Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Summary of Requirements for Majors | Studio Track | Summary of Requirements for Studio Track Majors | Honors | Grading | Minor Program in the Department of Visual Arts | Courses

Department Website: http://dova.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The Department of Visual Arts (DoVA) is concerned with art making as a vehicle for exploring creativity, expression, perception, and the constructed world. Whether students take courses listed under ARTV to meet a general education requirement or as part of a major in visual arts, the goal is that they will develop communicative, analytical, and expressive skills through the process of artistic production. The following three courses meet the general education requirement in the arts: ARTV 10100 Visual Language: On Images, ARTV 10200 Visual Language: On Objects, and ARTV 10300 Visual Language: On Time and Space. Most advanced courses require one of these as a prerequisite. (See individual course listings for specific prerequisites.) Students majoring or minoring in visual arts cannot use an ARTV course to meet the general education requirement in the arts.

Range of Course Offerings

The following courses introduce visual communication through the manipulation of various traditional and nonart materials, engaging principles of visual language while stressing the relationship between form and meaning. Readings and visits to local museums and galleries are required. 

ARTV 10100Visual Language: On Images100
ARTV 10200Visual Language: On Objects100
ARTV 10300Visual Language: On Time and Space100

ARTV courses numbered 21000 to 29700 include media specific courses that teach technical skills and provide a conceptual framework for working in these media (e.g., painting, photography, sculpture, video). Also included are more advanced studio courses designed to investigate the vast array of objects, spaces, and ideas embedded in the contemporary artistic landscape. ARTV courses numbered 20000 to 20999 are not studio-based and may not be counted toward studio requirements for the major or minor. ARTV courses in the 20000 to 20999 range may be counted toward the two electives relevant to the major. (See Program Requirements for more information.)

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in visual arts. Information follows the description of the major.

Program Requirements

The BA program in the Department of Visual Arts is intended for students interested in the practice and study of art. DoVA's faculty consists of a core of artists and other humanists interested in making and thinking about art. Students who major in visual arts take an individually arranged program of studio, lecture, and seminar courses that may include some courses outside the Humanities Collegiate Division. The program seeks to foster understanding of art from several perspectives: the practice and intention of the creator, the visual conventions employed, and the perception and critical reception of the audience. In addition to work in the studio, these aims may require study of many other subjects, including but not limited to art history, intellectual history, criticism, and aesthetics. 

All students take ARTV 10100 Visual Language: On Images, ARTV 10200 Visual Language: On Objects, or ARTV 10300 Visual Language: On Time and Space in the first two years of their studies. (NOTE: Students majoring or minoring in visual arts cannot use an ARTV course to meet the general education requirement in the arts.) After completing one of these general education courses but no later than Winter Quarter of their third year, students meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to plan the rest of their program. At least six of the courses beyond the general education requirement in the arts must be drawn from the second level of studio-based offerings (studio art courses numbered 21000 and above). Please note that only courses that are primarily focused on art making can be applied toward this requirement. Students may take up to two studio-based independent study courses (ARTV 29700 Independent Study in Visual Arts) toward their six studio requirements. Two of the remaining three electives may include any intellectually consistent combination of visual arts studio courses, visual arts critical and theory courses, and any other relevant offerings in the College. One elective must be a 20000-level (not meeting the general education requirement in the arts) course in Art History (ARTH). 

Students take ARTV 29600 Junior Seminar in their third year. At the end of the Junior Seminar, students may choose to apply for the visual arts studio track. Places in the studio track are limited. Applicants will be reviewed by a faculty committee at the end of their third year, and studio track decisions will be announced before the start of the Autumn Quarter of fourth year. Students in the studio track present their work in a thesis exhibition and may be eligible to receive shared studio space in their senior year. (See “Studio Track” section below for more details.)

Students who wish to study abroad in their third year should contact the department as soon as possible to discuss options for taking the Junior Seminar, which is generally only offered one quarter per year. Junior Seminar can sometimes be taken in the second year with permission from the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

All visual arts majors must take ARTV 29850 Senior Seminar in the Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. Students in the studio track are required to take an additional course, ARTV 29900 Senior Project, which serves as a critical forum to prepare for the thesis exhibition in the spring. (See “Studio Track” section below for more details.)

