Favorite Readings in the History and Philosophy of Science. 100 Units.

This course introduces some of the most important and influential accounts of science to have been produced in modern times. It provides an opportunity to discover how philosophers, historians, anthropologists, and sociologists have grappled with the scientific enterprise, and to assess critically how successful their efforts have been. Authors likely include Karl Popper, Thomas Kuhn, Robert Merton, Steven Shapin, and Bruno Latour.

Instructor(s): R. Richards     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 29800

HIST 25610. Islamic Thought and Literature I. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 950, concentrating on the career of the Prophet Muhammad; Qur‘an and Hadith; the Caliphate; the development of Islamic legal, theological, philosophical, and mystical discourses; sectarian movements; and Arabic literature.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30601,RLST 20401,SOSC 22000,HIST 35610,ISLM 30601,NEHC 20601

HIST 25704-25804-25904. Islamic History and Society I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence surveys the main trends in the political history of the Islamic world, with some attention to economic, social, and intellectual history. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required.

HIST 25704. Islamic History and Society I: The Rise of Islam and the Caliphate. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 600 to 1100, including the rise and spread of Islam, the Islamic empire under the Umayyad and Abbasid caliphs, and the emergence of regional Islamic states from Afghanistan and eastern Iran to North Africa and Spain.

Instructor(s): F. Donner     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general eduation requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30501,HIST 35704,ISLM 30500,RLST 20501,NEHC 20501

HIST 25804. Islamic History and Society II: The Middle Period. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1100 to 1750, including the arrival of the Steppe Peoples (Turks and Mongols), the Mongol successor states, and the Mamluks of Egypt and Syria. We also study the foundation of the great Islamic regional empires of the Ottomans, Safavids, and Moghuls.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 30502,HIST 35804,ISLM 30600,NEHC 20502

HIST 25904. Islamic History and Society III: The Modern Middle East. 100 Units.

This course covers the period from ca. 1750 to the present, focusing on Western military, economic, and ideological encroachment; the impact of such ideas as nationalism and liberalism; efforts at reform in the Islamic states; the emergence of the "modern" Middle East after World War I; the struggle for liberation from Western colonial and imperial control; the Middle Eastern states in the cold war era; and local and regional conflicts.

Instructor(s): A. Shissler     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Not open to first-year students
Note(s): This course does not apply to the medieval studies major or minor.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35904,ISLM 30700,NEHC 30503,NEHC 20503

HIST 25901. Radical Islamic Pieties, 1200 to 1600. 100 Units.

Some knowledge of primary languages (i.e., Arabic, French, German, Greek, Latin, Persian, Spanish, Turkish) helpful. This course examines responses to the Mongol destruction of the Abbasid caliphate in 1258 and the background to formation of regional Muslim empires. Topics include the opening of confessional boundaries; Ibn Arabi, Ibn Taymiyya, and Ibn Khaldun; the development of alternative spiritualities, mysticism, and messianism in the fifteenth century; and transconfessionalism, antinomianism, and the articulation of sacral sovereignties in the sixteenth century. All work in English. This course is offered in alternate years.

Instructor(s): C. Fleischer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35901,RLST 20840,NEHC 20840

HIST 26005. Colloquium: Sources for the Study of Islamic History. 100 Units.

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the basic problems and concepts as well as the sources and methodology for the study of premodern Islamic history. Sources will be read in English translation and the tools acquired will be applied to specific research projects to be submitted as term papers.

Instructor(s): J. Woods     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36005,NEHC 20605,NEHC 30605

HIST 26106. Tropical Commodities in Latin America. 100 Units.

This course explores selected aspects of the social, economic, and cultural history of tropical export commodities from Latin America, e.g., coffee, bananas, sugar, tobacco, henequen, rubber, vanilla, and cocaine. Topics include land, labor, capital, markets, transport, geopolitics, power, taste, and consumption.

Instructor(s): E. Kourí     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36106,LACS 26106,LACS 36106

HIST 26127. Latin America during the Age of Revolutions, c. 1750–1850. 100 Units.

