The College Catalog
The University of Chicago


Art History

Contacts | Program of Study | Courses for Nonmajors | Program Requirements | General Requirements for Art History Majors | Recommendations for Art History Majors | Summary of Requirements | Advising | Grading | Honors | Travel Fellowships | Minor Program in Art History |  Courses


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Chelsea Foxwell
CWAC 265

Administrative Contact

Department Coordinator
Joyce Kuechler
CWAC 160
773.702.5880
Email

Website

http://arthistory.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The study of art history encompasses the visual arts and material culture of a wide range of regions and historical periods. Art history courses develop students' skills in visual analysis, interpretation of images and texts, use of historical sources, and engagement with scholarly debates. Within the department, survey classes provide a chronological overview of an extended period in Western or non-Western art, while Art in Context courses focus on a particular artist or artists, medium or theme, artistic problem, movement, or period. Upper-level classes may be similarly focused but at a more advanced level, or may deal with theoretical questions. After taking an introduction to art historical methods in their third year, fourth-year students who are majoring in art history conduct independent research on a topic of their own devising, producing a BA paper with the guidance of a faculty member and a graduate preceptor. The major in art history thus introduces students to a variety of cultures and approaches while providing analytical skills to enable students to focus their attention productively on specific questions in the study of art. In combination with a broad general education, art history provides excellent preparation for professions as well as graduate school in art history and careers in the arts.

Nonmajors may take any 10000-level course to meet general education requirements or as an elective; ARTH 10100 Introduction to Art is designed specifically to introduce these students to skills in thinking and writing about art of different cultures and periods. Nonmajors may also take more advanced courses with the instructor's consent.

Courses for Nonmajors

ARTH 10100 Introduction to Art develops basic skills in the analysis and critical enjoyment of a wide range of visual materials. Issues and problems in the making, exhibition, and understanding of images and objects are explored through classroom discussion of key works, critical reading of fundamental texts, visits to local museums, and writing.

Survey Courses

  • ARTH 14000 through 16999 - discuss major monuments of world art and architecture in the context of broad chronological and geographic categories and in relation to broad questions concerning the role art plays in individual, societal, and institutional settings.
  • ARTH 14000 through 14999 - address Western art in Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance.
  • ARTH 15000 through 15999 - address Western art from the early modern period to the present day.
  • ARTH 16000 through 16999 - address the art of Africa, Asia, Latin America, and/or the Middle East.

Art in Context Courses

  • ARTH 17000 through 18999 - introduce students to a well-defined issue, topic, or period of art in depth; at the same time, these courses explore issues of creativity, communication, and value in a series of concrete case studies.

Any of these 10000-level courses is an appropriate choice to meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. None presuppose prior training in art.

Students who have taken at least one course in art history or studio art, or who have equivalent nonacademic experience, may elect to take an advanced lecture course, numbered from 20100 to 28999. The prerequisite is consent of instructor or any 10000-level course in art history or visual arts. The 20000-level art history courses investigate the arts of specific periods and places from a variety of perspectives. Some courses embrace large bodies of material defined by national culture; others follow developments in style, iconography, and patronage as they affect works in selected media.

Program Requirements

The BA in art history is intended to furnish students with a broad knowledge of Western and non-Western art. It also provides an opportunity for the complementary, intensive study of an area of special interest. It is recommended for students who wish to develop their abilities in visual analysis and criticism; to acquire some sense of the major developments in the arts from ancient times to the present; and to understand the visual arts as aspects of social, cultural, and intellectual history. So conceived, the study of art is an element of a general, liberal arts education; the skills of analytical thinking, logical argument, and clear verbal expression necessary to the program are basic to most fields. Thus, the major in art history can be viewed as training for a wide range of professions. The program in art history also prepares interested students for advanced study at the graduate level and, eventually, for work in academia, museums, galleries, and other organizations.

