Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Summary of Requirements | Grading | Honors | Minor Program in Linguistics | Linguistics Courses | American Sign Language Courses | Basque Courses | Modern Greek Courses | Swahili Courses

Department Website: http://linguistics.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The purpose of the BA program in linguistics is to provide a solid, integrated introduction to the scientific study of language through course work in the core subdisciplines of linguistics, as well as to ensure that the student has a language background sufficient to provide a complement to the theoretical parts of the program and for an understanding of the complexities of human language. This program provides students with a general expertise in the field and prepares them for productive advanced study in linguistics.

Students who are majoring in linguistics may visit linguistics.uchicago.edu to learn about events and resources on and off campus and for links to information on employment opportunities.

Students who are majoring in other fields of study may also complete a minor in linguistics. Information follows the description of the major.

Program Requirements

The BA in linguistics requires thirteen courses, which fall into two categories: courses that provide expertise in linguistics and courses that ensure breadth of study in a non–Indo-European language. Students have flexibility to construct a course of study that accords with their interests, but their final tally of thirteen courses must include the following:

LING 20001Introduction to Linguistics100
LING 20101Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology100
LING 20201Introduction to Syntax100
LING 20301Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics100
Study of a non-Indo-European language

The language requirement is designed to ensure breadth of study in a non–Indo-European language. This requirement can be met in four different ways:

  1. Registration in a three-quarter course in a non–Indo-European language on campus
  2. Examination credit in a non–Indo-European language for which the University offers placement examinations
  3. Registration for an intensive one-quarter course in the structure of a non–Indo-European language offered by a member of the linguistics faculty (or by another faculty member upon approval by the director of undergraduate studies)
  4. Completion of an approved intensive language program taken elsewhere for languages not offered or tested for at the University of Chicago.

Students who fulfill the non–Indo-European language requirement with fewer than three quarters of study must substitute elective courses for the language course quarters not taken. At least six electives for the major must be courses offered by the Department of Linguistics (i.e., courses whose numbers begin with LING). For any further electives, a student may petition the department to substitute a related course that does not have a LING number.

The complete list of available languages can be viewed at humanities.uchicago.edu/about/languages-uchicago.

Summary of Requirements

LING 20001Introduction to Linguistics100
LING 20101Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology (core course)100
LING 20201Introduction to Syntax (core course)100
LING 20301Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics (core course)100
Nine courses from the following:900
0-3 courses in a non-Indo-European language *
6-9 Linguistics electives **
Total Units1300

Grading

All courses used to satisfy requirements for the major and minor must be taken for quality grades. With consent of the instructor, nonmajors may take linguistics courses for P/F grading.

NOTE: Students who entered the University prior to Autumn 2009 may choose to fulfill either the requirements stated here or those that were in place when they entered the University.

Honors

In order to receive the degree in linguistics with honors, a student must write an honors essay. At the end of a student's third year, any student who has maintained a 3.0 or better overall GPA and a 3.5 or better GPA in linguistics courses may consult with the director of undergraduate studies about submitting an honors essay. The honors essay must be submitted by fifth week of the quarter in which the student plans to graduate. Complete guidelines and requirements for the honors essay can be obtained from the director of undergraduate studies.

Students wishing to write an honors essay are required to take two graduate-level courses (numbered 30000 or above) in areas most relevant to their thesis work, as determined in consultation with their adviser(s) and approved by the director of undergraduate studies.

This program may accept a BA paper or project used to satisfy the same requirement in another major with the consent of both program chairs. Students should consult with the chairs by the earliest BA proposal deadline (or by the end of their third year, when neither program publishes a deadline). A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Minor Program in Linguistics

Students in other fields of study may complete a minor in linguistics. The minor in linguistics requires a total of seven courses, which must include three linguistics electives (courses whose numbers begin with LING) and the following four courses:

LING 20001Introduction to Linguistics100
LING 20101Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology100
LING 20201Introduction to Syntax100
LING 20301Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics100

Students who elect the minor program in linguistics must contact the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. The adviser's approval for the minor program should be submitted to a student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the College adviser. Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades (not P/F), and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers. 

