Contacts | PROGRAM OF STUDY | Advanced Placement Credit | REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES | Courses Required for the Biological Sciences Major* | Grading | Research Opportunities | Honors | Pre-Med Sequence for Nonmajors | SPECIALIZATION PROGRAMS IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES | Specialization in Cancer Biology | Specialization in Cellular and Molecular Biology | Specialization in Ecology and Evolution | Specialization in Endocrinology | Specialization in Genetics | Specialization in Immunology | Specialization in Microbiology | Specialization in Neuroscience | REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES | MINOR PROGRAM IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES | Minor Program in Computational Neuroscience | Courses: Biological Sciences (BIOS) | Biological Sciences Sequences for Majors and Students Preparing for the Health Professions

Department Website: http://bscd.uchicago.edu

PROGRAM OF STUDY

Biology is the study of life, past and present. Life operates within supportive ecosystems that generate selective pressures driving diversity and complexity through natural selection. The faculty of the College believe that a sound knowledge of biology is essential for understanding many of the most pressing problems of modern life and for intelligent involvement in their eventual solution. The Biological Sciences Collegiate Division, therefore, provides a variety of general education courses for all College students—prospective biologists and non-biologists alike. Although most of the course offerings beyond the introductory year are designed to serve the needs of students majoring in biological sciences, many of these courses are well suited to students in other areas who wish to study some aspect of modern biology in greater detail. Courses on the ethical and societal implications of the biological sciences, for example, are of interest to many non-majors.

Academic Honesty

Academic dishonesty is a matter of grave concern to the faculty of the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division and will not be tolerated. Students should become familiar with the guidelines presented in Doing Honest Work in College by Charles Lipson and consult with each of their instructors to make sure they understand the specific expectations of each course. Consequences of academic dishonesty (including plagiarism) may result in suspension or expulsion from the University.

The General Education Requirement in the Biological Sciences

Students choose one of the following options to meet the general education requirement for the biological sciences:

  1. an integrated Natural Sciences sequence for non-majors, which meets all general education requirements for the physical and biological sciences
  2. a two-quarter general education sequence for non-majors
  3. a Fundamentals Sequence for nonmajors preparing for health professions (described below, the first two courses of BIOS 20170 through BIOS 20175); or
  4. BIOS 20150 How Do We Understand the Biosphere? and BIOS 20151 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic) or BIOS 20152 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced) are required for students majoring in the Biological Sciences.

Advanced Placement Credit

For students who do not plan to major in the biological sciences or prepare for the health professions, a score of 4 or 5 on the AP biology test confers credit for BIOS 10130 Core Biology. These students meet the general education requirement with either one or two topics courses in the biological sciences, depending on how the requirements in the mathematical and physical sciences are met; consult your College adviser for details.

Students with a score of 5 on the AP biology test who complete an AP 5 Fundamentals Sequence will be awarded a total of two quarters of credit to be counted toward the general education requirement for the biological sciences. This option is especially appropriate for students who plan to major in the biological sciences or prepare for the health professions, but it is open to all qualified students.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

The goals of the biological sciences program are to give students (1) an understanding of currently accepted concepts in biology and the experimental support for these concepts and (2) an appreciation of the gaps in our current understanding and the opportunities for new research in this field. Emphasis is placed on introducing students to the diversity of subject matter and methods of investigation in the biological sciences. The program prepares students for graduate or professional study in the biological sciences and for careers in the biological sciences. The following sections describe the requirements for a BA in the biological sciences. Sequences in the first year of the program are referred to as the Fundamentals and consist of the following: (1) The AP5 sequence is an advanced program designed for first-year students who have achieved a score of 5 on the Advanced Placement Biology test and are primarily interested in pursuing a research career. (2) The Track A and B sequences are designed for second-year students and are structured to provide them with a broad-based understanding of contemporary biology. (3) Track C (Life, Ecosystems, and Evolution) is designed for students interested in pursuing careers in ecology and evolution or environmental science and includes a broad survey of these fields. At the completion of a Fundamentals sequence students begin taking the advanced Biology courses and may start a specialization. NOTE:  Biological Sciences does NOT require the third quarter of Calculus in any of the sequences. Students entering Tracks A, B, or C MUST take BIOS 20151 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic) or BIOS 20152 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced) and students in the AP 5 sequence MUST take BIOS 20236 Biological Dynamics. NO MATH courses may be substituted for these requirements.

General Education Courses for Biological Sciences Majors

To prepare for more advanced work in the biological sciences, students must take:

Physical Sciences
One of the following sequences:200
Introductory General Chemistry I
   and Introductory General Chemistry II (or equivalent)
Comprehensive General Chemistry I
   and Comprehensive General Chemistry II
Mathematics
One of the following sequences:200
Elementary Functions and Calculus I-II (or higher)
Calculus I-II
Honors Calculus I-II
Biological Sciences
One of the following:200
How Do We Understand the Biosphere?
   and Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic)
How Do We Understand the Biosphere?
   and Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced)
Total Units600

Students with a score of 5 on the AP biology test may use their AP credit to meet the general education requirement for the biological sciences if the AP 5 sequence is completed. Students majoring in the Biological Sciences are encouraged to meet their general education humanities requirement in their first year with an autumn-winter, two-quarter sequence.

Courses Required for the Biological Sciences Major*

Natural Science excluding Biology

In addition to the General Education requirements, students majoring in biological sciences must complete the third quarter of general chemistry (CHEM 11300 Comprehensive General Chemistry III, or equivalent); two quarters of organic chemistry (CHEM 22000-22100 Organic Chemistry I-II/CHEM 23100 Honors Organic Chemistry II)**; two quarters of physics (PHYS 12100-12200 General Physics I-II, or higher); and one additional quantitative course (BIOS 26210 Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I, PHYS 12300 General Physics III (or higher), or STAT 22000 Statistical Methods and Applications (or higher)).

Biology Fundamentals Sequence

Students register for four quarters of Biology Fundamentals courses associated with one of four tracks: Track A includes BIOS 20186 Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology, BIOS 20187 Fundamentals of Genetics, BIOS 20188 Fundamentals of Physiology, and BIOS 20190 Principles of Developmental Biology; Track B includes BIOS 20186 Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology, BIOS 20187 Fundamentals of Genetics, BIOS 20189 Fundamentals of Developmental Biology, and BIOS 20242 Principles of Physiology; Track C (Life, Ecosystems, and Evolution) includes BIOS 20196 Ecology and Conservation, BIOS 20197 Evolution and Ecology, BIOS 20198 Biodiversity, and a Genetics course (chosen in consultation with the BSCD Ecology & Evolution Adviser, Christine Andrews candrews@uchicago.edu); the four-quarter AP 5 Fundamentals sequence (BIOS 20234 Molecular Biology of the Cell, BIOS 20235 Biological Systems, BIOS 20236 Biological Dynamics, and BIOS 20242 Principles of Physiology) makes up the final track and is open only to first-year students who have scored 5 on the AP biology exam. Students who do not enter the AP 5 sequence must complete BIOS 20150 A Serious Introduction to Biology for Majors: From LUCA to the University of Chicago and BIOS 20151 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic) or BIOS 20152 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced) in the winter or spring quarter of their first year (these two courses fulfill the general education requirement in the biological sciences. 

*Students planning to apply to medical school should be aware of individual medical school admissions requirements and should tailor their program accordingly with the help of UChicago Careers in Health Professions (UCIHP).

**The first two quarters of organic chemistry are required for all biology majors except for those completing Track C (Life, Ecosystems, and Evolution), who may take either two quarters of Organic Chemistry or two quarters of General Physics.

NOTE: Biological Sciences does NOT require the third quarter of calculus in any of the sequences. Students entering Tracks A, B, or C MUST take BIOS 20151 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic) or BIOS 20152 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced), and students in the AP 5 sequence MUST take BIOS 20236 Biological Dynamics. NO MATH courses may be substituted for these requirements.

20200-level and Above Courses in Biological Sciences

Students in Tracks A and B and the AP 5 sequence also register for BIOS 20200 Introduction to Biochemistry plus five additional 20200 to 28000-level and above courses in Biological Sciences. Track C also requires five additional 20236 to 28000-level and above courses in the Biological Sciences, but not BIOS 20200 Introduction to Biochemistry. These courses may be selected by the student or in consultation with the BSCD Senior Advisers (Megan McNulty, mmcnulty@uchicago.edu and Christine Andrews, candrews@uchicago.edu). If the student chooses to complete a “specialization” (see sections that follow), courses should be chosen in consultation with the Specialization adviser (listed below).

NOTE: BIOS 00206 Readings: Biology and BIOS 00299 Advanced Research: Biological Sciences may not be used to meet requirements for the biological sciences major. In most cases, courses listed under the heading Specialized Courses (numbered in the 29000 range) may not be used to meet requirements for the biological sciences major. Limited exceptions are specifically noted.

Summary of General Education Requirements for AP 5 and Tracks A, B, and C

Beginning with the Graduating Class of 2014

GENERAL EDUCATION
One of the following CHEM sequences (or equivalent): §200
Introductory General Chemistry I
   and Introductory General Chemistry II
Comprehensive General Chemistry I-II
One of the following MATH sequences: §200
Elementary Functions and Calculus I-II
Calculus I-II
Honors Calculus I-II
One of the following BIOS sequences:200
How Do We Understand the Biosphere?
   and Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic)
How Do We Understand the Biosphere?
   and Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced)
Completion of the three-quarter AP 5 sequence *
Total Units600
*

Open only to students with a 5 on the AP biology test. Upon completion of the sequence, students will be awarded a total of 200 units to be counted toward the general education requirement in the biological sciences.

§

 Credit may be granted by examination. The Biology Fundamentals sequences require an average grade of C or higher in CHEM 10100-10200-11300 Introductory General Chemistry I-II-III or CHEM 11100-11200-11300 Comprehensive General Chemistry I-II-III or CHEM 12100-12200-12300 Honors General Chemistry I-II-III, a 5 on the AP Chemistry exam, or consent of the department.

Summary of Major Requirements: AP 5

Beginning with the Graduating Class of 2016****

MAJOR
CHEM 11300Comprehensive General Chemistry III (or equivalent) §100
PHYS 12100-12200General Physics I-II (or higher) §200
One of the following:100
Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I
General Physics III (or higher)
Statistical Methods and Applications (or higher, or petition BSCD for replacement)
All of the following:
BIOS 20234Molecular Biology of the Cell *100
BIOS 20235Biological Systems100
BIOS 20236Biological Dynamics ***100
BIOS 20200Introduction to Biochemistry100
BIOS 20242Principles of Physiology100
Five courses above BIOS 20242 in Biological Sciences500
One of the following sequences:200
Organic Chemistry I-II
Honors Organic Chemistry I-II
Total Units1600
*

 Open only to students with a 5 on the AP biology test. Upon completion of the sequence, students will be awarded a total of 200 units to be counted toward the general education requirement in the biological sciences.

***

Students who matriculated prior to 2011 use one of the following courses as the third quarter of the sequence: BIOS 20242 Principles of Physiology, BIOS 20243 From Neurons to Behavior: The Morphological and Physiological Basis of Movement, BIOS 20246 Photons to Consciousness, BIOS 20249 Genome Informatics: Genome Organization, Expression, and Transmission, BIOS 20256 Developmental Genetics and Evolution, BIOS 20258 From Atomic Coordinate to Protein Function, or BIOS 20260 Chordate Evolutionary Biology.

****

Students graduating before 2016 should refer to the catalog of their year of matriculation for major requirements.

§

Credit may be granted by examination. The Biology Fundamentals require an average grade of C or higher in CHEM 10100-10200 Introductory General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 11100-11200 Comprehensive General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 12100-12200 Honors General Chemistry I-II, or a 5 on the AP Chemistry exam, or consent of the department.

Summary of Major Requirements: Track A

Beginning with Graduating Class of 2014

MAJOR
CHEM 11300Comprehensive General Chemistry III (or equivalent) §100
PHYS 12100-12200General Physics I-II (or higher) §200
One of the following:100
Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I
General Physics III (or higher)
Statistical Methods and Applications (or higher)
All of the following:
BIOS 20186Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology100
BIOS 20187Fundamentals of Genetics100
BIOS 20188Fundamentals of Physiology100
BIOS 20190Principles of Developmental Biology100
BIOS 20200Introduction to Biochemistry100
Five courses above BIOS 20236 in Biological Sciences500
One of the following sequences:200
Organic Chemistry I-II
Honors Organic Chemistry I-II
Total Units1600
§

Credit may be granted by examination. The Biology Fundamentals require an average grade of C or higher in CHEM 10100-10200 Introductory General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 11100-11200 Comprehensive General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 12100-12200 Honors General Chemistry I-II, or a 5 on the AP Chemistry exam, or consent of the department.

Summary of Major Requirements: Track B

Beginning with Graduating Class of 2016

MAJOR
CHEM 11300Comprehensive General Chemistry III (or higher) §100
PHYS 12100-12200General Physics I-II (or higher) §200
One of the following:100
Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I
General Physics III (or higher)
Statistical Methods and Applications (or higher)
All of the following:
BIOS 20186Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology100
BIOS 20187Fundamentals of Genetics100
BIOS 20189Fundamentals of Developmental Biology100
BIOS 20200Introduction to Biochemistry100
BIOS 20242Principles of Physiology100
Five courses above BIOS 20236 in Biological Sciences500
One of the following sequences:200
Organic Chemistry I-II
Honors Organic Chemistry I-II
Total Units1600
§

Credit may be granted by examination. The Biology Fundamentals require an average grade of C or higher in CHEM 10100-10200 Introductory General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 11100-11200 Comprehensive General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 12100-12200 Honors General Chemistry I-II, or a 5 on the AP Chemistry exam, or consent of the department.

Summary of Major Requirements: Track C

Beginning with Graduating Class of 2014

MAJOR
CHEM 11300Comprehensive General Chemistry III (or equivalent) §100
One of the following two-quarter sequences:200
Organic Chemistry I-II
Honors Organic Chemistry I-II
General Physics I-II (or higher) §
One of the following:100
Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I
General Physics III (or higher)
Statistical Methods and Applications
All of the following:
BIOS 20196 Ecology and Conservation100
BIOS 20197Evolution and Ecology100
BIOS 20198Biodiversity100
Five courses above BIOS 20236 in Biological Sciences500
Three additional quantitative courses and one Genetics course chosen in consultation with the BSCD Senior Adviser Christine Andrews (candrews@uchicago.edu).400
Total Units1600
§

Credit may be granted by examination. The Biology Fundamentals require an average grade of C or higher in CHEM 10100-10200 Introductory General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 11100-11200 Comprehensive General Chemistry I-II or CHEM 12100-12200 Honors General Chemistry I-II, or a 5 on the AP Chemistry exam, or consent of the department.

Grading

Students must receive quality grades in all courses that meet requirements for the biological sciences major.

Research Opportunities

Students are encouraged to carry out individual guided research in an area of their interest. A student may propose an arrangement with any faculty member in the Division of the Biological Sciences to sponsor and supervise research on an individual tutorial basis. Students register for BIOS 00199 Undergraduate Research or BIOS 00299 Advanced Research: Biological Sciences for course credit. Consult the following course description section for information about procedures, grading, and requirements for registration in BIOS 00199 Undergraduate Research and BIOS 00299 Advanced Research: Biological Sciences. For more information, see bscd.uchicago.edu/content/undergrad-research. NOTE: Course credit cannot be given for work that is compensated by a salary.

Some financial support may be available to students for summer research through their research supervisors or through fellowships awarded competitively by the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division. The deadline for applications for fellowships is early March preceding the summer of the fellowship application.

Honors

Honors in Biological Sciences can be earned via one of two tracks. Scholar Honors: This track recognizes exceptional academic performance (minimum cumulative GPA of 3.6 or above), including submission and acceptance of a scholarly thesis. Research Honors: This track emphasizes exceptional achievement in a program of original research (minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 or above) plus submission and acceptance of an in-depth research thesis. Both programs require formal declarations of intent to seek Honors by the candidates. The details of each program are provided on the BSCD Website (http://bscd.uchicago.edu/page/honors-biology). Candidates must apply for either program no later than the beginning of Spring quarter of their third year in the College. 

Pre-Med Sequence for Nonmajors

This integrated, five-course sequence explores the molecular, cellular, organismal, and biochemical properties of living systems. Open only to first- or second-year non-science majors, it is designed to prepare students with the fundamental knowledge required for graduate study in the health professions. The sequence begins with BIOS 20170 Microbial and Human Cell Biology  in the Winter Quarter and BIOS 20171 Human Genetics and Developmental Biology and  BIOS 20172 Mathematical Modeling for Pre-Med Students in the Spring Quarter. The second year of the sequence continues with BIOS 20173 Perspectives of Human Physiology in the Autumn Quarter and then concludes in the Winter Quarter with BIOS 20175 Biochemistry and Metabolism. BIOS 20171 Human Genetics and Developmental Biology must be taken concurrently with BIOS 20172 Mathematical Modeling for Pre-Med Students in the Spring Quarter of the first year, and BIOS 20173 Perspectives of Human Physiology must be taken in the Autumn Quarter of the second year. The courses in this sequence cannot be applied toward a major in Biological Sciences.   Students who complete this sequence are, however, eligible for the Biological Sciences minor.  These students must combine the sequence with four upper-level Biological Sciences courses to complete the requirement for the minor.  (Please review the section on the Minor Program in the Biological Sciences for additional relevant information.)

SPECIALIZATION PROGRAMS IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Students who wish to complete a "specialization" should discuss their plans with the specialization chair in Spring Quarter of their second year. Students may complete only one specialization.

Specialization in Cancer Biology

Students who complete the requirements detailed below will be recognized as having completed a specialization in cancer biology.

To be eligible to carry out a specialization in cancer biology, students must average a B grade in the Fundamentals Sequences BIOS 20180 or 20190.

Students who plan to specialize in cancer biology are advised to begin the required specialization courses below in their third year. Students who elect to specialize should consult Dr. Kay F. Macleod, The Ben May Department for Cancer Research and the Committee on Cancer Biology (kmacleod@uchicago.edu), who is available to advise on the objectives of the specialization and the importance of each of the classes, and to identify labs in which individual research projects can be carried out.