General Requirements for Art History Majors

  1. Students register for an approved drama, music, ARTV, or Creative Writing course to meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts; art history majors may not use art history courses to meet general education requirements.
  2. Students register for a total of four Survey Courses (see definition under Courses for Nonmajors above): one course at the 14000 level, one course at the 15000 level, one course at the 16000 level, and a fourth Survey Course of the student's choosing.
  3. Art history majors take the department's two undergraduate seminars. In Winter Quarter of their third year, they register for the ARTH 29600 Junior Seminar: Doing Art History. Students who wish to study abroad during that quarter are strongly urged to enroll in ARTH 29600 Junior Seminar: Doing Art History in the Winter Quarter of their second year and must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss their program in the major before they go abroad. In Autumn Quarter of their fourth year, they register for the BA paper writing seminar (ARTH 29800 Senior Seminar: Writing Workshop) (see following section).
  4. Students in art history write at least two research papers that are ten to fifteen pages in length before starting their fourth year, typically in the context of 20000-level courses in art history. Alternatives include 40000-level graduate seminars, reading courses, or, more rarely, Art in Context courses. It is the student's responsibility to initiate arrangements with an instructor and obtain his or her signature on an approval form when the paper is completed. To obtain an approval form, visit arthistory.uchicago.edu/files/undergraduate-research-approval-form.pdf.

    A research paper should address a topic chosen by the student in consultation with the instructor. The student should draw on scholarship and evidence to shape and support a thesis or argument of the student's own devising. Formal analyses of works of art and analytic papers on materials assembled for a class by the instructor do not qualify. However, students may ask the instructor to allow a substitution of a research paper or they may write a research paper in addition to basic course requirements.
  5. Students develop a special field of interest (see below).
  6. Within this field, students write a BA paper (see below).
  7. Double Majors and the BA Thesis: Whether or not a single BA thesis can satisfy the requirements for a double major in art history and another program is decided by the department on a case by case basis. The criteria on which the decision is based include: A student who wishes to write a single BA thesis for a double major in Art History and another program must write a letter (a page) explaining his or her request for the department's approval. The letter should be addressed to the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
    • the degree to which the resulting thesis is likely to speak from and to art history, even as it necessarily speaks from and to another field;
    • the feasibility of the proposed advising arrangements for the proposed joint thesis; and
    • the department's estimation of the student's track record for independent work that bodes well for writing a successful thesis while navigating between two majors
  8. Students may apply to transfer up to four courses in art history to fulfill their major requirements. Preference will be given to courses that fall into the survey course category or, in the case of students in Track II (see below), into the category of special field courses taken in disciplines/departments outside art history. Approval is required from the Director of Undergraduate Studies, who will review each course individually. Students who wish to receive credit in the major or minor for courses taken elsewhere should read carefully the following information. These guidelines apply not only to courses taught at other institutions and in study abroad programs but also to courses that are affiliated with the University but not taught by University faculty. Students should meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies well in advance to discuss a course they wish to take. After completing the course, students should petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies in writing for credit for the major. The petition must include a cover letter with the title and description of the course, as well as the name and location of the institution. To the cover letter should be attached a syllabus and a written record of the work the student did for the course.

    The Office of the Dean of Students in the College must approve the transfer of all courses taken at institutions other than those in which students are enrolled as part of a study abroad program that is sponsored by the University of Chicago. Please note that it may be possible use such a course to meet requirements in the College but not in the major. For more information, visit college.uchicago.edu/policies-regulations/course-registration-policies/transfer-credit.

Recommendations for Art History Majors

  1. Students are encouraged to take graduate seminars with prior consent of instructor. (These seminars are also open to nonmajors with the same proviso.)
  2. Students are urged to also pursue upper-level language courses. If a language course is relevant to a student's special field, the student may petition the Director of Undergraduate Studies to count it toward electives.
  3. Those planning to continue their study of art history at the graduate level are advised to achieve language competency equal to at least two years of college study in French or German, or in Italian for those with primary interest in the art of Italy.

Two Tracks

In structuring their programs, students may choose one of two orientations ("tracks"): one offering a broad coverage of the history of art, and the other offering a close cross-disciplinary study of a specific area or topic.

Track I

In addition to the four Survey Courses, the ARTH 29600 Junior Seminar: Doing Art History, and the ARTH 29800 Senior Seminar: Writing Workshop, Track I students take six upper-level courses within the department. Up to two Art in Context courses (see definition under Courses for Nonmajors above) may be substituted for upper-level courses with prior approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Within the six departmental courses, students must develop a special field consisting of three courses with a relevance to one another that is clearly established. The field may be defined by chronological period, medium, national culture, genre, theme, or methodological concerns. Because they reflect the interests of individual students, such fields range widely in topic, approach, and scope. Reading courses with art history faculty may be used to pursue specific questions within a field. Students are encouraged to distribute the remaining three departmental courses widely throughout Western and non-Western art. Within their six upper-level courses, students must take at least one course in Western art before 1400, one course in Western art after 1400, and one course in non-Western art.