During the period known as the Age of Revolutions, roughly spanning between 1750 and 1850, Latin American territories went from being colonies of two Iberian empires to being a collection of independent countries. This course examines the tumultuous history that led to the dissolution of the Spanish and Portuguese empires and the birth of new republics and monarchies in the Americas. The course begins by analyzing the imperial reforms of the eighteenth century and their relationship to Enlightenment thought. The course also considers the many tax revolts and indigenous and slave rebellions that surfaced in reaction to imperial reforms. The course then proceeds to examine the traumatic effects of the Napoleonic wars in the Iberian world, as well as the many innovative political experiments that came about in an effort to safeguard the Spanish and Portuguese empires. Finally, the course examines the many conflicts, wars, and liberation projects that ultimately culminated with Latin American independence. By the end of the course, students will have a firm understanding of the process of Latin American independence and its contribution to the formation of a new global order in the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): F. Tavárez     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36127,LACS 26127,LACS 36127

HIST 26128. How to Build a Global Empire. 100 Units.

Empire is arguably the oldest, most durable, and most diffused form of governance in human history that reached its zenith with the global empires of Spain, Portugal and Britain. But how do you build a global empire? What political, social, economic, and cultural factors contribute to their formation and longevity? What effects do they have on the colonizer and the colonized? What is the difference between a state, an empire, and a "global" empire? We will consider these questions and more in case studies that will treat the global empires of Rome, Portugal, and Britain, concluding with a discussion of the modern resonances of this first "Age of Empires."

Instructor(s): S. McManus     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 23002,LACS 26128,CLCV 22917

HIST 26220. Brazil: Another American History. 100 Units.

Brazil is in many ways a mirror image of the United States: an almost continental democracy, rich in natural resources, populated by the descendants of three continents, shaped by colonialism, slavery, and sui generis liberal capitalism. Why, then, has Brazil's historical path been so distinct? To explore this question, this course will focus on the history of economic development, race, citizenship, urbanization, the environment, popular culture, violence, and the challenge of democracy.

Instructor(s): B. Fischer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36220,LACS 26220,LACS 36220

HIST 26513. Migration, Urbanization, & Making of the Americas in 20th C. 100 Units.

This course investigates cities in the Americas as "migrant cities," that is, the outcomes of the movement of millions of peoples across regions, borders, and oceans. We will consider three broad migratory movements: European migrations to cities such as New York and Buenos Aires between 1870 and 1930; internal migrations of people of African or indigenous descent from the US South to northern cities and from the Brazilian northeast to its southern industrial cities between 1930 and 1970; and, finally, the South-North migration from Mexico and Central America to the United States between 1970 and the present. By comparing these migratory movements, we will explore how migration has shaped twentieth-century megacities, asking, among other questions: Is the United States "melting pot" truly exceptional or has the whole continent been effected by movements of people across regions and borders? Have cities represented spaces of opportunity and liberation for migrants, or rather, are they sites where inequality and oppression have simply adopted a different form? What is the relationship between urban migration and twentieth-century understandings of race and culture? Is the presence of Latinos and Mexicans in US cities a new phenomenon or and old one? Does it represent a threat, an opportunity, or more of the same?

Instructor(s): E. de Antuñano Villarreal     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 26513

HIST 26602. Mughal India: Tradition and Transition. 100 Units.

The focus of this course is on the period of Mughal rule during the late sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, especially on selected issues that have been at the center of historiographical debate in the past decades.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing or consent of instructor. Prior knowledge of appropriate history and secondary literature required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36602,SALC 37701,SALC 27701

HIST 26710. Sex and Censorship in South Asia. 100 Units.

There have been many exceptional moments of political intolerance and censorship in South Asia in the last two decades. Bloggers have been murdered in Bangladesh, student activists have been arrested on university campuses across India, books have been banned, theaters and galleries have been vandalized, couples have been attacked across the country on Valentine’s Day as sexuality is supposedly foreign to “Indian Culture”, the Indian judiciary has refused to strike down Section 377 of the Indian Penal Code, which leaves homosexuality as a criminal activity that is constantly censored in film and literature. Restrictions on speech are a feature of democracies everywhere, from persecuting whistle-blowers in the US, to ban on religious symbols in France, to restrictions on Twitter in Turkey. What sets the South Asian experience apart? This introductory course will interrogate how a nexus of concerns about power, religion and sex, originating in the colonial experience, has shaped the particular dynamics of censorship in South Asia. By looking at a long history of banning and prohibition, we will also examine how censorship has molded South Asian cultural and political lives.