The following two courses are required for a specialization in cancer biology. To continue in the specialization, students must achieve an A or B grade in both courses. 
BIOS 25108Cancer Biology100
BIOS 25308Heterogeneity in Human Cancer: Etiology and Treatment100
To complete the specialization in cancer biology, students should also take one of the following two courses in either their junior or senior years, having successfully completed BIOS 25108 and BIOS 25308 above, and started work in their chosen research laboratory.
BIOS 25309Cancer Metastasis100
BIOS 25310Pharmacogenomics: Discovery and Implementation100

Laboratory Research

To complete the specialization in cancer biology, students will also carry out individual guided research, participate in the honors research program, and attend cancer biology-related seminars. Participation in the research component of the specialization in cancer biology is by invitation only and is based on: (1) performance in the above-mentioned courses, (2) identification of a research project and mentor, (3) submission of a research abstract for consideration by the end of the Winter Quarter of their junior year to the Director of the Specialization in Cancer Biology (Dr. Kay Macleod).

Independent research projects performed by students in the specialization in cancer biology must be approved by the Director of the Specialization (Dr. Macleod) and be of sufficiently high standard to qualify as a senior honors project and ideally to produce data that contributes to peer-reviewed publication.

Students are encouraged to begin their research project no later than the Spring/Summer Quarter of their junior year.

Specialization in Cellular and Molecular Biology

Students majoring in biological sciences who meet the following requirements will be recognized as having completed a specialization in the area of cellular and molecular biology.

The following requirements must be met:

Courses

One of the following:100
Organic Chemistry III
Honors Organic Chemistry III
Three of the following: *300
Cell Biology
Genetics of Model Organisms
Developmental Mechanisms
Plant Development and Molecular Genetics
Fundamentals of Molecular Biology
Total Units400
*

three of the five 20200-level courses in the biological sciences that are required for the biological sciences major must be completed within the specialization.

Laboratory Research

Completion of an independent research project that either:

  1. qualifies as a senior honors project; or
  2. is approved by the director of the specialization.

The specialization in cellular and molecular biology is administered by the Department of Molecular Genetics and Cell Biology. For more information, consult Gayle Lamppa (702.9837, gklamppa@uchicago.edu).

Specialization in Ecology and Evolution

Students majoring in biological sciences who complete the course work indicated below and write a research-based senior thesis will be recognized as having completed a specialization in ecology and evolution. This specialization is recommended for students who are interested in pursuing graduate work in the field or in laboratory sciences of ecology, evolution, population genetics, or behavior. Based on the student's particular interest, he or she will select a faculty adviser, who then may recommend specific courses necessary to meet the specialization requirements (see following section). The faculty adviser may also help the student find an appropriate research lab in which to conduct an individual research project.

The following requirements must be met:

Courses

1.     Students intending to pursue the Ecology and Evolution specialization are strongly encouraged to follow Track C for the BIOS fundamentals sequence.

2.     Students in the Ecology and Evolution specialization must take three courses in statistics (STAT 22000 Statistical Methods and Applications or higher) or other quantitative approaches relevant to their research plans (BIOS 26210 Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I and BIOS 26211 Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences II recommended). These courses can count toward the quantitative requirements for Track C.

3.     Three of the upper-level courses required for completion of the BIOS major must be chosen from a menu of courses in behavior, ecology, evolution, and genetics. 

Students must select the courses required for the Ecology and Evolution specialization in consultation with the faculty research adviser, the director of the specialization (Cathy Pfister, 834.0071, cpfister@uchicago.edu) or the BSCD Ecology and Evolution adviser (Chris Andrews, 702.1214, candrews@uchicago.edu).

Laboratory or Field Research

Students specializing in Ecology and Evolution must perform original research under the guidance of a member of the ecology and evolution faculty and write a senior thesis based on this research. The research paper draft should be submitted before the end of fifth week in Spring Quarter, with the final thesis due in eighth week. NOTE: Students must complete field research by the end of the growing season (summer) of their third year.

The specialization in ecology and evolution is administered by the Department of Ecology and Evolution. For more information, please consult the director of the specialization, Cathy Pfister (834.0071, cpfister@uchicago.edu).

Specialization in Endocrinology

After taking the following three courses, students majoring in biological sciences will be recognized as having completed a specialization in endocrinology. Students who complete the specialization will be well versed in all aspects of endocrinology, ranging from basic cell signaling to the integration of endocrine systems and their dysregulation in human disease. Students will also have the option of participating in a hands-on research component in an endocrinology lab. The prerequisite for these courses is completion of the Fundamentals Sequence. It is strongly recommended that students complete a Biochemistry course before enrolling; however, the specialization can be completed as Endocrinology I–II-III or Endocrinology II, III, I.

Introductory Courses

BIOS 25226Endocrinology I: Cell Signaling (Autumn)100
BIOS 25227Endocrinology II: Systems and Physiology (Winter)100
BIOS 25228Endocrinology III: Human Disease (Spring)100

The specialization in endocrinology is administered by the Institute for Endocrine Discovery & Clinical Care, the Committee on Molecular Metabolism & Nutrition, and the NIH funded Diabetes Research & Training Center. For more information, consult Matthew Brady (mbrady@medicine.bsd.uchicago.edu).

Specialization in Genetics

Biological sciences majors who obtain a B or better in seven courses from the list below and complete an independent research project will be recognized as having fulfilled the requirements for a specialization in the area of genetics. Please consult Jocelyn Malamy (jmalamy@bsd.uchicago.edu) if you would like to request approval for any non-listed course with significant genetics content to satisfy this requirement.

Introductory Courses (3 courses)
One of the following:100
Genetics
Fundamentals of Genetics
Biological Systems
One of the following:100
Ecology and Evolution
Evolution and Ecology
and
STAT 22000Statistical Methods and Applications (section focused on biological data)100
Advanced Courses (4 courses)
BIOS 21206Human Evolution and Disease100
and one of the following:100
Genetics of Model Organisms (Autumn)
Molecular Evolution I: Fundamentals and Principles (Winter)
and two of the following:200
Fundamentals of Molecular Biology (Winter)
Intro Statistical Genetics (Winter)
Developmental Mechanisms (Winter)
Genome Informatics: How Cells Reorganize Genomes (Winter)
Human Genetics and Evolution (Autumn)
An Introduction to Population Genetics (Spring)
Plant Development and Molecular Genetics (Spring)
Molecular Basis of Bacterial Diseases (Winter)
Introduction to Virology (Spring)
Genomics and Systems Biology (Spring)
What Genomes Teach About Evolution (Spring)
Total Units700

Laboratory Research

completion of an independent research project.

The project must either:

qualify as a senior honors project

or

be approved by the director of the specialization.

The specialization in genetics is administered by the Committee on Genetics. Consult Jocelyn Malamy (702.4651, jmalamy@bsd.uchicago.edu) for more information.

Specialization in Immunology

After taking three of the four courses listed below, students majoring in biological sciences will be recognized as having completed a specialization in immunology. The fourth course is available to students who wish further study.

Students are required to take the following three courses:

BIOS 25256Immunobiology (Autumn)100
BIOS 25258Immunopathology (Winter)100
BIOS 25266Molecular Immunology (Spring)100
The following is an elective course:
BIOS 25260Host Pathogen Interactions (Autumn)100

For more information, students should consult with Bana Jabri, Department of Pathology and the Committee on Immunobiology (834.8670, bjabri@bsd.uchicago.edu).

Accelerated Program in Immunology

The University of Chicago Graduate Program in Immunology permits undergraduate students who have demonstrated outstanding potential for graduate studies in biology to begin graduate school during their fourth year in the College. This is a competitive merit-award program.

Because of the accelerated nature of the curriculum, applicants must have outstanding academic credentials (i.e., GPA typically in the range of 3.7 and GRE scores typically not less than 1400). Eligible students also have a clear understanding of their motivation for immunology. Laboratory experience is not mandatory but highly encouraged.

Candidates will apply to the Graduate Program in Immunology at the University of Chicago during their third year in the College. Eligible students must have completed thirty-three credits (of the forty-two required for a degree in the College) by the end of their third year. These thirty-three credits must include all fifteen general education requirements and one-half of the requirements for their major.

For further information, contact Bana Jabri, Department of Pathology and the Committee on Immunobiology (834.8670, bjabri@bsd.uchicago.edu).

Specialization in Microbiology

Students majoring in biological sciences who complete the following requirements will be recognized as having completed a specialization in microbiology. Students register for three required courses in the specialization (BIOS 25206 Fundamentals of Bacterial Physiology, BIOS 25216 Molecular Basis of Bacterial Diseases, and BIOS 25287 Introduction to Virology). Several electives are available to provide additional training in microbiology. With prior approval from the specialization chair, it may be possible to substitute one course from the list of suggested electives for one of the required courses. For more information, students should consult with Dominique Missiakas, undergraduate adviser of the Committee on Microbiology (834.8161, dmissiak@bsd.uchicago.edu).

Students are required to take the following three courses:

BIOS 25206Fundamentals of Bacterial Physiology (Autumn)100
BIOS 25216Molecular Basis of Bacterial Diseases (Winter)100
BIOS 25287Introduction to Virology (Spring)100
Total Units300

Specialization in Neuroscience

Students majoring in biological sciences who complete the three required courses on the list that follows will be recognized as having completed a specialization in neuroscience. Students who elect to specialize should consult Nicholas Hatsopoulos (702.5594, nicho@uchicago.edu), who is available to advise on the choice of classes and to help identify labs in which individual research projects can be carried out. Students who plan to specialize are encouraged to begin the required sequence below in Autumn Quarter of their third year, carry out individual guided research, participate in the honors research program, and attend neurobiology/biopsychology-related seminars.

BIOS 24203Introduction to Neuroscience (Autumn)100
BIOS 24204Cellular Neurobiology (Winter)100
BIOS 24205Systems Neuroscience (Spring)100
Total Units300

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE DEGREE IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Students can earn a BS in the Biological Sciences by (1) completing three upper-level BIOS courses beyond those required for the BA degree, and (2) writing a BS thesis (research paper or literature review) under the supervision of a faculty adviser. The additional upper-level courses must be chosen in consultation with the thesis adviser and a BSCD senior adviser. The BA is designed for students who wish to gain extensive training in modern biology but also retain the flexibility to take elective courses outside the major. The BS is suitable for students who wish to take more courses within the major and to write a senior thesis. Students completing the honors program or a specialization that requires a senior thesis can submit the same thesis for the BS degree. If you have any questions, please contact BSCD Senior Adviser Chris Andrews (candrews@uchicago.edu).

MINOR PROGRAM IN THE BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Students who elect the minor program must meet with the master or one of the senior advisers of the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division by the Spring Quarter of their second year in order to obtain consent to pursue the minor and to plan out the appropriate curriculum.

The minor in Biological Sciences requires a total of seven BIOS courses beyond the general education requirement. Courses in the minor may be selected from a specific area of the biological sciences (e.g., molecular and cell biology, genetics, evolutionary biology, developmental biology, organismal biology, ecology, neurobiology, immunobiology, microbiology). Alternatively, courses may be selected from related areas to construct a program that gives a more inclusive account of how different disciplines of biology interact. These areas could comprise, for instance, immunology and microbiology, organismal biology and evolution, genetics and genomics, developmental biology and evolution, or ecology and evolution. Other combinations are also possible.

Students must meet general education requirements for the biological sciences and the physical sciences before entering the program. Biological Sciences courses at the 10000-level or above, Natural Sciences (NTSC) courses, and MATH 11200 Studies in Mathematics I and MATH 11300 Studies in Mathematics II or MATH 13100 Elementary Functions and Calculus I and MATH 13200 Elementary Functions and Calculus II are the minimal general education requirements for the minor. Students interested in completing the minor are strongly encouraged to take BIOS 20150 A Serious Introduction to Biology for Majors: From LUCA to the University of Chicago and BIOS 20151 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic) (or BIOS 20152 Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced)) to complete the general education requirement in the biological sciences, as these courses also serve as prerequisites to the Fundamentals courses (BIOS 20186-88/89 or BIOS 20196-98), three of which are required for the minor. Students who fulfill their BIOS general education requirements via other paths may also request approval to pursue the minor. General Chemistry and Organic Chemistry are not specifically required. These courses would, however, allow for a greater variety of upper-level Biological Sciences courses, especially those in the areas of molecular and cellular biology; chemistry and/or biochemistry are usually prerequisites for those courses.

Following completion of the general education requirements, the minor can then be completed by taking three Fundamentals courses and at least four upper level electives to be chosen in consultation with one of the senior advisers in the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division.  

Students who complete the pre-med sequence for non-majors (BIOS 20170s) are also eligible for the Biological Sciences minor.  BIOS 20170 Microbial and Human Cell Biology and BIOS 20171 Human Genetics and Developmental Biology satisfy the general education requirement in biology; BIOS 20172 Mathematical Modeling for Pre-Med Students , BIOS 20173 Perspectives of Human Physiology and BIOS 20175 Biochemistry and Metabolism  satisfy the fundamentals requirement.  These students must follow up the 20170s with at least four upper-level electives to be chosen in consultation with one of the senior advisers in the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division.

No course in the minor can be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors, nor can they be counted toward general education requirements. More than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses with University of Chicago course numbers.  All courses for the minor must be taken for quality grades.

Prior to beginning the minor program, students must obtain formal approval from the master or one of the senior advisers in the biological sciences on a form obtained from their College adviser and returned to the adviser by the deadline. To schedule an appointment with the master, students should contact Kirsten Cole (kcole@uchicago.edu). Alternatively, students can schedule an appointment with one of the senior advisers (Christine Andrews (candrews@uchicago.edu) or Megan McNulty (mmcnulty@uchicago.edu)).

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Minor Program in Computational Neuroscience

The minor in computational neuroscience is offered by the Biological Sciences Collegiate Division. Computational neuroscience is a relatively new interdisciplinary area of inquiry that is concerned with how components of animal and human nervous systems interact to produce behaviors. It relies on quantitative and modeling approaches to understand the function of the nervous system and to design human-made devices that duplicate behaviors. Course work in computational neuroscience can prepare students for graduate studies in neurobiology or psychology, in the mathematical or engineering sciences, or in areas of medicine such as neurology or psychiatry. It can lead to either traditional academic careers or to opportunities in the corporate world. For more information, visit cns.bsd.uchicago.edu.

This minor is a good option for students who are majoring in biological sciences and are interested in mathematical approaches to biology, or for students who are majoring in computer science, mathematics, physics, psychology, or statistics and have an interest in neuroscience. Students electing this minor must have completed, or placed out of, the equivalent of a year of collegiate-level calculus and must have completed the general education requirement for the biological sciences.

The minor requires completion of the following five courses:

BIOS 24231Methods in Computational Neuroscience100
BIOS 24232Computational Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience100
BIOS 26210-26211Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I-II *200
BIOS 29408Signal Analysis and Modeling for Neuroscientists100
Total Units500
*

Autumn and Winter Quarters of the Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences sequence

Students who elect the minor program are required to meet with the chair of the Committee on Computational Neuroscience (Nicholas Hatsopoulos) by the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. Students must obtain formal approval from the chair to complete the minor program on a form obtained from their College adviser and returned to the adviser by the deadline. No courses in the minor can be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors, nor can they be counted toward general education requirements. More than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers. Students must earn a B- average or above in courses counted toward the minor.  All courses for the minor must be taken for quality grades.

Courses: Biological Sciences (BIOS)

Students must confirm their registration with their instructors by the second class meeting or their registration may be canceled.

In the following course descriptions, L indicates courses with a laboratory.

Biological Sciences Sequences for Nonmajors

Students choose from the following options to meet the biological sciences requirement. The requirement should be completed by the end of the second year.

1. Students may choose to take BIOS 10130 Core Biology as their first course. For their second quarter, students choose from a menu of topics courses (BIOS 11000–19999) that are comprehensive reviews of specialized topics in the biological sciences (descriptions follow). Nonmajors are encouraged to enroll in additional biological sciences courses that cover topics of interest to them.

Multiple sections of BIOS 10130 Core Biology are taught throughout the year. Sections are taught from a different perspective based upon the specialty of the instructor. The different descriptions are listed below. The student should register for the section that best suits their interests based upon the descriptions below.

BIOS 10130. Core Biology. 100 Units.

What is life? How does it work and evolve? This course uses student-centered interactive learning in the lab, assigned readings from both the popular press and primary scientific literature, and directed writing exercises to explore the nature and functions of living organisms, their interactions with each other, and their environment.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring

Section Descriptions of 10130. Core Biology

A. Neurobiology. The brain and being human: What does it mean to be human? What makes us unique and how have we evolved? Bridging the brain, the body, and biological behavior, this course uses inquiry-driven interactive learning activities, readings from the popular and scientific press, and directed writing exercises to explore the brain and the biological basis of being human. M. McNulty. Autumn, Winter. L.

B. Microbes and Immunity. These sections cover the most basic concepts in biology, such as life, macromolecules, cells, energy, metabolism, evolution, and genomics, as well as human anatomy and physiology. These particular sections draw examples from microbiology and immunology to tie these basic concepts together. The impact of our interactions with microorganisms in our evolution is highlighted in many ways. Hands-on laboratories, readings, and discussion sessions complement lectures. B. Fineschi. Autumn, Winter, Spring. L.

C. Basic Biology. What is life? How does it work and evolve? This course uses student-centered interactive learning in the lab, assigned readings from both the popular press and primary scientific literature, and directed writing exercises to explore the nature and functions of living organisms, their evolution, and their interactions with each other. A. Hunter. Autumn, Winter, Spring. L.

D. Biotechnology. In the first half of this course, basic biology concepts related to biotechnology are covered. These include lectures on life, cells, macromolecules, metabolism, and genetics, complemented by hands-on laboratories. The second half of the course involves student-led topical research and presentations on various aspects of biotechnology, such as plant biotechnology, animal biotechnology, microbial biotechnology, response to bioterrorism, and examining the consequences of developments in these areas. N. Bhasin. Spring. L.

2. Students may choose one of the sequences below (BIOS 10450 Pharmacological Perspectives in Cell and Molecular Biology and BIOS 10451 Pharmacological Perspectives II or BIOS 10500 Metabolism and Exercise and BIOS 10501 Metabolism and Nutrition or BIOS 10602 Multiscale Modeling of Biological Systems Iand BIOS 10603 Multiscale Modeling of Biological Systems II) as an alternative to BIOS 10130 Core Biology plus a Topics course. Taking one of these sequences meets the general education requirement in biological sciences.