Track II

In addition to the four Survey Courses, the ARTH 29600 Junior Seminar: Doing Art History, and the ARTH 29800 Senior Seminar: Writing Workshop, Track II students take six courses: three upper-level courses inside and two courses outside the Department of Art History that make up the special field, and one additional upper-level course in art history, the subject of which is the student's choice. In order to encourage breadth of expertise, the elective course may not be in the student's special field. Occasionally, Art in Context courses (see definition under Courses for Nonmajors above) may be substituted for upper-level courses with prior approval of the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

In Track II, the special field may take many different forms. It may be civilization defined by chronological period, nation-state, or cultural institution. Extradepartmental courses in history and literature are particularly relevant to such a program. Another special field might be conceptual in character (e.g., art and the history of science, urban history, geography) and draw upon a variety of extradepartmental courses in the Humanities Collegiate Division and the Social Sciences Collegiate Division. A field could combine historical, critical, and theoretical perspectives (e.g., visual arts in the twentieth century) and include courses in art history, drama, music, film, and popular culture. Finally, art history and studio courses (e.g., Visual Arts) may be combined in special fields exploring their interrelations (e.g., abstraction and conceptualism in modern art).

The Special Field

The topic for the BA paper normally develops from the special field and allows for further study of the area through independent research and writing.

Whether a student is following Track I or Track II, the declaration form for the special field must be received and approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies no later than the end of a student's third year. Students should obtain the form at arthistory.uchicago.edu/files/SpecialFieldDeclaration.pdf and discuss the proposed special field with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. It is strongly recommended that students complete at least two courses in their special field by the end of their third year.

Undergraduate Seminars and the BA Paper

The ARTH 29600 Junior Seminar: Doing Art History is designed to introduce the methods of art historical research. It also requires students to develop a BA paper topic and identify potential faculty advisers. Students who wish to study abroad during Winter Quarter of their third year are strongly urged to take ARTH 29600 Junior Seminar: Doing Art History in the Winter Quarter of the second year and must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss their program in the major before they go abroad.

By the end of their third year, it is the student's responsibility to find a member of the faculty who agrees to act as the faculty research adviser for the BA paper. The research paper or project used to meet this requirement may not be used to meet the BA paper requirement in another major without the approval of both majors.

ARTH 29800 Senior Seminar: Writing Workshop is a workshop course designed to assist students in writing and researching their BA papers. Students typically take the seminar in Autumn Quarter before graduating in Spring Quarter; students graduating in Autumn or Winter Quarter should take this course in the previous academic year. In the closing sessions of the seminar, students present their work in progress for the BA paper. They continue their research on the paper during the following quarters, meeting at intervals with their faculty research adviser. Students may elect to take ARTH 29900 Preparation for the Senior Paper in Autumn or Winter Quarter to afford additional time for research or writing. NOTE: This course may not count toward the twelve courses required in the major. A polished draft of the paper is due by Friday of ninth week of the quarter preceding graduation; the final version is due Monday of second week of the quarter of graduation. Both are to be submitted in duplicate: one copy to the research adviser and the second to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Because individual projects vary, no specific requirements for the senior paper have been set. Essays range in length from twenty to forty pages, but there is no minimum or maximum.

Summary of Requirements

GENERAL EDUCATION
Introductory drama, music, ARTV, or Creative Writing course100
Total Units100
MAJOR: TRACK I
14000s Survey Course100
15000s Survey Course100
16000s Survey Course100
Survey Course of student's choice100
3 upper-level ARTH courses in special field *300
3 upper-level ARTH courses (The six upper-level courses must include, altogether, one course each in Western art before 1400, Western art after 1400, and non-Western art.) *300
ARTH 29600Junior Seminar: Doing Art History100
ARTH 29800Senior Seminar: Writing Workshop100
BA paper
Total Units1200
MAJOR: TRACK II
14000s Survey Course100
15000s Survey Course100
16000s Survey Course100
Survey Course of student's choice100
5 upper-level ARTH courses in special field (three departmental and two extradepartmental) *500
1 upper-level ARTH elective (not special field)100
ARTH 29600Junior Seminar: Doing Art History100
ARTH 29800Senior Seminar: Writing Workshop100
BA paper
Total Units1200
*

With prior approval, up to two Art in Context courses may be used toward this requirement.