Instructor(s): Ahona Panda     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course should be of interest to students of gender and sexuality studies, cinema and media studies, literature, history, politics, human rights, anthropology and modern South Asian history and culture. It should also appeal to those interested in the past and present of law, censorship and democracy in the Non-West. Students at all stages of undergraduate study are encouraged to take this introductory course.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 25306-01,HREL 35306,SALC 25306

HIST 27012. Histories of Violence in the United States. 100 Units.

How does violence change life stories and national narratives? How can a nation remember and retell obscured histories of violence, reconcile past violence, and resist future violence? What does it mean that lynching emerged at the same moment as the Bill of Rights and that certain kinds of violence have been central to American identity? The story of the United States is built on the inclusion or omission of violence: from the genocide of Native Americans to slavery to imperial conquest, from the "private" pain of women to the nationalized pain of soldiers. This course brings violence to the center of US history. Moving from early America to the present, we will discuss these overlapping stories in terms of their visibility and invisibility, addressing questions of representation and the haunting function of traumatic experience. Following an emerging subfield of scholarship in histories of violence, this course examines narrative, archival, and political issues around studying, teaching, and writing such stories. The final project emphasizes public history.

Instructor(s): K. Belew     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Basic working knowledge of US history or be prepared to do extra reading.
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 27012,LLSO 27012

HIST 27102. Lincoln: Slavery, War, and the Constitution. 100 Units.

This course is a study of Abraham Lincoln’s view of the Constitution, based on close readings of his writings, plus comparisons to judicial responses to Lincoln’s policies.

Instructor(s): D. Hutchinson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 24711,FNDL 24711

HIST 27506. Changing America in the Twentieth Century. 100 Units.

This course explores the regional organization of U.S. society and its economy during the pivotal twentieth century, emphasizing the shifting dynamics that explain the spatial distribution of people, resources, economic activity, human settlement patterns, and mobility. We put special focus on the regional restructuring of industry and services, transportation, city growth, and cultural consumption. Two-day weekend field trip to the Mississippi River required.

Instructor(s): M. Conzen     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course offered odd years.
Equivalent Course(s): GEOG 22100,GEOG 32100,HIST 37506

HIST 27605. United States Legal History. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the connections between law and society in modern America. It explores how legal doctrines and constitutional rules have defined individual rights and social relations in both the public and private spheres. It also examines political struggles that have transformed American law. Topics to be addressed include the meaning of rights; the regulation of property, work, race, and sexual relations; civil disobedience; and legal theory as cultural history. Readings include legal cases, judicial rulings, short stories, and legal and historical scholarship.

Instructor(s): A. Stanley     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): AMER 27605,CRES 27605,GNSE 27605,HMRT 27061,LLSO 28010

HIST 27900. Asian Wars of the Twentieth Century. 100 Units.

This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, racial, and military aspects of the major Asian wars of the twentieth century: the Pacific War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. At the beginning of the course we pay particular attention to just war doctrines and then use two to three books for each war (along with several films) to examine alternative approaches to understanding the origins of these wars, their conduct, and their consequences.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 27900,EALC 27907,EALC 37907,HIST 37900

HIST 28703. Baseball and American Culture, 1840 to Present. 100 Units.

This course will examine the rise and fall of baseball as America's national pastime. We will trace the relationship between baseball and American society from the development of the game in the mid-nineteenth century to its enormous popularity in the first half of the twentieth century to its more recent problems and declining status in our culture. The focus will be on baseball as a professional sport, with more attention devoted to the early history of the game rather than to the recent era. Emphasis will be on using baseball as a historical lens through which we will analyze the development of American society and culture rather than on the celebration of individuals or teams. Crucial elements of racialization, ethnicity, class, gender, nationalism, and masculinity will be in play as we consider the Negro Leagues, women's leagues, the Latinization and globalization of the game, and more.

Instructor(s): M. Briones     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 28703,HIST 38703,CRES 38703

HIST 28800. Historical Geography of the United States. 100 Units.

This course examines the spatial dynamics of empire, the frontier, regional development, the social character of settlement patterns, and the evolution of the cultural landscapes of America from pre-European times to 1900. All-day northern Illinois field trip required.

Instructor(s): M. Conzen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course offered in even years.
Equivalent Course(s): GEOG 21900,GEOG 31900,HIST 38800

HIST 28802. United States Labor History. 100 Units.

