Contacts | Programs of Study | Degree Program in French and Francophone Literature, Culture, and Society | Degree Program in Italian Literature | Degree Program in Spanish Literature | Degree Program in More than One Literature | Minor Program in Romance Languages and Literatures | Catalan Courses | French Courses | Italian Courses | Portuguese/Luso-Brazilian Courses | Spanish Courses

Department Website: http://rll.uchicago.edu

Programs of Study

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures (RLLT) offers several programs of study leading to the BA degree in French, Italian, or Spanish literature and culture; or in some combination, which may include Catalan or Portuguese. Catalan and Portuguese offerings include a two-year language sequence, minor programs in Catalan and Portuguese, and selected literature and culture courses. The BA programs are designed to give students knowledge of the literature and culture of their area of concentration, as well as to develop their linguistic competence in one or more of the Romance languages.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in RLLT. Information follows the description of the major.

Courses in the major may not be counted toward general education requirements. For courses that are not taken as part of a University of Chicago study abroad program, students must petition for elective credit from the College before requesting departmental credit. Advanced language students should consider taking special topic courses at the 20000 and 30000 levels. Some of these courses require consent of the instructor.

Degree Program in French and Francophone Literature, Culture, and Society

Program Requirements

Students who elect the major program must meet with the French undergraduate adviser before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the major and to complete the required paperwork. Students choose their track and appropriate courses in consultation with the French undergraduate adviser. Students must submit to the departmental office an approval form for the major program signed by the French undergraduate adviser by the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. Students must then submit a copy of the signed approval form to their College adviser.

The major program in French consists of ten courses beyond FREN 20300 Language, History, and Culture IIIOne course must be either FREN 20500 Ecrire en français or FREN 20503 Modes De Raisonnement Francais (taught in Paris). The remaining courses should be upper-level courses in or related to French, and determined according to the student’s major track.

All students must take at least one departmental course at the introductory level. Introductory-level courses (as designated in the course title or description) are designed as “gateway” courses that provide foundations for the major and are suitable for students who have just completed the advanced language requirement. All students must also take at least three courses that include pre-nineteenth-century material.

Two tracks, with different emphases, are offered as paths to the French major. These areas of special emphasis are broadly defined, and the chosen track need not determine all the courses a student can take within the department. The tracks are intended to give students the flexibility to explore their own interests while developing in-depth knowledge of the language, literature, and culture of the Francophone world.

  1. French and Francophone Language and Literature: This track focuses on developing advanced proficiency in speaking, reading, and writing French, as well as broad knowledge of the field of French and Francophone literary studies. Through the close study of major works, students learn critical techniques appropriate to their interpretation. Students must complete most of their course work (e.g., readings, writing) in French in order to receive credit. Advanced students may petition to take RLLT 38800 Foreign Language Acquisition, Research and Teaching as one of their courses.
  2. French and Francophone Society and Culture
: This track is intended for students who have a special interest in understanding the historical, social, and cultural complexity of France and the Francophone world, or in the visual arts, cinema, music, or theater. Students must take a majority of their courses in the department, but are also encouraged to explore appropriate course offerings in History, Political Science, Sociology, Art History, Cinema and Media Studies, Music, and Theater and Performance Studies. 

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to participate in the College's study abroad programs in France. Many of these programs confer major or minor credit, including the courses in the summer Advanced French program. The three civilization courses in the French-language European Civilization in Paris program can be used for credit in any track of the French major or minor, assuming a student is not using these courses to fulfill the general education civilization studies requirement. For the French and Francophone Society and Culture major track, the three courses from the Autumn African Civilizations in Paris program or the three courses from the Winter Cinema and Media Studies program in Paris can be used for credit (if they are not being used to meet the general education requirements in civilization studies or the arts). Further information is available from the Study Abroad office or at study-abroad.uchicago.edu.

Students may also petition for credit for other courses taken at the University of Chicago Center in Paris, depending on the course content, or for courses taken at other institutions (for instance, at French universities as part of the year-long study abroad program), subject to College procedures and departmental approval.

Grading

French majors must receive quality grades in all required courses. Nonmajors may take departmental courses for P/F grading with consent of instructor. However, all language courses must be taken for a quality grade. 

Honors

To qualify for honors, students must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and an average GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major. They must also submit a completed BA paper to their adviser no later than Friday of fifth week of Spring Quarter of their fourth year. Students with papers judged superior by the BA paper adviser and another faculty reader will be recommended to the Master of the Humanities Collegiate Division for honors. Only students who wish to be considered for honors are required to write a BA paper.


Students should select a faculty supervisor for the paper in early Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. During Autumn or Winter Quarter, they may register for FREN 29900 BA Paper Preparation: French. Students seeking honors may count this course towards their course requirements; it must be taken for a quality grade. The BA paper typically is a research paper with a minimum of 15–20 pages, as agreed upon with the BA advisor, and a bibliography written in the language of specialization.

Students must seek permission from their BA paper adviser to use a single paper or project to meet both the major requirements of Romance Languages and Literatures and those of another department or program. Students must also obtain the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser, to be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Summary of Requirements: Track in French and Francophone Language and Literature

One of the following:100
Ecrire en français
Modes De Raisonnement Francais
Nine courses in advanced language, literature, or culture (FREN 20601 or above)900
Note: This must include at least one introductory-level course and at least three courses which include pre-nineteenth-century material. Courses must include a French language component.
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors) *
Total units1000

Summary of Requirements: Track in French and Francophone Society and Culture

One of the following:100
Ecrire en français
Modes De Raisonnement Francais
Nine courses in advanced French language (FREN 20601 or above), and French and Francophone culture, society, history, or arts.900
Note: This must include at least one introductory-level course and at least three courses which include pre-nineteenth-century material. Up to three courses may be taken outside the department with approval from the French undergraduate adviser.

BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors) *
Total Units1000

Sample Program 1: Track in French and Francophone Language and Literature

FREN 20500Ecrire en français100
FREN 20601Expression orale et phonétique100
FREN 21820Blinding Enlightenment (introductory-level course)100
FREN 22203The Literary Avant-Garde100
FREN 24410Montaigne dans l'histoire littéraire: inventions et récupérations100
FREN 25301Beautiful Souls, Adventurers, and Rogues. The European 18th Century Novel100
FREN 27600Ancien Francais/Old French100
FREN 27701Baudelaire100
FREN 27900Le Livre Antillais: Culture, Écriture, et Politique100
FREN 29900BA Paper Preparation: French (if student wishes to qualify for honors)100
BA Paper (student wishes to qualify for honors)
Total Units1000

Sample Program 2: Track in French and Francophone Society and Culture (with a focus on the social sciences)

FREN 20503Modes De Raisonnement Francais100
FREN 23600L'écriture de l'histoire à la Renaissance100
FREN 23610Litterature et societe: Flaubert et Marx100
FREN 26700Jeanne d'Arc: histoire et legende. Cours introductorie100
FREN 28500Les Revenants: histoire, fiction et société au 19e siècle100
FREN 29100Pascal and Simone Weil100
PLSC 27101Liberalism Confronts Democracy: Tocqueville and Mill100
SOSC 27501Civilisation Européenne I (if not used to fulfill the general education civilization studies requirement)100
SOSC 27601Civilisation Europeenne-2 (if not used to fulfill the general education civilization studies requirement)100
SOSC 27701Civilisation Europeenne-3 (if not used to fulfill the general education civilization studies requirement)100
Total Units1000

Sample Program 3: Track in French and Francophone Society and Culture (with a focus on theater, cinema, and the arts)

FREN 20500Ecrire en français100
FREN 23404French Cinema of the 1930s100
FREN 23405A Topography of Modernity: Cinema in Paris, 1890-1925100
FREN 23406Contemporary French Cinema100
FREN 24610Introduction au théâtre français100
FREN 25910Racine100
ARTH 24812Museums and Art100
CMLT 24408Before and After Beckett: Theater and Theory100
CMST 27220Classical Film Theory100
Total Units900

Degree Program in Italian Literature

The program in Italian consists of ten courses beyond ITAL 20300 Language, History, and Culture III, and is aimed at developing a broad knowledge of the field through the close study of major works and the critical techniques appropriate to their interpretation. These courses must include ITAL 20400 Corso di perfezionamento and ITAL 23410 Reading and Practice of the Short Story (or an equivalent introductory gateway course designed to facilitate the transition between language courses and upper-level electives). As such, students are strongly encouraged to take this gateway course before beginning upper-level course work. The eight remaining courses should be upper-level courses in or related to Italian. Most will be Italian literature and culture courses, but up to four can be Italian studies courses, which are largely interdisciplinary courses taught by affiliated faculty. A list of eligible Italian studies courses will be maintained on the department website. Students must complete a substantial part of the course work (e.g., readings, writing) in Italian in order to receive credit.

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to participate in the College's study abroad program in Italy. Further information is available from the Study Abroad office or at study-abroad.uchicago.edu.

Grading

Italian majors must receive quality grades in all required courses. Nonmajors may take departmental courses for P/F grading with consent of instructor. However, all language courses must be taken for a quality grade. 

Honors

To qualify for honors, students must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and an average GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major. They must also submit a completed BA paper to their adviser no later than Friday of fifth week of Spring Quarter of their fourth year. Students with papers judged superior by the BA paper adviser and another faculty reader will be recommended to the Master of the Humanities Collegiate Division for honors. Only students who wish to be considered for honors are required to write a BA paper.


Students should select a faculty supervisor for the paper in early Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. During Autumn or Winter Quarter, they may register for ITAL 29900 BA Paper Preparation: Italian. Students seeking honors may count this course towards their course requirements; it must be taken for a quality grade. The BA paper typically is a research paper with a minimum of 15–20 pages, as agreed upon with the BA adviser, and a bibliography written in the language of specialization.