Linguistics Courses

LING 20001. Introduction to Linguistics. 100 Units.

This course offers a brief survey of how linguists analyze the structure and the use of language. Looking at the structure of language means understanding what phonemes, words, and sentences are, and how each language establishes principles for the combinations of these things and for their use; looking at the use of language means understanding the ways in which individuals and groups use language to declare their social identities and the ways in which languages can change over time. The overarching theme is understanding what varieties of language structure and use are found across the world's languages and cultures, and what limitations on this variety exist.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter

LING 20101. Introduction to Phonetics and Phonology. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the study of speech sounds and their patterning in the world's languages. The first half of the course focuses on how speech sounds are described with respect to their articulatory, acoustic, and perceptual structures. There are lab exercises both in phonetic transcription and in the acoustic analysis of speech sounds. The second half focuses on fundamental notions that have always been central to phonological analysis and that transcend differences between theoretical approaches: contrast, neutralization, natural classes, distinctive features, and basic phonological processes (e.g., assimilation).

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): LING 20001

LING 20150. Language and Communication. 100 Units.

This course can also be taken by students who are not majoring in Linguistics but are interested in learning something about the uniqueness of human language, spoken or signed. It covers a selection from the following topics: What is the position of spoken language in the usually multimodal forms of communication among humans? In what ways does spoken language differ from signed language? What features make spoken and signed language linguistic? What features distinguish linguistic means of communication from animal communication? How do humans communicate with animals? From an evolutionary point of view, how can we account for the fact that spoken language is the dominant mode of communication in all human communities around the world? Why cannot animals really communicate linguistically? What do the terms language "acquisition" and "transmission" really mean? What factors account for differences between "language acquisition" by children and by adults? Are children really perfect language learners? What factors bring about language evolution, including language speciation and the emergence of new language varieties? How did language evolve in mankind? This is a general education course without any prerequisites. It provides a necessary foundation to those working on language at the graduate and undergraduate levels.

Instructor(s): Salikoko Mufwene     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LING 30150, CHDV 30150, CHDV 20150

LING 20201. Introduction to Syntax. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to basic goals and methods of current syntactic theory through a detailed analysis of a range of phenomena, with emphasis on argumentation and empirical justification. Major topics include phrase structure and constituency, selection and subcategorization, argument structure, case, voice, expletives, and raising and control structures.

Instructor(s): Chris Kennedy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LING 20001

LING 20202. Advanced Syntax. 100 Units.

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Syntax (LING 20201). We will discuss movement and agreement phenomena in a variety of constructions, based on selected readings from the primary literature, and data from a number of typologically diverse languages, such as Irish, Wolof, Chamorro, Kinande, Berber, West Germanic languages.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LING 20201

LING 20301. Introduction to Semantics and Pragmatics. 100 Units.

This course familiarizes students with what it means to study meaning and use in natural language. By "meaning" we refer to the (for the most part, logical) content of words, constituents, and sentences (semantics), and by "use" we intend to capture how this content is implemented in discourse and what kinds of additional dimensions of meaning may then arise (pragmatics). Some of the core empirical phenomena that have to do with meaning are introduced: lexical (i.e., word) meaning, reference, quantification, logical inferencing, presupposition, implicature, context sensitivity, cross-linguistic variation, speech acts. Main course goals are not only to familiarize students with the basic topics in semantics and pragmatics but also to help them develop basic skills in semantic analysis and argumentation.

Instructor(s): Itamar Francez     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): LING 20001
Equivalent Course(s): LING 30310

LING 21000. Morphology. 100 Units.