This course will explore the history of labor and laboring people in the United States. The significance of work will be considered from the vantage points of political economy, culture, and law. Key topics will include working-class life, industrialization and corporate capitalism, slavery and emancipation, the role of the state and trade unions, and race and sex difference in the workplace.

Instructor(s): A. Stanley     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 28802,LLSO 28802

HIST 28900. Roots of the Modern American City. 100 Units.

This course traces the economic, social, and physical development of the city in North America from pre-European times to the mid-twentieth century. We emphasize evolving regional urban systems, the changing spatial organization of people and land use in urban areas, and the developing distinctiveness of American urban landscapes. All-day Illinois field trip required.

Instructor(s): M. Conzen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course offered in odd years.
Equivalent Course(s): GEOG 26100,ENST 26100,GEOG 36100,HIST 38900

HIST 28906. Nineteenth-Century American Mass Entertainment. 100 Units.

Popular culture filters, reflects, and occasionally refracts many of the central values, prejudices, and preoccupations of a given society. From the Industrial Revolution to the advent of feature films in the early twentieth century, American audiences sought both entertainment and reassurance from performers, daredevils, amusement parks, lecturers, magicians, panoramas, athletes, and photographers. Amidst the Civil War, they paid for portraits that purportedly revealed the ghosts of lost loved ones; in an age of imperialism, they forked over hard-earned cash to relive the glories of western settlement, adventure, and conquest in Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Mass entertainment not only echoed the central events of the age it helped shape them: from phrenology as the channel for antebellum convictions about outward appearance (and racial identity), to the race riots following Jack Johnson's boxing victory over Jim Jeffries. Many of these entertainment forms became economic juggernauts in their own right, and in the process of achieving unprecedented popularity, they also shaped collective memory, gender roles, race relations, and the public's sense of acceptable beliefs and behaviors. This lecture course will examine the history of modern American entertainment over the course of the long nineteenth century. Requirements include careful reading, active and thoughtful participation, and written assignments.

Instructor(s): A. Lippert     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 38906,CRES 28906,CRES 38906,GNSE 28906,GNSE 38906

HIST 29304. Human Rights: Contemporary Issues. 100 Units.

This interdisciplinary course presents an overview of several major contemporary human rights problems as a means to explore the use of human rights norms and mechanisms. The course addresses the roles of states, inter-governmental bodies, national courts, civil society actors including NGOs, victims, and their families, and other non-state actors. Topics are likely to include universalism, enforceability of human rights norms, the prohibition against torture, U.S. exceptionalism, and the rights of women, racial minorities, and non-citizens.

Instructor(s): S. Gzesh     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 21001,LACS 31001,HIST 39304,LAWS 43245,LLSO 21001,HMRT 31001,HMRT 21001

HIST 29316. A Global History of Reparations. 100 Units.

In light of recent revelations tying the University of Chicago to slavery, this course will explore the long history of reparations as a global, national, and local set of questions. How does a given polity go about repairing the un-repairable and forgiving the unforgivable? Are the discursive norms of reparations irredeemably shackled to our current conceptualizations of politics, governance, private-property rights, individualism, and the law or can reparations, and how we talk about them, serve as a means of reimagining these categories? How might the practice and performance of reparations actually be structured to foster both intra-group and inter-group unity while avoiding a potentially divisive backlash? Beginning with ancient forms of restorative justice and proceeding briskly into more recent attempts at truth and reconciliation, this course aims to take a transnational and comparative approach to exploring the history of reparations from an interdisciplinary perspective. The ultimate aim is a greater understanding of the possibilities of reparations as they relate to slavery, Jim Crow, and post-1968 discrimination against people of African descent in the United States, which constitutes the second half of this course.

Instructor(s): G. Mount     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Prior or concurrent enrollment in a college-level African American history course; instructor can waived this PQ on a case by case basis.

HIST 29319. Human Rights: Philosophical Foundations. 100 Units.

