Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Degree Program in a Single Literature | Grading | Honors | Degree Program in More than One Literature | Minor Program in Romance Languages and Literatures | Catalan Courses | French Courses | Italian Courses | Portuguese/Luso-Brazilian Courses | Spanish Courses

Department Website: http://rll.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The Department of Romance Languages and Literatures (RLLT) offers programs of study leading to the BA degree in French, Italian, or Spanish literature; or in some combination, which may include Catalan or Portuguese. Catalan and Portuguese offerings include a two-year language sequence, minor programs in Catalan and Portuguese, and selected literature and culture courses.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in RLLT. Information follows the description of the major.

The BA programs are designed to give students knowledge of the literature and culture of their area of concentration, as well as to develop their linguistic competence in one or more of the Romance languages.

RLLT students are encouraged to participate in the College's study abroad programs. These programs currently exist in France, Italy, Mexico, and Spain. Two of these programs offer major or minor credit: The three civilization courses in the French-language European Civilization in Paris program can be used for credit in the French major or minor, assuming a student is not using these courses to fulfill the general education civilization studies requirement. Similarly, the three civilization courses in the Spanish-language Civilization in the Western Mediterranean program in Barcelona can be used for credit in the Spanish major or minor, if these courses are not used to fulfill the general education civilization studies requirement. Further information is available from the Study Abroad office or at study-abroad.uchicago.edu.

Advanced language students should consider taking special topic courses at the 20000 and 30000 levels. Some of these courses require consent of the instructor.

Program Requirements

Degree Program in a Single Literature

Students who elect the major program must meet with the appropriate RLLT undergraduate adviser before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the major and to complete the required paperwork. Students choose courses in consultation with the appropriate undergraduate adviser. Students must submit to the departmental office an approval form for the major program signed by the appropriate RLLT undergraduate adviser by the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. Students must then submit a copy of the signed approval form to their College adviser.

The programs in French, Italian, and Spanish languages and literatures consist of ten courses beyond FREN 20300 Language, History, and Culture III, ITAL 20300 Language, History, and Culture III, or SPAN 20300 Language, History, and Culture III.

One course must be an advanced language course:

One of the following:100
Ecrire en français
Corso di perfezionamento
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos

Students in French or Spanish are also required to take the following courses, which stress different approaches to literature and culture: FREN 21503 Approches à l’analyse littéraire or SPAN 21500 Introducción al análisis literario.

In addition to these requirements, students must take eight courses in the literature or culture of specialization (nine for Italian). These courses are aimed at developing a broad knowledge of the field and, through the close study of major works, a proficiency in the critical techniques appropriate to their interpretation. Students must complete a substantial part of the course work (e.g., readings, writing) in the appropriate Romance language in order to receive credit.

In French, at least one of these eight courses must be taken at the introductory level, and at least three of the eight (at any level) must include pre-nineteenth-century literature. Introductory-level courses (as designated in the course title) are designed as “gateway” courses that provide foundations for the major and are suitable for students who have just completed the advanced language requirement.

In Italian, one of the nine courses must be ITAL 23410, an introductory gateway course designed to facilitate the transition between language courses and upper level electives. As such, students are strongly encouraged to take this gateway course before beginning upper level coursework. The eight remaining courses should be upper level courses in or related to Italian. Most will be Italian literature and culture courses, but up to four of the eight can be Italian studies courses, which are largely interdisciplinary courses taught by affiliated faculty. A list of eligible Italian studies courses will be maintained on the department website.

In Spanish, students must take three courses from the introductory sequence in the history of the literature, plus an additional five courses in literature and culture.

Three courses from the following:300
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del Modernismo al presente

Courses in the major may not be counted toward general education requirements. For courses that are not taken as part of a University of Chicago study abroad program, students must petition for elective credit from the College before requesting departmental credit.

Grading

RLLT majors must receive quality grades in all required courses. Nonmajors may take departmental courses for P/F grading with consent of instructor. However, all language courses must be taken for a quality grade. 

Honors

To qualify for honors, students must have an overall GPA of 3.0 or higher and an average GPA of 3.5 or higher in the major. They must also submit a completed BA paper to their adviser no later than Friday of fifth week of Spring Quarter of their fourth year. Students with papers judged superior by the BA paper adviser and another faculty reader will be recommended to the Master of the Humanities Collegiate Division for honors. Only RLLT students who wish to be considered for honors are required to write a BA paper.