Students must seek permission from their BA paper adviser to use a single paper or project to meet both the major requirements of Romance Languages and Literatures and those of another department or program. Students must also obtain the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser, to be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

By the beginning of their fourth year, students may be asked to submit a writing sample in Italian. If the department deems language proficiency inadequate, there may be additional requirements to ensure that the BA paper can be successfully written in the language of study.

Summary of Requirements: Italian Literature

ITAL 20400Corso di perfezionamento100
ITAL 23410Reading and Practice of the Short Story (or equivalent gateway course)100
Eight upper-level Italian courses800
Note: Up to four of the eight may be interdisciplinary Italian studies courses; see department website for list of eligible courses.
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors) *
Total Units1000

Degree Program in Spanish Literature

The program in Spanish consists of ten courses beyond SPAN 20300 Language, History, and Culture III, and is aimed at developing a broad knowledge of the field through the close study of major works and the critical techniques appropriate to their interpretation. These courses must include an advanced language course and SPAN 21500 Introducción al análisis literario, which stresses different approaches to literature and culture. Students must also take three courses from the introductory sequence in the history of the literature, plus an additional five courses in literature and culture. Students must complete a substantial part of the course work (e.g., readings, writing) in Spanish in order to receive credit.

Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to participate in the College's study abroad programs in Mexico or Spain. The three civilization courses in the Spanish-language Civilization in the Western Mediterranean program in Barcelona can be used for credit in the Spanish major or minor, if these courses are not used to fulfill the general education civilization studies requirement. Further information is available from the Study Abroad office or at study-abroad.uchicago.edu.

Grading

Spanish majors must receive quality grades in all required courses. Nonmajors may take departmental courses for P/F grading with consent of instructor. However, all language courses must be taken for a quality grade. 

Honors

To qualify for honors, students must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and an average GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major. They must also submit a completed BA paper to their adviser no later than Friday of fifth week of Spring Quarter of their fourth year. Students with papers judged superior by the BA paper adviser and another faculty reader will be recommended to the Master of the Humanities Collegiate Division for honors. Only students who wish to be considered for honors are required to write a BA paper.

Students should select a faculty supervisor for the paper early in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. During Autumn or Winter Quarter they may register for SPAN 29900 BA Paper Preparation: Spanish with the faculty member chosen to direct the writing of the BA paper. Students seeking honors may count this course towards their course requirements; it must be taken for a quality grade. The BA paper typically is a research paper with a minimum of twenty pages and a bibliography written in the language of specialization.

Students must seek permission from their BA paper adviser to use a single paper or project to meet both the major requirements of Romance Languages and Literatures and those of another department or program. A significant and logical section of the BA paper must be written in the appropriate Romance language in consultation with the student's BA paper adviser. Students must also obtain the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser. The form must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

By the beginning of their fourth year, students may be asked to submit a writing sample in Spanish. If the department deems language proficiency inadequate, there may be additional requirements to ensure that the BA paper can be successfully written in the language of study.

Summary of Requirements: Spanish Literature

One of the following:100
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Redacción y discurso académico I para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Redacción y discurso académico II para hablantes nativos
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
SPAN 21500Introducción al análisis literario100
Three of the following:300
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos
Intro. a las lit. hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del modernismo al presente
Five additional courses in Spanish literature and culture500
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors) *
Total Units1000

Degree Program in More than One Literature

The programs in more than one Romance literature consist of twelve courses beyond the second-year language sequences. They are designed to accommodate the needs and interests of students who would like to broaden their literary experience. Linguistic competence in at least two Romance languages is assumed. There are two options: a program with equal emphasis on two literatures, and a program with greater emphasis on one literature. Students who wish to include Catalan or Portuguese in their program must choose the second option, with Portuguese or Catalan as a secondary literature.

Students who elect this major program must meet with the undergraduate adviser in each relevant literature before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the major and to complete the required paperwork. Students choose courses in consultation with both RLLT undergraduate advisers. Students must submit to the departmental office an approval form for the major program signed by both RLLT undergraduate advisers by the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. Students must then submit a copy of the signed approval form to their College adviser.

Grading

RLLT majors must receive quality grades in all required courses. Nonmajors may take departmental courses for P/F grading with consent of instructor. However, all language courses must be taken for a quality grade.

Honors

To qualify for honors, students must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and an average GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major. They must also submit a completed BA paper to their adviser no later than Friday of fifth week of Spring Quarter of their fourth year. Students with papers judged superior by the BA paper adviser and another faculty reader will be recommended to the Master of the Humanities Collegiate Division for honors. Only RLLT students who wish to be considered for honors are required to write a BA paper.

Students should select a faculty supervisor for the paper early in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. During Autumn or Winter Quarter they may register for FREN 29900 BA Paper Preparation: French, ITAL 29900 BA Paper Preparation: Italian, or SPAN 29900 BA Paper Preparation: Spanish with the faculty member chosen to direct the writing of the BA paper. Students seeking honors may count this course towards their course requirements; it must be taken for a quality grade. The BA paper typically is a research paper with a minimum of twenty pages and a bibliography written in the language of specialization.

Students must seek permission from their BA paper adviser to use a single paper or project to meet both the major requirements of Romance Languages and Literatures and those of another department or program. A significant and logical section of the BA paper must be written in the appropriate Romance language in consultation with the student's BA paper adviser. Students must also obtain the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser. The form must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

By the beginning of their fourth year, students may be asked to submit a writing sample in the language of emphasis (or, in the case of equal emphasis on two literatures, in both). If the department deems language proficiency inadequate, there may be additional requirements to ensure that the BA paper can be successfully written in the language of study.

Summary of Requirements

Program with Equal Emphasis on Two Literatures
One of the following advanced language courses:100
Ecrire en français
Modes De Raisonnement Francais
Corso di perfezionamento
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
Six courses in one Romance literature +600
Five courses in a second Romance literature +500
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors) *
Total Units1200

Summary of Requirements

Program with Greater Emphasis on One Literature
One of the following advanced language courses:100
An intermediate-advanced Catalan language course
Ecrire en français
Modes De Raisonnement Francais
Corso di perfezionamento
Curso de Aperfeiçoamento
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
Eight courses in the primary Romance literature (French, Italian, or Spanish). 800
Note: For students with an emphasis in Spanish, this must include SPAN 21500 and three introductory Spanish literature courses.
Three courses in a second Romance literature (Catalan, French, Italian, Portuguese, or Spanish)300
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors) *
Total Units1200

Minor Program in Romance Languages and Literatures

Students who elect the minor program must meet with the appropriate RLLT undergraduate adviser before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Students choose courses in consultation with the undergraduate adviser of their language program. Students must submit to the departmental office an approval form for the minor program signed by the appropriate RLLT undergraduate adviser. Students must then submit a copy of the signed approval form to their College adviser by the deadline on the form.

Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for a quality grade. Students must complete a substantial part of the course work (e.g., readings, writing) in the appropriate Romance language in order to receive credit.

The following groups of courses would comprise a minor in the areas indicated. Other programs may be designed in consultation with the appropriate undergraduate adviser. Minor program requirements are subject to revision.

Minor in Catalan

The RLLT minor in Catalan requires a total of six courses beyond the first-year language sequence (CATA 11100 Accelerated Catalan I or CATA 12200 Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I). One course must be an intermediate-advanced language course (CATA 11200 Accelerated Catalan II or equivalent). The balance must consist of five literature and culture courses, including at least one introductory-level course (CATA 21600 Catalan Culture and Society: Art, Music, and Cinema or CATA 21900 Contemporary Catalan Literature).

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Catalan

An intermediate-advanced Catalan language course100
A total of five literature and culture courses from the following:500
One or two of the following:
Catalan Culture and Society: Art, Music, and Cinema
Contemporary Catalan Literature
Three or four additional courses in Catalan literature
Total Units600
Minor in French and Francophone Studies

The RLLT minor program in French and Francophone Studies requires a total of six courses beyond the second-year language sequence (20100-20300). One course must be FREN 20500 Ecrire en français or FREN 20503 Modes De Raisonnement Francais. The remaining courses must consist of five courses in advanced language (20601 and above), literature, society, and culture, including at least one introductory-level course in French. At least one of the courses (at any level) must include pre-nineteenth-century material. With approval from the French undergraduate adviser, one course may be taken outside the department.

Summary of Requirements: Minor in French

One of the following:100
Ecrire en français
Modes De Raisonnement Francais
Five courses in French language (20601 and above), literature, culture, and society, including at least one introductory-level course and at least one including pre-nineteenth-century material. Students may receive credit for one course taken outside the department, in consultation with the undergraduate adviser. 500
Total Units600
Minor in Italian

The RLLT minor in Italian requires a total of six courses beyond the second-year language sequence (20100-20300). One of the six courses must be ITAL 23410 Reading and Practice of the Short Story or an equivalent introductory gateway course. Students are strongly encouraged to take this gateway course before beginning upper-level course work. The four remaining courses in the minor will be upper-level courses in or related to Italian. Most will be Italian literature and culture courses, but up to two may be Italian studies courses, which are largely interdisciplinary courses taught by affiliated faculty. A list of eligible Italian studies courses will be maintained on the department website.

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Italian

ITAL 20400Corso di perfezionamento100
ITAL 23410Reading and Practice of the Short Story (or equivalent)100
Four courses in Italian literature and culture (up to two may be interdisciplinary Italian studies courses; see department website for list of eligible courses)400
Total Units600
Minor in Portuguese

The RLLT minor in Portuguese requires a total of six courses beyond the second-year language sequence (20100-20200). One course must be an advanced language course (above 20200). The balance must consist of five literature and culture courses.

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Portuguese

PORT 21500Curso de Aperfeiçoamento100
Five courses in Luso-Brazilian literature and culture (i.e., with PORT numbers above 20200)500
Total Units600
Minor in Spanish

The RLLT minor in Spanish requires a total of six courses beyond the second-year language sequence (20100-20300). One course must be an advanced language course (above 20300). The balance must consist of five literature and culture courses, including at least two in the survey sequence.