Human rights are claims of justice that hold merely in virtue of our shared humanity. In this course we will explore philosophical theories of this elementary and crucial form of justice. Among topics to be considered are the role that dignity and humanity play in grounding such rights, their relation to political and economic institutions, and the distinction between duties of justice and claims of charity or humanitarian aid. Finally we will consider the application of such theories to concrete, problematic and pressing problems, such as global poverty, torture and genocide. (A) (I)

Instructor(s): B. Laurence     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Undergrads enroll in sections 01 through 06. Graduates enroll in section 07.
Equivalent Course(s): PHIL 21002,PHIL 31002,HIST 39319,LLSO 21002,MAPH 42002,LAWS 97119,HMRT 31002,INRE 31602,HMRT 21002

HIST 29412. The Face in Western Culture from the Mona Lisa to the Selfie. 100 Units.

The course will approach the history of the human face from a variety of disciplinary perspectives, ranging across art history through to the history of science and technology. Topics will include the Mona Lisa and Renaissance portraiture; early modern identity and identity documents; the discipline of physiognomy; Johann Kaspar Lavater and the makings of racial science; the impact of photography; Alphonse Bertillon and the "mug shot"; smiles in advertisements; biometrics to facial recognition technologies; and the art and science of the selfie. The course will draw on specialized readings from secondary literature alongside a wide range of literary and visual primary sources, including scientific texts, paintings, drawings, identity documents, photographs, advertisements, cosmetics, and prosthetic parts. The subject offers a great deal of room for the selection of a topic for a research paper on a subject of students' choices.

Instructor(s): C. Jones     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to upper-level undergraduates
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 29412

HIST 29516. History of Skepticism. 100 Units.

Before we ask what is true or false, we must ask how we can know what is true or false. This course examines the vital role doubt and philosophical skepticism have played in the Western intellectual tradition, from pre-Socratic Greece through the Enlightenment, with a focus on how Criteria of Truth—what kinds of arguments are considered legitimate sources of certainty—have changed over time. The course will examine dialog between skeptical and dogmatic thinkers, and how many of the most fertile systems in the history of philosophy have been hybrid systems which divided the world into things which can be known, and things which cannot. The course will touch on the history of atheism, heresy and free thought, on fideism and skeptical religion, and will examine how the Scientific Method is itself a form of philosophical skepticism. Primary source readings will include Plato, Sextus Empiricus, Lucretius, Ockham, Pierre Bayle, Montaigne, Descartes, Francis Bacon, Hobbes, Voltaire, Diderot, and others.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): No prerequisites; first-year students welcome.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 39516,CLCV 28517,CLAS 38517,HIPS 29516,CHSS 39516,KNOW 21406,KNOW 31406,RLST 22123,HREL 39516,SIGN 26011

HIST 29518. A Global History of Unemployment. 100 Units.

What is unemployment? Is it a simple economic category or complex historical construction? In this course, we examine the problem of unemployment as it was discovered—or as some would say, invented—in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in Europe and the United States. In addition, we look at problematic but generative attempts to extend the category of unemployment to the developing countries after World War II. We read a mixture of theoretical texts, policy documents, case studies, and novels that seek to describe, explain, categorize, and/or control the unemployed. We also look at various projects aimed at ending the scourge of unemployment, whether via public-works programs, the export of "unemployables" to colonies, insurance schemes, full employment policies, guaranteed income proposals, and socialist revolution. Time and again, crises of unemployment have have played key roles in the transformation of the institutions that both measure and govern the economy. Such crises have also been the occasion for posing questions about the ultimate ends and aims of economic development.

Instructor(s): A. Benanav     Terms Offered: Spring

HIST 29519. Histories of Racial Capitalism. 100 Units.

This course takes as its starting point the insistence that the movement, settlement, and hierarchical arrangements of people of African descent is inseparable from regimes of capital accumulation. It builds on the concept of "racial capitalism," which rejects treatments of race as external to a purely economic project and counters the idea that racism is an externality, cultural overflow, or aberration from the so-called real workings of capitalism. With a focus on the African diaspora, this course will cover topics such as racial slavery, labor in Jamaica, banking in the Caribbean, black capitalism in Miami, the under development of Africa, mass incarceration, and the contemporary demand for racial reparations.

Instructor(s): D. Jenkins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 39519,CRES 29519,CRES 39519

HIST 29635. History Colloquium: Imperial Europe. 100 Units.