Students should select a faculty supervisor for the paper early in Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. During Winter Quarter they may register for FREN 29900 BA Paper Preparation: French, ITAL 29900 BA Paper Preparation: Italian, or SPAN 29900 BA Paper Preparation: Spanish, with the faculty member chosen to direct the writing of the BA paper. This course does not count as one of the literature or culture courses required for the major; it must be taken for a quality grade. The BA paper typically is a research paper with a minimum of twenty pages and a bibliography written in the language of specialization.

Students must seek permission from their BA paper adviser to use a single paper or project to meet both the major requirements of Romance Languages and Literatures and those of another department or program. A significant and logical section of the BA paper must be written in the appropriate Romance language in consultation with the student's BA paper adviser. Students must also obtain the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser. The form must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

By the beginning of their fourth year, students may be asked to submit a writing sample in the language of their major (or, in the case of equal emphasis on two literatures, in both). If the department deems language proficiency inadequate, there may be additional requirements to ensure that the BA paper can be successfully written in the language of study.

Summary of Requirements: French

FREN 20500Ecrire en français100
FREN 21503Approches à l’analyse littéraire100
Eight courses in French literature and culture (including at least one introductory course and at least three including pre-nineteenth-century material)800
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors)
Total Units1000

Summary of Requirements: Italian

ITAL 20400Corso di perfezionamento100
ITAL 23410Reading and Practice of the Short Story100
Eight upper level Italian courses (up to four may be interdisciplinary Italian studies courses; see department website for list of eligible courses)800
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors)
Total Units1000

Summary of Requirements: Spanish

One of the following:100
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
SPAN 21500Introducción al análisis literario100
Three of the following:300
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del Modernismo al presente
Five additional courses in Spanish literature and culture500
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors)
Total Units1000

Degree Program in More than One Literature

The programs in more than one Romance literature consist of twelve courses beyond the second-year language sequences. They are designed to accommodate the needs and interests of students who would like to broaden their literary experience. Linguistic competence in at least two Romance languages is assumed. There are two options: a program with equal emphasis on two literatures, and a program with greater emphasis on one literature. Students who wish to include Catalan or Portuguese in their program must choose the second option, with Portuguese or Catalan as a secondary literature.

Students who elect this major program must meet with the RLLT undergraduate adviser in each literature before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the major and to complete the required paperwork. Students choose courses in consultation with both RLLT undergraduate advisers. Students must submit to the departmental office an approval form for the major program signed by both RLLT undergraduate advisers by the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. Students must then submit a copy of the signed approval form to their College adviser.

Students who wish to be considered for honors must write a BA paper under the guidance of a faculty adviser, as is the case of the major in a single literature.

Summary of Requirements

Program with Equal Emphasis on Two Literatures
One of the following advanced language courses:100
Ecrire en français
Corso di perfezionamento
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
Five literature courses, including three introductory literature courses in French or Spanish, or the agreed-upon alternative in Italian500
Six courses in literature equally divided between the same two Romance literatures, one of which must be FREN 21503, SPAN 21500, or the agreed-upon alternative in Italian600
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors)
Total Units1200

Summary of Requirements

Program with Greater Emphasis on One Literature
One of the following advanced language courses:100
An intermediate-advanced Catalan language course
Ecrire en français
Corso di perfezionamento
Curso de Aperfeiçoamento
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
Three introductory literature courses in French or Spanish, or the agreed-upon alternative in Italian300
Four courses in the same Romance literature (French, Italian, or Spanish)400
Three courses in a second Romance literature (Catalan, French, Italian, Portuguese, or Spanish)300
One of the following:100
Approches à l’analyse littéraire
Introducción al análisis literario
The agreed-upon alternative in Catalan, Italian, or Portuguese
BA paper (if the student wishes to qualify for honors)
Total Units1200

Minor Program in Romance Languages and Literatures

Students who elect the minor program must meet with the appropriate RLLT undergraduate adviser before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor. Students choose courses in consultation with the undergraduate adviser of their language program. Students must submit to the departmental office an approval form for the minor program signed by the appropriate RLLT undergraduate adviser. Students must then submit a copy of the signed approval form to their College adviser by the deadline on the form.