Summary of Requirements for Majors

GENERAL EDUCATION
One course outside of ARTV that meets the arts requirement *100
Total Units100
MAJOR
One of the following:100
Visual Language: On Images
Visual Language: On Objects
Visual Language: On Time and Space
ARTV 29600Junior Seminar100
ARTV 29850Senior Seminar100
Six studio art courses numbered 21000 and above**600
Two electives relevant to the major200
One 20000-level course in Art History 100
Total Units1200
*

Students majoring in visual arts cannot use an ARTV course to meet the general education requirement in the arts.

**

 ARTV courses numbered 20000 to 20999 cannot be used toward this requirement.

 ARTH courses that satisfy the general education requirement in the arts are not eligible.

Studio Track

Visual arts majors may apply for the studio track at the end of their third year. Places in the studio track are limited. Applicants will be reviewed by a faculty committee at the end of the third year, and studio track decisions will be announced before the start of the Autumn Quarter of fourth year. Studio track students work in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies and the visual arts faculty to mount a thesis exhibition at the beginning of the Spring Quarter of their senior year. Studio track students may also be awarded shared studio space during the senior year, based on merit and need, and contingent upon space being available.

Additionally, studio track students must take ARTV 29900 Senior Project in the Winter Quarter of their final year, in preparation for their thesis exhibition. 

Summary of Requirements for Studio Track Majors

GENERAL EDUCATION
One course outside of ARTV that meets the arts requirement *100
Total Units100
MAJOR
One of the following:100
Visual Language: On Images
Visual Language: On Objects
Visual Language: On Time and Space
ARTV 29600Junior Seminar100
ARTV 29850Senior Seminar100
ARTV 29900Senior Project100
Six studio art courses numbered 21000 and above**600
Two electives relevant to the major200
One 20000-level course in Art History 100
Total Units1300
*

 Students majoring in visual arts cannot use an ARTV course to meet the general education requirement in the arts.

**

 ARTV courses numbered 20000 to 20999 cannot be used toward this requirement.

  ARTH courses that satisfy the general education requirement in the arts are not eligible.

Honors

Students must have a portfolio of exceptional quality to be recommended to graduate with honors in visual arts. Visual arts faculty make final honors decisions at the end of the student's fourth year, based on performance in visual arts courses, the quality of participation in critiques, and the thesis exhibition.

Grading

Students majoring in visual arts must receive quality grades for the 12 or 13 courses that constitute the major. With consent of their College adviser and the instructor, nonmajors may take visual arts courses for P/F grades if the courses are not used to meet a general education requirement.

Minor Program in the Department of Visual Arts

The minor in visual arts requires six courses: one is from the 10000-level sequence (ARTV 10100 Visual Language: On Images, ARTV 10200 Visual Language: On Objects, or ARTV 10300 Visual Language: On Time and Space), and five are drawn from visual arts studio courses numbered 21000 to 29700, chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. ARTV courses numbered 20000 to 20999 are not studio-based and may not be counted toward studio requirements for the minor. (NOTE: Students minoring in visual arts cannot use an ARTV course to meet the general education requirement in the arts.)

Students who elect the minor program in visual arts must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Students choose courses in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The Director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to a student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors; and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Summary of Requirements for the Minor in Visual Arts

GENERAL EDUCATION
One course outside of ARTV that meets the arts requirement *100
Total Units100
MINOR
One of the following:100
Visual Language: On Images
Visual Language: On Objects
Visual Language: On Time and Space
Five studio art courses numbered 21000 and above**500
Total Units600
*

Students minoring in visual arts cannot use an ARTV course to meet the general education requirement in the arts.

**

 ARTV courses numbered 20000 to 20999 cannot be used toward this requirement.

Course Attendance

Students must attend the first and second classes to confirm enrollment. No exceptions will be made unless the student notifies the instructor before the first class.

Visual Arts Courses

ARTV 10100. Visual Language: On Images. 100 Units.