BIOS 10450. Pharmacological Perspectives in Cell and Molecular Biology. 100 Units.

This course introduces concepts related to the use, pharmacodynamic properties, manner in which drugs act at the molecular and/or cellular level, and their effects at the organismal level.

Instructor(s): R. Zaragoza     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): This course is equivalent to BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 10451. Pharmacological Perspectives II. 100 Units.

Must new taken in sequence with BIOS 10450. The goal of this course is to learn the pharmacological principles by which drugs act, at the molecular and cellular level, to affect an organ/organ systems of the human body.  The pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetic, pharmacotherapeutics and toxicology of a number of drugs are discussed.  Drugs currently in the media, how these drugs affect different systems ranging from cardiovascular to the central nervous system, and the fundamental basis for the use of drugs are covered.

Instructor(s): R. Zaragoza     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10450. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 10500. Metabolism and Exercise. 100 Units.

Must be taken in sequence with BIOS 10501. This course examines the flow of energy through the human body—from what we eat to what we can do. Basic physiology, metabolism, and exercise concepts are covered from cells to systems. Students should be prepared to alter their diet and/or physical activity. This course is intended to be followed by BIOS 10501 (Metabolism and Nutrition).

Instructor(s): M. Osadjan     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): This course is equivalent to BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 10501. Metabolism and Nutrition. 100 Units.

Must be taken in sequence with BIOS 10500. Taking a scientific approach to nutrition, this course covers nutritional requirements and why they are required for human health by exploring their function at the cellular and molecular level. Basic physiology concepts related to nutritional health are covered, including digestive physiology and some aspects of endocrinology. As a continuation of the exercise concepts covered in BIOS 10501, the relationship between exercise and nutrition is considered. Students complete a dietary analysis of their food intake to critique their individual nutritional health.

Instructor(s): P. Strieleman     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10500. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.
Note(s): Credit may not be earned for both BIOS 10501 and BIOS 12114.

BIOS 10602. Multiscale Modeling of Biological Systems I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students with strong quantitative background, such as those majoring in physical sciences or economics. The first course in the sequence begins with the organization of life at the molecular level, and builds a physical understanding to the workings of macromolecules such as proteins, membranes, DNA, and RNA. Students learn computational tools such as molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the function of proteins.

Instructor(s): D. Kondrashov, E. Kovar     Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): MATH 13300/15300/16300 or equivalent placement This course is equivalent to BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 10603. Multiscale Modeling of Biological Systems II. 100 Units.

Must be taken in sequence with BIOS 10602.  This second course in the sequence focuses on biological information. Students learn about biological databases, algorithms for sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree building, and systems biology. The goal is to take the mechanistic understanding of molecular biology developed in the first quarter, and synthesize into a larger, system-level view of living things. Students implement computational algorithms using Python.

Instructor(s): E. Haddadian     Terms Offered: Winter. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10602. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

Topics Courses for Nonmajors

The courses that follow have a prerequisite of BIOS 10130 Core Biology, or a score of 4 or 5 on the AP biology test. Attendance is required at the first class to confirm enrollment.

BIOS 11119. The Biology of Gender. 100 Units.

This course explores the biological evidence and theories that seek to explain gender in humans. This course relies on current research in neuroscience, physiology, and cell biology to address topics such as the genetics of gender; sexual differentiation of the fetus; sexually dimorphic brain regions; the biology of gender identity and gender preference; and hormonal/environmental contributions to gender.

Instructor(s): M. Osadjan     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PQ: BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 12000

BIOS 11125. Life through a Genomic Lens. 100 Units.

The implications of the double helical structure of DNA triggered a revolution in cell biology. More recently, the technology to sequence vast stretches of DNA has offered new vistas in fields ranging from human origins to the study of biodiversity. This course considers a set of these issues, including the impact of a DNA perspective on the legal system, on medicine, and on conservation biology.

Instructor(s): A. Turkewitz, M. Nobrega     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.
Equivalent Course(s): ENST 12402

BIOS 11128. Introduction to Human Genetics. 100 Units.

This course covers both classical Mendelian human genetics and advances in molecular genetics. We discuss the inheritance of normal human traits and a variety of genetic diseases, including single gene traits and multifactorial, complex traits. Other topics include chromosome abnormalities, sex inheritance, human population genetics, and microevolution.

Instructor(s): T. Christianson     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 11129. Human Use and Abuse of Biological Molecules. 100 Units.

This course explores the science (molecular, microbial, and evolutionary) as well as some environmental, medical, and ethical issues associated with our use of biological molecules.  Antibiotics and pesticides server as case studies.

Instructor(s): S. Crosson     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 11140. Biotechnology for the 21st Century. 100 Units.

This course is designed to provide a stimulating introduction to the world of biotechnology. Starting with an overview of the basic concepts of molecular biology and genetics that serve as a foundation for biotechnology, the course will segue into the various applied fields of biotechnology. Topics will include microbial biotechnology, agricultural biotechnology, biofuels, cloning, bioremediation, medical biotechnology, DNA fingerprinting and forensics. The goal of this course is to provide the Biology non-majors with an appreciation of important biotechnology breakthroughs and the associated bioethics issues

Instructor(s): N. Bhasin     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 12107. Cell Biology of Physiological Stress. 100 Units.

This course studies the application of cell biology principles to physiological stress. We use paradigms (e.g., fasting) to talk about organ interactions (e.g., the Cori cycle). This includes discussions of receptors, kinases, and other cellular biology.

Instructor(s): M. Musch     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 12114. Nutritional Science. 100 Units.

This course examines the underlying biological mechanisms of nutrient utilization in humans and the scientific basis for setting human nutritional requirements. The relationships between food choices and human health are also explored. Students consider how to assess the validity of scientific research that provides the basis for advice about how to eat healthfully. Class assignments are designed to help students apply their knowledge by critiquing their nutritional lifestyle, nutritional health claims, and/or current nutrition policy issues.

Instructor(s): P. Strieleman     Terms Offered: Autumn, Summer
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.
Note(s): Credit may not be earned for both BIOS 12114 and BIOS 10501

BIOS 12115. Responses of Cardiopulmonary System to Stress. 100 Units.

This course discusses basic concepts involved in the functioning of the cardiopulmonary system, followed by various types of patho-physiological stresses experienced by the lungs and heart. We discuss how these systems adapt to stress conditions by turning on "emergency response" mechanisms at the molecular, cell, tissue, and organ levels. We also discuss current strategies and drugs designed to treat maladaptive changes taking place in the heart and lungs under stress.

Instructor(s): M. Gupta, K. Birukov     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 12116. The Human Body in Health and Disease. 100 Units.

This course is designed to provide an overview of physiological organ systems under different states of health and disease. A comprehensive tour through the human body will take students through the anatomy and functioning of several systems including, but not limited to, the cardiovascular, respiratory, nervous, renal, gastrointestinal, and immune systems. We will examine each of these systems under normal conditions and from the perspective of disease. A variety of pathological conditions including diabetes, heart and kidney diseases, neurodegenerative conditions, and autoimmune diseases, will be covered with an emphasis on how many diseases involve multiple organ systems.

Instructor(s): M. McNulty     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 12117. The 3.5 Billion Year History of the Human Body. 100 Units.

This course looks at the structure, function, and deep history of the human body. Each major organ and system of the body is explored from perspectives of anatomy, paleontology, and developmental genetics to reveal the deep history of the body and our connections to the rest of life on the planet.

Instructor(s): N. Shubin     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 12118. The Descent of Man: Human Health across the Ages. 100 Units.

This course examines the relationship between human health, lifestyles, and environment.  How have agriculture, urbanization, and industrialization affected human health?  We discuss measures of heath among hunting and gathering societies, after the development of agriculture and large settlements, at the dawn of the city, and in contemporary industrialized and developing societies.  Topics include diet, malnutrition, malaria, the bubonic plague, sanitation, pollution, the obesity epidemic, stress, and sleep.

Instructor(s): K. Knutson     Terms Offered: Autumn. Offered every other year in odd years
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13107. Environmental Ecology. 100 Units.

This course emphasizes basic scientific understanding of ecological principles that relate most closely to the ways humans interact with their environments. It includes lectures on the main environmental pressures, notably human population growth, disease, pollution, climate change, habitat destruction, and harvesting. We emphasize the ongoing impacts on the natural world, particularly causes of population regulation and extinction and how they might feed back on to humans. Discussion required.

Instructor(s): T. Price     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NTSC 10300 or BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.
Equivalent Course(s): ENST 12404,NTSC 10400

BIOS 13111. Natural History of North American Deserts. 100 Units.

This lecture course focuses on the ecological communities of the Southwest, primarily on the four subdivisions of the North American Desert, the Chihuahuan, Sonoran, Mohave, and Great Basin Deserts. Lecture topics include climate change and the impact on the flora and fauna of the region; adaptations to arid landscapes; evolutionary, ecological, and conservation issues in the arid Southwest, especially relating to isolated mountain ranges; human impacts on the biota, land, and water; and how geological and climatic forces shape deserts.

Instructor(s): E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13112. Natural History of North American Deserts: Field School. 100 Units.

This lecture/lab course is the same course as BIOS 13111, but includes a lab section preparatory to a two-week field trip at end of Spring Quarter, specific dates to be announced. Our goal in the lab is to prepare proposals for research projects to conduct in the field portion of this course. Field conditions are rugged. Travel is by twelve-passenger van. Lodging during most of this course is tent camping on developed campsites.

Instructor(s): E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13115. From So Simple a Beginning: Evolution. 100 Units.

This course discusses a wide range of biological and geological phenomena in the light of evolutionary theory. The material is presented in the form of scientific inquiry to provide insight into how we know what we know. Concepts are presented using examples relevant to the human condition and human evolution. The diversity of organisms is demonstrated throughout the course in the lectures, using living and preserved specimens. Practical sessions in the Evolving Planet exhibit of the Field Museum required.

Instructor(s): P. Sierwald, R. Bieler     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PQ: BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13123. Evolution of the Natural World III: Biological Evolution. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to evolutionary processes and patterns in present-day organisms and in the fossil record and how they are shaped by biological and physical forces. Topics emphasize evolutionary principles. They include DNA and the genetic code, the genetics of populations, the origins of species, and evolution above the species level. We also discuss major events in the history of life, such as the origin of complex cells, invasion of land, and mass extinction. (L)

Instructor(s): D. Jablonski     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): For students in the NTSC sequence: MATH 10500, or placement into MATH 13100 or higher; NTSC 10200. For students in the BIOS sequence: MATH 10500, or placement into MATH 13100 or higher; BIOS 10130; No Biological Sciences majors except by petition to the BSCD Senior Advisers.
Equivalent Course(s): NTSC 10300

BIOS 13125. Ecology and the Environment. 100 Units.

This course introduces the principles of ecology and environmental biology. Focusing on both studies of wild populations of plants and animals as well as human ecology, we discuss population growth, the distribution and abundance of species, and conservation biology. Other topics include such current environmental issues as climate change, invasive species, and resource use. This course is intended for students who are not majoring in biological sciences or who are seeking an introductory understanding of ecology and environmental biology.

Instructor(s): S. Pruett-Jones     Terms Offered: Summer
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13126. Tropical Ecology: Biodiversity and Human Impacts. 100 Units.

This course covers the description of the geographic distribution of the tropics, the nature of biological communities found there in contrast with temperate communities, and the interrelations of those communities with human society, both indigenous and global. Conservation of tropical biodiversity and ecosystem services related to human populations and exploitation of resources is a major theme of the course.

Instructor(s): E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13128. Plant-Animal Interactions. 100 Units.

In this course we investigate the ecological interactions between plants and animals, and their evolution. Through readings and discussion we explore herbivory and mutualisms (pollination, seed dispersal). How do plants defend themselves against herbivores? How have plants and their seed dispersers, pollinators, and predators co-evolved?

Instructor(s): A. Hunter     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13131. Chicago's Natural History: Where Is it? What Is It? and There It Goes! 100 Units.

In this course you will explore the organisms of the Chicago region, and learn how to identify major groups of organisms: animal phyla and some orders and classes, plant divisions and higher plant families. The identification principles will be useful beyond Chicago as well. The class will combine field and lab exercises in sampling and identification, and lectures on the ecology and evolution of the organisms, with an emphasis on species native to the region. Be prepared to work outdoors and walk around Hyde Park, carrying a net and with binoculars on, in all sorts of weather. L.

Instructor(s): A. Hunter     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 13140. The Public and Private Lives of Insects. 100 Units.

This course examines the ecology and evolution of insects, from their early evolution over 350 million years ago to their adaptations that allow them to exploit nearly every habitat on earth and become the most diverse animal group on the planet. We explore the basic biology of insects that have allowed them to become the largest group of animals on the planet, making up approximately 1.5 million of the 2 million described species.

Instructor(s): E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 14112. Workings of the Human Brain: From Brain to Behavior. 100 Units.

This course examines how the brain generates behavior. Topics include the organization of the nervous system; the mechanisms by which the brain translates external stimuli into electrical and chemical signals to initiate or modify behavior; and the neurological bases of learning, memory, sleep, cognition, drug addiction, and neurological disorders.

Instructor(s): M. McNulty     Terms Offered: Winter, Summer
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 14114. Drugs Galore: What They Are and What They Do to You. 100 Units.

The course will cover several drugs used and abused (such as alcohol, ritalin, adderall, cannabinoids), their targets and pharmacological actions.

Instructor(s): R. Zaragoza     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 15106. Plagues: Past and Present. 100 Units.

This course explores selected examples of ancient, re-emerging, and emerging pathogens in the context of biology, as well as epidemiology and the selective pressures that influence the spread and control of epidemics. Emphasis is placed on the biological basis of how microbes gain access to and cause damage in their hosts and the struggle between the pathogen and the host's immune system. Students also gain an understanding of the basis for diagnostic procedures, treatments, and immunization. Discussion sessions required in addition to lectures.

Instructor(s): S. Boyle-Vavra     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 15115. Cancer Biology: How Good Cells Go Bad. 100 Units.

This lecture/discussion course examines the multi-step process by which normal cells become malignant cancer cells. Topics include how defects in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis can occur in cancer cells, as well as how cancer cells can acquire the ability to attract blood vessels (angiogenesis) and to invade other organ systems (metastasis). We emphasize the study of signal transduction pathways and how they are altered in cancer cells. The concept of genes that cause cancer (oncogenes) and genes that deter cancer (tumor suppressor genes) is discussed. New disease treatments that target specific molecular defects within cancer cells are reviewed.

Instructor(s): M. Villereal     Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

BIOS 15119. Immunology: Light and Tasty. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to familiarize students with the properties of the immune system, with a focus on responses to infections. The material is presented in a series of lectures, and learning is reinforced through reading and discussing relevant current literature. The first half of the course focuses on the cellular and molecular aspects of the immune system. The second half focuses on how the various components are integrated during the response to infectious agents. The flu (including H1N1) and HIV are used as examples.

Instructor(s): B. Fineschi     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS, except by petition.

Biological Sciences Sequences for Majors and Students Preparing for the Health Professions

Fundamentals Sequences

Beginning with students matriculating in Autumn 2010, all first-year students who wish to major in Biological Sciences must take two of the following three courses during Spring Quarter of their first year as prerequisites for the Fundamentals courses. (Chemistry and Biological Chemistry majors can take the Fundamentals Sequences without the Biological Sciences prerequisites (BIOS 20150-20151/20152) unless they pursue a double major in Biological Sciences. They are expected to show competency in mathematical modeling of biological phenomena covered in BIOS 20151 or BIOS 20152.)

BIOS 20150. How Do We Understand the Biosphere? 100 Units.

This course is designed to introduce Biological Sciences majors to a wide range of subdisciplines within biology.  Lecture topics include ecology, evolution, organismal biology, biodiversity, molecular biology, development, and structural biology.  Students will gain experience with integrative approaches to science as they read and dissect the primary literature and complete a quarter-long group project organized around a big question in biology.

Instructor(s): M. Hale, M. McNulty, C. Andrews, Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 10100-10200 or CHEM 11100-11200 or CHEM 12100-12200

BIOS 20151. Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Basic) 100 Units.

The goal for this course is to give future biologists the quantitative tools to fully participate in modern biological research. These include descriptive statistics, linear regression, stochastic independence and hypothesis testing, Markov models and stationary probability distributions, solutions of linear differential equations, equilibria and stability analysis of nonlinear differential equations. The ideas are applied to different areas of biology, e.g. molecular evolution, allometry, epidemiology, and biochemistry, and implemented by students in computer assignments using the R computational platform.

Instructor(s): D. Kondrashov     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): Two quarters of calculus of any sequence (MATH 13200 or 15200 or 16200) AND CHEM 10100-10200 or CHEM 11100-11200 or CHEM 12100-12200. First-year Biology Major standing only.

BIOS 20152. Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology (Advanced) 100 Units.

This is a more advanced version of 20151, intended for students with greater mathematical maturity. In addition to the topics covered in the regular version, students will learn about nonlinear least-squares fitting, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, bifurcations and bistability in differential equations. Additional applications will include phylogenetic distance and systems biology.

Instructor(s): D. Kondrashov     Terms Offered: Winter, Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): MATH placement of 15200 or higher OR completion of MATH 16200 AND CHEM 10100-10200 or CHEM 11100-11200 or CHEM 12100-12200. First-year Biology Major standing only.

BIOS 20170 through BIOS 20175 

This integrated sequence explores the molecular, cellular, organismal, and biochemical properties of living systems. It is designed to prepare students who do not intend to major in biology for graduate study in the health professions. This five-course sequence begins with BIOS 20170 Microbial and Human Cell Biology in the Winter Quarter and both BIOS 20171 Human Genetics and Developmental Biology and BIOS 20172 Mathematical Modeling for Pre-Med Students in the Spring Quarter. The second year of the sequence continues with BIOS 20173 Perspectives of Human Physiology in the Autumn Quarter and concludes with BIOS 20175 Biochemistry and Metabolism in the Winter Quarter. BIOS 20172 must be taken concurrently with BIOS 20171 in the Spring Quarter of the first year.  This sequence is open only to first- and second-year non-science majors and cannot be applied toward a major in Biological Sciences.