Advising

Art history majors should see the Director of Undergraduate Studies no less than once a year for consultation and guidance in planning a special field, in selecting courses, and in choosing a topic for the BA paper, as well as for help with any academic problems within the major. When choosing courses, students should refer to the worksheet available at arthistory.uchicago.edu/files/MajorWorksheet-form.pdf. This form helps each student and the Undergraduate Program Chair monitor the student's progress in the program.

Grading

Art history majors must receive quality grades in art history courses taken for the major. ARTH 29900 Preparation for the Senior Paper is open for P/F grading with consent of instructor, but this course may not count toward the twelve courses required in the major. Art history courses elected beyond program requirements may be taken for P/F grading with consent of instructor. Students taking art history courses to meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts must receive quality grades. Nonmajors may select the P/F grading option with consent of instructor if they are taking an art history class that is not satisfying a general education requirement. A Pass grade is given only for work of C- quality or higher.

Honors

Students who complete their course work and their BA papers with great distinction are considered for honors. Candidates also must have a 3.3 or higher overall GPA and a 3.5 or higher GPA for art history course work.

Standards will inevitably differ from adviser to adviser, but in general students are expected to write a BA paper that is of A quality. This typically means that the paper involves substantial research; makes an argument that is supported with evidence; and is well crafted, inventive, and, often, intellectually passionate.

The faculty adviser of a student who wishes to be considered for honors must submit a detailed letter of nomination. Students are not responsible for requesting the letter, but they should plan to work closely with their adviser to make sure they understand the standards that they are expected to meet.

Travel Fellowships

The department offers a limited number of Visiting Committee Travel Fellowships to fund travel related to research on the BA paper during the summer between a College student's third and fourth years. Applications must be submitted to the Director of Undergraduate Studies by Thursday of the second week of Spring Quarter. Details on the fellowships and the application process are available on the Department of Art History's CHALK site for majors and minors.

Minor Program in Art History

The minor in art history requires a total of seven courses: three survey courses (one from the 14000 series, one from the 15000 series, and one from the 16000 series), and four courses at the 20000 level or above. With the permission of the Director of Undergraduate Studies, students may substitute up to two Art in Context courses (17000 and 18000 series) for 20000-level courses. Students also write one research paper of about ten to fifteen pages on a topic chosen with and guided by the instructor, by individual arrangement at the start of one of the 20000-level courses. As one of their 20000-level courses, minors may elect to take ARTH 29600 Junior Seminar: Doing Art History with the majors; if they do, they will research and write an essay on a topic of their choice instead of preparing a BA paper proposal. Students with a minor in art history may use art history courses to meet general education requirements.

Students who elect the minor program in art history must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Students choose courses in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The Director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to a student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form available at arthistory.uchicago.edu/files/MinorProgramApplicationForm.pdf.

Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors; and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. If students have already taken one of the survey courses to fulfill the general education requirement, they may substitute an additional 20000-level course to complete their seven-course program. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

The following group of courses would comprise a minor in art history:

Sample Minor Program

  • ARTH 14000–14999 e.g., The Ancient World, The Medieval World, or Renaissance Art
  • ARTH 15000–15999 e.g., Nineteenth-Century Art, or Twentieth-Century Art
  • ARTH 16000–16999 e.g., Art of Asia: China, or Arts of Japan
  • ARTH 20000 series, e.g., ARTH 28804 American Art Since 1960; or ARTH 27304 Photo/Modernism/Esthetic; or ARTH 28300 Chinese Scroll Painting; or ARTH 22204 Medieval Chinese Visual Cult; or ARTH 26504 Revolution and 20th Century Mexican Culture

 Courses

ARTH 10100. Introduction to Art. 100 Units.

This course seeks to develop skills in perception, comprehension, and appreciation when dealing with a variety of visual art forms. It encourages the close analysis of visual materials, explores the range of questions and methods appropriate to the explication of a given work of art, and examines the intellectual structures basic to the systematic study of art. Most importantly, the course encourages the understanding of art as a visual language and aims to foster in students the ability to translate this understanding into verbal expression, both oral and written. Examples draw on local collections.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, this course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 14000 through 16999. Art Surveys.  May be taken in sequence or individually. Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. The major monuments and masterpieces of world painting, sculpture, and architecture are studied as examples of humankind’s achievements in the visual arts. Individual objects are analyzed in detail and interpreted in light of society’s varied needs. While changes in form, style, and function are emphasized, an attempt is also made to understand the development of unique and continuous traditions of visual imagery throughout world civilization. Courses focus on broad regional and chronological categories.