Looking at data from a wide range of languages, we will study the structure of words. We will consider the nature of the elements out of which words are built and the principles that govern their combination. The effects of word structure on syntax, semantics, and phonology will be examined. We will think critically about the concepts of morpheme, inflection, derivation, and indeed, the concept of word itself.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): LING 20001

LING 21310. Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics. 100 Units.

An introduction to the comparative study of the Indo-European languages. We will survey the major branches of the Indo-European family and discuss various aspects of PIE grammar as it is currently reconstructed.

Instructor(s): Yaroslav Gorbachov     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LING 31310

LING 21920. The Evolution of Language. 100 Units.

How did language emerge in the phylogeny of mankind? Was its evolution saltatory or gradual? Did it start late or early and then proceed in a protracted way? Was the emergence monogenetic or polygenetic? What were the ecological prerequisites for the evolution, with the direct ecology situated in the hominine species itself, and when did the prerequisites obtain? Did there ever emerge a language organ or is this a post-facto construct that can be interpreted as a consequence of the emergence of language itself? What function did language evolve to serve, to enhance thought processes or to facilitate rich communication? Are there modern "fossils" in the animal kingdom that can inform our scholarship on the subject matter? What does paleontology suggest? We will review some of the recent and older literature on these questions and more.

Instructor(s): Salikoko Mufwene     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 47305, PSYC 41920, LING 41920, CHDV 41920, CHSS 41920, CHDV 21920, EVOL 41920

LING 22750. Laboratory Phonology. 100 Units.

This course is intended to provide a foundation for students to pursue the quantitative study of phonology in the context of human interaction, and of speech and perception in the context of language. Specifically, this course focuses on how to design, conduct, and analyze a phonological experiment. We will approach laboratory phonology from the perspectives of both the speaker and the listener, with each perspective constituting roughly half the course. In the process, we will gain and practice skills in experimental phonetic and psycholinguistic work, while testing aspects of current phonological theory.

Instructor(s): Alan Yu     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LING 32750

LING 23115. Old Church Slavonic. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the language of the oldest Slavic texts. It begins with a brief historical overview of the relationship of Old Church Slavonic to Common Slavic and the other Slavic languages. This is followed by a short outline of Old Church Slavonic inflectional morphology. The remainder of the course is spent in the reading and grammatical analysis of original texts in Cyrillic or Cyrillic transcription of the original Glagolitic.

Equivalent Course(s): REES 23115, REES 33115, LING 35100

LING 23200. Topics in Semantics and Pragmatics. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): LING 42010

LING 23450. Language and Violence. 100 Units.

Language is generally associated with the abstract realm of thought, representation and expression, a realm that contrasts sharply with the material realm in which we tend to place violence. Language is furthermore often seen as antithetical to violence: violence is outburst that comes when the rational order of language fails. In fact, however, questions of language, and especially of speech, surface in every aspect of thinking about violence. Speech is a medium within which violence is performed, and is part of the modern machinery of war. It is also a medium through which systems of oppression and subordination are articulated and registered by groups and individuals, socially and psychically. Violence relies on speech for its justification, rationalization, and sustention. At the same time, the rawness of violence challenges our fundamental faith in the representational and expressive capacities of language, in both destructive and creative ways. This intensive reading seminar explores the relation between speech and violence through scholarly and literary texts from a variety of humanistic fields and traditions.

Instructor(s): Itamar Francez     Terms Offered: Spring

LING 23920. The Language of Deception and Humor. 100 Units.

In this course we will examine the language of deception and humor from a variety of perspectives: historical, developmental, neurological, and cross-cultural and in a variety of contexts: fiction, advertising, politics, courtship, and everyday conversation. We will focus on the (linguistic) knowledge and skills that underlie the use of humor and deception and on what sorts of things they are used to communicate.

Instructor(s): Jason Riggle     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26030, LING 33920

LING 26020. Truth. 100 Units.