BIOS 20170. Microbial and Human Cell Biology. 100 Units.

This course is the entry point into an integrated biology sequence designed to prepare non-science majors for application to medical school.  We explore topics in human cell biology within the context of evolutionary biology, chemistry, microbiology, and medicine.  We pay special attention to the influence of prokaryotes on the history of life and to the ecological interactions between humans and their microbiota, which have major implications for human health and disease.  Students read and discuss papers from the scientific literature, attend discussions led by physicians and other medical professionals, and gain experience with microbiological and basic microscopy techniques and vertebrate dissection in lab.

Instructor(s): L. Mets, C. Andrews, R. Zaragoza, E. Kovar     Terms Offered: Winter. L.
Prerequisite(s): First or second-year standing

BIOS 20171. Human Genetics and Developmental Biology. 100 Units.

This course covers the fundamentals of genetics, with an emphasis on human traits and diseases. Topics include Mendelian genetics, simple and complex traits, genetic diseases, the human genome, and testing for human traits and diseases. After establishing a foundation in genetics, we will discuss mechanisms underlying differentiation and development in humans. We will focus on events that lead to gastrulation and the establishment of the body plan (how humans develop from an unpatterned egg into a recognizable human form). Other topics may include limb development and stem cell biology.

Instructor(s): T. Christianson, C. Schonbaum, R. Zaragoza, C. Andrews     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20170

BIOS 20172. Mathematical Modeling for Pre-Med Students. 100 Units.

This course covers mathematical approaches in biology and medicine, including basic statistics and hypothesis testing, mathematical modeling of biological systems, and an introduction to bioinformatics.  Students will apply what they learn as they analyze data and interpret primary papers in the biological and clinical literature.  BIOS 20172 lays the foundation for biomathematical approaches explored during subsequent courses in the BIOS 20170s sequence.

Instructor(s): E. Haddadian     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20170

BIOS 20173. Perspectives of Human Physiology. 100 Units.

This course will explore the structure and function of the human body as a set of integrated, interdependent systems. We will continue the cellular, genetic, and developmental themes of the previous courses to explore the emergent functions of the human body, from cells to systems. The laboratory exercises will allow the students to experience the concepts discussed in lecture in a way that introduces them to the methods of academic research.

Instructor(s): C. Andrews, E. Kovar     Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20170, BIOS 20171, BIOS 20172, BIOS 20175

BIOS 20175. Biochemistry and Metabolism. 100 Units.

The course introduces cellular biochemical metabolism. The chemical characteristics, biochemical properties, and function of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids are introduced. Basic protein structure and enzyme kinetics including basic allosteric interactions are considered. The integration of carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids in cellular intermediary metabolism is examined including pathway regulation and bioenergetics. Adaptation of the pathways to changes in nutritional or disease state is used to highlight interrelationships in cellular metabolism.

Instructor(s): P. Strieleman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20170, BIOS 20171, BIOS 20172

BIOS 20186 through 20190

This sequence is an introduction to the breadth of biology as a modern scientific discipline. It is designed for students who are preparing for a career in the biological sciences. Topics include cell and molecular biology, genetics, physiology and developmental biology. Students registering for this sequence must have completed or placed out of general or honors chemistry or be enrolled concurrently in general or honors chemistry.

BIOS 20186. Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to molecular and cellular biology that emphasizes the unity of cellular processes amongst all living organisms. Topics are the structure, function, and synthesis of nucleic acids and protein; structure and function of cell organelles and extracellular matrices; energetics; cell cycle; cells in tissues and cell-signaling; temporal organization and regulation of metabolism; regulation of gene expression; and altered cell functions in disease states.

Instructor(s): Variant A: G. Lamppa, A. Imamoto, T Christianson. Variant B: L. Mets, B. Glick, C. Schonbaum.     Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20150 and BIOS 20151. Second year standing or above. An average grade of C or higher in, and completion of, CHEM 10100-10200-10300 or CHEM 11100-11200-11300 or CHEM 12100-12200-12300, a 5 on the AP Chemistry exam, or consent of the department.

BIOS 20187. Fundamentals of Genetics. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to integrate recent developments in molecular genetics and the human genome project into the structure of classical genetics. Topics include Mendelian inheritance, linkage, tetrad analysis, DNA polymorphisms, human genome, chromosome aberrations and their molecular analysis, bacterial and virus genetics, regulatory mechanisms, DNA cloning, mechanism of mutation and recombination, and transposable elements.

Instructor(s): Variant A: Staff, T. Christianson. Winter. Variant B: Staff, C. Schonbaum, E. Kovar. Winter. L..     Terms Offered: Winter. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20186

BIOS 20188. Fundamentals of Physiology. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the physiological problems that animals (including humans) face in natural environments; solutions to these problems that the genome encodes; and the emergent physiological properties of the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels of organization. Lectures and labs emphasize physiological reasoning, problem solving, and current research. (Variant A.)

Instructor(s): D. McGehee, D. Hanck, M. Osadjan, C. Andrews     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20187
Note(s): Variant A.

BIOS 20189. Fundamentals of Developmental Biology. 100 Units.

This course covers both the classical experiments that contributed to our understanding of developmental biology and the recent explosion of information about development made possible by a combination of genetic and molecular approaches. Examples from both vertebrate and invertebrate systems are used to illustrate underlying principles of animal development. (Variant B.)

Instructor(s): R. Ho, S. Horne-Badovinac, C. Schonbaum, E. Kovar     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20187BB
Note(s): Variant B.

BIOS 20190. Principles of Developmental Biology. 100 Units.

This course is required of students in the BB sequence. This course will cover important events/processes such as differentiation, lineage, fate, and pattern formation that lead to development of tissues and ultimately the organism. We will review mechanisms that underlie developmental processes, as identified in model organisms—vertebrates (e.g., chicken and mice) and non-vertebrates (e.g., Drosophila). (Variant A)

Instructor(s): A. Imamoto, W. Du     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20186AA-BIOS 20187AA
Note(s): Variant A.

BIOS 20196 through 20198

Life, Ecosystems, and Evolution

This sequence is designed for students majoring in Biology and interested in pursuing a course of study in ecology and evolution or environmental science. The three-course sequence is an introduction to biological diversity, conservation biology, principles of ecology, and mechanisms of evolution. Topics include a broad survey of biological diversity and evolutionary relationships, the evidence for evolution, mechanisms of adaptation and speciation, life-history strategies, competition and predation, mechanisms that shape communities, and how these topics apply to current issues in conservation biology. Students in the Variant A sequence are required to take BIOS 20186AA, 20187AA, 20188AA, and 20190AA. Students in the Variant B sequence are required to take BIOS 20186BB, 20187BB, 20189BB, and 20242. Once a variant is started, students may not switch to the other variant unless they have petitioned the BSCD Senior Advisers (Megan McNulty or Christine Andrews).

BIOS 20196. Ecology and Conservation. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the contribution of ecological theory to the understanding of current issues in conservation biology. We emphasize quantitative methods and their use for applied problems in ecology (e.g., risk of extinction, impact of harvesting, role of species interaction, analysis of global change). Course material is drawn mostly from current primary literature; lab and field components complement concepts taught through lecture. Overnight field trip required.

Instructor(s): C. Pfister, E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20150, BIOS 20151 or BIOS 20152
Note(s): BIOS 20196 is identical to the previously offered BIOS 23251. Students who have taken BIOS 23251 should not enroll in BIOS 20196.

BIOS 20197. Evolution and Ecology. 100 Units.

This course surveys the basic principles of ecology and evolutionary biology. Topics in evolutionary biology include the evidence for evolution, the history of life, the mechanisms of evolution (e.g., mutation, selection, genetic drift), adaptation, speciation, the origin of evolutionary novelties, and phylogenetics. Topics in ecology include demography and life histories, competition, predation, and the interspecific interactions that shape the structure of ecological communities.

Instructor(s): S. Allesina, M. Kronforst, C. Andrews     Terms Offered: Winter. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20150 and BIOS 20151 or BIOS 20152
Note(s): BIOS 20197 is identical to the previously offered BIOS 20185. Students who have taken BIOS 20185 should not enroll in BIOS 20197.

BIOS 20198. Biodiversity. 100 Units.

An overview of the diversity of living organisms, both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, is presented. We emphasize the major groups of organisms, their evolutionary histories and relationships, and the biological and evolutionary implications of the characteristic features of each group. We discuss how the biosphere transformed to its present state over the past four billion years.

Instructor(s): M. LaBarbera, C. Andrews     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20150 except for Geophysical Sciences majors
Note(s): BIOS 20198 is identical to the previously offered BIOS 20184. Students who have taken BIOS 20184 should not enroll in BIOS 20198.

Three-Quarter AP 5 Fundamentals Sequence

This sequence is open only to students who (1) have a score of 5 on the AP biology test and (2) have first- or second-year standing. It is most appropriate for students considering careers in biomedical sciences. In addition to topics listed below, courses will cover experimental design and interpretation.

A score of 5 on the AP biology test, together with a sufficiently high score on the biology diagnostic exam, allows students to register for the three-quarter accelerated sequence below. This sequence meets requirements for the biological sciences major. Upon completion of the three-quarter AP 5 sequence, students will have three credits in the major and they will have met the general education requirement in the biological sciences. Nonmajors who are preparing for the health professions meet the general education requirement by completing the first two quarters of the AP Fundamentals Sequence. Beginning with the graduating class of 2015, all students must register for BIOS 20234 Molecular Biology of the Cell (Autumn Quarter), BIOS 20235 Biological Systems (Winter Quarter), and BIOS 20236 Biological Dynamics (Spring Quarter). To continue in the sequence, students must receive a minimum grade of B- in each course.* During their second year, AP 5 students are required to take BIOS 20242 Principles of Physiology (Autumn Quarter) and BIOS 20200 Introduction to Biochemistry (Spring Quarter).

* Students unable to continue in the sequence after the first term will receive one AP Biology credit to be applied to their Biology general education requirement along with BIOS 20234 and may continue in the Biological Sciences major by taking BIOS 20187AA or BIOS 20187BB and then completing the requirements for Tracks A or B. Students unable to continue after the second term, may continue in the Biological Sciences major by completing BIOS 20188 or BIOS 20189 and then completing the requirements for Tracks A or B.

BIOS 20234-20235-20236. Molecular Biology of the Cell; Biological Systems; Biological Dynamics.

BIOS 20234. Molecular Biology of the Cell. 100 Units.

This course covers the fundamentals of molecular and cellular biology. Topics include protein structure and function; DNA replication, repair, and recombination; transcription, translation, and control of gene expression; cellular structure; cell division; protein modification and stability; cellular signaling; and cell growth, cell death, and cancer biology.

Instructor(s): M. Glotzer, A. Ruthenburg, N. Bhasin. L.     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Score of 5 on the AP biology test
Note(s): To continue in the sequence, students must receive a minimum grade of B- in BIOS 20234

BIOS 20235. Biological Systems. 100 Units.

Students preparing for the health professions must take BIOS 20235 and 20242 in sequence. This course builds upon molecular cell biology foundations to explore how biological systems function. Topics include classical and molecular genetics, developmental signaling networks, genomics, proteomics, transcriptomics, and biological networks.

Instructor(s): I. Rebay, R. Hudson, N. Bhasin. L.     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): A grade of B- or above in BIOS 20234

BIOS 20236. Biological Dynamics. 100 Units.

This class introduces the use of quantitative approaches to study biological dynamics. Deeper exploration of cellular and developmental processes introduced in BIOS 20234 and BIOS 20235 will emphasize the use of quantitative analysis and mathematical modeling to infer biological mechanisms from molecular interactions.  The lab portion of the class will introduce basic approaches for simulating biological dynamics using examples drawn from the lectures.

Instructor(s): E. Munro, M. Rust, E. Kovar.     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20234 and BIOS 20235 with a minimum grade of B- in each course.

BIOS 20242. Principles of Physiology. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the physiological problems that animals (including humans) face in natural environments; solutions to these problems that the genome encodes; and the emergent physiological properties of the molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and organismal levels of organization. We emphasize physiological reasoning, problem solving, and current research.

Instructor(s): M. Feder, E. Kovar.      Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20236 or BIOS 20189 or consent of instructor

Course Summary

The following list provides information for students who are planning programs of study. Letters after course titles refer to the subject matter presented in the course: (C) Cell and Molecular, Genetics, Developmental Biology, or Biochemistry; (CI) Computer Intensive; (E&E) Ecology and Evolution; (F) Fundamentals Sequence; (I) Integrative Biology; (M) Minor Program in Interdisciplinary Sciences; (MIV) Microbiology, Immunology, or Virology; (N) Neuroscience; (O) Organismal; and (S) Specialized. L indicates courses with laboratory.

Autumn Quarter

20173. Human Physiology. L. (F)

20186. Fundamentals of Cell and Molecular Biology. L. (F)

20190. Principles of Developmental Biology. (F)

20196. Ecology and Conservation. L. (F)

20200. Introduction to Biochemistry. L. (F)

20234. Molecular Biology of the Cell. L. (F)

20242. Principles of Physiology. L. (F)

21236. Genetics of Model Organisms. (C)

21306. Human Genetics and Evolution. (C)

21416. Stem Cells and Regeneration. (C)

22233. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. L. (O)

22306. Evolution and Development. (O)

23248. Primate Behavior and Ecology. (E&E)

23253. Apes and Human Evolution. (E&E)

23261. Invertebrate Paleobiology and Evolution. (E&E)

23266. Evolutionary Adaptation. (E&E)

23404. Reconstructing the Tree of Life: An Introduction to Phylogenetics. (E&E)

24203. Introduction to Neuroscience. (N)

24208. Survey of Systems Neuroscience. (N)

24209. Photons to Consciousness. (N)

25206. Fundamentals of Bacterial Physiology. (MIV)

25226. Endocrinology I: Cell Signaling. (MIV)

25256. Immunobiology. (MIV)

25260. Host Pathogen Interactions. (MIV)

25309. Cancer Metastasis. (MIV)

26120. An Introduction to Bioinformatics and Proteomics. L. (CI)

26210. Mathematical Models for Biological Sciences I. (CI)

29286. Biological and Cultural Evolution. (S)

29323. Health Care and the Limits of State Action. (S)

Winter Quarter

20152.  Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology. L. (Advanced) (F)

20170. Microbial and Human Cell Biology. L. (F)

20175. Biochemistry and Nutrition. (F)

20187. Fundamentals of Genetics. L. (F)

20197. Evolution and Ecology. L. (F)

20235. Biological Systems. L. (F)

20242. Physiology. (F - AP5)

21206. Human Evolution and Disease. (C)

21208. Fundamentals of Molecular Biology. (C)

21216. Introductory Statistical Genetics. (C)

21229. Genome Informatics: How Cells Reorganize Genomes. (C)

21237. Developmental Mechanisms. (C)

21349. Protein Structure and Functions in Medicine. (C)

21415. Stem Cells in Development and Diseases. (C)

22226. Human Developmental Biology. (O)

22242. Biological Fluid Mechanics. L. (O)

22247. Principles of Pharmacology. (O)

22243. Biomechanics of Organisms. L. (O)

23100. Dinosaur Science. (E&E)

23247. Bioarchaeology and the Human Skeleton. (E&E)

23249. Animal Behavior. (E&E)

23258. Molecular Evolution I: Fundamentals and Principles. (E&E)

23281. Evolutionary Aspects of Gene Regulation. (C)

23289. Marine Ecology. (E&E)

23406. Biogeography. (E&E)

23411. Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases. (E&E)

24204. Cellular Neurobiology. (N)

24231. Methods in Computational Neuroscience. L. (N)

24246. Neurobiology of Disease I. (N)

25108. Cancer Biology. (MIV)

25216. Molecular Basis of Bacterial Disease. (MIV)

25227. Endocrinology II: Systems and Physiology. (MIV)

25258. Immunopathology. (MIV)

25320. Epigenetics and Cancer. (MIV)

25407. Organ Transplantation. (MIV)

26211. Mathematical Models for Biological Sciences II. (CI)

29279. Topics in Global Health. (S)

29281. Introduction to Medical Ethics. (S)

29294. Introduction to Global Health. (S)

29300. Biological Psychology. (S)

Spring Quarter

20150.  How Do We Understand the Biosphere? (F)

20151. Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology. L. (Basic) (F)

20152.  Introduction to Quantitative Modeling in Biology. L. (Advanced) (F)

20171. Human Genetics and Developmental Biology. L. (F)

20172. Mathematical Modeling for Pre-Med Students I. L. (F)

20188. Fundamentals of Physiology. L. (F)

20189. Fundamentals of Developmental Biology. L. (F)

20198. Biodiversity. L. (F)

20200. Introduction to Biochemistry. L. (F)

21207. Cell Biology. (C)

21317. Topics in Biological Chemistry. (C)

21328. Biophysics of Biomolecules. (C)

21346. Systems Analysis of Proteins and Post-Translational Modifications. (C)

21356. Vertebrate Development. (O)

21357. Extracellular Matrices: Chemistry and Biology. (O)

21358. Simulation, Modeling, and Computation in Biophysics. (C)

21407. Image Processing In Biology. (C)

21409.  Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Function. (C)

21410. Synthetic Biology and Regulation of Genes. (C)

21417. Systems Biology: Molecular Regulatory Logic of Networks. (C)

22236. Reproductive Biology of Primates. (C)

22244. Introduction to Invertebrate Biology. L. (O)

22249. Principles of Toxicology. (O)

22250. Chordates: Evolution and Comparative Anatomy. (O)

23232. Ecology and Evolution in the Southwest. (E&E)

23233. Ecology and Evolution in the Southwest: Field School. (E&E)

23252. Field Ecology. L. (E&E)

23254. Mammalian Ecology. L. (E&E)

23286. An Introduction to Population Genetics. (C)

23299. Plant Development and Molecular Genetics. (E&E)

24205. Systems Neuroscience. L. (N)

24206. Peering Inside the Black Box: Neocortex. (N)

24218. Molecular Neurobiology. (N)

24232. Computational Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. (N)

24247. Neurobiology of Disease III. (N)

24408. Signal Analysis and Modeling for Neuroscientists. L. (N)

25109. Topics in Reproductive Biology and Cancer. (MIV)

25126. Animal Models of Human Disease. (MIV)

25129. Animal Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorders. (MIV)

25228. Endocrinology III: Human Disease. (MIV)

25266. Molecular Immunology. (MIV)

25287. Introduction to Virology. (MIV)

25308. Heterogeneity in Human Cancer: Etiology and Treatment. (MIV)

25310.  Pharmacogenomics: Discovery and Implementation. (MIV)

25419. Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Networks, and Modeling. (MIV)

28407. Genomics and Systems Biology. (M)

29270. A History of Cell and Molecular Biology. (S)

29285. Evolution and Medicine: Brain and Sex. (S)

29288. Genetics in an Evolutionary Perspective. (S)

29313. Medical Ethics: Who Decides and on What Basis? (S)

29317. Issues in Women's Health. (S)

29318. Principles of Epidemiology. (S)

29319. What Genomes Teach about Evolution. (S)

29321. The Problem of Evil: Disease? (S)

29322. The Role of Animals in Modern Society. (S)

29324. The Social Brain: Social Isolation and Loneliness. (S)

29326. Introduction to Medical Physics and Medical Imaging. (S)

Advanced-Level Courses

There are three types of advanced courses. In courses listed under the heading General Courses, instructors present the general principles and recent developments for broad areas within the biological sciences. Such courses are usually offered on a regular basis, either annually or biennially. In courses listed under the heading Specialized Courses, the focus is on either a topic of particular interest to the instructor or on topics that are examined at a more advanced level than in General Courses. Such courses are offered less regularly, as warranted by student and faculty interest. Unless otherwise stated, most General Courses and Specialized Courses assume mastery of the material covered in the Fundamentals Sequences. Courses listed under the headings Specialized Courses and Independent Study and Research may not be counted toward the courses required for the major with the exception of BIOS 00296 Undergraduate Honors Research.