ARTH 17000 through 18999. Art in Context. May be taken in sequence or individually. Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 17000 through 18999 course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. Courses in this series investigate basic methods of art historical analysis and apply them to significant works of art studied within definite contexts. Works of art are placed in their intellectual, historical, cultural, or more purely artistic settings in an effort to indicate the origins of their specific achievements. An informed appreciation of the particular solutions offered by single works and the careers of individual artists emerges from the detailed study of classic problems within Western and non-Western art.

For nonmajors, these courses meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts. Art History majors/minors who wish to take these courses for departmental credit should see the instructor about additional assignments and requirements.

ARTH 14107. Greek Art and Archaeology. 100 Units.

This course will survey the art and archaeology of ancient Greece from ca. 1000 BCE–ca. 200 BCE. Participants will see the Greeks emerge from poverty and anarchy to form a distinctive political and social system based on city-states—and they will see that system grow unstable and collapse. They will see the emergence of distinctive forms of sculpture, architecture, pottery, and urban design—many of which are still in use today. Along with these facts, they will acquire a conceptual toolkit for looking at works of art and for thinking about the relation of art to social life. The big question is: How can we make sense of the past by means of artifacts?

Instructor(s): R. Neer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 21807

ARTH 14115. Roman Art I: Republican and Early Imperial Art and Architecture. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): P. Crowley     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 24115

ARTH 14211. Introduction to African Art. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the arts of Africa and its diaspora. It surveys selected monuments of African expressive culture from a variety of places and times. Lectures, readings and discussions explore the relationship between art and leadership, religion, and society on the continent and in African diasporic communities in the Americas. Class meetings and assignments make use of local collections such as the Art Institute of Chicago and the Field Museum.

Instructor(s): C. Fromont     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): tudents must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 14215. Roman Art II: Late Antique and Early Christian Art and Architecture. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): P. Crowley     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 24215

ARTH 14700. Building Renaissance Italy: Urban Design and Social Life at the Threshold of Modernity. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): N. Atkinson     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 15600. Twentieth-Century Art. 100 Units.

Focusing on the interrelationships between avant-garde culture and the emerging mass cultural formations of industrializing societies in Europe, North America, Asia, and South America, our survey will address a wide range of historical and methodological questions: the impact of new technologies of production, the utopian projects of the Euro-American avant-gardes, the transformation of modernist conceptions of artistic autonomy, the changing roles of cultural institutions, the construction of social Others, the formation of new audiences, and the rise of “contemporary art.” Prior knowledge of art history not required.

Instructor(s): L. Lee     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 16100. Art of Asia: China. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the arts of China focusing on major monuments and artworks produced in imperial, aristocratic, literati, religious, and public milieus. Lectures will reconstruct the functions and the meanings of objects, to better understand Chinese culture through the objects it produced.

Instructor(s): Wu Hung     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 16100

ARTH 16800. Arts of Japan. 100 Units.

This course surveys the arts of the Japanese archipelago through the study of selected major sites and artifacts. We will consider objects in their original contexts and in the course of transmission and reinterpretation across space and time. How did Japanese visual culture develop in the interaction with objects and ideas from China, Korea, and the West? Prehistoric artifacts, the Buddhist temple, imperial court culture, the narrative handscroll, the tea ceremony, folding screens, and woodblock prints are among the topics covered.

Instructor(s): C. Foxwell     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 16806

ARTH 16809. Islamic Art and Architecture, 1500–1900. 100 Units.

This course surveys the art and architecture of the Islamic world from 1500–1900. This was the period of the three great Islamic empires: the Ottomans, the Safavids, and the Mughals. Each of these multi-religious, multi-linguistic, multi-ethnic empires developed styles of art and architecture that expressed their own complex identities. Further, they expressed their complex relations with each other through art and architecture. The various ways in which contact with regions beyond the Islamic world throughout this period impacted the arts will also be considered.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): NEAA 10631

ARTH 17015. Blood, Sweat, and Tears: The Sacred Image in Byzantium. 100 Units.

During the Middle Ages, icons—sacred images—played a pivotal role in the devotional practice of Byzantium, the eastern Christian empire that had its capital in Constantinople from 324 to 1453. “Windows to heaven,” sacred images provided access to the divine. Despite their spiritual function, icons also drew attention to their materiality by erupting into life—bleeding, weeping, and attacking foes. In this course, we will combine the study of Byzantine images with Byzantine primary sources (in translation) to explore a range of topics related to the icon, including medieval image theory, iconoclasm, visuality, enshrinement, the copy, and materiality. Our investigation of Byzantine images will be enhanced through comparison with responses to the image in Islam, Judaism, and the Christian west.