The RLLT minor requires a total of six courses beyond the second-year language sequence (20100-20300 in French, Italian, or Spanish; 20100-20200 in Portuguese). One course must be an advanced language course (above 20300 in French, Italian, or Spanish; above 20200 in Portuguese). The balance must consist of five literature and culture courses, including at least two in the survey sequence for Spanish or at least one introductory-level course in French. In French, at least one of the courses (at any level) must include pre-nineteenth-century material.

In Italian, one of the six courses must be ITAL 23410, an introductory gateway course designed to facilitate the transition between language courses and upper level electives. As such, students are strongly encouraged to take this gateway course before beginning upper level coursework. The four remaining courses in the minor will be upper level courses in or related to Italian. Most will be Italian literature and culture courses, but up to two may be Italian Studies courses, which are largely interdisciplinary courses taught by affiliated faculty. A list of eligible Italian Studies courses will be maintained on the department website.

The minor in Catalan requires a total of six courses beyond the first-year language sequence (11100 or 12200). One course must be an intermediate-advanced language course (11200 or equivalent). The balance must consist of five literature and culture courses, including at least one introductory-level course (21600 or 21900).

Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for a quality grade. Students must complete a substantial part of the course work (e.g., readings, writing) in the appropriate Romance language in order to receive credit.

The following groups of courses would comprise a minor in the areas indicated. Other programs may be designed in consultation with the appropriate undergraduate adviser. Minor program requirements are subject to revision.

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Catalan

An intermediate-advanced Catalan language course100
A total of five literature and culture courses from the following:500
One or two of the following:
Catalan Culture and Society: Art, Music, and Cinema
Contemporary Catalan Literature
Three or four additional courses in Catalan literature
Total Units600

Summary of Requirements: Minor in French

FREN 20500Ecrire en français100
Five courses in French literature and culture (including at least one introductory course and at least one including pre-nineteenth-century material)500
Total Units600

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Italian

ITAL 20400Corso di perfezionamento100
ITAL 23410Reading and Practice of the Short Story100
Four courses in Italian literature and culture (up to two may be interdisciplinary Italian Studies courses; see department website for list of eligible courses)400
Total Units600

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Portuguese

PORT 21500Curso de Aperfeiçoamento100
Five courses in Luso-Brazilian literature and culture (i.e., with PORT number above 20200)500
Total Units600

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Spanish

One of the following:100
Composición y conversación avanzada I
Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos
Composición y conversación avanzada II
Discurso académico para hablantes nativos
A total of five courses from the following:500
Two or three of the following:
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia
Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del Modernismo al presente
Two or three additional Spanish literature and culture courses
Total Units600

NOTE: Some 30000- and 40000-level courses in Catalan (CATA), French (FREN), Italian (ITAL), Portuguese (PORT), and Spanish (SPAN) are open to advanced RLLT undergraduates with consent of instructor. For further information, consult the department.

Catalan Courses

Language

CATA 12200-12300. Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I-II.

Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages

CATA 12200. Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. In this introductory course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with a Romance language.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

CATA 12300. Catalan for Speakers of Romance Languages II. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Catalan. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to mastering Catalan by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages. This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in CATA 12200.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Familiarity with a Romance language.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

CATA 21100. Català avançat: Llengua, societat i cultura. 100 Units.

This advanced-level course will focus on speaking and writing skills through the study of a wide variety of contemporary texts and audiovisual materials. It will provide students with a better understanding of contemporary Catalan society. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates. 

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CATA 11200, CATA 12300 or consent of instructor

Literature and Culture

CATA 21600. Catalan Culture and Society: Art, Music, and Cinema. 100 Units.

This course provides an interdisciplinary survey of contemporary Catalonia. We study a wide range of its cultural manifestations (architecture, paintings, music, arts of the body, literature, cinema, gastronomy). Attention is also paid to some sociolinguistic issues, such as the coexistence of Catalan and Spanish, and the standardization of Catalan.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): The course will be conducted in English and/or Catalan, depending on the students' command of the language.
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 21610

CATA 21900. Contemporary Catalan Literature. 100 Units.

This course provides a survey of major authors, works, and trends in Catalan literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. We study works representing various literary genres (novel, poetry, short story) and analyze the most important cultural debates of the period.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 31900,SPAN 21910,SPAN 31910

CATA 27917. Catalan Multipart Singing in Modern and Contemporary History. 100 Units.