One of the salient features of our culture is that there is so much bullshit," says the Princeton philosopher Harry Frankfurt in his 1986 essay, 'On Bullshit.' Frankfurt distinguishes bullshit from lying, and argues that it is the more insidious of the two because it involves not an attempt to conceal the truth, but rather a failure to even care about the truth in the first place. But what exactly is truth, and why should we care so much about it? This course will begin with an examination of the fundamental role of a truth convention in meaning and communication, the way that such a convention makes bullshit possible, and the causes and consequences of bullshit. We will then turn to foundational questions about the nature of truth, criticisms of the value of truth and why they have had such appeal, and expressions of skepticism about the possibility of "objective" truth. Along the way, we will consider whether it makes sense for everyone to agree that something is the case and yet still be wrong; whether our claims to know certain things are always limited because they come from a particular perspective; paradoxes of truth and falsity and their relevance for scientific inquiry; and what value (if any) truth contributes to the well-lived life.

Instructor(s): Chris Kennedy     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26007

LING 26030. American Deaf Community: Language, Culture, and Society. 100 Units.

This course will focus on the Deaf community that uses American Sign Language (ASL) as a lens into the disciplines of linguistics, psychology, and cultural studies, and how the use of ASL contributes to individual identity and identity within society. In addition to these disciplinary foci, topics of Deaf literature and art forms will figure in the discussion and readings, which come from a variety of sources and include seminal works in the field from historical and contemporary perspectives.

Instructor(s): Diane Brentari     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26018

LING 26601. Intro Programming for Linguists. 100 Units.

No description available

Equivalent Course(s): LING 36601

LING 27010. Psycholinguistics. 100 Units.

This is a survey course in the psychology of language. We will focus on issues related to language comprehension, language production, and language acquisition. The course will also train students on how to read primary literature and conduct original research studies.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 27010

LING 28355. A Linguistic Introduction to Swahili I. 100 Units.

Spoken in ten countries of Eastern and Central Africa, Swahili has more speakers than any other language in the Bantu family, a group of more than 400 languages most prevalent in sub-equatorial Africa. Based on Swahili Grammar and Workbook, this course helps the students master key areas of the Swahili language in a fast yet enjoyable pace. Topics include sound and intonation patterns, noun class agreements, verb moods, and sentence structures. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. For advanced students, historical interpretations are offered for exceptional patterns observed in Swahili, in relation with other Bantu languages. This is a general introduction course with no specific prerequisites.

Instructor(s): Fidèle Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LING 38355

LING 28356. Linguistic Introduction to Swahili II. 100 Units.

Based on Swahili Grammar and Workbook, this course is a continuation of Linguistic Introduction to Swahili I. It addresses complex issues related to grammatical agreement, verb moods, noun and verb derivation, non-typical adjectives and adverbs, double object constructions, subordinate / coordinated clause constructions, and dialectal variation. Additionally, this course provides important listening and expressive reading skills. For advanced students, historical interpretations are offered for exceptional patterns observed in Swahili, in relation with other Bantu languages. This course allows fulfilling the non-Indo-European language requirement.

Instructor(s): Fidele Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LING 38356

American Sign Language Courses

ASLG 10100-10200-10300. American Sign Language I-II-III.

American Sign Language is the language of the deaf in the United States and much of Canada. It is a full-fledged autonomous language, unrelated to English or other spoken languages. This introductory course teaches the student basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as aspects of deaf culture.

ASLG 10100. American Sign Language-1. 100 Units.

American Sign Language is the language of the deaf in the United States and much of Canada. It is a full-fledged autonomous language, unrelated to English or other spoken languages. This introductory course teaches the student basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as aspects of deaf culture.

Instructor(s): Drucilla Ronchen     Terms Offered: Autumn

ASLG 10200. American Sign Language II. 100 Units.

American Sign Language is the language of the deaf in the United States and much of Canada. It is a full-fledged autonomous language, unrelated to English or other spoken languages. This introductory course teaches the student basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as aspects of deaf culture.