Instructor(s): H. Badamo     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 17211. Arts of Medieval Japan. 100 Units.

The arts of medieval Japan are known for their material luxury and otherworldly splendor, as in images of Buddhist paradise, and, conversely, for their rusticity and understatement, as exemplified by developments in ink painting, architecture, and ceramics. This course will examine the worldviews, historical circumstances, and practices of making and appreciation that underscore both trends. We will explore how the aesthetic tensions within and between objects relate to the social and political tensions among groups during this age of unrest and instability. The course spans the period between 1200 and 1550.

Instructor(s): C. Foxwell     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 17211

ARTH 17310. Between the Agora and the Shopping Mall: The Social Construction of the City Square. 100 Units.

Centrally located open urban spaces have been dominant architectural and social features of western cities. By focusing on these urban gathering sites, this course explores a range of key historical moments in which different formations of the city square emerge (political, communal, royal, imperial, colonial, modernist, privatized, etc.). Its goal is to define a set of criteria for analyzing what constitutes a city square, how “public space” also has a history, how public monuments function over time, and how understanding the urban environment is always dependent on the intimate relationship between physical structures and spatial performances. It will consider, therefore, both the design morphology and the social configurations that infuse such spaces with meaning in any given context. Several site visits in the Chicago area will be scheduled.

Instructor(s): N. Atkinson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 17400. University of Chicago Campus. 100 Units.

An introduction to architecture and planning, this course examines the changes in thinking about the University campus from its origins in the 1890s to the present. Many of the University’s choices epitomize those shaping American architecture generally and some of our architects are of national significance. The course develops skill in analyzing architecture and urban form in order to interpret: how the University images itself in masonry, metal, and lawn; how it works with architects; the role of buildings in social and intellectual programs and values; the effects of campus plans and the siting of individual buildings; and the impact of technological change. Includes many sessions around campus and study of archival documents.

Instructor(s): K. Taylor     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): tudents must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 17410. Frank Lloyd Wright in Chicago and Beyond. 100 Units.

This course looks at Wright's work from multiple angles. We examine his architecture, urbanism, and relationship to the built environment, as well as the socio-cultural context of his lifetime and legend. We take advantage of the Robie House on campus and of the rich legacy of Wright's early work in Chicago; we also think about his later Usonian houses for middle-income clients and the urban framework he imagined for his work (Broadacre City), as well as his Wisconsin headquarters (Taliesin), and spectacular works like the Johnson Wax Factory (a field trip, if funds permit), Fallingwater, and the Guggenheim Museum. By examining one architect's work in context, students gain experience analyzing buildings and their siting, and interpreting them in light of their complex ingredients and circumstances. The overall goal is to provide an introduction to thinking about architecture and urbanism.

Instructor(s): K. Taylor     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 20502

ARTH 17612. The Art of Michelangelo. 100 Units.

The central focus of this course will be Michelangelo’s prolific production in sculpture, painting, and architecture while making substantial use of his writings, both poetry and letters, and his extensive extant body of preparatory drawings to help us understand more about his artistic personality, creative processes, theories of art, and his intellectual and spiritual biography, including his changing attitudes towards Neoplatonism, Christianity, and politics. Our structure will be roughly chronological starting with his highly precocious juvenilia of the 1490s in Florence at the court of Lorenzo the Magnificent through his death in Rome in 1564 as an old man who was simultaneously already the deity of art and a lonely, troubled, repentant Christian, producing some of his most moving works in a highly personal style. Beyond close examination of the works themselves, among the themes that will receive considerable attention for the ways they bear upon his art are Michelangelo’s fraught relationship with patrons such as the Medici and a succession of popes; his complex devotion to and rivalry with ancient classical art and his living rivalry with Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Bramante, and others; his changing attitude towards religion, especially his engagement with the Catholic Reform and some of its key personalities such as Vittoria Colonna; his sexuality and how it might bear on the representation of gender in his art and poetry; his “official” biographies created by the devotees Giorgio Vasari (1550, 1568) and Ascanio Condivii (1553) during Michelangelo’s lifetime and some of the most influential moments in the artist’s complex, sometimes ambivalent, reception over the centuries; new approaches and ideas about Michelangelo that have emerged in recent decades from the unabated torrent of scholarship and, especially, the restoration and scientific imaging of many of his works. Through the concentrated art-historical material studied, the course will take seriously the attempt to introduce students with little or no background in art or art history to some of the major avenues for interpretation in this field, including formal, stylistic, iconographical, psychological, social, feminist, theoretical, and reception. Readings are chosen with this diversity of approach in mind.