Through studio work and critical discussions on 2D form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of images and image-making. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but they are also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as, but not limited to, illusion, analogy, metaphor, time and memory, nature and culture, abstraction, the role of the author, and universal systems can be illuminated through these primary investigations. Visits to museums and other fieldwork required, as is participation in studio exercises and group critiques. Students must attend class for the full first week to confirm enrollment. Wait list requests are due several weeks before the quarter begins. Sign up for the wait list at dova.uchicago.edu/content/wait-list-core-courses-0

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Note(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, and 10300 may be taken in sequence or individually. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts. Previous experience in media-based studio courses not accepted as a substitute for this course. Wait list requests are due several weeks before the quarter begins. Sign up for the wait list at dova.uchicago.edu/content/wait-list-core-courses-0

ARTV 10200. Visual Language: On Objects. 100 Units.

Through studio work and critical discussions on 3D form, this course is intended to reveal the conventions of sculpture while investigating its modes of production. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as, but not limited to, platonic form, analogy, metaphor, verisimilitude, abstraction, nature and culture, and the body politic can be illuminated through these primary investigations. Visits to museums and other fieldwork required, as is participation in studio exercises and group critiques. Students must attend class for the full first week to confirm enrollment. Wait list requests are due several weeks before the quarter begins. Sign up for the wait list at dova.uchicago.edu/content/wait-list-core-courses-0 

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Note(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, and 10300 may be taken in sequence or individually. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts. Previous experience in media-based studio courses not accepted as a substitute for this course. Wait list requests are due several weeks before the quarter begins. Sign up for the wait list at dova.uchicago.edu/content/wait-list-core-courses-0

ARTV 10300. Visual Language: On Time and Space. 100 Units.

Through studio work and critical discussion on four-dimensional form, this course is designed to reveal the conventions of the moving image, performance, and/or the production of digital-based media. Basic formal elements and principles of art are presented, but also put into practice to reveal perennial issues in a visual field. Form is studied as a means to communicate content. Topics as varied as but not limited to narrative, mechanical reproduction, verisimilitude, historical tableaux, time and memory, the body politic, and the role of the author can be illuminated through these primary investigations. Some sections focus solely on performance; others incorporate moving image technology. Please check Class Search at registrar.uchicago.edu/classes for details. Visits to museums and other fieldwork required, as is participation in studio exercises and group critiques. Students must attend class for the full first week in order to confirm enrollment. Wait list requests are due several weeks before the quarter begins. Sign up for the wait list at dova.uchicago.edu/content/wait-list-core-courses-0

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Note(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, and 10300 may be taken in sequence or individually. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts. Previous experience in media-based studio courses not accepted as a substitute for this course. Wait list requests are due several weeks before the quarter begins. Sign up for the wait list at dova.uchicago.edu/content/wait-list-core-courses-0

ARTV 20002-20003. History of International Cinema I: Silent Era; History of International Cinema II: Sound Era to 1960.

This sequence is required of students majoring in Cinema and Media Studies. Taking these courses in sequence is strongly recommended but not required.

ARTV 20002. History of International Cinema I: Silent Era. 100 Units.

This course introduces what was singular about the art and craft of silent film. Its general outline is chronological. We also discuss main national schools and international trends of filmmaking.

Instructor(s): J. Lastra     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prior or concurrent registration in CMST 10100 required. Required of students majoring in Cinema and Media Studies.
Note(s): This is the first part of a two-quarter course.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 28500,ARTH 38500,CMLT 22400,CMLT 32400,CMST 48500,ENGL 29300,ENGL 48700,MAPH 36000,CMST 28500

ARTV 20003. History of International Cinema II: Sound Era to 1960. 100 Units.

The center of this course is film style, from the classical scene breakdown to the introduction of deep focus, stylistic experimentation, and technical innovation (sound, wide screen, location shooting). The development of a film culture is also discussed. Texts include Thompson and Bordwell's Film History: An Introduction; and works by Bazin, Belton, Sitney, and Godard. Screenings include films by Hitchcock, Welles, Rossellini, Bresson, Ozu, Antonioni, and Renoir.

Instructor(s): Y. Tsivian     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Prior or concurrent registration in CMST 10100 required. Required of students majoring in Cinema and Media Studies.
Note(s): CMST 28500/48500 strongly recommended
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 28600,ARTH 38600,CMLT 22500,CMLT 32500,CMST 48600,ENGL 29600,ENGL 48900,MAPH 33700,CMST 28600

ARTV 20202. Political Documentary Film. 100 Units.