Instructor(s): Drucilla Ronchen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ASLG 10100

ASLG 10300. American Sign Language-3. 100 Units.

American Sign Language is the language of the deaf in the United States and much of Canada. It is a full-fledged autonomous language, unrelated to English or other spoken languages. This is the third course in the introductory series that teaches the student basic vocabulary and grammatical structure, as well as aspects of deaf culture.

Instructor(s): Drucilla Ronchen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ASLG 10200

ASLG 10400-10500-10600. Intermediate American Sign Language I-II-III.

This course continues to increase grammatical structure, receptive and expressive skills, conversational skills, basic linguistic convergence, and knowledge of idioms. Field trip required.

ASLG 10400. Intermediate ASL-1. 100 Units.

This course continues to increase grammatical structure, receptive and expressive skills, conversational skills, basic linguistic convergence, and knowledge of idioms. Field trip required

Instructor(s): Drucilla Ronchen     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ASLG 10300

ASLG 10500. Intermediate ASL-2. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Drucilla Ronchen     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ASLG 10400

ASLG 10600. Intermediate American Sign Language III. 100 Units.

This is the third course in the Intermediate series. In this course we continue to increase grammatical structure, receptive and expressive skills, conversational skills, basic linguistic convergence, and knowledge of idioms. Field trip required.

Instructor(s): Drucilla Ronchen     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ASLG 10500

Basque Courses

BASQ 12000-12100-12200. Elementary Basque I-II-III.

Elementary Basque I-II-III

BASQ 12000. Elementary Basque I. 100 Units.

This course will be an approach to the puzzling language and culture that defines Basque people. A challenge for those who dare to learn a language different from any they have ever heard. A journey to the wonderful land of the Basques, full of enigmas, strong traditions, and peculiar customs that will be discovered through very dynamic activities, such as interactive presentations, brief dialogues, games. The aim of the course is to introduce students to the Basque language through the development of some basic written and conversational skills and through structural analysis. The instructor will propose real communicative situations that will encourage the students to learn the language for the purpose of visiting the Basque Country and being able to communicate in basic ways with Basque speakers. These are usually small classes where it is easy to get a lot of first-hand exposure to the language, and the instructor creates an enriching atmosphere full of entertaining activities and possibilities to hone all skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing-as well as gaining a good grasp of the structure of the language.

Instructor(s): Diana Palenzuela     Terms Offered: Autumn

BASQ 12100. Elementary Basque II. 100 Units.

This course will be a continuation of Elementary Basque I, advancing the students' knowledge of grammatical structure and their receptive, expressive, and conversational skills. The module uses a task-based approach to learning Basque. By means of this methodology, the accumulation of task cycles promotes the acquirement of communicative goals. We will work on different tasks on each lesson, and the progressive build-up of those tasks will cause the gradual improvement of the students' communicative skills and overall fluency. By the end of the quarter the student should be able to produce grammatically accurate short texts in Basque, interact with speakers of Basque at a basic level while employing a variety of complex cases and tenses, understand a range of basic written and oral texts in Basque, and understand a range of cases and the differences between them. This is achieved by creating a motivating atmosphere where all the students want to take part in the activities, while the teacher guides them during their learning process, providing them with the vocabulary and grammar they need to reach these goals.

Instructor(s): Diana Palenzuela     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): BASQ 12000 or instructor's consent

BASQ 12200. Elementary Basque III. 100 Units.

A continuation of Elementary Basque II, with more emphasis in reading/writing and conversation. To consolidate linguistic competence in Basque and expand knowledge of specific areas of grammar. Emphasis will be placed on oral and written competence. Teamwork and personal input will be essential aspects of this module. We will work on practical objectives and will enact real-life situations in groups. Our final aim will be to achieve a relevant and useful command of the Basque language. As in the previous levels, most activities will be very dynamic and interactive.

Instructor(s): Diana Palenzuela     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BASQ 12100 or instructor's consent

BASQ 24700. Introduction to Basque Culture. 100 Units.