Instructor(s): C. Cohen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 21411

ARTH 17700. 19th Century Art in the Art Institute. 100 Units.

In this course, we will closely examine 19th century paintings and sculptures in the Art Institute of Chicago and seek to understand how and why art changed during this period. Topics to be considered include the meaning of stylistic innovation in the 19th century, the development and dissolution of the genres as landscape and portraiture, and varying conceptions of realism and abstraction. Most class sessions will be devoted to looking at works in the galleries of the Art Institute. Because attendance is mandatory, students should consider whether their schedules will allow time for traveling to and from the museum for class meetings. Assignments include three papers and a variety of written homework exercises.

Instructor(s): M. Ward     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

The following courses do not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 21415. Gender and Sexuality in Roman Art. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): P. Crowley     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 31415,CLCV 21415,CLCV 31415

ARTH 21511. Image, Spectacle, Sound. 100 Units.

Focusing on the pre-modern city primarily in Italy, this seminar seeks to introduce upper level undergraduate and graduate students in the humanities to the way in which art and architecture were elements within a comprehensive urban system that included civic, religious, and daily rituals, both modest and spectacular. The pre-modern city was the site of a whole range of practices in which art played an important but integrated role. The assumption of such a course is that the paintings, sculptures, and artifacts that remain in museums and collections today are only a part of what was once a whole set of social relations between the individual and the collective, between the sacred and the profane. Consequently, through a series of readings that will focus on experience rather than aesthetic production, students will be encouraged to develop research projects that go beyond the frame of the work of art in order to see how it was intimately connected to the structure of urban life and how it profoundly affected the lives of its audience.

Instructor(s): N. Atkinson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 31511

ARTH 22550. Histories of Cairo. 100 Units.

This course examines the urban planning and architectural development of the city from the late antique era to the present. By studying urban planning and the main architectural types in different periods—churches, mosques, synagogues, palaces, defensive works, mausoleums, and houses—this course considers the role of architecture in shaping society. It combines study of monuments and primary sources with work on urban spaces from relevant disciplines, and addresses themes such as the temporalities of monuments, minorities within the Islamic city, orientalism, modernization, contemporary practices of preservation and accommodation, and the recent role of public spaces in politics.

Instructor(s): H. Badamo     Terms Offered: Autumn

ARTH 23005. Medieval Islamic Art and Architecture: Mongols and Mamluks. 100 Units.

The Mongol Conquest of Baghdad and the Islamic east in 1258 deepened cultural divisions between the eastern and western Islamic lands to an unprecedented degree. Under the Mongol Ilkhans in the Islamic east, artists and architects combined familiar and newly introduced visual forms to negotiate their place in a radically altered new world order. Under the Mamluk sultans in the Islamic west, artists and architects visually asserted the Mamluks' special claim to legitimacy as the defenders of Islam who had stopped the Mongol advance. And yet, artists, architects and objects moved frequently between Mongol and Mamluk courts, complicating what at first appears to be a simple dichotomy between experimental and traditionalist visual cultures in the eastern and western regions of the Islamic world in this period. Students will write research papers on topics chosen in consultation with the instructor.

Instructor(s): P. Berlekamp     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 33005,NEAA 23005,NEAA 33005

ARTH 24602. Mediums and Contexts of Chinese Pictorial Art. 100 Units.

In this course, pictorial representations are approached and interpreted, first and foremost, as concrete, image-bearing objects and architectural structures—as portable scrolls, screens, albums, and fans, as well as murals in Buddhist cave-temples and tombs, and relief carvings on offering shrines and sarcophagi. The lectures and discussion investigate the inherent features of these forms, as well as their histories, viewing conventions, audiences, ritual/social functions, and the roles these forms played in the construction and development of pictorial images.

Instructor(s): Wu Hung     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 34602,EALC 24622,EALC 34622

ARTH 24812. Museums and Art. 100 Units.

This course considers how the rise of the art museum in the 19th and 20th centuries affected the making of modern art and the viewing of past art. It is not designed to be a survey course, but rather a historical investigation of certain issues and developments. We will concentrate on the following:  what has been said to happen to objects when they are uprooted and moved into the museum; how and why museums have changed display practices so as to get viewers to look at art in new ways; what artists have understood museums to represent and how they have responded to that understanding in their work and their display preferences. Though reference will be made to the contemporary art world, the focus will be on materials and case studies drawn from the French Revolution through the 1960s. French, German, English and American museums will be featured.