General Courses

Most general and specialized courses that are at the 20000-level and above assume mastery of the material covered in the Fundamentals Sequences. Students who have not yet completed the Fundamentals Sequence should consult with the individual instructor and the BSCD senior adviser before registering for the following courses. Students must confirm their registration with their instructors by the second class meeting or their registration may be canceled.

BIOS 20191. Integrative Physiology. 100 Units.

This course investigates body function in animals (including humans) at times of rest and under various environmental stresses such as temperature, salinity, altitude, fasting, activity, and others. The lectures and labs of this course will draw together concepts of physics, chemistry, and quantitative biology to explore the interactions of molecules, cells, tissues, and organs in living organisms. Students will be asked to serve as test subjects in the various laboratory exercises of this course.

Instructor(s): M. Osadjan     Terms Offered: Winter. L.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of BIOS 20186BB-20188

BIOS 20200. Introduction to Biochemistry. 100 Units.

This course meets the biochemistry requirement in the biological sciences major. This course examines the chemical nature of cellular components, enzymes, and mechanisms of enzyme activity, energy interconversion, and biosynthetic reactions. Strong emphasis is given to control and regulation of metabolism through macromolecular interactions.

Instructor(s): M. Makinen, P. Strieleman, L.      Terms Offered: Autumn, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sciences fundamentals sequence with an average grade of C and CHEM 22000-22100/23100 with an average grade of C.

BIOS 21206. Human Evolution and Disease. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to provide an evolutionary perspective on the molecular genetic bases of human diseases and non-clinical human traits.  The course covers fundamental concepts and recent progress in Mendelian and complex trait mapping, as well as evolutionary principles as they apply to genomics analyses of DNA sequence variation in human populations.  These topics are introduced through lectures and are complements by discussion and student presentations of original research papers.

Instructor(s): A. Di Rienzo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing; BIOS 20182, 20192, BIOS 20187, or BIOS 20235

BIOS 21207. Cell Biology. 100 Units.

Third- or fourth-year standing. This course covers fundamental concepts in gene expression and RNA processing, and then focuses on ribosome dynamics, regulation of protein synthesis and turnover, chaperone and proteasome functions, RNA and protein shuttling in and out of the nucleus, trafficking to different cellular compartments, cytoskeleton structures, movement through the endoplasmic reticulum and golgi, mitochondrial and chloroplast biogenesis, signaling pathways from the cell surface to the nucleus, cell-cell interactions, and apoptosis. Experimental approaches in cell biology are emphasized. Students participate in discussions on specialized topics based on original research reviews.

Instructor(s): G. Lamppa     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200 or equivalent

BIOS 21208. Fundamentals of Molecular Biology. 100 Units.

This course covers the structure of genetic material, chromatin, replication, DNA repair and transcription, including its regulation, RNA processing, post-transcriptional regulation, and protein synthesis. Third- or fourth-year standing is required for undergraduates; any graduate student may enroll.

Instructor(s): U. Storb, J. Staley     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): For College students: Basic knowledge of genetics and biochemistry
Equivalent Course(s): BCMB 31000,MGCB 31000

BIOS 21216. Intro Statistical Genetics. 100 Units.

This course focuses on genetic models for compex human disorders and quantitative traits. Topics covered also include linkage and linkage disequilibrium mapping and genetic models for complex traits, and the explicit and implicit assumptions of such models.

Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HGEN 47100

BIOS 21229. Genome Informatics: How Cells Reorganize Genomes. 100 Units.

This course deals with the molecular and cellular basis of genetic change. We discuss DNA repair functions, mutator loci, induced mutation, mechanisms of homologous recombination and gene conversion, site-specific recombination, transposable elements and DNA rearrangements, reverse transcription and retrotransposons, transposable vector systems for making transgenic organisms, and genetic engineering of DNA sequences in antibody formation. Discussion section required.

Instructor(s): J. Shapiro     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20182 or 20192 or 20187

BIOS 21236. Genetics of Model Organisms. 100 Units.

A small number of organisms have been chosen for extensive study by biologists. The popularity of these organisms derives largely from the fact that their genomes can be easily manipulated, allowing sophisticated characterization of biological function. This course covers modern methods for genetic analysis in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster), plants (Arabidopsis thaliana), and mice (Mus musculus). Case studies demonstrate how particular strengths of each system have been exploited to understand such processes as genetic recombination, pattern formation, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

Instructor(s): D. Bishop, J. Malamy, E. Ferguson, A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20182 or 20192 or 20187

BIOS 21237. Developmental Mechanisms. 100 Units.

This course provides an overview of the fundamental questions of developmental biology, with particular emphasis on the genetic, molecular and cell biological experiments that have been employed to reach mechanistic answers to these questions.  Topics covered will include formation of the primary body axes, the role of local signaling interactions in regulating cell fate and proliferation, the cellular basis of morphogenesis, and stem cells.

Instructor(s): E. Ferguson, R. Fehon     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): For undergraduates only: BIOS 20182, 20192, 20187, or 20235
Equivalent Course(s): DVBI 36400,MGCB 36400

BIOS 21249. Organization, Expression, and Transmission of Genome Information. 100 Units.

This seminar course examines how genomes are organized for coding sequence expression and transmission to progeny cells. The class discusses a series of key papers in the following areas: bacterial responses to external stimuli and genome damage, control of eukaryotic cell differentiation, complex loci regulating developmental expression in animals, centromere structure and function, position effect variegation, chromatin domains, chromatin remodeling, RNAi, and chromatin formatting.

Instructor(s): J. Shapiro     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence. Recommended for AP5 students

BIOS 21306. Human Genetics and Evolution. 100 Units.

Open only to students with advanced standing who are majoring in the biological sciences or preparing for the medical professions. This course deals with issues in genetics of variations within, as well as between, modern human populations. Normal genetic variations and the genetic basis of human diseases are explored with an emphasis at the molecular level. We stress understanding the fundamental concepts of genetics and evolution using mainly, but not exclusively, human studies as examples. Genome organization, genetic mapping, population genetic theories, and molecular evolution of humans are covered.

Instructor(s): C.-I. Wu     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of Biological Sciences Fundamentals Sequence, or consent of instructor

BIOS 21317. Topics in Biological Chemistry. 100 Units.

Required of students who are majoring in biological chemistry. This course examines a variety of biological problems from a chemical and structural perspective, with an emphasis on molecular machines. Topics include macromolecular structure-function relationships, DNA synthesis and repair, RNA folding and function, protein synthesis, targeting and translocation, molecular motors, membrane proteins, photosynthesis, and mechanisms of signal transduction. Computer graphics exercises and in-class journal clubs complement the lecture topics.

Instructor(s): P. Rice, R. Keenan     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200

BIOS 21328. Biophysics of Biomolecules. 100 Units.

This course covers the properties of proteins, RNA, and DNA, as well as their interactions. We emphasize the interplay between structure, thermodynamics, folding, and function at the molecular level. Topics include cooperativity, linked equilibrium, hydrogen exchange, electrostatics, diffusion, and binding.

Instructor(s): T. Sosnick     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): BCMB 32200,BPHS 31000

BIOS 21338. Epithelial Cell Biology. 100 Units.

This course provides a fundamental understanding of epithelial cell biology and pathobiology. Topics include the molecular mechanisms that drive polarization, apical and basolateral sorting, cell-cell and cell–matrix interactions, and disease states of epithelial cells (e.g., cancer, ischemia).

Instructor(s): K. Goss, K. Matlin, P. Bouyer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): A Fundamentals Sequence (BIOS 20180s or 20190s, or AP 5 sequence)
Equivalent Course(s): CABI 34000,CPHY 34000

BIOS 21346. Systems Analysis of Proteins and Post-Translational Modifications. 100 Units.

Proteins play a major role in all cellular processes and their modification represents a major vehicle for expanding the genetic code of the cellular proteome (the inventory of all protein species in a cell). Given the crucial roles in the major cellular pathways and diseases such as cancer, proteins and PTM studies are a critical aspect of most biological projects. This course will cover concepts (including biochemistry, proteomics/systems biology, molecular biology, and bioinformatics), and practical techniques for identifying and quantifying proteins and PTMs. Topics include, but are not limited to quantification of protein interactions, abundances, modifications including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, and lysine acetylation, and subsequent discussion of biochemical and functional roles of proteins and PTMs in regulating biological networks.

Instructor(s): R. Jones, Y. Zhao     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200
Equivalent Course(s): CABI 40300,IMMU 40300,MOMN 40300

BIOS 21349. Protein Structure and Functions in Medicine. 100 Units.

This course explores how molecular machinery works in the context of medicine (vision, fight or flight, cancer, and action of drugs). We first explore the physical and biochemical properties of proteins in the context of cellular signaling. We then examine how proteins and other cellular components make up the signal transduction pathway of humans and conduct their biological functions. The course engages students to strengthen their scientific communication and teaching skills via the in-class podcast, oral examinations, computer-aided structural presentations, student lectures, and discussions.

Instructor(s): W-J. Tang     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence. Biochemistry strongly recommended.
Equivalent Course(s): CABI 31900,NURB 31349

BIOS 21356. Vertebrate Development. 100 Units.

This advanced-level course combines lectures, student presentations, and discussion sessions.  It covers major topics on the developmental biology of embryos (e.g. formation of the germ line, gastrulation, segmentation, nervous system development, limb pattering, organogenesis).  We make extensive use of the primary literature and emphasize experimental approaches (e.g. classical embryology, genetics, molecular genetics).

Instructor(s): V. Prince, C. Ragsdale.     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): For College students: BIOS 20180s or 20190, or AP 5 sequence
Equivalent Course(s): DVBI 35600,MGCB 35600

BIOS 21357. Extracellular Matrices: Chemistry and Biology. 100 Units.

This course covers advanced topics dealing with the biology and chemistry of the extracellular matrix, cell-matrix interactions, and current methodologies for engineering these interfaces.

Instructor(s): J. Collier, M. Mrksich, M. Gardel, K. Matlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20180s or 20190s, AP 5 sequence, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): MPMM 33000

BIOS 21358. Simulation, Modeling, and Computation in Biophysics. 100 Units.

This course develops skills for modeling biomolecular systems.  Fundamental knowledge covers basic statistical mechanics, free energy, and kinetic concepts.  Tools include molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations, random walk and diffusion equations, and methods to generate random Gaussian and Poisson distributors.  A term project involves writing a small program that simulates a process.  Familiarity with a programming language or Mathlab would be valuable.

Instructor(s): B. Roux     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200 and Bios 26210-26211, or consent from instructor
Equivalent Course(s): BCMB 31358,CPNS 31358

BIOS 21407. Image Processing in Biology. 100 Units.

Whether one is trying to read radio signals from faraway galaxies or to understand molecular structures, it is necessary to understand how to read, interpret, and process the data that contain the desired information. In this course, we learn how to process the information contained in images of molecules as seen in the electron microscope. We also deal with the principles involved in processing electron microscope images, including the underlying analytical methods and their computer implementation.

Instructor(s): R. Josephs     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): For College students: One year of calculus
Equivalent Course(s): MGCB 34300

BIOS 21409. Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Function. 100 Units.

Cytoskeleton Dynamics and Function will focus on the regulation and dynamics of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton and the fundamental cellular process the cytoskeleton controls including division, motility, polarity, endocytosis, and transport. Equal emphasis will be given to discussing the mechanistically diverse molecular factors that regulate cytoskeletal polymer dynamics, the cellular processes they control, and the array of interdisciplinary strategies researchers utilize to investigate the cytoskeleton including genetics, cell biology, time-lapse fluorescent microscopy, biochemistry and biophysics. Lectures will be combined with reading and discussion of primary research articles to bridge the gap between scientific exploration and knowledge.

Instructor(s): D. Kovar, M. Gupta     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20234 or BIOS 20186 and BIOS 20200, or consent of instructor. Second, third, or fourth-year standing.

BIOS 21410. Synthetic Biology and Regulation of Genes. 100 Units.

This lecture and lab course will take an empirical approach to understanding gene regulation during development in Drosophila. Topics include synthetic biology, Drosophila embryonic development, gene regulation, and enhancer evolution. Enhancers are short regions of the genome composed of clusters of transcription factor binding sites. Using the even-skipped stripe 2 enhancer as a model system, the class will explore what is currently known about enhancer molecular organization and how it controls gene expression during development. We will then expand upon that knowledge. Using modeling software, students will design their own enhancers. They will then construct these novel sequences using cutting-edge DNA synthesis methods. Finally, students will clone their synthetic enhancers into an expression vector and send the constructs for injection into Drosophila embryos. Reporter patterns generated by the students’ enhancers will be uploaded onto the course website after conclusion of the course. Students who produce usable data may be involved in co-authoring a resulting publication.

Instructor(s): J. Moran, J. Reinitz     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20182, 20192, 20187 or 20235. Third or fourth-year standing.

BIOS 21415. Stem Cells in Development and Diseases. 100 Units.

This course will provide a survey of concepts and biology of stem cells based on experimental evidence for their involvement in developmental processes and human diseases. Topics will discuss classic models as well as recent advance made in the biomedical research community.

Instructor(s): A. Imamoto, X. Wu     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20186 and BIOS 20187

BIOS 21416. Stem Cells and Regeneration. 100 Units.

The course will focus on the basic biology of stem cells and regeneration, highlighting biomedically relevant findings that have the potential to translate to the clinic. We will cover embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells, as well as adult stem cells from a variety of systems, both invertebrate and vertebrates.

Instructor(s): E. Ferguson, V. Prince, J. Cunningham, J. De Jong, X. Wu     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): For undergraduates only: completion of a biological sciences fundamentals sequence
Equivalent Course(s): DVBI 36200

BIOS 21417. Systems Biology: Molecular Regulatory Logic of Networks. 100 Units.

Systems biologists investigate networks of genes and model how they function. They do this to better understand the nature of systems-based mechanisms that control development, physiology, evolution, and disease resistance. Quantitative techniques and computational tools help investigators analyze heterogeneous data about molecular networks to uncover meaningful relationships about key components. These studies inspire a framework for understanding the molecular regulatory logic of living states. Related principles about dynamic biological systems are the focus of the course.

Instructor(s): B. Aprison, Staff.     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20186 and BIOS 20187

BIOS 22226. Human Developmental Biology. 100 Units.

This course covers the anatomic and physiologic development of the human from conception to birth, on an organ-by-organ basis. Special attention is paid to the profound physiologic events that take place in the transition from intra-uterine to extra-uterine life. Examples of clinical conditions due to specific errors in development are presented in context. Genetic regulation of organogenesis with reference to mouse models are discussed where the data are available.

Instructor(s): J. Marks     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20183, 20187, 20189, 20193, 20194, 20235, or 20242

BIOS 22233. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 100 Units.

This course covers the structure and function of major anatomical systems of vertebrates. Lectures focus on vertebrate diversity, biomechanics, and behavior (from swimming and feeding to running, flying, seeing, and hearing). Labs involve detailed dissection of animals (muscles, organs, brains) and a focus on skull bones in a broad comparative context from fishes to frogs, turtles, alligators, mammals, birds, and humans. Field trip to Field Museum and visit to medical school lab for human dissection required.

Instructor(s): M. Westneat. L.     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Fundamentals or AP 5 sequence

BIOS 22236. Reproductive Biology of Primates. 100 Units.

The aim of this advanced-level course is to provide a comparative overview of adaptations for reproduction in primates as a background to human reproductive biology. Where appropriate, reference will be made to other mammals and some comparisons will be even wider. Ultimately, the aim of all comparisons is to arrive at concrete lessons for human reproduction, notably in the realm of obstetrics and gynecology. For this reason, the course will be of interest for medical students as well as for those studying anthropology, biology or psychology.

Instructor(s): R. Martin     Terms Offered: Spring (2016)
Prerequisite(s): Biological Sciences Fundamentals or AP 5 sequence

BIOS 22242. Biological Fluid Mechanics. 100 Units.

Prior physics course required; prior chemistry and calculus courses recommended. This course introduces fluid mechanics and the interactions between biology and the physics of fluid flow (both air and water). Topics range from the fluid mechanics of blood flow to the physics (and biology) of flight in birds and insects.

Instructor(s): M. LaBarbera. L.     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement for the biological sciences
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 34200,ORGB 34200

BIOS 22243. Biomechanics of Organisms. 100 Units.

Prior chemistry, physics, and calculus courses recommended. This course examines how organisms cope with their physical environment, covering the properties of biological materials, mechanical analysis of morphology, and principles of design optimization. We emphasize support systems of organisms but also examine aspects of cardiovascular design. Mechanical properties of biomaterials are analyzed in relation to their underlying biochemical organization and biophysical properties, with mathematical treatment at an introductory level. The lab research project is optional.