This course explores the political documentary film, its intersection with historical and cultural events, and its opposition to Hollywood and traditional media. We will examine various documentary modes of production, from films with a social message, to advocacy and activist film, to counter-media and agit-prop. We will also consider the relationship between the filmmaker, film subject and audience, and how political documentaries are disseminated and, most importantly, part of political struggle.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 38201,CMST 28201

ARTV 20300. Introduction to Film Analysis. 100 Units.

This course introduces basic concepts of film analysis, which are discussed through examples from different national cinemas, genres, and directorial oeuvres. Along with questions of film technique and style, we consider the notion of the cinema as an institution that comprises an industrial system of production, social and aesthetic norms and codes, and particular modes of reception. Films discussed include works by Hitchcock, Porter, Griffith, Eisenstein, Lang, Renoir, Sternberg, and Welles.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Note(s): Required of students majoring in Cinema and Media Studies
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 20000,ENGL 10800,CMST 10100

ARTV 20704. Photo/Modernism/Esthetic. 100 Units.

The course presents the history of photographic practices in the United States, beginning in the late 19th century and extending into the 1980s, aimed at gaining an audience for photographs within museums of art. The issues under study include the contention over claims about medium specificity, notions of photographic objectivity, a peculiarly photographic esthetics, the division of photography into two categories—art vs. documentary—and the role of tradition and canon formation in the attempted definition of the photographic medium.

Instructor(s): J. Snyder     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 37304,ARTV 30704,ARTH 27304

ARTV 20940. The Artist as Ethnographer. 100 Units.

This interdisciplinary seminar considers the idea of the artist as ethnographer in contemporary art and curatorial practice. Through lecture, screening, and group discussions, we will trace the historical relationship between visual culture and the social sciences, uncovering how this has impacted ways of viewing objects, people, and cultures within the Western tradition. Armed with this knowledge, we will consider how the ethnographer’s commitment to the study of Others has been challenged by an increasingly globalized and post-colonial world. We will explore questions of authority and subjectivity in ethnographic fieldwork. Finally, we will look to contemporary artworks and exhibitions that have reinvested in the image and practice of the ethnographer to uncover the politics and poetics of their work. You will be introduced to the practices of Brad Butler and Karen Mirza, Paulo Nazareth, Marine Hugonnier, Camille Henrot, Kapwani Kiwanga, et al. Sessions will include close reading and discussion of texts by Hal Foster, James Clifford, Clementine Deliss, Okwui Enwezor, and Kaelen Wilson-Goldie, among others. 

Instructor(s): Y. Umolu     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): This course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 35940,ARTV 30954,ARTH 25940

ARTV 21005. Art Practice and Theory. 100 Units.

This course examines the place of artistic practice in contemporary culture and the rhetoric of images. Emphasis is placed on the visual arts, examining discourses such as the assignment of value to works, the formation of taste, the relationship between individual production and institutional practices, the role of authorship (intentionality) in the construction of meaning, the gate-keeping functions of curatorial and critical practice, the function and maintenance of categorical distinctions constituting "otherness" (high/low, naive, primitive, outside), the relationship between truth and authenticity, and the uses of art (e.g., transcendence, decoration, activism, therapy, play). Visits to museums, galleries, and other cultural and commercial sites required, as is attendance at designated events.

Instructor(s): A. Ginsburg     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200 or 10300

ARTV 21501. Introduction to Printmaking. 100 Units.

An introduction to basic printmaking techniques, including monoprint, intaglio (drypoint), planographic, and relief printing. Printmaking will be explored as a “bridge medium”: a conduit between drawing, painting, and sculpture. Emphasis will be placed upon investigating visual structures through “calculated spontaneity” and “controlled accidents,” as well as on the serial potential inherent in printmaking, as opposed to the strictly technical aspects of this medium.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 31501

ARTV 21701. Conceptual Drawing. 100 Units.

When does a drawing become an object rather than a picture? How can a line leave the page and be made as an action in the world? Can a design tell a story? These questions and many others will guide course work, addressing the history of drawing, its contemporary condition as its potential for presenting personal ideas and innovative new forms. Art historical examples and non-art formats such as maps, instructional graphics and schematics will be introduced as models for weekly assignments and longer-term projects.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200 or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 31701

ARTV 21902. Color: Theory and Experience. 100 Units.