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Spanish

One of the following:100
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Redacción y discurso académico I para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Redacción y discurso académico II para hablantes nativos
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
A total of five courses from the following:500
Two or three of the following survey courses:
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos
Intro. a las lit. hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del modernismo al presente
Two or three additional Spanish literature and culture courses
Total Units600

A Note on Courses: Some 30000- and 40000-level courses in Catalan (CATA), French (FREN), Italian (ITAL), Portuguese (PORT), and Spanish (SPAN) are open to advanced RLLT undergraduates with consent of instructor. For further information, consult the department.

Catalan Courses

Language

CATA 12200-12300. Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I-II.

Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages

CATA 12200. Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. In this introductory course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Autumn Spring
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with a Romance language.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

CATA 12300. Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages II. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages. This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in CATA 12200.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CATA 11100, CATA 12200 or consent of instructor.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

CATA 21100. Llengua, societat i cultura I. 100 Units.

This advanced-level course will focus on speaking and writing skills through the study of a wide variety of contemporary texts and audiovisual materials. It will provide students with a better understanding of contemporary Catalan society. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CATA 11200, CATA 12300 or consent of instructor

CATA 21200. Llengua, Societat i Cultura II. 100 Units.

This advanced-level course will focus on speaking and writing skills through a wide variety of texts and audiovisual materials. We will study a wide range of Catalan cultural manifestations (e.g., visual arts, music, gastronomy). Students will also review advanced grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CATA 21100 or consent of instructor

Literature and Culture

CATA 21600. Catalan Culture and Society: Art, Music, and Cinema. 100 Units.

This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of contemporary Catalonia. We study a wide range of its cultural manifestations (architecture, paintings, music, arts of the body, literature, cinema, gastronomy). Attention is also paid to some sociolinguistic issues, such as the coexistence of Catalan and Spanish, and the standardization of Catalan.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): The course will be conducted in English.
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 21610

CATA 21900. Contemporary Catalan Literature. 100 Units.

This course provides a survey of major authors, works, and trends in Catalan literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. We study works representing various literary genres (novel, poetry, short story) and analyze the most important cultural debates of the period.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 31900, SPAN 21910, SPAN 31910

CATA 24019. The Translation Zone: Languages in Catalan-Speaking Territories. 100 Units.

This course will be focusing on Catalan culture and translation in order to address different aspects of translation history, ethics and practice in relation to minority and minoritized languages, identities and communities. The classes would seek to explore and analyze what happens to Catalan literature, film, theatre and performance in translation into other languages (in particular in the Anglophone world), as well as reflect on changing approaches to and affordances of translation within, between and beyond the Catalan-speaking territories in diverse situations of language contact and intercultural encounter involving Catalan-speaking individuals and communities. The course will be structured in four parts: Catalonia in-translation; invisible landscapes; traumatic translations; and cartographies of desire.

Instructor(s): H. Buffery     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 34019, SPAN 24019, SPAN 34019

CATA 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course involves directed readings in special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in Catalan. Subjects treated and work to be completed for this course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): CATA 10300 or 20200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

French Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

FREN 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary French I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in French. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written French (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on placement exam results.

FREN 10100. Beginning Elementary French I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French and for those who need an in-depth review of the very basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade

FREN 10200. Beginning Elementary French II. 100 Units.

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in FREN 10100.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10100 or placement.

FREN 10300. Beginning Elementary French III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in FREN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10200 or placement.

FREN 10123. Summer Intensive Elementary French. 300 Units.

Summer Elementary French is an eight-week course which helps students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken French and their use in everyday communication. Attention will be given to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Completing this sequence is the equivalent of FREN 10100-10200-10300 during the regular academic year, and it will fulfill the College language competency requirement for UChicago students.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2018 dates: 6/18/18-8/9/18
Note(s): Successfully completing this course will fulfill the College language competency requirement.

FREN 14100. French for Romance Language Speakers. 100 Units.

This course helps students quickly gain skills in spoken and written French by building on their prior working knowledge of another Romance language (Catalan, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of French. This class covers content from FREN 10100 and 10200.

Instructor(s): A. McLean     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): 20100 in another Romance language or consent of instructor

FREN 20100-20200-20300. Language, History, and Culture I-II-III.

Courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of French literature, culture, and contemporary society.

FREN 20100. Language, History, and Culture I. 100 Units.

This course is intended as a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore selected aspects of contemporary French society through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10300 or placement

FREN 20200. Language, History, and Culture II. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through a variety of texts, audio-visual materials, and activities.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20100 or placement.

FREN 20300. Language, History, and Culture III. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding and producing written and spoken arguments in French through readings and debates on various issues relevant to contemporary French society.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): PQ: FREN 20200 or placement

FREN 20500. Ecrire en français. 100 Units.

The main goal of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the French language and develop their writing skills. This course is strongly recommended for all students who intend to take courses in which writing essays in French are required: French literature classes on campus, the Autumn Paris Civilization program, or the academic yearlong program in Paris. It is also strongly recommended for students who wish to take the advanced proficiency exam in French.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20300 or placement

FREN 20601. Expression orale et phonétique. 100 Units.

This course focuses on developing the tools necessary for advanced oral proficiency in an academic context. Through active class participation involving a number of class presentations, students practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). Special emphasis is placed on correct pronunciation.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20300 or placement

FREN 20602. Expression orale : Décrire l'art moderne et contemporain en français. 100 Units.

This course explores major contemporary French and francophone artists, art forms and art works. Students will acquire basic linguistic and analytical skills to apprehend visual arts, graphic novels, movies and theatrical performance in French. They will work on individual and group art and academic assignments.

Instructor(s): S. Goutas     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20300 or placement

FREN 23333. Reading French for Research Purposes. 100 Units.

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Summer Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10200 or placement in FREN 10300 for undergraduates. No prerequisite for graduate students, though some prior experience with French is highly recommended.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 33333

Literature and Culture

All literature classes are conducted in French unless otherwise indicated. Students who are taking a course for credit toward the French major or minor do all work in French. With prior consent of instructor, nonmajors may write in English.

FREN 21719. Histoire, Superstitions et Croyances dans le roman francophone des XXe et XXIe siècles. 100 Units.

L'Afrique et les Antilles sont généralement présentées comme des régions hautement superstitieuses, figées dans les croyances et les traditions. La littérature apparaît comme le lieu privilégié où se reflètent ces éléments culturels. Les écrivains africains et antillais (plus précisément d'Haïti, de Martinique, de Guadeloupe et de la Guyane française) analysent, questionnent, reformulent des récits, mythes et légendes tirés d'une tradition avant tout orale. A leur suite, nous essayerons de remonter aux origines de ces croyances et superstitions. Nous naviguerons entre essais théoriques et récits linéaires pour mener une réflexion critique, et formuler des réponses à un certain nombre de questions, notamment : Croyances et superstitions sont-elles uniquement les vestiges d'un héritage oral ? Comment se rattachent-elles à l'histoire de ces peuples ? Quelle perception [sociale] suscitent-elles ? En tant qu'éléments du récit, quels effets provoquent-elles chez le lecteur ? Soulignent-elles des objectifs spécifiques d'écriture ? Nous examinerons également les rapports entre ces deux notions et celles d'identité et d'altérité. Les auteurs plus particulièrement étudiés seront Mariama Bâ, René Depestre, Jean-Roger Essomba, Véronique Lordinot, André Paradis, Gisèle Pineau, Jacques Roumain, Simone Schwarz-Bart et Véronique Tadjo.

Instructor(s): M. Kenfack     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503

FREN 21903. Introduction à la littérature française III: Littérature à l'Age des Révolutions. 100 Units.

An introduction to some major nineteenth-century French literary works, this course emphasizes the main cultural debates of the period through some close readings and discussions. We study various literary genres from early Romanticism to the rise of Symbolism. Authors may include Chateaubriand, Mme de Staël, Benjamin Constant, Balzac, George Sand, Hugo, Musset, Zola, Lamartine, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, and Mallarmé.

Instructor(s): D. Desormeaux     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503, or consent of instructor

FREN 22619. Paris and the French Revolution. 100 Units.

The French Revolution is one of the defining moments of modern world history. This course will explore the mix of social, political, and cultural factors which caused its outbreak in 1789 and go on to consider the overthrow of the Bourbon monarchy in 1792, the drift towards state-driven Terror in 1793-94, and the ensuing failure to achieve political stability down to the advent of Napoleon Bonaparte in 1799. We will view these epochal changes through the prism of France's capital city. Paris shaped the revolution in many ways, but the revolution also reshaped Paris. The urbane city of European enlightenment acquired new identities as democratic hub from 1789 and as site of popular democracy after 1793-94. In addition, the revolution generated new ways of thinking about urban living and remodelling the city for the modern age. A wide range of primary sources will be used, including visual sources (notably paintings, political cartoons and caricatures, and maps).

Instructor(s): C. Jones     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students taking FREN 22619/32619 must read French texts in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 32619, HIST 22610, HIST 32610

FREN 22818. Figures du poète au XXème siècle (1900-1950) 100 Units.

En quoi consiste la crise du moi poétique théorisée par Mallarmé à la fin du XIXe siècle ? Quelles sont les formes du lyrisme « neuf et humaniste à la fois » envisagé par Apollinaire au début du XXe ? Est-ce qu'il est encore possible de dire « je » en poésie ? Face à ces changements, le poète doit reconfigurer son rapport à une histoire à la fois bouleversée et bouleversante, et retrouver sa place au milieu d'un renouvèlement littéraire désormais nécessaire. Ce cours analysera la façon dont la recherche poétique, dans son contenu comme dans sa forme, fait front au défi de la modernité sans renoncer à sa nature d'expérience de « vie intégrale » (Saint-John Perse). Par le moyen d'une variété expressive extraordinaire, le poète devient une figure souple, en mesure d'adapter son langage et son rôle aux sollicitations de la réalité. Les textes du corpus (Breton, Aragon, Char, Cocteau, Claudel, Éluard, Ponge, etc.) seront accompagnés de références critiques qui serviront de guide pour l'étudiant. À travers ces lectures on essaiera d'examiner comment le poète rend compte des expériences qui l'entourent à l'aube du XXe siècle : la guerre, le cosmopolitisme, l'appel à un engagement politique et culturel, la confluence des arts - autrement dit, tous les champs d'application d'une nouvelle forme de lyrisme. Ainsi le poète se fait-il soldat, voyageur, peintre, musicien, artiste engagé, dans un processus de métamorphose incessante et pourtant indispensable.