This course explores the range of encounters, collisions, and exchanges that modern European empires have fostered. Geographically, our readings traverse the space from Russia to the Atlantic world, covering overseas colonial empires as well as their overland counterparts; chronologically, they focus on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. We will consider governance, mobility, imperial politics, the built environment, and consumption as venues of cross-cultural contact and exchange; examine the role that imperial societies have played in the construction of ethnic and racial difference, religious practices, and gender norms; and consider how the collapse of empires restructured networks, identities, and subjectivities. Roughly half of the class will be devoted to discussing exemplary studies of imperial societies and half to discussing historiographical approaches and research techniques. Over the course of the quarter, students will be expected to design and carry out an original research project of fifteen to twenty pages. Please come to the first day of class having read and ready to discuss Jane Burbank and Frederick Cooper, Empires in World History: Power and the Politics of Difference (2010).

Instructor(s): F. Hillis     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29652. History Colloquium: Migration and Citizenship. 100 Units.

Looking through a broad interdisciplinary lens, this colloquium will examine the history of migration and citizenship. The focus will largely be on the United States, but, given its topic, the course will necessitate transnational and comparative histories. How did nineteenth- and early twentieth-century "sojourners" become "citizens"? What constituted the public's perception of some immigrants as inassimilable aliens and others as an ostensible "model minority"? We will interrogate not only what it means to have been and to be an immigrant in America but also what it means to be a citizen in a multiracial democracy. As a junior history colloquium, the course's main purpose is to help students learn to write a long research paper based on primary sources in preparation for writing the BA thesis.

Instructor(s): M. Briones     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29662. History Colloquium: Gender & Sexuality in US History 1620–1920. 100 Units.

This colloquium will examine three centuries of US history through the lens of nearly three decades of historical scholarship since Joan Wallach Scott first proposed gender as "a useful category of historical analysis." Readings are primarily composed of monographs with some theoretical selections included. We will address recent developments in the history of sexuality, as well as that field's capacity for complicating or problematizing the politics of feminism and feminist history. Requirements include active and thoughtful participation, short preliminary paper assignments, and a research paper due at the end of the term.

Instructor(s): A. Lippert      Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29667. History Colloquium: The History of the Public Museum. 100 Units.

What do people do in museums and why does it matter? This junior colloquium will examine this question and its history from the emergence of the public museum in eighteenth-century Europe through its many iterations around the world to the present day. Throughout our attention will be on the historical relationship between museums and their publics. What role have public museums played in shaping communities of nation, gender, race, faith, and class? We will also take up how different communities have shaped the role of museums in public life, defining their missions, determining their contents, and occasionally undermining them in various ways as well. In addition to common readings, visits to local institutions, and close observation of objects and images as a class, students will be required to spend time independently in a public museum exhibition of their choosing in preparation for a final research paper based on primary sources.

Instructor(s): A. Goff     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29668. History Colloquium: Economic Growth in Theory and Practice. 100 Units.

The idea of economic growth is one of the foundational concepts of modern politics and society. This course will examine the intellectual roots of growth theory from early modern alchemy to Silicon Valley, with a special emphasis on the material and social context of economic thought.

Instructor(s): F. Albritton Jonsson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29669. Hist Coll: Politics & Culture in 20th-C African American Hist. 100 Units.

Through readings, films, and artifacts, this course explore the political implications of black cultural formations and expressions. From late-nineteenth-century spirituals to mid-twentieth-century social movements and debates about the so-called culture of poverty and contemporary hip-hop, the course will focus in each historical era on the diverse ways in which culture has been explicitly invoked or deployed to achieve political ends, whether serving as a means of political mobilization and/or marking African Americans as fit or unfit for citizenship rights. Through such debates—which have been sometimes explicit and at other times buried in "hidden transcripts"—we will probe the meanings and political significance attributed to race, to culture, and to their interrelationship. Among the topics to be addressed in lectures and discussions are the debates on the relation between slave culture and resistance, the contrasting ways black and white performers have engaged the minstrel tradition and racial stereotypes, the social-political interpretations of black musical expression, the role of the state in promoting black cultural expression, and "culture" as a continuing site of resistance to oppression and dispossession.

Instructor(s): T. Holt     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29670. History Colloquium: Britain's Age of Revolutions. 100 Units.