Instructor(s): M. LaBarbera. L.     Terms Offered: Winter 2013
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 34300,ORGB 34300

BIOS 22244. Introduction to Invertebrate Biology. 100 Units.

This is a survey of the diversity, structure, and evolution of the invertebrate phyla, with emphasis on the major living and fossil invertebrate groups. Structure-function relationships and the influence of body plans on the evolutionary history of the invertebrate phyla are stressed.

Instructor(s): M. LaBarbera. L.     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 34100

BIOS 22247. Principles of Pharmacology. 100 Units.

This course considers the physiological and biochemical bases of drug actions, common pharmacological methods, and a small set of specific drugs and their targets.

Instructor(s): D. Hanck, P Singleton     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200

BIOS 22249. Principles of Toxicology. 100 Units.

This course covers basic concepts of toxicology including routes of exposure and uptake, metabolic conversion, and elimination of toxic agents, as well as fundamental laws governing the interaction of external chemicals with biological systems. In addition to toxins of biological origin, we also consider a set of physical and chemical toxicants in the environment, including air pollution, radiation, manufactured chemicals, metals, and pesticides. Methods of risk assessment will also be considered.

Instructor(s): Y-Y He     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 22247

BIOS 22250. Chordates: Evolution and Comparative Anatomy. 100 Units.

Chordate biology emphasizes the diversity and evolution of modern vertebrate life, drawing on a range of sources (from comparative anatomy and embryology to paleontology, biomechanics, and developmental genetics). Much of the work is lab-based, with ample opportunity to gain firsthand experience of the repeated themes of vertebrate body plans, as well as some of the extraordinary specializations manifest in living forms. The instructors, who are both actively engaged in vertebrate-centered research, take this course beyond the boundaries of standard textbook content.

Instructor(s): M. Coates     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence. Recommended for AP5 students.
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 30250,ORGB 30250

BIOS 22260. Vertebrate Structure and Function. 100 Units.

This course is devoted to vertebrate bones and muscles, with a focus on some remarkable functions they perform. The first part takes a comparative look at the vertebrate skeleton via development and evolution, from lamprey to human. The major functional changes are examined as vertebrates adapted to life in the water, on land, and in the air. The second part looks at muscles and how they work in specific situations, including gape-feeding, swimming, leaping, digging, flying, and walking on two legs. Dissection of preserved vertebrate specimens required.

Instructor(s): P. Sereno. L.     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): consent of instructor

BIOS 22306. Evolution and Development. 100 Units.

The course will provide a developmental perspective on animal body plans in phylogenetic context. The course will start with a few lectures, accompanied by reading assignments. Students will be required to present a selected research topic that fits the broader goal of the course and will be asked to submit a referenced written version of it after their oral presentation. Grading will be based on their presentation (oral and written) as well as their contributions to class discussions.

Instructor(s): U. Schmidt-Ott     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced undergraduates may enroll with the consent of the instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): ORGB 33850,DVBI 33850,EVOL 33850

BIOS 23100. Dinosaur Science. 100 Units.

This introductory-level (but intensive) class includes a ten-day expedition to South Dakota and Wyoming (departing just after graduation). We study basic geology (e.g., rocks and minerals, stratigraphy, Earth history, mapping skills) and basic evolutionary biology (e.g., vertebrate and especially skeletal anatomy, systematics and large-scale evolutionary patterns). This course provides the knowledge needed to discover and understand the meaning of fossils as they are preserved in the field, which is applied to actual paleontological sites. Participants fly from Chicago to Rapid City, and then travel by van to field sites. There they camp, prospect for, and excavate fossils from the Cretaceous and Jurassic Periods. Field trip required.

Instructor(s): P. Sereno. L.     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and a prior course in general science, preferably geology or biology

BIOS 23232. Ecology and Evolution in the Southwest. 100 Units.

This lecture course focuses on the ecological communities of the Southwest, primarily on the four subdivisions of the North American Desert, the Chihuahuan, Sonoran, Mohave, and Great Basin Deserts. Lecture topics include climate change and the impact on the flora and fauna of the region; adaptations to arid landscapes; evolutionary, ecological, and conservation issues in the arid Southwest, especially relating to isolated mountain ranges; human impacts on the biota, land, and water; and how geological and climatic forces shape deserts.

Instructor(s): E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences, BIOS 20185, or BIOS 20197, or consent of instructor

BIOS 23233. Ecology and Evolution in the Southwest: Field School. 100 Units.

This lecture/lab course is the same course as BIOS 13111, but includes a lab section preparatory to a two-week field trip at end of Spring Quarter, specific dates to be announced. Our goal in the lab is to prepare proposals for research projects to conduct in the field portion of this course. Field conditions are rugged. Travel is by twelve-passenger van. Lodging during most of this course is tent camping on developed campsites.

Instructor(s): E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20185 or BIOS 20197 and consent of instructor

BIOS 23247. Bioarchaeology and the Human Skeleton. 100 Units.

This course is intended to provide students in archaeology with a thorough understanding of bioanthropological and osteological methods used in the interpretation of prehistoric societies by introducing bioanthropological methods and theory. In particular, lab instruction stresses hands-on experience in analyzing the human skeleton, whereas seminar classes integrate bioanthropological theory and application to specific cases throughout the world. Lab and seminar-format class meet weekly.

Instructor(s): M. C. Lozada     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 28400,ANTH 38800

BIOS 23248. Primate Behavior and Ecology. 100 Units.

This course is the second of three in the Primate Biology and Human Evolution sequence (see also BIOS 23241 and BIOS 23253). This course explores the behavior and ecology of nonhuman primates with emphasis on their natural history and evolution. Specific topics include methods for the study of primate behavior, history of primate behavior research, socioecology, foraging, predation, affiliation, aggression, mating, parenting, development, communication, cognition, and evolution of human behavior.

Instructor(s): D. Maestripieri     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences

BIOS 23249. Animal Behavior. 100 Units.

This course introduces the mechanism, ecology, and evolution of behavior, primarily in nonhuman species, at the individual and group level. Topics include the genetic basis of behavior, developmental pathways, communication, physiology and behavior, foraging behavior, kin selection, mating systems and sexual selection, and the ecological and social context of behavior. A major emphasis is placed on understanding and evaluating scientific studies and their field and lab techniques.

Instructor(s): S. Pruett-Jones (even years), J. Mateo (odd years)     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 23249,PSYC 23249

BIOS 23252. Field Ecology. 100 Units.

Open only to students who are planning to pursue graduate research. This course introduces habitats and biomes in North America and the methods of organizing and carrying out field research projects in ecology and behavior, focusing on questions of evolutionary significance. A two-week field trip to southern Florida during the Winter/Spring Quarter break consists of informal lectures and discussions, individual study, and group research projects. During Spring Quarter, there are lectures on the ecology of the areas visited and on techniques and methods of field research. Field trip required.

Instructor(s): S. Pruett-Jones     Terms Offered: Spring. This course is offered in alternate (odd) years.
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor

BIOS 23253. Apes and Human Evolution. 100 Units.

This course is a critical examination of the ways in which data on the behavior, morphology, and genetics of apes have been used to elucidate human evolution. We emphasize bipedalism, hunting, meat eating, tool behavior, food sharing, cognitive ability, language, self-awareness, and sociability. Visits to local zoos and museums, film screenings, and demonstrations with casts of fossils and skeletons required.

Instructor(s): R. Tuttle     Terms Offered: Autumn, Spring
Note(s): BIOS 23241 recommended. Autumn course at University of Chicago Center in Paris; Spring course on campus.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 28600

BIOS 23254. Mammalian Ecology. 100 Units.

This course introduces the diversity and classification of mammals and their ecological relationships. Lectures cover natural history, evolution, and functional morphology of major taxonomic groups. Lab sessions focus on skeletal morphology, identifying traits of major taxonomic groups, and methods of conducting research in the field. Participation in field trips, occasionally on Saturday, is required.

Instructor(s): E. Larsen     Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences and third-year standing; or BIOS 20184 or 20185, or 20187

BIOS 23258. Molecular Evolution I: Fundamentals and Principles. 100 Units.

The comparative analysis of DNA sequence variation has become an important tool in molecular biology, genetics, and evolutionary biology. This course covers major theories that form the foundation for understanding evolutionary forces that govern molecular variation, divergence, and genome organization. Particular attention is given to selectively neutral models of variation and evolution, and to alternative models of natural selection. The course provides practical information on accessing genome databases, searching for homologous sequences, aligning DNA and protein sequences, calculating sequence divergence, producing sequence phylogenies, and estimating evolutionary parameters.

Instructor(s): M. Kreitman L.     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Two quarters of biology and calculus, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ECEV 44001,EVOL 44001

BIOS 23261. Invertebrate Paleobiology and Evolution. 100 Units.

This course provides a detailed overview of the morphology, paleobiology, evolutionary history, and practical uses of the invertebrate and microfossil groups commonly found in the fossil record. Emphasis is placed on understanding key anatomical and ecological innovations within each group and interactions among groups responsible for producing the observed changes in diversity, dominance, and ecological community structure through evolutionary time. Labs supplement lecture material with specimen-based and practical application sections. An optional field trip offers experience in the collection of specimens and raw paleontological data. Several "Hot Topics" lectures introduce important, exciting, and often controversial aspects of current paleontological research linked to particular invertebrate groups. (L)

Instructor(s): M. Webster     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): GEOS 13100 and 13200, or equivalent. Students majoring in biological sciences only; Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences, or consent of instructor.
Note(s): Not offered 2014-2015
Equivalent Course(s): GEOS 26300,EVOL 32400,GEOS 36300

BIOS 23262. Mammalian Evolutionary Biology. 100 Units.

This course examines mammalian evolution—the rise of living mammals from ancient fossil ancestors stretching back over 300 million years. Lectures focus on the evolutionary diversification of mammals, including anatomical structure, evolutionary adaptations, life history, and developmental patterns. Labs involve detailed comparative study of mammalian skeletons, dissection of muscular and other systems, trips to the Field Museum to study fossil collections, and studies of human anatomy at the Pritzker School of Medicine. Students will learn mammalian evolution, functional morphology, and development, and will gain hands-on experience in dissection. Taught by instructors who are active in scientific research on mammalian evolution, the course is aimed to convey new insights and the latest progress in mammalian paleontology, functional morphology, and evolution.

Instructor(s): Z. Luo, K. Angielczyk     Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): Second-year standing and completion of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence; or GEOS 13100-13200 or GEOS 22300, or consent of instructors.

BIOS 23266. Evolutionary Adaptation. 100 Units.

This course deals with the adaptation of organisms to their environments and focuses on methods for studying adaptation. Topics include definitions and examples of adaptation, the notion of optimization, adaptive radiations, and the comparative method in evolutionary biology.

Instructor(s): C. Andrews     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20184 or 20185, 20197 or 20198, or AP 5 sequence, or consent of instructor

BIOS 23281. Evolutionary Aspects of Gene Regulation. 100 Units.

Using primary research literature, this course examines recent advances in understanding of evolution of gene regulation. Topics include patterns and forces of evolutionary change in regulatory DNA and transcription factors, genetic changes that are responsible for phenotypic evolution, and discovery and evolutionary of implications of gene control by microRNAs.

Instructor(s): I. Ruvinsky     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 32600,ECEV 32500,GENE 32500,DVBI 32500,ORGB 32600

BIOS 23286. An Introduction to Population Genetics. 100 Units.

Population genetics connects genetics and evolution.  It addresses such questions as: What determines the level of genetic variation in a population? How fast do populations evolve?  This course emphasizes population genetics theory and modeling, but connects them to empirical observations in many organisms, including humans.  Many concepts are examines with computer programs written in R, and homework problems require students to write R programs.  Prior programming experience is not required, and instruction in R is provided.

Instructor(s): R. Hudson     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20182, 20187 or 20192

BIOS 23289. Marine Ecology. 100 Units.

This course provides an introduction into the physical, chemical, and biological forces controlling the function of marine ecosystems and how marine communities are organized. The structures of various types of marine ecosystems are described and contrasted, and the lectures highlight aspects of marine ecology relevant to applied issues such as conservation and harvesting.

Instructor(s): T. Wootton     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Prior introductory course in ecology or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ENST 23289

BIOS 23299. Plant Development and Molecular Genetics. 100 Units.

Genetic approaches to central problems in plant development will be discussed.  Emphasis will be placed on embryonic pattern formation, meristem structure and function, reproduction, and the role of hormones and environmental signals in development.  Lectures will be drawn from the current literature; experimental approaches (genetic, cell biological, biochemical) used to discern developmental mechanisms will be emphasized. Graduate students will present a research proposal in oral and written form; undergraduate students will present and analyze data from the primary literature, and will be responsible for a final paper.

Instructor(s): J. Greenberg     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): For undergraduates only: Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences
Equivalent Course(s): DVBI 36100,ECEV 32900,MGCB 36100

BIOS 23404. Reconstructing the Tree of Life: An Introduction to Phylogenetics. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the tree of life (phylogeny): its conceptual origins, methods for discovering its structure, and its importance in evolutionary biology and other areas of science. Topics include history and concepts, sources of data, methods of phylogenetic analysis, and the use of phylogenies to study the tempo and mode of lineage diversification, coevolution, biogeography, conservation, molecular biology, development, and epidemiology. One Saturday field trip and weekly computer labs required in addition to scheduled class time. This course is offered in alternate (odd) years.

Instructor(s): C. Moreau, R. Ree.      Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences or consent of instructor
Note(s): This course is offered in alternate (odd) years.
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 35401

BIOS 23406. Biogeography. 100 Units.

This course examines factors governing the distribution and abundance of animals and plants. Topics include patterns and processes in historical biogeography, island biogeography, geographical ecology, areography, and conservation biology (e.g., design and effectiveness of nature reserves).

Instructor(s): B. Patterson (odd years, lab). L., Heaney (even years, discussion)     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences and a course in either ecology, evolution, or earth history; or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ENST 25500,EVOL 45500,GEOG 25500,GEOG 35500

BIOS 23409. The Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases. 100 Units.

Understanding the ecology and evolution of infectious diseases is crucial for both human health and for preservation of the natural environment.  In this course, we combine mathematical modeling with ecological and evolutionary analyses to understand how fundamental mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions are translated into disease dynamics and host-pathogen co-evolution.

Instructor(s): G. Dwyer     Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): Integral calculus and some background in biology

BIOS 23410. Complex Interactions: Coevolution, Parasites, Mutualists, and Cheaters. 100 Units.

This course emphasizes the enormous diversity of interactions between organisms. It is an introduction to the biology and ecology of parasitic and mutualistic symbiotic associations and their evolution. Topics include endosymbioses and their impact on the evolution of photosynthetic organisms, bacterial symbioses (e.g., nitrogen fixation), symbioses that fungi evolved with plants and animals (e.g., endophytes, mycorrhizae, lichens), pollination biology, insect-plant associations, and associations of algae with animals. Methods to elucidate the evolution of these associations are discussed with a focus on coevolutionary events and the origin of cheaters.

Instructor(s): T. Lumbsch     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20187

BIOS 23411. Molecular Epidemiology of Infectious Diseases. 100 Units.

Which pathogens are potentially eradicable, and which might acquire resistance to antimicrobials or escape vaccines? This course links the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of pathogen populations to the medical and epidemiological challenges they present. We will shift between theoretical models and analyses of outbreaks and sequences to understand patterns of pathogen diversity and highlight current uncertainties in the field. This course complements BIOS 23409, which is an intensive mathematical modeling course.

Instructor(s): S. Cobey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): One quarter of calculus and completion of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence.

BIOS 24203. Introduction to Neuroscience. 100 Units.

This course is required for the neuroscience specialization. This course is designed to provide a comprehensive introduction to the structure and function of the mammalian brain.

Instructor(s): X. Zhuang, M. Sherman, E. Grove     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): A Fundamentals Sequence (BIOS 20180s or 20190s) or AP 5 sequence
Note(s): AP5 students should take BIOS 24209 in place of BIOS 24203.

BIOS 24204. Cellular Neurobiology. 100 Units.

This course meets one of the requirements of the neuroscience specialization. This course is concerned with the structure and function of the nervous system at the cellular level. It describes the cellular and subcellular components of neurons and their basic membrane and electrophysiological properties. We study cellular and molecular aspects of interactions between neurons, which leads to functional analyses of the mechanisms involved in the generation and modulation of behavior in selected model systems.

Instructor(s): P. Lloyd, A. Fox.      Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 24203

BIOS 24205. Systems Neuroscience. 100 Units.

This course meets one of the requirements of the neuroscience specialization. This course introduces vertebrate and invertebrate systems neuroscience with a focus on the anatomy, physiology, and development of sensory and motor control systems. The neural bases of form and motion perception, locomotion, memory, and other forms of neural plasticity are examined in detail. We also discuss clinical aspects of neurological disorders.

Instructor(s): M. Hale, D. Freedman     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 24204 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 24000,PSYC 31200

BIOS 24206. Peering Inside the Black Box: Neocortex. 100 Units.

The neocortex is the multilayered outermost structure of the mammalian brain. It is the site of higher brain functions including reasoning and creativity. However, the complexity of the neocortex—it is comprised of ~20 billion neurons which have 0.15 quadrillion connections between them—seems to preclude any hope of achieving a fundamental understanding of the system. Recent technological innovations have opened novel avenues of investigation making realization of the neocortex an increasingly tractable problem. This course will place particular emphasis on how to critically read scientific papers as we evaluate and discuss current experimental approaches to the neocortex. Integral to this evaluation will be the detailed discussion of the latest technological approaches.

Instructor(s): J. MacLean     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 24205 or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 34206

BIOS 24208. Survey of Systems Neuroscience. 100 Units.

This lab-centered course teaches students the fundamental principles of vertebrate nervous system organization. Students learn the major structures and the basic circuitry of the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nervous system. Early sensory processing and the motor system are presented in particular depth. A highlight of this course is that students become practiced at recognizing the nuclear organization and cellular architecture of the rodent, cat, and primate brain.

Instructor(s): L. Osborne.     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor

BIOS 24209. Photons to Consciousness: Cellular and Integrative Brain Functions. 100 Units.