Instructor(s): C. Nifosi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503

FREN 22910. Medieval Beasts. 100 Units.

From fables to bestiaries, in the margins of medieval manuscripts and at the center of animal narratives, animals abound in medieval literature. Transformations from human to animal form (or vice versa), friendships between animals and humans, the anthropomorphization of animals, invite us to interrogate the relationship between animals and humans, and to put into question the boundary (if indeed one can be defined) between the two. In this course we will read a variety of medieval texts as well as modern critical theory in order to gain a better understanding of the textual, narrative, hermeneutic, and ethical roles that animals play in medieval literature, and in our contemporary critical posture vis à vis the natural world.

Instructor(s): D. Delogu     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of French for all; FREN 20500 or 20503 for those seeking credit for the French major/minor.
Note(s): Taught in English, with required discussion section in French for those seeking French credit.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 32910, MDVL 22910

FREN 23219. The Medieval Mediterranean. 100 Units.

In this course we will be looking at the medieval Mediterranean world from the perspective of French literature of the 12th and 13th centuries. In direct contrast to an understanding of the Middle Ages as a time of cultural isolation and homogeneity, we will be considering some of the many points of contact between medieval France and other Mediterranean geographies, cultures, and peoples. Our readings will take us to such places as Greece and Rome, Constantinople, Cairo, Syria, Jerusalem, and Spain. The emphasis will be on texts that present these trans-Mediterranean relationships in complex and varied ways. Texts will be selected from a variety of genres, including poetry, epic, and romance, and we will also look at medieval art and art objects.

Instructor(s): J. Victor     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): All of the Old French texts will be available in modern French translations.
Equivalent Course(s): MDVL 23219

FREN 23404. French Cinema of the 1930s. 100 Units.

In our study of this important decade in the history of French cinema, we will track the rise of the poetic realist style from the culture of experimentation that was alive in both the French film industry and its surrounding artistic and literary landscape. As an exercise in the excavation of a history of film style, we will consider the salient features of the socio-political, cultural, theoretical, and critical landscape that define the emergence and the apex of poetic realism, and that reveal it as a complicated nexus in the history of film aesthetics. Main texts by Dudley Andrew and Richard Abel will accompany a wide range of primary texts.

Instructor(s): J. Wild     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CMST 10100, ARTH 20000, ENGL 10800, ARTV 25300, or consent of instructor.
Note(s): This class is cross-listed with the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures and may be accompanied by a French language section.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 33404, CMST 23404, FREN 33404

FREN 23500. Caribbean Fiction: Self-Understanding and Exoticism. 100 Units.

The Caribbean is often described as enigmatic, uncommon, and supernatural. While foreigners assume that the Caribbean is exotic, this course will explore this assumption from a Caribbean perspective. We will examine the links between Caribbean and Old World imagination, the relationship between exoticism and Caribbean notions of superstition, and the way in which the Caribbean fictional universe derives from a variety of cultural myths.

Instructor(s): D. Desormeaux     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503
Note(s): Taught in English. A weekly session in French will be held for majors/minors and graduate students in French and Comparative Literature.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 23500, CMLT 31801, FREN 33500, CMLT 21801, LACS 23500, CRES 33500, LACS 33500

FREN 23660. Baudelaire et Flaubert: la vie littéraire en l'an 1857. 100 Units.

Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) and Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880): two young men from wealthy families, two opponents of bourgeois education, two aborted social callings, two terminal illnesses, two resounding failures before literary institutions, two adventures in love, two satanic fascinations, two notorious literary trials, two conceptions of the craft of writing, two approaches to realism, two criticisms of romantic art, two models of poetic inspiration, two aesthetics of language, two cults of Beauty, all for one and a unique literature. This seminar will be devoted to the literary life of two writers whose canon for more than a century has occupied a central place of importance in contemporary literary criticism. It will be our task to place their work in perspective within the context of the rise of modernism, which is to say, the new status of literature as of the year 1857. We shall endeavor, thus, to discern the authenticity of the creative relationship of each artist with himself and subsequently with others. The point will be to foreground three fundamental principles that will aid in grasping the evolution of the literary world under the Second Empire and under the Third Republic: literary history, writing and the elevation of the writer (Bénichou). Our work will be based on three or four texts by Baudelaire and Flaubert, it being understood that additional works of criticism will illuminate the discussion of these texts.

Instructor(s): D. Desormeaux     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503
Note(s): Taught in French. Discussions in both French and English.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 33660, FNDL 23660

FREN 23810. Memory and Identity in French Literature: Proust to the Present. 100 Units.

This introductory-level course takes as its point of departure Marcel Proust's conceptualization of memory as the foundation both for the self and for literature. For Proust, literary style conveys the singularity of an individual vision while rescuing experience from the contingencies of time. Literature, identity, and memory are inseparable. Later writers will follow Proust's lead in defining literature as an art of memory; but they develop this art in different ways, whether by inventing new forms of life-writing or attempting to revive, via fiction, a lived connection to history. How does memory serve as the foundation of individual or collective identities? How does fiction imagine and give form to memory, and how does literature serve as a medium for cultural memory? How do literary works register the intermittence of memory, its failings and distortions, its fragility as well as its attachment to bodies and places? We will tackle these questions through close analysis of a range of texts. In addition to Proust, authors studied may include Yourcenar, Perec, Modiano, Roubaud, and Ernaux.

Instructor(s): A. James     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in English. French reading knowledge desirable but not required. The course may be counted toward the French major or minor; students taking the course for French credit will do appropriate readings in French and participate in a weekly French discussion section.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 23810, SIGN 26047

FREN 24110. L'écriture du quotidien au XXe siècle. 100 Units.

Si les avant-gardes de la première moitié du siècle prétendent "changer la vie" (selon l'expression de Rimbaud), c'est surtout après la Seconde Guerre mondiale que s'élaborent des théories du quotidien (Lefebvre, de Certeau). Ce cours se propose de confronter les théories du quotidien aux différentes pratiques d'écriture du quotidien et au quotidien (des surréalistes à Annie Ernaux, en passant par Michel Leiris, Roland Barthes, et Georges Perec), afin de mieux cerner la spécificité des approches littéraires du réel.

Instructor(s): A. James     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 34110

FREN 25000. Molière. 100 Units.

Molière crafted a new form of satirical comedy that revolutionized European theater, though it encountered strong opposition from powerful institutions. We will read the plays in the context of the literary and dramatic traditions that Molière reworked (farce, commedia dell'arte, Latin comedy, Spanish Golden Age theater, satiric poetry, the novel), while considering the relationship of laughter to social norms, as well as the performance practices and life of theater in Molière's day.

Instructor(s): L. Norman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503, and one introductory-level literature course taught in French
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 35000, TAPS 28470, REMS 35000

FREN 25220. Pour une sociologie de Rabelais. 100 Units.

Nous aborderons l'œuvre de Rabelais à partir d'une lecture contextuelle de Gargantua et Pantagruel (les deux romans que nous lirons dans ce sours). Le but de ce cours est de présenter le contexte social, politique, économique et religieux de la première moitié du XVIe siècle en reliant les thèmes choisis (guerre, genre, utopie, éducation, amitié, écocomie, etc.), à des problèmes plus modernes. Car Rabelais nous permet aussi d'adresser les grands thèmes de la société française et occidentale contemporaine. Nous étudierons ainsi l'écriture du corps, l'organisation sociale de l'Ancien régime, les premières théories économiques, la découverte du Nouveau Monde et l'exploration de l'altérité. Nous lirons deux romans de Rabelais: Gargantua et Pantagruel.

Instructor(s): P. Desan     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20300
Note(s): Taught in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 25220, FREN 35220

FREN 26043. Versailles: Art, Power, Resistance and the Sun King's Palace. 100 Units.

Louis XIV's Palace of Versailles helped shape European culture and history from the Baroque era through the French Revolution, and it continues to animate contemporary international culture. How does this astounding assemblage of architecture, visual arts, landscaping, performance spaces and political arenas reveal transformations in cultural tastes and power arrangements over the centuries? How do literature and art alternately support and subvert absolutist power and state propaganda? To respond we will range across media, from the bitingly satiric comedies and provocative tragedies of the 17th century (Molière, Racine), through royal edicts regulating colonial slavery and first-hand accounts of the 1789 Women's March on Versailles that upended the monarchy, and finally to cinematic depictions (from Jean Renoir to Sophia Coppola) and experimental palace installations by the world's leading contemporary artists (Jeff Koons, Anish Kapoor, etc.). While this course will broadly introduce major themes of French and European culture and history of the early-modern and modern periods, students are also encouraged to pursue in-depth projects in their own areas of interest, from history and political philosophy to the visual arts, theater and performance, and literature.

Instructor(s): L. Norman     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students who register under the FREN course number must have completed FREN 20003 or equivalent, and will read French texts in the original.
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26043

FREN 27400. Autobiographies Maghrébines: de l'Ecriture de Soi à l'Ecriture de l'Histoire. 100 Units.