Straddling the border of southern France and northern Spain, the land of the Basques has long been home to a people who had no country of their own but have always viewed themselves as a nation. No one has ever been able to find their roots, and their peculiar language is not related to any other in the world, but they have managed to keep their mysterious identity alive, even if many other civilizations tried to blot it out. The aim of this course is to create real situations that will enable the students to learn the meaning of Basque culture. It will be a guided tour throughout Basque history and society. They will learn about the mysterious origins of the language; they will visit the most beautiful places of the Basque country; they will get to know and appreciate Basque traditions, gastronomy, music... and most importantly, they will be able to compare and constrast their own cultures and share their ideas during the lessons, creating an enriching atmosphere full of entertaining activities, such as listening to music, reading legends and tales, watching documentaries, and much more. This course will be conducted in English. It is not necessary to have prior knowledge of Basque language or culture to take this course.

Instructor(s): Diana Palenzuela     Terms Offered: Spring

Modern Greek Courses

MOGK 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Greek I-II-III.

Sequence description not available.

MOGK 10100. Elementary Modern Greek I. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the Greek alphabet, Modern Greek pronunciation rules and the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to communicate minimally with formulaic and rote utterances and produce words, phrases and lists.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30100

MOGK 10200. Elementary Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge. The course will familiarize the students with the basic morphology and syntax, with an emphasis on reading and conversational skills. The students will be able to handle a variety of tasks and manage an uncomplicated situation using mostly formulaic and rote utterances. They will also be able to express personal meaning forming paragraphs.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10100/30100 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): NELG 10200, MOGK 30200

MOGK 10300. Elementary Modern Greek III. 100 Units.

This course aims to develop elementary proficiency in spoken and written Modern Greek and to introduce elements of cultural knowledge.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10200/30200 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): MOGK 30300

MOGK 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Greek I-II-III.

No sequence description available.

MOGK 20100. Intermediate Modern Greek-1. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy. They are expected to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks and to express personal meaning by creating with the language; to ask a variety of questions to obtain simple information to satisfy needs, such as directions, prices and services. Overall they are expected to have a significant quantity and quality of language. Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10300/30300 Equivalent Course(s): NELG 20100

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 10300/30300

MOGK 20200. Intermediate Modern Greek II. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy. They are able to handle successfully uncomplicated tasks and social situations requiring an exchange of basic information related to their work, school, recreation, particular interests and areas of competence. They can also speak about some topics related to employment, current events and matters of public and community interest. They are able to create with language, ask questions, narrate and describe in all major time frames using connected discourse of paragraph length.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 20100
Equivalent Course(s): NELG 20200

MOGK 20300. Intermediate Modern Greek III. 100 Units.

This course aims to enable students to attain conversational fluency and to become independent users of the language who deal effectively and with a good deal of accuracy.

Instructor(s): Chrysanthi Koutsiviti     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MOGK 20200

Swahili Courses

SWAH 25200-25300-25400. Swahili I-II-III.

No sequence description available.

SWAH 25200. Swahili I. 100 Units.

This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Swahili and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop both oral and writing skills.

Instructor(s): Fidele Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SWAH 35200

SWAH 25300. Swahili II. 100 Units.

This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Swahili and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop both oral and writing skills.

Instructor(s): Fidele Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SWAH 25200 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): SWAH 35300

SWAH 25400. Swahili III. 100 Units.

This course is designed to help students acquire communicative competence in Swahili and a basic understanding of its structures. Through a variety of exercises, students develop both oral and writing skills.

Instructor(s): F. Mpiranya     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SWAH 25300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): SWAH 35400


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contacts

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Amy Dahlstrom (Autumn Quarter only)
Ro 224B
773.834.9910
Email

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Itamar Francez (Winter and Spring Quarters)
Rosenwald 229D
773.834.2366
Email

Administrative Contact

Department Administrator
Jason R. Moore

773.702.8522
Email