To sing together “a veus” (multipart) has historically been an experiential way to build social groups. The aim of this course is to present this activity across Catalonia from the 16th to the 21st century, paying special attention to how multipart singing has articulated a large part of association and shared community life since the middle 19th century. The Catalan example will be placed among multipart singing in Mediterranean Latin countries, where the phenomenon is shared with great intensity.

Instructor(s): J. Ayats     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of Arabic, Catalan, French, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. Prerequisite for students taking course for music credit: MUSI 23300.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 37917,SPAN 27917,SPAN 37917,MUSI 27918,MUSI 37918

CATA 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course involves directed readings in special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in Catalan. Subjects treated and work to be completed for this course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): CATA 10300 or 20200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

French Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

FREN 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary French I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in French. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written French (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them based on placement exam results.

FREN 10100. Beginning Elementary French I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of French and for those who need an in-depth review of the very basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade

FREN 10200. Beginning Elementary French II. 100 Units.

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in FREN 10100.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10100 or placement.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

FREN 10300. Beginning Elementary French III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in FREN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10200 or placement.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

FREN 10123. Summer Intensive Elementary French. 300 Units.

Summer Elementary French is an eight-week course which helps students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken French and their use in everyday communication. Attention will be given to all four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing). Completing this sequence is the equivalent of FREN 10100-10200-10300 during the regular academic year, and it will fulfill the College language competency requirement for UChicago students.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/10/17
Note(s): Successfully completing this course will fulfill the College language competency requirement.

FREN 20100-20200-20300. Language, History, and Culture I-II-III.

Courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills by describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of French literature, culture, and contemporary society.

FREN 20100. Language, History, and Culture I. 100 Units.

This course is intended as a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore selected aspects of contemporary French society through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10300 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

FREN 20200. Language, History, and Culture II. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through a variety of texts, audio-visual materials, and activities.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20100 or placement.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

FREN 20300. Language, History, and Culture III. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding and producing written and spoken arguments in French through readings and debates on various issues relevant to contemporary French society.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): PQ: FREN 20200 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

FREN 20500. Ecrire en français. 100 Units.

The main goal of this course is to help students acquire advanced grammatical knowledge of the French language and develop their writing skills. This course is strongly recommended for all students who intend to take courses in which writing essays in French are required: French literature classes on campus, the Autumn Paris Civilization program, or the academic yearlong program in Paris. It is also strongly recommended for students who wish to take the advanced proficiency exam in French.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20300 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade

FREN 20601. Expression orale et phonétique. 100 Units.

This course focuses on developing the tools necessary for advanced oral proficiency in an academic context. Through active class participation involving a number of class presentations, students practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). Special emphasis is placed on correct pronunciation.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20300 or placement
Note(s): This course does not count toward major or minor requirements. Must be taken for a quality grade.

FREN 23333. Reading French for Research Purposes. 100 Units.

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of French to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring,Summer,Winter. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-7/21/17
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 33333

Literature and Culture

All literature classes are conducted in French unless otherwise indicated. Students who are taking a course for credit toward the French major or minor do all work in French. With prior consent of instructor, nonmajors may write in English.

FREN 21700. Le Roman de la rose. 100 Units.

The mid-thirteenth-century Roman de la Rose was arguably the single most influential vernacular text of the (French) Middle Ages. A sprawling, encyclopedic summa composed by two separate authors writing some forty years apart, whether taken as a source of inspiration or an object of condemnation, the Roman de la Rose became an obligatory point of reference for generations of authors. Over the course of the quarter, we will read the conjoined text, each student focusing their reading through a critical optic of their choice (e.g., gender studies, animal studies, ethics and philosophy, reception studies, manuscript studies, etc.). Students will select and read ancillary texts to enrich their understanding of the Rose, and will collaborate with one another to chart a rich and diverse set of interpretive paths through this complex work.

Instructor(s): D. Delogu     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 and at least one other literature course taught in French.
Note(s): Taught in English, with readings in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 31700,GNSE 27300,FNDL 21700

FREN 21820. Blinding Enlightenment. 100 Units.