AP5 students taking the Neuroscience sequence or specialization, should take this course in place of BIOS 24203. This course uses the visual system as a model to explore how the brain works. We begin by considering the physical properties of light. We then proceed to consider the mechanism of sensory transduction, cellular mechanisms of neuron to neuron communication, the operation of small neural networks, strategies of signal detection in neuron networks, and the hierarchical organization of cortical function. We conclude with visually guided behavior and consciousness.

Instructor(s): E. Schwartz     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20236 or consent of instructor

BIOS 24217. Conquest of Pain. 100 Units.

This course examines the biology of pain and the mechanisms by which anesthetics alter the perception of pain. The approach is to examine the anatomy of pain pathways both centrally and peripherally, and to define electrophysiological, biophysical, and biochemical explanations underlying the action of general and local anesthetics. We discuss the role of opiates and enkephalins. Central theories of anesthesia, including the relevance of sleep proteins, are also examined.

Instructor(s): J. Moss     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHEM 2200-22100-22200 or BIOS 20200 required; prior course in neurobiology or physiology recommended.

BIOS 24218. Molecular Neurobiology. 100 Units.

This lecture/seminar course explores the application of modern cellular and molecular techniques to clarify basic questions in neurobiology. Topics include mechanisms of synaptic transmission, protein trafficking, exo- and endo-cytosis, and development and mechanisms of neurological diseases.

Instructor(s): S. Sisodia     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200 and 24204, or consent of instructor

BIOS 24231. Methods in Computational Neuroscience. 100 Units.

Topics include (but are not limited to): Hodgkin-Huxley equations, Cable theory, Single neuron models, Information theory, Signal Detection theory, Reverse correlation, Relating neural responses to behavior, and Rate vs. temporal codes.

Instructor(s): S. Bensmaia     Terms Offered: Winter. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 26210 and BIOS 26211 which must be taken concurrently, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 34231

BIOS 24232. Computational Approaches to Cognitive Neuroscience. 100 Units.

This course is concerned with the relationship of the nervous system to higher order behaviors (e.g., perception, object recognition, action, attention, learning, memory, and decision making). Psychophysical, functional imaging, and electrophysiological methods are introduced. Mathematical and statistical methods (e.g. neural networks and algorithms for studying neural encoding in individual neurons and decoding in populations of neurons) are discussed. Weekly lab sections allow students to program cognitive neuroscientific experiments and simulations.

Instructor(s): N. Hatsopoulos     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 26210, a course in systems neuroscience, and knowlege using Matlab, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 33200, ORGB 34650, PSYC 34410,CPNS

BIOS 24239. Cellular Mechanisms of Learning. 100 Units.

We will explore the molecular and cellular mechanisms that have been proposed to underlie learning and memory. Although we will briefly mention other animal systems, we will focus primarily on cellular / molecular studies in the mammalian hippocampus, and on genetic/molecular studies in Drosophila.  This course is designed to begin with a description of the general cellular components that are crucial to understanding learning at the cellular level followed by the examination of critical primary (research) publications with extensive student discussion and participation. Students should have some background in cell and molecular biology and some understanding of neurobiological mechanisms.

Instructor(s): P. Lloyd     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence.

BIOS 24246. Neurobiology of Disease I. 100 Units.

This seminar course is devoted to basic clinical and pathological features and pathogenic mechanisms of neurological diseases. The first semester is devoted to a broad set of disorders ranging from developmental to acquired disorders of the central and peripheral nervous system. Weekly seminars are given by experts in the clinical and scientific aspects of the disease under discussion. For each lecture, students are given a brief description of clinical and pathological features of a given set of neurological diseases followed by a more detailed description of the current status of knowledge of several of the prototypic pathogenic mechanisms.

Instructor(s): C. Gomez, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NURB 31800 or BIOS 24203
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 34600,NURB 34600,CCTS 40100

BIOS 24247. Neurobiology of Disease II. 100 Units.

This seminar course is devoted to understanding pathogenic mechanisms of neuronal death, neurodegenerative disease, and neuronal repair. Weekly seminars are given by experts in the basic and clinical aspects of neurodegenerative diseases. For each lecture, students are provided with a brief description of clinical and pathological features of a given set or mechanistic category of neurodegenerative diseases that is followed by a more detailed description of the current status of knowledge of several of the prototypical pathogenic mechanisms.

Instructor(s): C. Gomez, Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 24246
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 34700,NURB 34700

BIOS 24408. Modeling and Signal Analysis for Neuroscientists. 100 Units.

The course provides an introduction into signal analysis and modeling for neuroscientists. We cover linear and nonlinear techniques and model both single neurons and neuronal networks. The goal is to provide students with the mathematical background to understand the literature in this field, the principles of analysis and simulation software, and allow them to construct their own tools. Several of the 90-minute lectures include demonstrations and/or exercises in Matlab.

Instructor(s): W. van Drongelen      Terms Offered: Spring. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 26210 and 26211, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 32111

BIOS 25108. Cancer Biology. 100 Units.

This course covers the fundamentals of cancer biology with a focus on the story of how scientists identified the genes that cause cancer. The emphasis is on “doing” science rather than “done” science: How do scientists think, how do they design experiments, where do these ideas come from, what can go wrong, and what is it like when things go right? We stress the role that cellular subsystems (e.g., signal transduction, cell cycle) play in cancer biology, as well as evolving themes in cancer research (e.g., ongoing development of modern molecular therapeutics).

Instructor(s): M. Rosner, W. Du     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement for the biological sciences

BIOS 25109. Topics in Reproduction and Cancer. 100 Units.

This course focuses on several aspects of the molecular and cellular biology of human reproduction. We also discuss the basis of chemical/viral carcinogenesis and the progression, treatment, and prevention of cancer. The role of steroid hormones and their receptors in the control of growth, development, and specialized cell function is discussed in the context of normal and abnormal gene expression in human development and disease. Key historical events, research approaches, utilization of knowledge, recent advances in drug design and herbal medicines, and philosophies of scientific research are also covered.

Instructor(s): G. Greene, D. Vander Griend     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sciences fundamentals sequence and Biochemistry, or consent of Instructor.

BIOS 25126. Animal Models of Human Disease. 100 Units.

This course introduces the use of animals in biomedical research for the purposes of understanding, treating, and curing human disease. Particular emphasis is placed on rodent models in the context of genetic, molecular, and immunologic manipulations, as well as on the use of large animal surgical models. University veterinarians also provide information regarding humane animal care.

Instructor(s): G. Langan, M. Niekrasz     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20186 or 20234, or consent of instructor

BIOS 25129. Animal Models of Neuropsychiatric Disorders. 100 Units.

This course will cover the development, validation, and use of animal models of neuropsychiatric disorders. A wide range of animal models will be covered including behavioral, pharmacological, and genetic models, with an emphasis on mouse models. The disorders covered will range from those with unknown etiology to those with known single-gene causes. Disorders covered will include schizophrenia, mood disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and autism spectrum disorders.

Instructor(s): S. Dulawa     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): NURB 33800

BIOS 25206. Fundamentals of Bacterial Physiology. 100 Units.

This course meets one of the requirements of the microbiology specialization. This course introduces bacterial diversity, physiology, ultra-structure, envelope assembly, metabolism, and genetics. In the discussion section, students review recent original experimental work in the field of bacterial physiology.

Instructor(s): D. Missiakas     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20186 or 20234, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): MICR 30600

BIOS 25216. Molecular Basis of Bacterial Diseases. 100 Units.

This course meets one of the requirements of the microbiology specialization. This lecture/discussion course involves a comprehensive analysis of bacterial pathogens, the diseases that they cause, and the molecular mechanisms involved during pathogenesis. Students discuss recent original experimental work in the field of bacterial pathogenesis.

Instructor(s): H. Shuman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences
Equivalent Course(s): MICR 31600

BIOS 25226. Endocrinology I: Cell Signaling. 100 Units.

The subject matter of this course considers the wide variety of intracellular mechanisms that, when activated, change cell behavior. We cover aspects of intracellular signaling, the latter including detailed discussions of receptors, G-proteins, cyclic nucleotides, calcium and calcium-binding proteins, phosphoinositides, protein kinases, and phosphatases.

Instructor(s): M. Brady, R. Cohen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200
Equivalent Course(s): CPHY 33600,NPHP 33600

BIOS 25227. Endocrinology II: Systems and Physiology. 100 Units.

Endocrinology is the study of hormones, which are chemical messengers released by tissues that regulate the activity of other cells in the body. This course covers the classical hormone systems, including hormones regulating metabolism, energy mobilization and storage, calcium and phosphate metabolism, reproduction, growth, "fight or flight," and circadian rhythms. We focus on historical perspective, the mechanisms of action, homeostatic regulation, and relevant human diseases for each system.

Instructor(s): M. Brady, R. Cohen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): A Fundamentals Sequence.

BIOS 25228. Endocrinology III: Human Disease. 100 Units.

A Fundamentals Sequence (BIOS 20180s or 20190s, or AP 5 sequence) and BIOS 25227 recommended but not required. This course is a modern overview of the patho-physiologic, genetic, and molecular basis of human diseases with nutritional perspectives. We discuss human diseases (e.g., hypertension, cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes, osteoporosis, alopecia).

Instructor(s): Y. C. Li, M. Musch     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): A Fundamentals Sequence (BIOS 20180s or 20190s, or AP 5 sequence)

BIOS 25256. Immunobiology. 100 Units.

This comprehensive survey course presents an integrated coverage of the tactics and logistics of innate and adaptive immunity in mammalian organisms. It conveys the elegance and complexity of immune responses against infectious agents. It introduces their implications in autoimmune diseases, cancer and organ transplantation and presents some of the emerging immunotherapeutics that are transforming health care. 
Prior knowledge of microbiology (e.g., BIOS 25206) will be advantageous.

Instructor(s): A. Bendelac     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sceinces Fundamentals Sequence which includes, Cell, Genetics, Developmental Biology, and Physiology

BIOS 25258. Immunopathology. 100 Units.

Five examples of diseases are selected each year among the following categories: autoimmune diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, infection immunity, immunodeficiencies and gene therapy, and transplantation and tumor immunology. Each disease is studied in depth with general lectures that include, where applicable, histological analysis of diseased tissue samples and discussions of primary research papers on experimental disease models. Special emphasis is placed on understanding immunopathology within the framework of general immunological concepts and on experimental approaches to the study of immunopathological models.

Instructor(s): B. Jabri     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): IMMU 30010,PATH 30010

BIOS 25260. Host Pathogen Interactions. 100 Units.

This course explores the basic principals of host defense against pathogens and pathogens' strategies to overcome host immune mechanisms. We address evolutionary aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses, while also studying specific examples of viral and bacterial interactions with their hosts. The reviews of relevant immunological mechanisms necessary for appreciation of host/pathogen interactions are incorporated in the studies of specific cases.

Instructor(s): A. Chervonsky     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 25206 and BIOS 25256

BIOS 25266. Molecular Immunology. 100 Units.

This discussion-oriented course examines the molecular principles of immune recognition. We explore the roles of protein modification, protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions in the discrimination between self and non-self, and study the molecular fundamentals of cell stimulation and signaling. Primary literature focused on molecular research of the immune system is integrated with lectures on commonly used biochemical, structural and immunological techniques used in the research papers examined.

Instructor(s): E. Adams     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20200 or 25256, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): IMMU 30266

BIOS 25287. Introduction to Virology. 100 Units.

This class on animal viruses considers the major families of the viral kingdom with an emphasis on the molecular aspects of genome expression and virus-host interactions. Our goal is to provide students with solid appreciation of basic knowledge, as well as instruction on the frontiers of virus research.

Instructor(s): T. Golovkina, B. Roizman     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the general education requirement in the biological sciences and third- or fourth-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): MICR 34600

BIOS 25308. Heterogeneity in Human Cancer: Etiology and Treatment. 100 Units.

This course addresses the importance of understanding human tumor heterogeneity (organ site by organ site) in terms of predicting whether tumors will progress to malignancy and how tumors will respond to standard treatments or require tailored molecular therapeutics. Alternating lecture and discussion lectures will explore and tease apart the controversies in the field that limit progress in cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment. At the end of the course, students should have an in-depth understanding of the complexities, challenges and opportunities facing modern cancer researchers and clinical oncologists and be able to discuss novel scientific approaches to solving these issues.

Instructor(s): K. MacLeod     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): A grade of B or better in BIOS 25108

BIOS 25309. Cancer Metastasis. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the fundamental principles of cancer metastases as well as new and emerging concepts in metastatic colonization of target organs. Metastasis remains the most lethal aspect of cancer, thus its importance to cancer biologists cannot be overstated. In this course, students will gain a robust knowledge of hypothesis-driven studies that laid the foundation for our current understanding of cancer metastases, recent breakthroughs, and discussion of ongoing novel, cross-disciplinary studies. This course builds molecular and cellular knowledge gained in preceding courses and specifically addresses the discovery and implementation of use of metastasis suppressors in dissecting molecular mechanisms controlling dormancy, metastatic colonization of target organs, and cancer cell-microenvironment interactions that may be targeted therapeutically.

Instructor(s): C. Rinker-Schaeffer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): B average or above in a Biological Sciences Fundamentals Sequence.

BIOS 25310. Pharmacogenomics: Discovery and Implementation. 100 Units.

Pharmacogenomics is aimed at advancing our knowledge of the genetic basis for variable drug response. Advances in genetic knowledge gained through sequencing have been applied to drug response, and identifying heritable genetic variants that predict response and toxicity is an area of great interest to researchers. The ultimate goal is to identify clinically significant variations to predict the right choice and dose of medications for individuals—"personalizing medicine." The study of pharmacogenomics is complicated by the fact that response and toxicity are multigenic traits and are often confounded by nongenetic factors (e.g., age, co-morbidities, drug-drug interactions, environment, diet). Using knowledge of an individual's DNA sequence as an integral determinant of drug therapy has not yet become standard clinical practice; however, several genetics-guided recommendations for physicians have been developed and are highlighted. The ethics and economics of pharmacogenomics are also discussed.

Instructor(s): M. E. Dolan, R. S. Huang      Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20186 and 20187 and consent of Instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CABI 47510,CCTS 40006

BIOS 25320. Epigenetics and Cancer. 100 Units.

This class is designed to be a graduate level class that will be also open for undergraduates. Several of the goals of this class include to strengthen the students’ knowledge and ability to be critical of primary research in the field of epigenetics and cancer; to understand better the epigenetic machinery; and to challenge students to write an insightful and thoughtful review to capture an important concept in epigenetics.

Instructor(s): J. Chen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals Sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): CABI 40600

BIOS 25407. Organ Transplantation. 100 Units.

This course presents biological, technical, ethical, and economic issues associated with organ transplantation. We sharply focus the immunologic knowledge from BIOS 25256 onto the biologic barriers to organ acceptance and the ultimate goal of immunologic tolerance. We also address principles of organ preservation and the mechanisms of ischemia/reperfusion injury. The technical aspects and physiology of organ transplantation (i.e., kidney, liver, heart, lung, pancreas, islet, intestinal) are covered. The social, economic, and ethical issues raised in transplantation (i.e., allografts, xenografts, living donation) are also discussed. This course is offered in alternate years.

Instructor(s): A. Chong     Terms Offered: Winter. Every other year in odd years.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 25256

BIOS 25419. Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Networks and Modeling. 100 Units.

This intermediate-level epidemiology course directed by two infectious disease epidemiologist-physicians will provide an up to date perspective on forgotten, contemporary and emerging infections. The course lectures and readings will provide a rigorous examination of the interactions among pathogens, hosts and the environment that produce disease in diverse populations. In addition to the demographic characteristics and the behaviors of individuals that are associated with a high risk of infection, we will examine complex aspects of the environment as they pertain to disease transmission. These include poverty, globalization, social networks, public health, and racial and ethnic disparities. Methodologic approaches to infectious disease epidemiology that will be covered include traditional study designs, molecular epidemiology, social network analysis, modeling, and network science. Local and global approaches will be applied to case studies from the United States, Asia, and Africa.

Instructor(s): M. David, J. Schneider     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HSTD 30700 or HSTD 30900 or introductory epidemiology or consent of instructor
Note(s): offered every other year in 'odd' years
Equivalent Course(s): HSTD 31300

BIOS 26120. An Introduction to Bioinformatics and Proteomics. 100 Units.

Modern biology generates massive amounts of data; this course is devoted to biological information and the models and techniques used to make sense of it. Students learn about biological databases, algorithms for sequence alignment, phylogenetic tree building, and systems biology. They will also learn about the basics of large-scale study of proteins, particularly their structures and functions. Students will be introduced to basics of high performance computation (HPC) and its application to the field of bioinformatics. They will learn how to use our in-house Super Computer to process and analyze next generation sequencing data. Using state of the art tools, students will align and genotype a group of genes in order to identify disease-relevant variants. The course will be taught as a hands on computer approach (a computation background would be helpful, but not needed).

Instructor(s): E. Haddadian     Terms Offered: Autumn. L.
Prerequisite(s): Completion of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence or BIOS 20172 or consent of Instructor. No computation background required.

BIOS 26210-26211. Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I-II.


BIOS 26210. Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences I. 100 Units.

This course builds on the introduction to modeling course biology students take in the first year (BIOS 20151 or 152). It begins with a review of one-variable ordinary differential equations as models for biological processes changing with time, and proceeds to develop basic dynamical systems theory. Analytic skills include stability analysis, phase portraits, limit cycles, and bifurcations. Linear algebra concepts are introduced and developed, and Fourier methods are applied to data analysis. The methods are applied to diverse areas of biology, such as ecology, neuroscience, regulatory networks, and molecular structure. The students learn computations methods to implement the models in MATLAB.

Instructor(s): D. Kondrashov     Terms Offered: Autumn. L
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 20151 or BIOS 20152 or consent of the instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 31000,PSYC 36210

BIOS 26211. Mathematical Methods for Biological Sciences II. 100 Units.

This course is a continuation of BIOS 26210. The topics start with optimization problems, such as nonlinear least squares fitting, principal component analysis and sequence alignment. Stochastic models are introduced, such as Markov chains, birth-death processes, and diffusion processes, with applications including hidden Markov models, tumor population modeling, and networks of chemical reactions. In computer labs, students learn optimization methods and stochastic algorithms, e.g., Markov Chain, Monte Carlo, and Gillespie algorithm. Students complete an independent project on a topic of their interest.