Dès sa naissance, la littérature maghrébine d'expression française s'est distinguée par son ancrage dans le contexte historique, politique et socio-culturel des trois pays du Maghreb que sont le Maroc, l'Algérie et la Tunisie. Souvent, l'écriture de soi a donné lieu à une (ré)écriture de l'Histoire, mettant l'individuel et le collectif en dialogue permanent. L'autobiographie, par exemple, devient le champ d'une exploration simultanée des identités individuelle et collective, le lieu d'un témoignage littéraire autour de l'expérience coloniale et de ses conséquences, ou encore de la confrontation entre le poids persistant de la tradition et le désir de liberté et de changement. En se racontant, l'écrivain maghrébin restitue les tensions qui hantent l'espace et la mémoire partagés tout en proposant des voies de reconstruction à travers la révolte, le désir, et le travail de la langue. En s'appuyant sur un corpus d'œuvres marquantes de la littérature maghrébine d'expression française (Albert Memmi, Driss Chraïbi, Kateb Yacine, Assia Djebar, Fatima Mernissi, Abdellatif Laâbi), ce séminaire sera consacré essentiellement à la question du rapport entre écriture personnelle et écriture de l'Histoire dans un contexte maghrébin. On s'interrogera en particulier sur les stratégies narratives et les outils esthétiques mis en œuvre par les auteurs maghrébins pour représenter, affronter ou déconstruire une réalité d'ordre historique, politique ou socio-culturel.

Instructor(s): K. Lyamlahy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 or 20503
Note(s): Taught in French.

FREN 29100. Pascal and Simone Weil. 100 Units.

Blaise Pascal in the seventeenth century and Simone Weil in the twentieth formulated a compelling vision of the human condition, torn between greatness and misery. They showed how human imperfection coexists with the noblest callings, how attention struggles with distraction and how individuals can be rescued from their usual reliance on public opinion and customary beliefs. Both thinkers point to the religious dimension of human experience and suggest unorthodox ways of approaching it. We will also study an important text by Gabriel Marcel emphasizing human coexistence and cooperation.

Instructor(s): T. Pavel     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must be in their third or fourth year.
Note(s): The course will be taught in English. For French undergraduates and graduates, we will hold a bi-weekly one-hour meeting to study the original French texts.
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 24910, FNDL 21812, CMLT 29101, SCTH 38201, FREN 39100

FREN 29322. Europe's Intellectual Transformations, Renaissance through Enlightenment. 100 Units.

This course will consider the foundational transformations of Western thought from the end of the Middle Ages to the threshold of modernity. It will provide an overview of the three self-conscious and interlinked intellectual revolutions which reshaped early modern Europe: the Renaissance revival of antiquity, the "new philosophy" of the seventeenth century, and the light and dark faces of the Enlightenment. It will treat scholasticism, humanism, the scientific revolution, Bacon, Descartes, Hobbes, Locke, Voltaire, Diderot, and Sade.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students taking FREN 29322/39322 must read French texts in French.
Note(s): First-year students and non-History majors welcome.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 29522, SIGN 26036, HIST 39522, HCHR 39522, FREN 39322, RLST 22605

FREN 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course is a study of directed readings in special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in French. Subjects treated and work completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10300 or 20300, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

FREN 29900. BA Paper Preparation: French. 100 Units.

In consultation with a faculty member, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of undergraduate adviser
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade. Counts towards course requirements for French majors seeking honors.

Other Courses of Interest

RLLT 38800. Foreign Language Acquisition, Research and Teaching. 100 Units.

This course provides students with a foundation in foreign language acquisition and sociolinguistic research pertinent to foreign language teaching and introduces current teaching methodologies and technologies and their usefulness in the classroom.

Instructor(s): A. Lima     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open only to RLL students

SOSC 27501-27601-27701. Civilisation Européenne I-II-III.

Enrollment in Paris study abroad program. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Cette série de cours est un hybride: à la fois une introduction à l’histoire de la civilisation européenne depuis le Moyen Age et une vue d’ensemble de l’histoire de France durant cette période. Notre objectif sera double: d’une part, intégrer étude de textes et découverte de Paris et de sa région; de l’autre, pratiquer le métier d’historiens de la culture. Pour ce faire, nous analyserons de nombreux documents historiques et oeuvres littéraires, philosophiques, artistiques, et musicales. Nous en discuterons lors de nos trois réunions hebdomadaires. De plus, nous étudierons la civilisation française à travers les villages, monastères, et châteaux de la région parisienne et ailleurs. Classes conducted in French. This sequence meets in Paris.

SOSC 27501. Civilisation Européenne I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced knowledge of French

SOSC 27601. Civilisation Europeenne-2. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced Knowledge of French

SOSC 27701. Civilisation Europeenne-3. 100 Units.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced Knowledge of French

Italian Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

ITAL 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary Italian I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Italian. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Italian (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence at whatever level is appropriate for them. Cultural awareness is enhanced through the use of authentic audio-visual materials and literary texts.

ITAL 10100. Beginning Elementary Italian I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Italian and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn

ITAL 10200. Beginning Elementary Italian II. 100 Units.

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in ITAL 10100.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10100 or placement

ITAL 10300. Beginning Elementary Italian III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in ITAL 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language. Successful completion of ITAL 10300 meets the language competence requirement.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10200 or placement

ITAL 12200. Italian for Speakers of Romance Languages. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages.

Terms Offered: Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): 20100 in another Romance language or consent of instructor

ITAL 20100-20200-20300. Language, History, and Culture I-II-III.

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills in describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to literary and nonliterary texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of the Italian-speaking world.

ITAL 20100. Language, History, and Culture I. 100 Units.

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Italian-speaking world through the reading of excerpts from contemporary Italian literature.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10300 or placement

ITAL 20200. Language, History, and Culture II. 100 Units.

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Italian-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items. Cultural awareness is enhanced through close study of contemporary Italian film and literature, as well as through in-class discussion.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20100 or placement

ITAL 20300. Language, History, and Culture III. 100 Units.

This course completes the study of the common grammatical functions and syntactical structures of the oral and written language and introduces students to description and analysis of a variety of texts through written, oral, listening, and reading activities. Students read a contemporary Italian novel and a selection of Italian poetry.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20200 or placement

ITAL 20400. Corso di perfezionamento. 100 Units.

This course helps students achieve a very high level of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. Using a variety of literary and nonliterary texts as models, students examine the linguistic structure and organization of several types of written Italian discourse. This course is also intended to help students attain high levels in reading, speaking, and listening through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Italian society.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20300, placement, or consent of instructor

Literature and Culture

All literature and culture classes are conducted in Italian unless otherwise indicated. Students who are taking a course for credit toward the Italian major or minor do all work in Italian. With prior consent of instructor, nonmajors may write in English.

ITAL 16000. Italian Renaissance: Dante, Machiavelli, and the Wars of Popes and Kings. 100 Units.

This course will consider Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250-1600), with a focus on literature, philosophy, primary sources, the revival of antiquity, and the papacy's entanglement with pan-European politics. We will examine humanism, patronage, politics, corruption, assassination, feuds, art, music, magic, censorship, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Writing assignments focus on higher-level writing skills, with a creative writing component linked to our in-class live-action-role-played (LARP) reenactment of a Renaissance papal election. This is a Department of History Gateway course.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Graduate students by consent only; register for the course as HIST 90000 (sect 53) Reading and Research: History.
Note(s): History Gateways are introductory courses meant to appeal to 1st- through 3rd-yr students who may not have done previous course work on the topic of the course; topics cover the globe and span the ages
Equivalent Course(s): CLCV 22216, SIGN 26034, KNOW 12203, HIST 12203, MDVL 12203, RLST 22203

ITAL 22101. Dante's Divine Comedy-3: Paradiso. 100 Units.

An in-depth study of the third cantica of Dante's masterpiece, considered the most difficult but in many ways also the most innovative. Read alongside his scientific treatise the Convivio and his political manifesto the Monarchia.

Instructor(s): H. J. Steinberg     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Completion of the previous courses in the sequence not required, but students should familiarize themselves with the Inferno and the Purgatorio before the first day of class.
Note(s): Taught in English
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 32101, MDVL 22101, REMS 32101, FNDL 21804

ITAL 22900. Vico's New Science. 100 Units.

This course offers a close reading of Giambattista Vico's masterpiece, New Science (1744)-a work that sets out to refute "all opinions hitherto held about the principles of humanity." Vico, who is acknowledged as the most resolute scourge of any form of rationalism, breathed new life into rhetoric, imagination, poetry, metaphor, history, and philology in order to promote in his readers that originary "wonder" and "pathos" which sets human beings on the search for truth. However, Vico argues, the truths that are most available and interesting to us are the ones humanity "authored" by means of its culture and history-creating activities. For this reason the study of myth and folklore as well as archeology, anthropology, and ethnology must all play a role in the rediscovery of man. The New Science builds an "alternative philosophy" for a new age and reads like a "novel of formation" recounting the (hi)story of the entire human race and our divine ancestors. In Vico, a prophetic spirit, one recognizes the fulfillment of the Renaissance, the spokesperson of a particular Enlightenment, the precursor of the Kantian revolution, and the forefather of the philosophy of history (Herder, Hegel, and Marx). The New Science remained a strong source of inspiration in the twentieth century (Cassirer, Gadamer, Berlin, Joyce, Beckett, etc.) and may prove relevant in disclosing our own responsibilities in postmodernity.

Instructor(s): R. Rubini     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 22501, CMLT 32501, FNDL 21408, ITAL 32900

ITAL 23101. Early Italian Lyric: Dante and His Rivals. 100 Units.

This course examines Dante's complicated relationship with other contemporary and near-contemporary lyric poets. In particular, we examine Dante's texts as part of a dense web of contending vernacular discourses instead of as the final word or telos of our studies. For this reason, special emphasis is given to the sonnet form as a ritualized genre in which poetic communities are formed and contending philosophical, political, and sociological visions of society are constructed and deconstructed. The role of books and manuscript culture is especially important as we try to understand the material production and reception of the emergent vernacular literature, and its role and function in late medieval urban Italy.