The French Enlightenment marks a blinding explosion of moral, philosophical, and artistic creativity. The dynamics of self and other are explored as vehicles for critical thought as well as a playful, even ironic understanding of a modern self that is being defined and constructed in and through many of the works that we will read for this course. The dialectics of passion and reason are examined in this unfurling of a newly self-conscious modernity. This introductory-level course will examine some of the great works of the French Enlightenment in their specific relation to the world we have become. Works by Voltaire, Montesquieu, Diderot, and Rousseau, as well as Marivaux and Beaumarchais; genres: theater, novels, philosophical dialogues, and tales.

Instructor(s): R. Morrissey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500
Note(s): Introductory-level course. Discussion, readings, and writing in French.

FREN 21903. Introduction à la littérature française III: Littérature du 19e. 100 Units.

An introduction to some major nineteenth-century French literary works, this course emphasizes the main cultural debates of the period through some close readings and discussions. We study various literary genres from early Romanticism to the rise of Symbolism. Authors may include Chateaubriand, Mme de Staël, Benjamin Constant, Balzac, George Sand, Hugo, Musset, Zola, Lamartine, Baudelaire, Rimbaud, Verlaine, and Mallarmé.

Instructor(s): D. Desormeaux     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500
Note(s): Classes conducted in French.

FREN 22203. The Literary Avant-Garde. 100 Units.

This course surveys the history and aesthetics of French avant-garde groups and tendencies in the twentieth century, from Dada and surrealism to the Nouveau Roman and Oulipo. While our focus will be on literary texts, we will also consider theoretical perspectives on the avant-garde and explore connections and contacts between literature and the other arts. Authors studied include Apollinaire, Artaud, Breton, Robbe-Grillet, Sarraute, and Perec.

Instructor(s): A. James     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 and one other literature course taught in French.
Note(s): Taught in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 32203

FREN 22217. Anthropologie, littérature et société 100 Units.

Du naturalisme de Zola (France) à la littérature-monde de Mabanckou (Congo), en passant par l’exotisme de Segalen (France) ou la négritude de Senghor (Sénégal), la littérature de langue française est pleine de ces œuvres inspirées, voire imprégnées, de savoirs anthropologiques. Mais l’inverse est aussi vrai puisque, dès la fin du XIXe siècle, il n’est pas rare de voir les anthropologues s’intéresser à l’écriture littéraire comme moyen d’exploration, de découverte et d’exposition de problématiques propres aux sciences sociales. Ce cours d’introduction se propose d’aborder, à travers un nombre réduit de textes fondateurs (Rousseau, Gobineau, Firmin, Césaire, Lévi-Strauss, etc.), certaines des grandes questions sociopolitiques et culturelles (race, culture, nation, religion, etc.) qui ont poussé les écrivains et savants, aux XIXe et XXe siècles, à dépasser les barrières institutionnelles de leurs disciplines respectives. Il s’agira grâce à cette approche interdisciplinaire de comprendre comment la pensée des uns a pu permettre de réinventer la pratique des autres, et vice versa.

Instructor(s): B. Craipain     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500
Note(s): Taught in French.

FREN 23217. La réalité et ses contraires du moyen âge au XVIIe siècle. 100 Units.

What if I told you that the real was imaginary and the imaginary was real? This course will explore the concepts of the marvelous, the imaginary, and the real through a selection of French literature from the Middle Ages to the 17th century. The Middle Ages are often perceived as a rigid feudal society. Yet, fairies abound in stories, people shape-shift, and objects magically transform under our eyes. In the 16th century truth appears to harden through advances in science, mathematics, and art. But simultaneously religious schisms, the discovery of the New World, and political anarchy shake the notion of the world’s stable limits to the core. The 17th century is known for Descartes’ rationalism and classical regularity. But even here there is the unexpected, the surprising je ne sais quoi and overwhelming ineffable. Through the literature of each era, we will see how reality often mixes with the marvelous and everything is not always as it seems.

Instructor(s): E. Van Dyke     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500
Note(s): Taught in French.

FREN 23610. Littérature et société: Flaubert et Marx. 100 Units.

Our approach to Flaubert will be sociological. Three novels will be studied (Madame Bovary, Un cœur simple, and L’Education sentimentale) in direct relation with texts from Marx, Althusser, and other critics on alienation, merchandise, value theory, and the revolution of 1848 (Capital, Manuscripts of 1844, The German Ideology, and 18 Brumaire de Louis Napoleon). 