This course looks at British history in the "long seventeenth century," ranging from the accession of Elizabeth I in 1558 to the end of the Stuart dynasty in 1714. The period was one of upheaval, extraordinary both in itself and in its lasting consequences. The country saw protracted civil conflict, a king put on trial and executed, and (arguably) two revolutions. Its culture was distinguished by figures such as Shakespeare, Milton, Newton, Locke, and Purcell. And it created the origins of a world empire, as well as pursuing radical developments in economics, politics, and experimental science. We shall explore aspects of this period, using selected primary and secondary sources to introduce the history and historiography of early modern English culture.

Instructor(s): A. Johns     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29671. History Colloquium: The United States at War, 1914–1924. 100 Units.

This course explores the multilayered experience of Americans during and immediately after the First World War. We will engage the war years through literature, law, and social and political history. Topics we will address include radical politics in the United States, including political violence; the rise of the national security state; the articulation of and suppression of civil liberties; First Amendment jurisprudence and freedom of expression; Prohibition and the rise of the surveillance state; the expansion and contraction of democratic participation in the polity; pacifism and war; and the relationship between the state and the economy.

Instructor(s): J. Dailey     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29672. History Colloquium: France in the Age Enlightenment. 100 Units.

The Enlightenment was a European, even a global movement, but Paris was its capital. This course will examine the contexts that gave rise to diverse movements that, taken together, have come to define the Age of Enlightenment. In France, enlightened philosophes advanced schemes to relieve poverty and passionately criticized a state that was often needlessly cruel and inefficient; hitherto excluded groups entered into very public conversations about truth and beauty, but also the salacious scandals that were undermining the legitimacy of the monarchy; and hoards of scientists, merchants, and colonial administrators traveled to the four corners of the earth to understand, profit from, and sometimes subjugate the new environments and peoples they found there. The Enlightenment contained within it many contradictory impulses, and we shall try to determine if they are really reducible to a single coherent movement. Although we will read historical documents from the eighteenth century, we will mainly concentrate on how historians have approached the period in order to provide students with a toolkit for their own, self-directed explorations into France's century of Enlightenment.

Instructor(s): P. Cheney     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Priority registration is given to History majors

HIST 29700. Readings in History. 100 Units.

Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and the History undergraduate advisor.

HIST 29801-29802. BA Thesis Seminar I-II.

History students in the research track are required to take HIST 29801-29802. Third-year students in the research track and in residence in Chicago take BA Thesis Seminar I in Spring Quarter. Those who are out of residence take the seminar in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year.

HIST 29801. BA Thesis Seminar I. 100 Units.

BA Thesis Seminar I provides a systematic introduction to historical methodology and approaches (e.g., political, intellectual, social, cultural, economic, gender, environmental history), as well as research techniques. It culminates in students' submission of a robust BA thesis proposal that will be critiqued in class. Guidance will also be provided for applications for research funding.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring
Prerequisite(s): All third-year history students in the research track and in residence in Chicago take HIST 29801 in spring quarter. Those who are out of residence take it in autumn quarter of their fourth year.

HIST 29802. BA Thesis Seminar II. 100 Units.

BA Thesis Seminar II is a forum to discuss and critique BA theses. Ideally, students will have completed most of their research for the thesis and will use this quarter to produce a complete draft. Early weeks of the seminar will be devoted to writing strategies and discussion of the introduction. Sections of the theses will be critiqued in the middle weeks of term, while in the final weeks of the quarter full rough drafts will be read. The final deadline for submission of the BA thesis is second week of Spring Quarter.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 29801

HIST 29905. History of the Megalopolis in the Americas. 100 Units.

The megalopolis comprises a unique phenomenon where social conflicts, such as violence and inequality, and ecological devastation occur simultaneously with social mobility and economic, cultural, and political opportunities. And all occur at exponential rates. What historical factors made such monsters possible in the Americas? What do they tell us about larger urban, social, and cultural assumptions about history? The course will explore these questions, focused on such cities as Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, São Paulo, Buenos Aires, New York City, Los Angeles, and Chicago.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 39905,AMER 29905,AMER 39905,LACS 29905,LACS 39905


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Chair, Collegiate Affairs Committee
Susan L. Burns, Associate Professor in History
SS 221
773.702.8934
Email

Undergraduate Secondary Contact

Undergraduate Program Coordinator
Staff
SS 225
773.702.2178

Preceptor/BA Advisor


Preceptors
F 4
773.702.3079

Listhost

https://lists.uchicago.edu/web/info/ugradhistory