Instructor(s): J. Steinberg     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Interested undergraduates should contact instructor before the first day of class
Note(s): The first hour will be dedicated to close reading of poem/s in Italian. Auditors without knowledge of Italian are welcome to arrive for the discussion after that.
Equivalent Course(s): MDVL 23101, ITAL 33101

ITAL 24218. Unveiling Chivalry: Chivalric literature in Medieval and Early Modern Europe (1100-1600) 100 Units.

When we think of chivalry today we imagine damsels in distress, knights' self-sacrifice, adventures and courtly love. But how was chivalry in the 11th- or 17th-century literature different from today's perception? What changed between historical chivalry and its fictional representation? This course aims to challenge the mainstream narrative of chivalry as conventionally characterized by its progressive decadence, from the superstitious Middle Ages to scientific modernity, from the virtuous Roland to the ironic Don Quixote. We will see instead how chivalry is constantly redefined across time and space, and how each literary text provides multiple layers of interpretation that contradict this stereotypical narrative. Exploring the notion of chivalry will allow us to question the so-called "spirituality" of the Middle Ages and the relationship between Early Modernity and the past. We will study chivalric literature from the "Chanson de Roland" to Cervantes's "Don Quijote." A strong emphasis will be given to Italian literature, including Dante's "Commedia," Boccaccio's "Decameron" and Ariosto's "Orlando furioso." Readings will also include Chrétien de Troyes's "Lancelot and Perceval," with a final session devoted to T.S. Eliot's "The Waste Land."

Instructor(s): F. Petricca     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in English
Equivalent Course(s): MDVL 24218, CMLT 24218

ITAL 25218. Reading Nonhuman Animals: A Challenge to Anthropocentrism. 100 Units.

How can we "read" a literary nonhuman animal? In what ways does literature deal with ethical and political issues concerning nonhuman animals? What does it mean to live in a multicultural and multispecies world? What does it mean to be "human"? In this course we will ask these and other related questions as they are presented and represented in Italian 20th century literary texts, read alongside philosophical writings, scholarly essays, and visual materials. While maintaining a focus on Italian literature, a comparative approach involving literary works of non-Italian authors will be key in understanding the pervasiveness of the problems that have caused our detachment from nature and our broken relationship with nonhuman animals. We will closely analyze and critically evaluate the works of several authors, including those by Italo Calvino, Primo Levi, Anna Maria Ortese, Elsa Morante, Italo Svevo, Alice Walker, and Franz Kafka, giving particular attention to techniques of close reading. A thematic approach will enable us to explore a large number of critical discourses, from the moral status of nonhuman animals to the long-held assumptions regarding the anthropocentric set of values that have defined (Western) culture. We will also take into consideration different theoretical frameworks such as posthumanist theory and gender studies in order to discuss and evaluate the selected texts from different perspectives and entry points.

Instructor(s): E. Tavella     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English. No previous knowledge of Italian is required.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 25218

ITAL 26500. Renaissance Demonology. 100 Units.

In this course we analyze the complex concept of demonology according to early modern European culture from a theological, historical, philosophical, and literary point of view. The term 'demon' in the Renaissance encompasses a vast variety of meanings. Demons are hybrids. They are both the Christian devils, but also synonyms for classical deities, and Neo-platonic spiritual beings. As far as Christian theology is concerned, we read selections from Augustine's and Thomas Aquinas's treatises, some complex exorcisms written in Italy, and a recent translation of the infamous Malleus maleficarum, the most important treatise on witch-hunt. We pay close attention to the historical evolution of the so-called witch-craze in Europe through a selection of the best secondary literature on this subject, with special emphasis on Michel de Certeau's The Possession at Loudun. We also study how major Italian and Spanish women mystics, such as Maria Maddalena de' Pazzi and Teresa of Avila, approach the issue of demonic temptation and possession. As far as Renaissance Neoplatonic philosophy is concerned, we read selections from Marsilio Ficino's Platonic Theology and Girolamo Cardano's mesmerizing autobiography. We also investigate the connection between demonology and melancholy through a close reading of the initial section of Robert Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy and Cervantes's short story The Glass Graduate (El licenciado Vidriera).

Instructor(s): A. Maggi     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Course taught in English
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 27602, RLST 26501, GNSE 26504, HIST 22110

ITAL 27500. Women and the Mafia in Contemporary Italian Cinema. 100 Units.

This course will examine how gender dynamics within mafia contexts have been represented in a selection of Italian films. Students will engage in cinematic analysis by drawing from sociological and psychological studies on female roles in relation to organized crime. Both these fields, sociology and psychology, have underscored the important part that women play in relation to the mafia, notwithstanding the rigid patriarchal structure that allows only male affiliation. Although focusing primarily on Sicilian mafia, this course will include information on other types of Italian mafia, namely Camorra, 'Ndrangheta and Sacra Corona Unita. Vocabulary in Italian to identify formal elements of the films will be provided throughout the course.

Instructor(s): V. Vegna     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20300 or consent of instructor.
Note(s): Taught in Italian.

ITAL 27700. The (Auto)Biography of a Nation: Francesco De Sanctis and Benedetto Croce. 100 Units.

At its core, this course examines the making and legacy of Francesco De Sanctis's History of Italian Literature (1870-71), a work that distinguished literary critic René Wellek defined as "the finest history of any literature ever written" and "an active instrument of aesthetic evolution." We will read the History in the larger context of De Sanctis's corpus, including his vast epistolary exchanges, autobiographical writings, and so-called Critical Essays in order to detail his reform of Hegelian aesthetics, his redefinition of the intellectual's task after the perceived exhaustion of the Renaissance, Enlightenment, and Romantic moments, and his campaign against the bent toward erudition, philology, and antiquarianism in 19th-century European scholarship. We will compare De Sanctis's methodology to that of his scholarly models in France (Alphonse de Lamartine, Alfred Mézières) and Germany (Georg Gottfried Gervinus, Georg Voigt) to explore De Sanctis's claim that literary criticisms - not just literary cultures - are "national." In the second part of the course, we assess Benedetto Croce's appropriation of De Sanctis in his Aesthetics (1902), arguably the last, vastly influential work in its genre and we conclude with Antonio Gramsci's use of De Sanctis for the regeneration of a literary savvy Marxism or philosophy of praxis.

Instructor(s): R. Rubini     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 37700, CMLT 38800, KNOW 37700, KNOW 27700, CMLT 28800

ITAL 28219. Negative Empathy, Catharsis, Fear: An Intermedial Approach to Tragedy and Its Transformations. 100 Units.

Literature on empathy has enormously increased in recent decades, especially from the point of view of neuroscience and neuro-aesthetics. Scholars, however, have been focusing on the ethical dimension of empathy: on the identification with the victims, which is also highlighted by the political use of this concept. The course focuses instead on the (more or less latent) empathy with negative characters, which can have a strong cathartic and social function, as a discharge of destructive and self-destructive drives, and is often linked to the representation of fear and other strong emotions. The preliminary step is a theoretical introduction to the category of empathy, from its first eighteenth-century conceptions to new aesthetic and psychoanalytic elaborations at the beginning of twentieth century (especially Theodor Lipp), up to recent developments coming from the neurosciences. Other parallel issues to be introduced are catharsis, identification, and discharge. Greek tragedy, Shakespeare, Giuseppe Verdi and Pier Paolo Pasolini will be studied, as well as the TV series "Breaking Bad," which brilliantly exemplifies what negative empathy means today.

Instructor(s): M. Fusillo     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in English.

ITAL 28400. Pasolini. 100 Units.

This course examines each aspect of Pasolini's artistic production according to the most recent literary and cultural theories, including Gender Studies. We shall analyze his poetry (in particular "Le Ceneri di Gramsci" and "Poesie informa di rosa"), some of his novels ("Ragazzi di vita," "Una vita violenta," "Teorema," "Petrolio"), and his numerous essays on the relationship between standard Italian and dialects, semiotics and cinema, and the role of intellectuals in contemporary Western culture. We shall also discuss the following films: "Accattone," "La ricotta," "Edipo Re," "Teorema," and "Salo".

Instructor(s): A. Maggi     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 28401, CMST 23500, GNSE 28600, ITAL 38400, CMST 33500

ITAL 29600. The Worlds of Harlequin: Commedia Dell'arte. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the Italian art of theatrical improvisation or commedia dell'arte, a type of theater featuring masked characters and schematic plots. We will look at the influence of Boccaccio's Decameron on the formation of stock-characters, the introduction of women into the realm of theatrical professionalism, the art of costume and mask making, and the Italian knack for pantomime and gestural expression. Readings include such masterpieces in the tradition of comic theater as Machiavelli's The Mandrake and Goldoni's Harlequin Servant of Two Masters, as well as their renditions in film.

Instructor(s): R. Rubini     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 28480, ITAL 39601

ITAL 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course provides directed readings in special topics not covered as part of the program in Italian. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10300 or 20300, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

ITAL 29900. BA Paper Preparation: Italian. 100 Units.

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project.

Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of undergraduate adviser
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Students seeking honors may count this course towards their course requirements. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Portuguese/Luso-Brazilian Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

PORT 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary Portuguese I-II-III.

This sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Portuguese. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Portuguese (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three courses constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them.

PORT 10100. Beginning Elementary Portuguese I. 100 Units.

This sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Portuguese. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Portuguese (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three courses constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them. This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Portuguese and for students who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn

PORT 10200. Beginning Elementary Portuguese II. 100 Units.

This course is a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in PORT 10100.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10100 or placement

PORT 10300. Beginning Elementary Portuguese III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in PORT 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10200 or placement
Note(s): Successful completion of PORT 10300 fulfills the competency requirement

PORT 12200. Portuguese For Spanish Speakers. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of Spanish to develop competence quickly in spoken and written Portuguese. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their Spanish language skills to mastering Portuguese by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20100 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 12200

PORT 13120. Accelerated Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages. 300 Units.