Instructor(s): M. Ward     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 34812

ARTH 25503. City, Crisis, Utopia. 100 Units.

This course is offered in conjunction with the Art Institute's fall exhibition, The City Dynamic: Representing Crisis and Renewal in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles 1960–1980. It will study the conjunction of aesthetic practices, urban space, and social movements in the 1960s and 70s, focusing mainly on Chicago, with theoretical readings drawn from a variety of fields and numerous field trips.

Instructor(s): R. Zorach     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 35503

ARTH 26803. Enlightenment and 19th Century Architectural Theory and Practice. 100 Units.

This course examines influential new ideas about architectural design from the Enlightenment and nineteenth century in terms of writings and related buildings in Europe and the United States. This experimental period generated theoretical writing that continues to matter to architects today; we will study it in terms of its initial contexts and application. Major themes are: (1) the relationship of a building’s structure to its decoration (or body to clothing, as it was sometimes put); (2) the rise of historical interest in older buildings from divergent stylistic traditions (e.g., classical and Gothic) and its impact on new design; (3) the development of aesthetic theory suited to mass as well as elite audiences (e.g., the sublime and the picturesque); and (4) the idea that architect and building could and should be ethical or socially reformative.

Instructor(s): K. Taylor     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prior course in art history or permission of the instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 36803

ARTH 27215. Public Sculpture. 100 Units.

This class examines sculpture made for public spaces since World War II. We will read foundational texts on postwar sculpture; test the relevance of theories of the public; consider the role of commemoration, site-specificity, context, architecture, and photography; and examine questions of censorship, vandalism, and conservation. Significant portions of the class will involve on-site case studies, including Henry Moore’s Nuclear Energy, Wolf Vostell’s Concrete Traffic, Giuseppe Penone’s Ideas of Stone, Jean Dubuffet’s Monument with Standing Beast, Arturo Herrara’s Night Before Last, Sol LeWitt’s Lines in Four Directions, Louise Bourgeois’s Untitled, and the sculptures in Millennium Park. Depending on interest, students may work on a campus public sculpture app or website, and/or an exhibition surrounding Wolf Vostell’s Concrete Traffic.

Instructor(s): C. Mehring     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 37215

ARTH 29600. Junior Seminar: Doing Art History. 100 Units.

The aim of this seminar is to deepen an understanding of art history as a discipline and of the range of analytic strategies art history affords to students beginning to plan their own BA papers or, in the case of students who are minoring in art history, writing research papers in art history courses. Students read essays that have shaped and represent the discipline, and test their wider applicability and limitations. Through this process, they develop a keener sense of the kinds of questions that most interest them in the history and criticism of art and visual culture. Students develop a formal topic proposal in a brief essay, and write a final paper analyzing one or two works of relevant, significant scholarship for their topics. This seminar is followed by a workshop in Autumn Quarter focusing on research and writing issues for fourth-year students who are majoring in art history, which is designed to help writers of BA papers advance their projects.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Required of third-year students who are majoring in art history; open to nonmajors with consent of instructor. This course does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 29700. Reading Course. 100 Units.

This course is primarily intended for students who are majoring in art history and who can best meet program requirements by study under a faculty member's individual supervision. The subject, course of study, and requirements are arranged with the instructor.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. Must be taken for a quality grade. With adviser's approval, students who are majoring in art history may use this course to satisfy requirements for the major, a special field, or electives. This course is also open to nonmajors with advanced standing. This course does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 29800. Senior Seminar: Writing Workshop. 100 Units.

This workshop is designed to assist students in researching and writing their senior papers, for which they have already developed a topic in the Junior Seminar. Weekly meetings target different aspects of the process; students benefit from the guidance of the workshop instructors, but also are expected to consult with their individual faculty advisers. At the end of this course, students are expected to complete a first draft of the senior paper and to make an oral presentation of the project for the seminar.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Required of fourth-year students who are majoring in art history. This course does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.

ARTH 29900. Preparation for the Senior Paper. 100 Units.

This course provides guided research on the topic of the senior paper. Students arrange their program of study and a schedule of meetings with their senior paper adviser.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and Undergraduate Program Chair
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Form. May be taken for P/F grading with consent of instructor. This course may not count toward the twelve courses required in the major. This course does not meet the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.


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