This studio course proposes a hands-on investigation into the way we experience color in the world and in our own work. We will study a range of approaches to color, including: “haptic” color perception, Symbolic/Spiritual color theories, as well as more widely known theories of "optical color." In the studio, you will be introduced to a unique series of exercises that elucidate the expressive, symbolic, scientific, and cultural aspects of color perception using both acrylic pigment and light. Lectures, field trips, and guest speakers will broaden our discussion of color. A final project in a medium of your choice will serve as a culminating experience for the course.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200 or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 31902

ARTV 22000-22002. Introduction to Painting I-II.

This studio course introduces students to the fundamental elements of painting (its language and methodologies) as they learn how to initiate and develop an individualized investigation into subject matter and meaning. This course emphasizes group critiques and discussion. Courses taught concurrently.

ARTV 22000. Introduction to Painting I. 100 Units.

This studio course introduces students to the fundamental elements of painting (its language and methodologies) as they learn how to initiate and develop an individualized investigation into subject matter and meaning. This course emphasizes group critiques and discussion. 

Instructor(s): D. Schutter, K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 32200

ARTV 22002. Introduction to Painting II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 32202

ARTV 22200. Introduction to Sculpture. 100 Units.

This course introduces the technical fundamentals of sculptural practice. Using basic introductions to welding, basic woodworking, and metal fabrication, students will undertake assignments designed to deploy these new skills conceptually in their projects. Lectures and reading introduce the technical focus of the course in various historical, social, and economic contexts. Discussions and gallery visits help engender an understanding of sculpture within a larger societal and historical context. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 32000

ARTV 22304. Ceramics: Surface and Content. 100 Units.

Ceramics and painting have a long connected history. In Natural History (77–79 AD), Pliny the Elder attempts to trace the history of portraiture. Butades the potter, brokenhearted at the departure of his soon-to-be-married daughter, catches a glimpse of her profile on the wall from the reflection cast by a candle and traces the outline with some clay. In the retelling of this narrative, this act of doubling is attributed, variously, to the origin of portrait painting and to the origin of the portrait modeling, depending on the focus of the outline as an act done by a brush or the plastic actions of filling in the trace. While historically apocryphal, this account captures the historical dance between ceramics as a surface for painting and material to form shape. In this course, you will bring surface and form together to create a space and site of content. While using the inherently plastic nature of clay to create shape, the workshop format of this course will instrumentalize the surface to test and play with color and line. Thinking of ceramics as a flexible surface for archival paint, also known as glaze, this studio course will test glazes, oxides, decals, and multi-fired surfaces. Assignments will be geared towards experimental results that allow students to further their own interests and practices.

Instructor(s): A. Ginsburg     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 32304

ARTV 22313. Building a House for a Kiln II. 100 Units.

Building a House for a Kiln II, taught in collaboration with David Woodhouse and Andy Tinucci of Woodhouse Tinucci Architects, is a hands-on building laboratory in which students will construct a student-designed structure adjacent to the Logan Center for the Arts.  Students will have the opportunity to take up hammers and trowels to create a lasting sculpture that will house kilns for the University arts community. Building, the third in a design/build series, is an opportunity to work at an unusually ambitious scale and will create a work space that gives the arts community access to kilns. In this course, students will be asked to construct elements of the structure, from walls to exterior claddings and interior cabinetry. Construction and material processes and techniques will be explored and taught, and the results will be physical. No prior building experience necessary.

Instructor(s): A. Ginsburg     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 32313

ARTV 22500. Computational Imaging. 100 Units.

This studio course introduces fundamental tools and concepts used in the production of computer-mediated artwork. Instruction includes a survey of standard digital imaging software and hardware (i.e., Photoshop, scanners, storage, printing, etc.), as well as exposure to more sophisticated methods. We also view and discuss the historical precedents and current practice of media art. Using input and output hardware, students complete conceptually driven projects emphasizing personal direction while gaining core digital knowledge.

Instructor(s): J. Salavon     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 32500,CMST 28801,CMST 38801

ARTV 22502. Data and Algorithm in Art. 100 Units.

An introduction to the use of data sources and algorithmic methods in visual art, this course explores the aesthetic and theoretical possibilities of computational art-making. Focusing on the diverse and ever expanding global data-feed, we will craft custom software processes to create works investigating the visual transformation of information. Additionally, software programming may be deployed independently, without a connection to source material. While placing an emphasis on creating new work, we will also survey the history of this type of art practice.