Our summer Portuguese course helps students gain intermediate skills in spoken and written Portuguese quickly by building on their prior knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to make very quick progress and to develop their abilities for further study at the advanced level or for professional purposes. All students enrolled in Accelerated Portuguese will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

Terms Offered: Summer
Prerequisite(s): At least one year of recent college-level study of Spanish, French, or Italian.
Note(s): This course provides 140 contact hours and accepts the FLAS grant as full tuition.

PORT 14100. Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages. 100 Units.

This course helps students quickly gain skills in spoken and written Portuguese by building on their prior working knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, Catalan or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to develop their abilities for further study. This class covers content from PORT 10100 and 10200.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PORT 20100 or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 14100

PORT 14500. Portuguese for the Professions: Intensive Business Portuguese. 100 Units.

This is an accelerated language course that covers vocabulary and grammar for students interested in working in a business environment where Portuguese is spoken. The focus of this highly interactive class is to develop basic communication skills and cultural awareness through formal classes, readings, discussions, and writings.

Instructor(s): A. Lima     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10200, SPAN 20100, or consent of instructor.

PORT 20100-20200. Intermediate Portuguese; Advanced Portuguese.

In this intermediate/advanced-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills in describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of Portuguese literature, culture, and contemporary society.

PORT 20100. Intermediate Portuguese. 100 Units.

This sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Portuguese. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Portuguese (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three courses constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them. This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore selected aspects of Luso-Brazilian tradition through a variety of texts.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10300, 12200 or placement

PORT 20200. Advanced Portuguese. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through exposure to written and oral documents (e.g., literary texts, interviews). Students are taught the grammatical and lexical tools necessary to understand these documents, as well as to produce their own analysis and commentaries.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PORT 20100 or placement

PORT 21500. Curso de Aperfeiçoamento. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding, summarizing, and producing written and spoken arguments in Portuguese through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Luso-Brazilian societies. Special consideration is given to the major differences between continental and Brazilian Portuguese. In addition to reading, analyzing, and commenting on advanced texts (both literary and nonliterary), students practice and extend their writing skills in a series of compositions.

Instructor(s): A. Lima     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 20200 or consent of instructor

Literature and Culture

PORT 27200. Introduction to Brazilian Culture. 100 Units.

This course provides a survey of Brazilian culture through its literature, music, cinema, visual arts, and digital culture. Through these different media, we will discuss topics such as urban development, racial issues, gender issues, modernity, deforestation, and internal migrations, besides samba, bossa nova, funk, and visual arts movements, among others. Authors may include Machado de Assis, Oswald de Andrade, Rubem Fonseca, Bernardo Carvalho, Angélica Freitas, Glauber Rocha, Suzana Amaral, and Walter Salles.

Instructor(s): V. Saramago     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 37200, PORT 37200, LACS 27200

PORT 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course is directed readings in special topics not covered as part of the program in Portuguese. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10300 or 20200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Spanish Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

SPAN 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary Spanish I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Spanish. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Spanish (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills to the level required to demonstrate competency on the Spanish examination. Although the three classes constitute a sequence leading to the Spanish competency examination, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them.

SPAN 10100. Beginning Elementary Spanish I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Spanish, and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn Winter

SPAN 10200. Beginning Elementary Spanish II. 100 Units.

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in SPAN 10100.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10100 or placement

SPAN 10300. Beginning Elementary Spanish III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in SPAN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language as needed to prepare students for the Spanish competency examination.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10200 or placement

SPAN 10123. Summer Intensive Elementary Spanish. 300 Units.

Summer Elementary Spanish is an eight-week course which helps beginning students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken Spanish and their use in everyday communication. It is specifically designed to help you obtain functional competency in speaking, reading, writing and listening in Spanish. The curriculum in Summer Elementary Spanish is the equivalent of SPAN 10100-10200-10300 during the regular academic year.

Terms Offered: Summer
Note(s): Successfully completing this course will fulfill the College language competency requirement.

SPAN 20100-20200-20300. Language, History, and Culture I-II-III.

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review but most of all extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills in describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 20100. Language, History, and Culture I. 100 Units.

This course is a general extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10300 or placement

SPAN 20200. Language, History, and Culture II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on both objective and subjective description of people, places, and life processes. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media, as well as through in-class discussion.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20100 or placement

SPAN 20300. Language, History, and Culture III. 100 Units.

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore an ample selection of topics, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media as well as through in-class oral presentations and discussions.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20200 or placement

SPAN 20102-20202-20302. Language, History, and Culture for Heritage Speakers I-II-III.


SPAN 20102. Language, History, and Culture for Heritage Speakers I. 100 Units.

The goal of this first course in a two-course intermediate sequence is to help students who are heritage learners of Spanish to improve their oral, writing and reading skills and to formalize their linguistic ability. Basic grammatical patterns (e.g. grammar, vocabulary, socio-cultural norms) and orthographic conventions are reviewed and practiced in a variety of short papers, oral presentations and class discussions. Awareness of contemporary Hispanic societies and their historical roots will be enhanced through exposure to a variety of literary and non-literary texts and authentic audio-visual materials.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10300 or placement. Open only to heritage speakers or with consent of instructor.

SPAN 20202. Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers. 100 Units.

This intermediate-level course, which is intended for native or heritage speakers of Spanish, focuses on improving descriptive language skills. Challenging grammatical structures and orthographic conventions are reviewed and practiced in a variety of short papers and class discussions. Both literary and nonliterary texts are read and discussed to enhance awareness of contemporary Hispanic societies and their historical roots. Students are also exposed to the linguistic diversity of Spanish-speaking countries through a variety of audio-visual materials.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20102 or consent of instructor (based on evaluation)
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20302. Language, History, and Culture for Heritage Speakers III. 100 Units.

The goal of this second course in a two-course intermediate sequence is to teach heritage learners of Spanish how to use formal written and spoken language to debate and to formulate cogent arguments. Students are expected to analyze particular topics related to the Spanish-speaking world and to participate within an academic forum. Challenging grammatical structures and orthographic conventions are reviewed and practiced in a variety of writing exercises and through class discussions. Students are exposed to a wide range of literary and non-literary texts and audio-visual materials that exemplify the different cultures and regional varieties within the Spanish-speaking world.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20102 or placement. Open only to heritage speakers or with consent of instructor.

SPAN 20304. Spanish for the Professions. 100 Units.

This course is designed as an alternative to SPAN 20300 for students aspiring to use Spanish in a professional context. In order for both courses to serve as equal preparation for the following course in the sequence (SPAN 20400), the textbook used and the grammatical topics covered in SPAN 20300 and 20304 are identical, while some readings, listenings, and vocabulary will differ. Students will expand their lexical and cultural knowledge of their chosen professional area through self-selected readings and a presentation, and will hone linguistic skills relevant to any workplace environment.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20200 or consent of instructor

SPAN 20400-20500. Composición y conversación avanzada I-II.

Third-year language sequence

SPAN 20400. Composición y conversación avanzada I. 100 Units.

This course targets the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production.

Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

SPAN 20500. Composición y conversación avanzada II. 100 Units.

This course, the second segment of two in the third-year language sequence, continues the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production.

Terms Offered: Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20400 or consent of instructor

SPAN 20602. Discurso académico para hablantes nativos. 100 Units.

This seminar/practicum focuses on developing vocabulary and discourse styles for academic verbal communication. This goal is achieved through exposure to taped formal and informal interviews and public debate in the media. Most important, however, is active class participation. Through a number of class presentations, students put into practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews).

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20302 or placement. Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor.

SPAN 23333. Reading Spanish for Research Purposes. 100 Units.

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of Spanish to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research.

Terms Offered: Spring Summer
Prerequisite(s): One quarter of French or equivalent, placement into SPAN 10200, or an intermediate level of another Romance or classical language.
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 33333

Literature and Culture

All literature and culture classes are conducted in Spanish unless otherwise indicated. Students who are majoring in Spanish do all work in Spanish. With prior consent of instructor, nonmajors may write in English.

SPAN 21100. Las regiones del español. 100 Units.

This sociolinguistic course expands understanding of the historical development of Spanish and awareness of the great sociocultural diversity within the Spanish-speaking world and its impact on the Spanish language. We emphasize the interrelationship between language and culture as well as ethno-historical transformations within the different regions of the Hispanic world. Special consideration is given to identifying lexical variations and regional expressions exemplifying diverse sociocultural aspects of the Spanish language, and to recognizing phonological differences between dialects. We also examine the impact of indigenous cultures on dialectical aspects. The course includes literary and nonliterary texts, audio-visual materials, and visits by native speakers of a variety of Spanish-speaking regions.

Terms Offered: Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 21100

SPAN 21703. Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos. 100 Units.

This course involves careful reading and discussion of significant works from the Spanish Middle Ages, Renaissance, and the Golden Age, including Juan Manuel's Conde Lucanor, Jorge Manrique's Coplas, the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes, and the theater of Calderón.

Instructor(s): F. de Armas     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

SPAN 21803. Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos. 100 Units.

Este curso ofrecerá un amplio panorama de las literaturas españolas de los siglos XIX y XX. Buena parte de la historia cultural de España ha estado marcada por la ansiedad respecto al supuesto atraso cultural, político, social y económico del país. La modernidad se convierte así en objeto de deseo y de disputa cultural para los intelectuales españoles que luchan por definir en qué consiste y cómo alcanzarla. Este es el tema que nos guiará, de manera flexible, por las obras de autores como Mariano José de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Leopoldo Alas Clarín, Antonio Machado, Federico García Lorca, Ana María Matute, Max Aub y Manuel Rivas, entre otros, complementadas por algunas películas. En relación con este tema principal, se explorarán también el lugar del campo y la ciudad en la imaginación moderna, la cuestión nacional, las luchas por la emancipación de la mujer, las tensión creativa entre tradición y vanguardia artística, o los debates sobre la historia y la memoria del pasado reciente de España.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

SPAN 21903. Intro. a las lit. hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia. 100 Units.