Instructor(s): P. Desan     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in English, with Flaubert readings in French. Meets RLL French section's graduate theory requirement.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 33610,FNDL 23610

FREN 25551. Psychoanalytic Theory: Freud and Lacan. 100 Units.

For this course, we will read major texts by Freud and Lacan. Freud readings will include “Beyond the Pleasure Principle,” “Note on a Mystic Writing Pad,” “The Uncanny,” “Jensen’s Gradiva,” the Dora case, and a selection of texts from other works. Lacan readings: “Seminar on the Purloined Letter,” Poe’s “The Purloined Letter,” “God and the Jouissance of the Woman: A love letter,” and parts of the Ecrits. We will also read excerpts from a variety of texts that use the writings of Freud and Lacan for theoretical purposes: Derrida, Sarah Kristeva, Irigaray, Zizek, and others.

Instructor(s): Françoise Meltzer     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 35551,CMLT 35500,CMLT 25500

FREN 26103. Les Misérables. 100 Units.

In this course we read Les Misérables and discuss the work's message, structure, and aesthetic vision. We will be particularly attentive to Victor Hugo's role as an observer of nineteenth-century French society as well as an actor in the political life of his times.

Instructor(s): R. Morrissey     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500
Note(s): All classes and texts in French; presentations preferred in French, but English will be acceptable depending on the concentration. Written work in French or English.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 36103,FNDL 26100

FREN 26118. The French Enlightenment’s Legacy in Political Theory. 100 Units.

The course is an introduction to the main aspects of the French Enlightenment’s political thought and its contemporary legacy. We will study major philosophers (Montesquieu, Rousseau, Voltaire, Diderot) and examine their influence on contemporary controversies on Democracy, Justice, Civilization, Europe and Empire. We will read Foucault, Habermas, Philipp Pettit, Charles Taylor and challenge the idea of a "Radical Enlightenment." 

Instructor(s): C. Spector     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): For those enrolled FREN 26118 or FREN 36118, there will be a weekly discussion session in French.
Equivalent Course(s): PLSC 36102,FREN 36118,PLSC 26102

FREN 26217. Histoire du théâtre français de la Renaissance aux Lumières. 100 Units.

Entre le XVIe et le XVIIIe siècle, le théâtre français connaît une période de remarquable effervescence. La tragédie renaît avec la Cléopâtre captive d’Étienne Jodelle (1553), la pastorale et la tragi-comédie connaissent une popularité sans précédent, la comédie est à jamais transformée par la représentation de L’école des femmes (1663), le théâtre lyrique et l’opéra-comique acquièrent leurs spécificités respectives et le drame bourgeois rencontre ses premiers succès. Ce cours d’Histoire du théâtre français de la Renaissance aux Lumières se propose d’examiner la poétique de chacun de ces genres dans le contexte des grands courants esthétiques de l’époque (humanisme, baroque et classicisme). Tout en soulignant que les pièces produites durant les trois siècles étudiés sont encore tributaires des sources antiques et médiévales, ce panorama montrera de quelle façon le génie de certains auteurs – ainsi que les querelles que suscite l’opposition morale et intellectuelle à l’art dramatique – contribue au développement d’un des spectacles les plus brillants et les plus acclamés d’Europe.

Instructor(s): J. Perrier-Chartrand     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 36217,TAPS 26217,TAPS 36217

FREN 26220. Classicism, Romanticism, Modernism. 100 Units.

This undergraduate/graduate course will examine the problematic impact of seventeenth-century French “Classicism” on the later literary movements of Romanticism and modernism, considering both the violent resistance and enduring influence it encounters. We will pair readings—of both literary (poetic, dramatic, narrative) and critical works—from the 17th century (e.g., Molière, Mme de Sévigné, Boileau, and Racine) with later counterparts ranging from Germaine de Staël, Chateaubriand, Stendhal, and Hugo to Gide, Valéry, Genet, and Beckett.

Instructor(s): L. Norman     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): FREN 20500 and one introductory-level literature course taught in French.
Note(s): Taught in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 36220

FREN 27701. Baudelaire. 100 Units.

An in-depth study of Baudelaire’s works. We will read (in English translation) Les Fleurs du mal, Les Petits poèmes en prose, and selections from his art criticism, in order to develop a perspective on this great poet who was both classical and romantic, both a traditional and a revolutionary artist who helped create modernism.