Instructor(s): J. Salavon     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Note(s): No prior experience with programming is necessary.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 32502

ARTV 23801. Video. 100 Units.

This is a production course geared towards short experimental works and video within a studio art context.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200 or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 33801

ARTV 23804. Experimental Animation. 100 Units.

Individually directed video shorts will be produced in this intensive studio course. Experimental and improvised approaches to stop-animation and motion picture art will combine digital production and post-production with analog and material methods of picture making. Early and experimental cinema, puppetry and contemporary low-tech animation strategies will be presented as formal and technical examples.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 33804

ARTV 23806. Video Workshop. 100 Units.

This production course is geared toward short video works and innovative approaches to digital moving-image art. Video Workshop will function as a continuation and expansion on the foundations of Video I, with emphasis on individually directed projects and experimentation. While some technical instruction and assistance will be offered, a basic understanding of digital cameras and editing software will be beneficial. Projects include several short video sketches and experiments, group exercises, and a larger-scale independent project. Weeks will be divided into screenings/discussion sessions and technical work periods.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PQ: ARTV 10300, ARTV 23801, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 33806

ARTV 23904. Senior Creative Thesis Workshop. 100 Units.

This seminar will focus on how to craft a creative thesis in film or video. Works-in-progress will be screened each week, and technical and structural issues relating to the work will be explored. The workshop will also develop the written portion of the creative thesis. The course is limited to seniors from CMS and DoVA, and MAPH students working on a creative thesis.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CMST 23930; CMST 23931; departmental approval of senior creative thesis project.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 33904,CMST 23904

ARTV 23905. Creative Thesis Workshop. 100 Units.

This seminar will focus on how to craft a creative thesis in film or video. Works-in-progress will be screened each week, and technical and structural issues relating to the work will be explored. The workshop will also develop the written portion of the creative thesis. The class is limited to seniors from CMS and DOVA, and MAPH students working on a creative thesis.

Instructor(s): Judy Hoffman     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): CMST 23930; CMST 23931 or 27600; departmental approval of senior creative thesis project.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 33905,ARTV 33905

ARTV 23930. Documentary Production I. 100 Units.

Documentary Video Production focuses on the making of independent documentary video.  Examples of Direct Cinema, Cinéma Vérité, the Essay, Ethnographic film, the Diary, Historical and Biographical film, Agitprop/Activist forms, and Guerilla Television, will be screened and discussed. Issues embedded in the documentary genre, such as the ethics and politics of representation and the shifting lines between documentary fact and fiction will be explored. Pre-production strategies and production techniques will be taught, including the camera, interviews and sound recording, shooting in available light, working in crews, and post-production editing.  Students will be expected to purchase a portable firewire. A five-minute string-out/rough-cut will be screened at the end of the quarter. Students are encouraged to take Doc. Production II to complete their work.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Prior or concurrent enrollment in CMST 10100 recommended.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 33930,CMST 33930,HMRT 25106,HMRT 35106

ARTV 23931. Documentary Production II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the shaping and crafting of a nonfiction video. Students are expected to write a treatment detailing their project. Production techniques focus on the handheld camera versus tripod, interviewing and microphone placement, and lighting for the interview. Postproduction covers editing techniques and distribution strategies. Students then screen final projects in a public space.

Instructor(s): J. Hoffman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CMST 23930 or ARTV 23930.
Note(s): This course meets for two quarters.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 23931,HMRT 25107

ARTV 24000. Introduction to Black and White Film Photography. 100 Units.

Photography is a familiar medium due to its ubiquitous presence in our visual world, including popular culture and personal usage. In this course, students learn technical procedures and basic skills related to the 35mm camera, black and white film, and print development. They also begin to establish criteria for artistic expression. We investigate photography in relation to its historical and social context in order to more consciously engage the photograph's communicative and expressive possibilities. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Field trips required.

Instructor(s): E. Hogeman     Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Note(s): Camera and light meter required.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 34000

ARTV 24004. Introduction to Color Photography. 100 Units.