This course examines an array of representative texts written in Spanish America from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century, underscoring not only their aesthetic qualities but also the historical conditions that made their production possible. Among authors studied are Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Simón Bolívar, and José Martí.

Instructor(s): L. Brewer-Garcia     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 21903, CRES 21903

SPAN 21910. Contemporary Catalan Literature. 100 Units.

This course provides a survey of major authors, works, and trends in Catalan literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. We study works representing various literary genres (novel, poetry, short story) and analyze the most important cultural debates of the period.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 31900, CATA 21900, SPAN 31910

SPAN 22003. Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del modernismo al presente. 100 Units.

Students in this course study an array of texts written in Spanish America from the late nineteenth century to the present, including the literature of the Hispanic diasporas. Authors may include José Martí, Rubén Darío, Mariano Azuela, Pablo Neruda, César Vallejo, Teresa de la Parra, Jorge Luis Borges, Octavio Paz, Rosario Castellanos, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Pedro Pietri.

Terms Offered: Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 22003

SPAN 22218. De capa y espada: Martial Arts Culture in the Spanish Golden Age. 100 Units.

In this course we will study the surprising interconnections between literature and Hispanic martial arts in the early modern period (16th and 17th centuries). The course is divided in three units. In Unit 1, we will discuss general issues regarding the practice of fencing and other early modern martial arts, as well as its social and ideological implications. In Unit 2 we will examine the theme of arms and letters by analyzing two philosophical fencing treatises by Jerónimo Carranza and Luis Pacheco-two of the most famous swordsmen in early modern Europe. We will read this masters in the light of the most renowned literary authors of the moment, from Garcilaso de la Vega in the 16th century to Miguel de Cervantes and Francisco de Quevedo in the 17th century. In Unit 3, we will study the importance of fencing in the cultural (re)construction of concepts such as honor, race, gender, and other social issues. To this end, we will explore the narrative production of Maria de Zayas-a pioneer of literary feminism-and two plays by Lope de Vega and Andrés Claramonte.

Instructor(s): M. Olmedo     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

SPAN 23201. Art, Ekphrasis, and Myth in Early Modern Spanish Theater. 100 Units.

In the early modern age, the verbal had a strong visual component. Poets and playwrights utilized the sense of sight since it was the highest of the Platonic senses and a mnemonic key to lead spectators to remember vividly what they had read or heard, long before spectacle plays were in fashion. One important technique for visualization was ekphrasis, the description of an art work within a text. Often, to perform was to imitate the affects, sentiments and poses of a painting. For this purpose, playwrights such as Cervantes, Lope de Vega and Calderón often turned to the mythological canvases of the Italian Renaissance along with the portraits of great rulers and images of battle. The class will examine the uses of art onstage: mnemonic, mimetic, political, religious comic, tragic, lyric and licentious. It will also delve into different forms of ekphrasis from the notional to the dramatic and from the fragmented to the reversed. Although the course will focus on Spanish plays of the early modern period, it will also include ancient treatises by Cicero, and Pliny as well as Renaissance mnemonic treatises by Della Porta. The course will be in English. Reading knowledge of Spanish is required since plays will be read in the original. Those taking the class for credit in Spanish must write their final paper in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Frederick de Armas     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 33201, CMLT 23212, CMLT 33212

SPAN 23219. Leyes del deseo: miradas queer en España y Latinoamérica. 100 Units.

This course will follow the traces of queer voices throughout different textual and artistic manifestations - from poetry to scenic arts, from narrative to cinema - with the aim to draw an intersectional, unstable and transnational map of rebel textualities and visualities in both the Latin American countries and Spain. As a lateral way of looking, queerness brings together, not without conflict, activism and academia, theory, action and creation. During the course, we will address how these Hispanic queer works problematize notions such as the canon, the tradition, the sociopolitical structures or the idea of family and lineage. By questioning them, we will see how not only these works challenge the fundamental basis of social, political and literary order, but also unfold a fluid, productive alternative to neoliberalism.

Instructor(s): I. Fanlo     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Note(s): Taught in Spanish. Readings in Spanish and English.

SPAN 23619. Music and Ethnic Authenticity in Mexico and Cuba. 100 Units.

Music and Ethnic Authenticity in Mexico and Cuba, 1900-1950 This course uses literary, artistic, and musical materials to compare visions of Afro-Cuban and Native Mexican cultures as imagined by artists in this time period. Some of the issues in the political and cultural changes behind the remarkable new repertoires created in these two countries include nationalism, nativism, modernism, and relations with France and the U.S. We look at representations of these non-European cultures in paintings, "high-culture" music, anthropological research, and literature. Graduate students will have longer papers and more intense readings. Students will prepare one (oral) reading report, take two short ID/listening quizzes, and prepare a final paper due on Tuesday of Week 11.

Instructor(s): Robert Kendrick     Terms Offered: Autumn. Autumn 18 TR 3:30-4:50 GoH 205
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: ONE of the following: (a) a Music Core course (101, 102, 104, 122); OR (b) a LACS Core Civ course (LACS 161 or 163); OR (c) a RLL Latin American literature course (e.g. SPAN 219 or 220, or the equivalent). Music-reading NOT necessary; Spanish at a 103 level will help.
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 23619, LACS 33619, MUSI 33619, SPAN 33619, MUSI 23619

SPAN 24019. The Translation Zone: Languages in Catalan-Speaking Territories. 100 Units.

This course will be focusing on Catalan culture and translation in order to address different aspects of translation history, ethics and practice in relation to minority and minoritized languages, identities and communities. The classes would seek to explore and analyze what happens to Catalan literature, film, theatre and performance in translation into other languages (in particular in the Anglophone world), as well as reflect on changing approaches to and affordances of translation within, between and beyond the Catalan-speaking territories in diverse situations of language contact and intercultural encounter involving Catalan-speaking individuals and communities. The course will be structured in four parts: Catalonia in-translation; invisible landscapes; traumatic translations; and cartographies of desire.

Instructor(s): H. Buffery     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 34019, CATA 24019, SPAN 34019

SPAN 24202. Don Quixote. 100 Units.

The course will provide a close reading of Cervantes' Don Quijote and discuss its links with Renaissance art and Early Modern narrative genres. On the one hand, Don Quijote can be viewed in terms of prose fiction, from the ancient Greek romances to the medieval books of knights errant and the Renaissance pastoral novels. On the other hand, Don Quijote exhibits a desire for Italy through the utilization of Renaissance art. Beneath the dusty roads of La Mancha and within Don Quijote's chivalric fantasies, the careful reader will come to appreciate glimpses of images with Italian designs.

Instructor(s): F. de Armas, T. Pavel     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English. Students seeking Spanish credit will read the text in the original and use Spanish for the course assignments.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 38101, REMS 34202, SPAN 34202, FNDL 21221, SCTH 38250, CMLT 28101

SPAN 25818. Signs of the Americas. 100 Units.

It is a common misconception that literature can happen only in the alphabet or that such non-alphabetical literatures have long ago ceased to be made. This course corrects such misconceptions by exploring modern and contemporary literatures that have been written with, or in response to, such sign-systems as pictographs, hieroglyphs, totem poles, wampum, and khipu. Focusing especially on the sign-systems of the native Americas, this class gives students a basic introduction to the mechanics of these signs, in order to discuss how these mechanics might be at play in the works of such poets, writers, and artists as Anni Albers, Simon Ortiz, Gerald Vizenor, Louise Erdrich, John Borrows, Charles Olson, Bill Reid, Robert Bringhurst, Fred Wah, Clayton Eshleman, Cy Twombly, Joaquín Torres-Garcia, Cecilia Vicuña, and others. Key questions to be asked include: how are these signs an interface for contemporary histories of nation and capital? And: how do those material histories and their identifications in race, gender, kinship, and ecology change when cast in the mechanics, tropes, and figures of these signs? As a "Makers Seminar," this course will include creative alternatives to the standard analytical college paper. (Fiction, Poetry, Theory)

Instructor(s): Edgar Garcia     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 25804, ENGL 25804

SPAN 26555. Self-determination and Democracy in Spain: The Case of Catalonia. 100 Units.

In recent years, tensions between Spain and Catalonia have called attention to a number of long-standing issues that have remained unresolved in modern Spanish cultural and political history: the recognition of national or regional identities, the rights of minority cultures and languages, the nature of democracy and citizenship… This course will study the history of Spanish and Catalan nation-building, as well as the ideological and cultural discourses generated around those projects, and it will pay particular attention to current debates regarding Catalonia's claim to self-determination.

Instructor(s): M. Santana     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 26555, CATA 36555, SPAN 36555

SPAN 29117. Theater and Performance in Latin America. 100 Units.

What is performance? How has it been used in Latin America and the Caribbean? This course is an introduction to theatre and performance in Latin America and the Caribbean that will examine the intersection of performance and social life. While we will place particular emphasis on performance art, we will examine some theatrical works. We ask: how have embodied practice, theatre and visual art been used to negotiate ideologies of race, gender and sexuality? What is the role of performance in relation to systems of power? How has it negotiated dictatorship, military rule, and social memory? Ultimately, the aim of this course is to give students an overview of Latin American performance including blackface performance, indigenous performance, as well as performance and activism.

Instructor(s): D. Roper     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must be in their third or fourth year
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 39117, CRES 29117, CRES 39117, LACS 29117, LACS 39117, GNSE 29117, TAPS 28479, SPAN 39117, TAPS 38479

SPAN 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course involves directed readings on special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in Spanish. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10300 or 20300, depending on the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

SPAN 29900. BA Paper Preparation: Spanish. 100 Units.

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project.

Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of undergraduate adviser
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Students seeking honors may count this course towards their course requirements. Must be taken for a quality grade.


Contacts

Administrative Contact

Department Coordinator
Jennifer Hurtarte
Wb 205
773.834.5880
Email