Instructor(s): D. Kondrashov     Terms Offered: Winter. L.
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 26210 
Equivalent
Equivalent Course(s): CPNS 31100,PSYC 36211

BIOS 27700. Quantitative Biology: Data Analysis and Modeling. 100 Units.

The focus of the course will be the analysis and modeling of kinetic phenomena produced by stochastic events, e.g., the opening of single ion channels, enzyme behavior, and other biological events that are determined probabilistically. When observations are contaminated by noise it becomes challenging to characterize the underlying events. The course will develop theoretical, software, and practical expertise by dealing with real data.

Instructor(s): E. Schwartz, A. Hammond     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Two quarters of Biology.

BIOS 28407. Genomics and Systems Biology. 100 Units.

This lecture course explores the technologies that enable high-throughput collection of genomic-scale data, including sequencing, genotyping, gene expression profiling, assays of copy number variation, protein expression and protein-protein interaction. We also cover study design and statistical analysis of large data sets, as well as how data from different sources can be used to understand regulatory networks (i.e., systems). Statistical tools introduced include linear models, likelihood-based inference, supervised and unsupervised learning techniques, methods for assessing quality of data, hidden Markov models, and controlling for false discovery rates in large data sets. Readings are drawn from the primary literature.

Instructor(s): Y. Gilad     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): STAT 23400 or Statistics in the Biomath Sequence
Equivalent Course(s): BPHS 47300,CABI 47300,HGEN 47300,IMMU 47300

Big Problems Courses

These courses may not be used towards the general education requirement in biological sciences unless approved through petition to the BSCD Senior Advisers.

BIOS 02280. Drinking Alcohol: Social Problems or Normal Cultural Practice? 100 Units.

Alcohol is the most widely used psychoactive agent in the world, and, as archaeologists have recently demonstrated, it has a very long history dating back at least 9,000 years. This course will explore the issue of alcohol and drinking from a trans-disciplinary perspective. It will be co-taught by an anthropologist/archaeologist with experience in alcohol research and a neurobiologist who has experience with addiction research. Students will be confronted with literature on alcohol research from anthropology, sociology, history, biology, medicine, psychology, and public health and asked to think through the conflicts and contradictions. Selected case studies will be used to focus the discussion of broader theoretical concepts and competing perspectives introduced in the first part of the course. Topics for lectures and discussion include: What is alcohol? chemical definition, cultural forms, production processes, biological effects; The early history of alcohol: archaeological studies; Histories of drinking in ancient, medieval, and modern times; Alcohol and the political economy: trade, politics, regulation, resistance; Alcohol as a cultural artifact: the social roles of drinking; Styles of drinking and intoxication; Alcohol, addiction, and social problems: the interplay of biology, culture, and society; Alcohol and religion: integration vs. prohibition; Alcohol and health benefits: ancient beliefs and modern scientific research; Comparative case studies of drinking: ethnographic examples, historical examples, contemporary America (including student drinking).

Instructor(s): M. Dietler, W. Green     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2014-2015; will be offered in 2015-16.
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): BPRO 22800,ANTH 25310

BIOS 02490. Biology and Sociology of AIDS. 100 Units.

This interdisciplinary course deals with current issues of the AIDS epidemic.

Instructor(s): H. Pollack, J. Schneider     Terms Offered: Not offered 2014-2015
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Note(s): This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): BPRO 24900

Specialized Courses

These courses may not be counted toward the courses required for the Biological Sciences major except as noted below.

BIOS 29100. Biology of Toxoplasma. 100 Units.

This course is suitable for undergraduates with a good background in biology and molecular genetics. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major. This course undertakes a study of Toxoplasma gondii and toxoplasmosis: a model system to study the cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, and genetics of an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite; the immune responses it elicits; its interactions with host cells; and the pathogenesis of the diseases it causes. This information is also applied to consideration of public health measures for prevention of infection, for vaccines, and for development of new antimicrobial treatments. General principles applicable to the study of other microorganisms are emphasized.

Instructor(s): R. Mcleod     Terms Offered: Autumn, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor. This course does not meet the requirements for the Biological Sciences Major.

BIOS 29270. A History of Cell and Molecular Biology. 100 Units.

This course will trace the parallel histories of cell and molecular biology, primarily in the 20th century, by exploring continuities and discontinuities between these fields and their precursors. Through discussion, attempts will be made to develop definitions of cell and molecular biology that are based upon their practices and explanatory strategies, and to determine to what extent these practices and strategies overlap. Finally, the relevance of these definitions to current developments in biology will be explored. The course is not designed to be comprehensive, but will provide an overall historical and conceptual framework.

Instructor(s): K. Matlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): This course does not meet the requirements for the Biological Sciences Major.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 25902

BIOS 29279. Topics in Global Health. 100 Units.

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Global Health (CCTS 43000). It is designed to address specific medical issues of global significance including maternal and child health, communicable and non- communicable diseases, and emerging diseases; the course will also address the impact of population growth, migration, environmental decay, and humanitarian disasters on health.  Finally, the course will discuss research and career opportunities within the field of global health.

Instructor(s): C. S. Olopade     Terms Offered: Winter 2015
Prerequisite(s): This course does not meet the requirements for the Biological Sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): CCTS 43000

BIOS 29280. Developmental Psychopathology. 100 Units.

This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major. This advanced course focuses on the development of mental disorders that have their onset in infancy, childhood, or adolescence from the perspective of developmental psychopathology. Developmental psychopathology is a field that lies at the interface of clinical and developmental psychology within which the aim is to identify the earliest deviations from normative developmental processes that likely lead to the development of psychopathology. By incorporating the study of basic biological and psychological processes into the study of psychopathology, the identification of earliest markers, and ultimately causal factors, may be achieved.

Instructor(s): K. Keenan     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor. This course does not meet the requirements for the Biological Sciences Major.
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 22750

BIOS 29286. Biological and Cultural Evolution. 100 Units.

This course draws on readings in and case studies of language evolution, biological evolution, cognitive development and scaffolding, processes of socialization and formation of groups and institutions, and the history and philosophy of science and technology. We seek primarily to elaborate theory to understand and model processes of cultural evolution, while exploring analogies, differences, and relations to biological evolution. This has been a highly contentious area, and we examine why. We seek to evaluate what such a theory could reasonably cover and what it cannot.

Instructor(s): W. Wimsatt, S. Mufwene     Terms Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing or consent of instructor required; core background in genetics and evolution strongly recommended. This course does not meet the requirements for the Biological Sciences Major.

BIOS 29294. Introduction to Global Health. 100 Units.

This course provides an overview of global health from the historical perspective to the current state of global health. The course features weekly guest lecturers with a broad range of expertise in the field: topics include the social and economic determinants of health, the economics of global health, global burden of disease, and globalization of health risks, as well as the importance of ethics, human rights, and diplomacy in promoting a healthier world. The course is designed for graduate-level students and senior undergraduates with an interest in global health work in resource-limited settings.

Instructor(s): J. Schneider, C. S. Olopade     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major
Equivalent Course(s): CCTS 43000,HSTD 30030

BIOS 29300. Biological Psychology. 100 Units.

What are the relations between mind and brain? How do brains regulate mental, behavioral, and hormonal processes; and how do these influence brain organization and activity? This course introduces the anatomy, physiology, and chemistry of the brain; their changes in response to the experiential and sociocultural environment; and their relation to perception, attention, behavioral action, motivation, and emotion.

Instructor(s): L. Kay     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Some background in biology and psychology. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 20300

BIOS 29313. Medical Ethics: Who Decides and on What Basis? 100 Units.

Decisions about medical treatment take place in the context of changing health care systems, changing ideas about rights and obligations, and among doctors and patients who have diverse religious and cultural backgrounds. By means of historical, philosophical, and medical readings, this course examines such issues as paternalism, autonomy, the commodification of the body, and the enhancement of mental and/or physical characteristics. (A)

Instructor(s): D. Brudney, Staff     Terms Offered: Not offered in 2014-15; will be offered in 2015-16
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Note(s): This course does not meet requirements for the biological science major.
Equivalent Course(s): BPRO 22610,HIPS 21911,PHIL 21610

BIOS 29317. Issues in Women's Health. 100 Units.

The course will focus on important sources of morbidity and mortality in women, such as heart disease, breast cancer, depression, eating disorders, and HIV. In addition to learning about the etiology, biology, and epidemiology of these conditions, we will explore related social, historical, political, and cultural issues. The course will be comprised of presentations by the instructor, guest lectures by clinical experts in the condition of interest, and student-led discussions of readings.

Instructor(s): L. Kurina     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 29302,GNSE 30500,HSTD 30500

BIOS 29318. Principles of Epidemiology. 100 Units.

This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major. Epidemiology is the study of the distribution and determinants of health and disease in human populations. This course introduces the basic principles of epidemiologic study design, analysis, and interpretation through lectures, assignments, and critical appraisal of both classic and contemporary research articles.

Instructor(s): B. Lahey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Introductory statistics recommended or Consent of Instructor. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): HSTD 30900,ENST 27400,PPHA 36400,STAT 35000

BIOS 29319. What Genomes Teach About Evolution. 100 Units.

This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major. The twenty-first century opened with publication of the draft human genome sequence, and there are currently over 3,000 species whose genomes have been sequenced. This rapidly growing database constitutes a test of nineteenth- and twentieth-century theories about evolution and a source of insights for new theories. We discuss what genome sequences have to teach us about the relatedness of living organisms, the diversity of cellular life, mechanisms of genome change over evolutionary time, and the nature of key events in the history of life on earth. The scientific issues are related to the history of evolutionary thought and current public controversies about evolution.

Instructor(s): J. A. Shapiro, M. Long     Terms Offered: Spring; Not Offered 2014-5
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.

BIOS 29321. The Problem of Evil: Disease? 100 Units.

The problem of evil remains a central problem for monotheistic religions: How can an omnipotent and benevolent God allow evil in the world? Disease represents an important “test case” for this question. Some argue that disease should not be called evil and would reserve this word for moral ills. Others argue that disease is a dysfunction of nature and therefore represents evil par excellence. In this course, we examine a variety of texts treating the question of disease as a philosophical issue and exemplar of the problem of evil. The texts include Scripture (Job) and selections from the writings of Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas, Feodor Dostoevsky, Albert Camus, and Thomas Mann.

Instructor(s): S. Meredith     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Third- and fourth-year students only. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): RETH 30300

BIOS 29323. Health Care and the Limits of State Action. 100 Units.

In a time of great human mobility and weakening state frontiers, epidemic disease is able to travel fast and far, mutate in response to treatment, and defy the institutions invented to keep it under control: quarantine, the cordon sanitaire, immunization, and the management of populations. Public health services in many countries find themselves at a loss in dealing with these outbreaks of disease, a deficiency to which NGOs emerge as a response (an imperfect one to be sure). Through a series of readings in anthropology, sociology, ethics, medicine, and political science, we will attempt to reach an understanding of this crisis of both epidemiological technique and state legitimacy, and to sketch out options.

Instructor(s): E. Lyon, H. Saussy     Terms Offered: Winter. Not offered in 2014-2015; will be offered in 2015-16.
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.
Equivalent Course(s): BPRO 28600,CMLT 28900,HMRT 28602

BIOS 29324. The Social Brain: Social Isolation and Loneliness. 100 Units.

The past two decades have witnessed a remarkable rise in the number of investigations published on the social brain. The discoveries conveyed by the titles of many of these reports (e.g., the neural basis of love, altruism, morality, generosity, trust) have piqued the interest of young investigators, funding agencies, the media, and laypeople alike. Such attention is a double-edged sword, however, as errors are exaggerated in importance, and oversimplifications create false expectations and, ultimately, disillusionment in what the field can contribute. It is, of course, one thing to assume that neural processes underlie all psychological phenomenon, it is another to claim that a given brain region is the biological instantiation of complex psychological functions like the self, empathy or loneliness. The purpose of this course is to examine opportunities and challenges in this field primarily through research on two of the most important topics in the field: social isolation and empathy.

Instructor(s): J. Cacioppo, L. Hawkley     Terms Offered: Not Offered 2014-2015
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.

BIOS 29326. Introduction to Medical Physics and Medical Imaging. 100 Units.

This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major. Students majoring in physics may use this course either as an elective or as one of the topics courses to meet the general education requirement in the biological sciences. This course covers the interaction of radiation with matter and the exploitation of such interactions for medical imaging and cancer treatment. Topics in medical imaging include X-ray imaging and radionuclide imaging, as well as advanced technologies that provide three-dimensional images, including X-ray computed tomography (CT), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and ultrasonic imaging.

Instructor(s): S. Armato, P. La Riviere, C. Pelizzari     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 23500. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.

Independent Study and Research

BIOS 00199. Undergraduate Research. 100 Units.

This course may be elected for up to three quarters. Before Friday of fifth week of the quarter in which they register, students must submit a one-page summary of the research that they are planning to their research sponsor and to the director of undergraduate research and honors. A detailed two to three page summary on the completed work must be submitted to the research sponsor and the Master of BSCD before Friday of examination week.

Instructor(s): L. Mets     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s): Consent of research sponsor and The Master of BSCD.
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course is graded P/F. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.

BIOS 00206. Readings: Biology. 100 Units.

Students may register for only one BIOS 00206 tutorial per quarter. Enrollment must be completed by the end of the second week of the quarter. This tutorial offers individually designed readings.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s): Consent of faculty sponsor
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course is graded P/F. This course does not meet requirements for the biological sciences major.

BIOS 00289-00290-00291-00292. Interdisciplinary Research Seminar ; Interdisciplinary Research Seminar I-II-III.

These courses cannot be counted toward any of the five upper-level biological sciences courses required for the biological sciences major. This seminar course for advanced research students serves as a classroom component to complement their experience in their mentor’s lab. Students participate in critical analyses of scientific literature and formal presentations of their ongoing research, as well as writing and revising reviews, research reports, and theses.

BIOS 00289. Interdisciplinary Research Seminar. 000 Units.

Instructor(s): S. Kron, Staff     Terms Offered: Summer
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor

BIOS 00290. Interdisciplinary Research Seminar I. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): S. Kron, Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor

BIOS 00291. Interdisciplinary Research Seminar II. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): S. Kron, Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor

BIOS 00292. Interdisciplinary Research Seminar III. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): S. Kron, Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor

BIOS 00295. Undergraduate Honors Research. 000 Units.

This seminar course is designed to complement the Summer Quarter laboratory component of the Research Honors program, associated with the Biology Honors Summer Fellowship. Students will meet weekly for a mandatory research-in-progress meeting and other scheduled scholarly activities throughout the Summer Quarter. An end-of-summer or beginning-of-fall retreat will provide an opportunity for all students to report on progress toward their thesis. All students must be in residence on campus during the Summer Quarter except for specific field work with their thesis mentor. Admission to Research Honors by application. Graded P/F.

Instructor(s): Honors Faculty, Staff     Terms Offered: Summer
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor
Note(s): Consent Only. Acceptance in the BSCD Research Honors Program.

BIOS 00296. Undergraduate Honors Research. 100 Units.

This course is required for students accepted into the BSCD Research Honors program. Students must register for this course both Autumn and Winter Quarters of their fourth year. This course can be counted toward the Biological Sciences major and may be counted among the three upper-level courses required for the BS. See also bscd.uchicago.edu/page/honors-biology. Quality grade.

Instructor(s): S. Kron     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent Only. Acceptance in BSCD Honors Research Program.

BIOS 00299. Advanced Research: Biological Sciences. 100 Units.

Before Friday of fifth week of the quarter in which they register, students must submit a one-page summary of the research that they are planning to their research sponsor and to the director of undergraduate research and honors. A detailed two to three page summary on the completed work must be submitted to the research sponsor and the Master of BSCD before Friday of examination week. This course does may be counted as a general elective but does not meet requirements for the Biological Sciences major. In the first quarter of registration, students must submit College Reading and Research form to their research sponsor and the director of undergraduate research and honors.

Instructor(s): L. Mets     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring, Summer
Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing and consent of research sponsor and Master of BSCD.
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. This course is graded P/F.

Graduate-Level Courses

Many graduate-level courses in the Division of the Biological Sciences are open to qualified College students. Students should consult their advisers, the BSCD office, or the various departments and committees in the division to identify appropriate courses.


Contacts

Chair

Master
Laurens Mets
BSLC 300
702-7964
Email

Administrative Contacts

Administrative Assistant
Kila Roberts
BSLC 328
702.7962
Email

Staff Secretary
Kirsten Cole
BSLC 301
702.7963
Email

Manager of Technology
Anthony Chacon
BSLC 310
702.4937
Email

Secondary Contacts

Laboratory Manager
Marcia A. Gilliland-Roberts
BSLC 336
702.1930
Email

Undergraduate Research and Honors
Stephen Kron
GCIS W522A
834.0250
Email

Summer Undergraduate Research
Paul Strieleman
BSLC 338
702.5076
Email

Summer Undergraduate Research
Rosemary Zaragoza
BSLC 211
702.2018
Email

Preceptors/BA Advisors

Senior Adviser
Christine Andrews
BSLC 306
702.1214
Email

Faculty Adviser, Genetics
Doug Bishop
CLSC 821B
702.9211
Email

Faculty Adviser, Endocrinology Specialization
Matthew Brady
KCBD 8124
702.2346
Email

Faculty Adviser, Neuroscience Specialization
Nicholas Hatsopoulos
CH 206
702.5594
Email

Faculty Adviser, Immunology Specialization
Bana Jabri
KCBD 9124
834.8632
Email

Faculty Adviser, Organismal Biology & Anatomy
Mike LaBarbera
CH 101
702.8092
Email

Faculty Adviser, Molecular Genetics & Cell Biology
Gayle Lamppa
CLSC 827A
702.9837
Email

Faculty Adviser, Genetics
Jocelyn Malamy
GCIS W524A
702.4651
Email

Senior Adviser
Megan McNulty
BSLC 304
834.7744
Email

Faculty Adviser, Ecology and Evolution Specialization
Cathy Pfister
Z401A
834.0071
Email

Faculty Adviser, Microbiology Specialization
Olaf Schneewind
CLSC 607B
834.9060
Email