In this course students learn technical procedures and basic skills related to camera operation, color editing workflows, and inkjet printing. Students interested in working with film will learn how to make inkjet prints from high resolution scans from 35mm negatives. Through readings, discussions, and field trips we will investigate color photography in relation to its historical and social context in order to more consciously engage the contemporary photograph's communicative and expressive possibilities. Course work culminates in a portfolio of works exemplary of the student's understanding of the medium. Students need their own DSLR camera (with manual settings) or a 35mm film camera.

Instructor(s): E. Hogeman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200 or 10300
Note(s): Students need their own DSLR camera (with manual settings) or a 35mm film camera.,
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 34004

ARTV 24201. Collage. 100 Units.

This studio course explores collage as a means for developing content and examining complex cultural and material relationships. Projects and assigned texts outline the history of collage as a dynamic art form with a strong political dimension, as well as critically addressing how it is being used today.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 34201

ARTV 24301. Writing for Performance. 100 Units.

This course is an exploration of select texts for performance written by performance artists primarily but not entirely operating within the context of art. Via historical context and literary technique, students read, discuss, and analyze texts by various authors spanning the history of performance art: Hugo Ball, John Cage, Richard Foreman, Carolee Schneeman, Joseph Beuys, Karen Finley, Nature Theater of Oklahoma, John Leguizamo, and create and perform their own writing. Field trips and attendance at first class are required.

Instructor(s): W. Pope.L     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 34301,TAPS 28414

ARTV 24403. Advanced Photography. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to develop students’ investigations and explorations in photography, building on beginning level experience and basic facility with this medium. Students pursue a line of artistic inquiry by participating in a process that involves experimentation, reading, gallery visits, critiques, and discussions, but mostly by producing images. Primary emphasis is placed upon the visual articulation of the ideas of students through their work, as well as the verbal expression of their ideas in class discussions, critiques, and artist’s statements. As a vital component of articulating ideas and inquiry, students will refine their skills, e.g., black and white or color printing, medium or large format camera usage, or experimenting with light-sensitive materials.

Instructor(s): L. Letinsky     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300; and 24000.
Note(s): Camera and light meter required.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 34403

ARTV 24550. Shopcraft: Methods and Materials. 100 Units.

Designed as a complementary course to the DOVA sculpture sequence, Shopcraft explores the tools and techniques available to students in the wood shop. Topics covered include shop safety; the properties of woods; the planning and material selection process for sculpture, furniture, and other woodworking applications; the care and use of hand tools; and interpreting and creating scale drawings and conceptual plans. A series of small projects designed to challenge and expand students' design, drafting, and woodworking skills are assigned. In addition, students are invited to incorporate projects from sculpture classes or their individual studio practice into the course.

Instructor(s): D. Wolf     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 34550

ARTV 24703. Mixed-Media Drawing: From Object to Concept. 100 Units.

An object of your choice will serve as a departure point for this process-oriented studio course that takes you through a sequenced exploration of a variety of mixed media drawing materials, methods, and approaches: from observation to abstraction—to the purely conceptual. Readings, critical writing, and discussion are intended to reinforce fluidity between theory, your ideas, and your art practice. This course is augmented by an image bank and gallery visits.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Note(s): Open to all levels of experience.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 34703

ARTV 25401. Transmedia Game. 100 Units.

This experimental course explores the emerging game genre of “transmedia” or “alternate reality” gaming. Transmedia games use the real world as their platform while incorporating text, video, audio, social media, websites, and other forms. We will approach new media theory through the history, aesthetics, and design of transmedia games. Course requirements include weekly blog entry responses to theoretical readings; an analytical midterm paper; and collaborative participation in a single narrative-based transmedia game project. No preexisting technical expertise is required but a background in any of the following areas will help: creative writing, literary or media theory, web design, visual art, computer programming, performance, and game design.

Instructor(s): P. Jagoda     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ENGL 25953,CMST 25953,CMST 35953,CRWR 26003,CRWR 46003,ENGL 32311,TAPS 28455

ARTV 26203. The Informed Object: Archives + Sculpture. 100 Units.

This course will develop a canon of past artistic projects and social endeavors that have conceived of new works based, in some way, on the use of “past meanings” as the principal or tangible agent of inspiration. With this constant as our basis, we will conceive of new works of art based in the historic signature of known and under-known collections, policies, everyday news, and significant past characters.