Instructor(s): R. Warren     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English. Students taking the course for French credit will do readings in French and participate in a weekly French discussion section.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 27701

FREN 28500. Les Revenants: histoire, fiction et société au 19e siècle. 100 Units.

Depuis belle lurette, la littérature fantastique est hantée de revenants et de fantômes, c’est-à-dire des êtres qui reviennent au bercail après une longue séparation, pour découvrir que tout a changé en leur absence et qu’ils n’ont plus de place. Dans le roman du XIXe siècle en France le personnage du revenant connaît un succès populaire phénoménal. Des figures quasi mythologiques comme Chabert, Vautrin, Jean Valjean, Rodolphe ou Monte-Cristo (évoluant symboliquement entre l’image triomphante d’Ulysse et celle d’un larron messianique) sont irrémédiablement ancrées dans l’imaginaire collectif. Mais presque tout revient dans ce siècle dit moderne: Histoire, préhistoire, mémoires, Révolutions, régimes politiques, Moyen-âge et anciens modes? Tout en explorant la fonction sociale et les fantasmes politiques que le thème du retour suscite dans l’univers romanesque, on tentera de déchiffrer la fonction complexe de la figure du revenant à travers l’axe anthropologique  et historique. Les auteurs étudiés plus particulièrement seront Chateaubriand, Balzac, Dumas, Flaubert, Hugo, Goncourt, Nerval, Sand et Zola.

Instructor(s): D. Desormeaux     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must be in their third or fourth year.
Note(s): Taught in French.
Equivalent Course(s): FREN 38500

FREN 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course is a study of directed readings in special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in French. Subjects treated and work completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): FREN 10300 or 20300, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

FREN 29900. BA Paper Preparation: French. 100 Units.

In consultation with a faculty member, students devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of undergraduate adviser
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Other Courses of Interest

SOSC 27501-27601-27701. Civilisation Européenne I-II-III.

Enrollment in Paris study abroad program. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. Cette série de cours est un hybride: à la fois une introduction à l’histoire de la civilisation européenne depuis le Moyen Age et une vue d’ensemble de l’histoire de France durant cette période. Notre objectif sera double: d’une part, intégrer étude de textes et découverte de Paris et de sa région; de l’autre, pratiquer le métier d’historiens de la culture. Pour ce faire, nous analyserons de nombreux documents historiques et oeuvres littéraires, philosophiques, artistiques, et musicales. Nous en discuterons lors de nos trois réunions hebdomadaires. De plus, nous étudierons la civilisation française à travers les villages, monastères, et châteaux de la région parisienne et ailleurs. Classes conducted in French. This sequence meets in Paris.

SOSC 27501. Civilisation Européenne I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced knowledge of French

SOSC 27601. Civilisation Européenne II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced Knowledge of French

SOSC 27701. Civilisation Européenne III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Advanced Knowledge of French

Italian Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

ITAL 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary Italian I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Italian. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Italian (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three classes constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence at whatever level is appropriate for them. Cultural awareness is enhanced through the use of authentic audio-visual materials and literary texts.

ITAL 10100. Beginning Elementary Italian I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Italian and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

ITAL 10200. Beginning Elementary Italian II. 100 Units.

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in ITAL 10100.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10100 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

ITAL 10300. Beginning Elementary Italian III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in ITAL 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language. Successful completion of ITAL 10300 meets the language competence requirement.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10200 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

ITAL 12200. Italian for Speakers of Romance Languages. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of other Romance languages to quickly develop competence in spoken and written Italian. Students learn ways to apply their skills in another Romance language to Italian by concentrating on the similarities and differences between languages.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): 20100 in another Romance language or consent of instructor

ITAL 20100-20200-20300. Language, History, and Culture I-II-III.

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills in describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to literary and nonliterary texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of the Italian-speaking world.

ITAL 20100. Language, History, and Culture I. 100 Units.

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Italian-speaking world through the reading of excerpts from contemporary Italian literature.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10300 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

ITAL 20200. Language, History, and Culture II. 100 Units.

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Italian-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items. Cultural awareness is enhanced through close study of contemporary Italian film and literature, as well as through in-class discussion.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20100 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

ITAL 20300. Language, History, and Culture III. 100 Units.