Instructor(s): T. Gates     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 36203

ARTV 26204. Speeches and Podiums. 100 Units.

Combining observation, making, and performance, this course will explore the corollary between important moments, platforms, and what one says. Through the analysis of conventional and unconventional speeches, speech acts, lyrics, legal defense, etc., we will locate the power of language and the body to cause a shift, rift, or bridge. Speech, the intangible material, will meet the tangible world through the creation of stages, soap boxes, and temporary micro-architectural sculptures.

Instructor(s): T. Gates     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 36204

ARTV 26214. On Art and Life. 100 Units.

This course is a multidisciplinary intensive into the ways in which artistic production is dependent on and part of larger cultural tropes. Utilizing contemporary culture as a framework, how does art form connective tissues with the worlds that happen outside of the artist's studio? Visual art is a communicative form that requires subject matter, and this course will investigate the myriad of ways that artists mine culturally meaningful materials, forms, and images as both subjects and as palette. Participation in several field trips and out-of-class film screenings is required. Reference materials are drawn from a variety of disciplines.

Instructor(s): G. Oppenheimer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 36214

ARTV 27210. Intermediate/Advanced Painting. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to literally expand your painting practice and your definition of painting. Through a series of studio projects, we will consider fundamental issues surrounding 21st-century painting such as: figuration/abstraction, the body, digital/analog, painting’s expanded relationship to itself and to other media. In the studio we will frequently subject painting to juxtaposition with other 2-D. 3-D, and 4-D media as we come to terms with the actual physical properties of paint. A final project serves as a culminating experience.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200 or 10300 and 22000 or 22002 or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 37210

ARTV 27214. Art and Knowledge. 100 Units.

This course is an exploration of questions concerning the relationship between Art and knowledge. Is Art knowledge? Can Art create knowledge? If Art is neither knowledge nor creates knowledge, what is its function? These questions are discussed using themes: secrecy, rumor, ignorance and surveillance, and a corresponding set of artworks by a group of artists who utilize these approaches: Vito Acconci, Bruce Nauman, Sophie Calle and Julia Scher, among others. We will also do close readings of essays relating to our themes, for example: texts on recent theories of ignorance as knowledge or Derrida's metaphysics of presence. To round out our discussions, students will participate in a series of hands-on art exercises to give our analyses more material form and further ‎exemplify our exploration.

Instructor(s): W. Pope.L, D. Roelstraete     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTV 37214

ARTV 29600. Junior Seminar. 100 Units.

Students in the Junior Seminar engage in two main activities: (1) a series of studio projects challenging the imagination and enlarging formal skills; and (2) an introduction to the contemporary art world through selected readings, lectures, careful analysis of art objects/events, and critical writing. Studio skills are developed while contending with the central task of articulating ideas through a resistant medium. Toward the end of the quarter, students who wish to apply for the Honors Track may submit their applications to the Department. Visits to museums, galleries, and other cultural and commercial sites required, as is attendance at designated events.

Instructor(s): S. Wolniak, A. Ginsburg     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): For Visual Arts majors only
Note(s): It is recommended that students who are majoring in visual arts enroll in this required course in Spring Quarter of their third year

ARTV 29700. Independent Study in Visual Arts. 100 Units.

Students in this reading course should have already done fundamental course work and be ready to explore a particular area of interest much more closely.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): ARTV 10100, 10200, or 10300 and consent of instructor
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

ARTV 29850. Senior Seminar. 100 Units.

This is a critique-based course utilizing group discussion and individual guidance in the service of advancing the art practice of students who are majoring in visual arts. Emphasis is placed on the continued development of student's artistic production that began in the preceding Junior Seminar. Readings and written responses required. In addition to studio work, visits to museums and galleries required.

Instructor(s): K. Desjardins, W. Pope.L     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Required of students who are majoring in visual arts

ARTV 29900. Senior Project. 100 Units.

Required of Visual Arts majors in the Studio Track. This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in a sustained and intense development of their art practice in weekly critiques throughout the Winter Quarter.

Instructor(s): J. Stockholder     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Undergraduate Studies


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies:
William Pope.L
LC 239

Email

Administrative Contact

Assoc. Director, Student Affairs:
Alison LaTendresse
LC 236
773.753.4821
Email

Listhost

visual-arts@lists.uchicago.edu