This course completes the study of the common grammatical functions and syntactical structures of the oral and written language and introduces students to description and analysis of a variety of texts through written, oral, listening, and reading activities. Students read a contemporary Italian novel and a selection of Italian poetry.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20200 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

ITAL 20400. Corso di perfezionamento. 100 Units.

This course helps students achieve a very high level of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. Using a variety of literary and nonliterary texts as models, students examine the linguistic structure and organization of several types of written Italian discourse. This course is also intended to help students attain high levels in reading, speaking, and listening through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Italian society.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20300, placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

Literature and Culture

All literature and culture classes are conducted in Italian unless otherwise indicated. Students who are taking a course for credit toward the Italian major or minor do all work in Italian. With prior consent of instructor, nonmajors may write in English.

ITAL 21100. Le regioni italiane: lingua, dialetti, tradizioni. 100 Units.

This course expands students' awareness of the diversity of the Italian language and culture. It emphasizes the interrelationship between language and culture, as well as social and historical transformations. We also study the Italian phonological system. Students are exposed to a wide variety of texts, both literary and nonliterary, as well as audio-visual materials that enhance their awareness of regional expressions and Italian dialects. Guest lecturers include native speakers from different Italian regions.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 20300 or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

ITAL 21800. Italo Calvino. 100 Units.

Italo Calvino is one of the most important authors of the twentieth century. We will read some of his most famous books in Italian. Among others, we will study Le Cita, Invisibili, Gli Amori Difficili, Il Barone Rampante, Se Una Notte D'Inverno Un Viaggiatore. Reading Calvino is an essential experience for all students of Italian culture. We will place his books and his poetics in the context of modern Italian culture and Western European post-modernism.

Instructor(s): A. Maggi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in Italian.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 21810

ITAL 22914. The Italian Renaissance. 100 Units.

Florence, Rome, and the Italian city-states in the age of plagues and cathedrals, Dante and Machiavelli, Medici and Borgia (1250–1600), with a focus on literature and primary sources, the recovery of lost texts and technologies of the ancient world, and the role of the church in Renaissance culture and politics. Humanism, patronage, translation, cultural immersion, dynastic and papal politics, corruption, assassination, art, music, magic, censorship, religion, education, science, heresy, and the roots of the Reformation. Assignments include creative writing, reproducing historical artifacts, and a live reenactment of a papal election. First-year students and non-history majors welcome.

Instructor(s): A. Palmer     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 32900,CLCV 22914,CLAS 32914,ITAL 32914,HCHR 32900,RLST 22900,KNOW 21405,KNOW 31405,HIST 22900

ITAL 23217. Challenges of Translation: Italian Poetry and Prose. 100 Units.

The course focuses on the analysis and production of translations of Italian literary texts. We will compare different English translations of classics of Italian literature, such as Dante’s Inferno, Boccaccio’s Decameron, and Petrarch’s Canzoniere. We will analyze translations of modern poetry and prose, by authors such as Montale, Calvino, and Pasolini, and discuss the effectiveness of Ann Goldstein’s recent translations of Elena Ferrante’s tetralogy and their role in securing the author’s success abroad. Students will also be faced with the challenges of allegedly untranslatable texts, such as those produced by Futurism. The course will shed light on the ways in which translations shape our reading of the Italian literary tradition and on the strategies involved in transporting literary artifacts across cultures. Students will be encouraged to produce their own translations and provide feedback on each other’s texts in a workshop setting.

Instructor(s): S. Guslandi     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Only a very basic knowledge of Italian is required.

ITAL 23410. Reading and Practice of the Short Story. 100 Units.

What are the specific features of the short story? How does this literary form organize different visions of time and space? Informed by these fundamental theoretical questions, this course explores the logic of the short story and investigates its position among literary genres. We will read together a selection of contemporary Italian short stories (privileging the production of Italo Calvino, Beppe Fenoglio, and Elsa Morante, but also including less visible authors, such as Goffredo Parise, Dino Buzzati, and Silvio D’Arzo). The moments of close reading and theoretical reflection will be alternated with creative writing activities, in which students will have the opportunity to enter in a deeper resonance with the encountered texts. This course is especially designed to help students improve their written Italian and literary interpretive skills.

Instructor(s): M.A. Mariani     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in Italian.

ITAL 23900. Marsilio Ficino's "On Love" 100 Units.

This course is first of all a close reading of Marsilio Ficino’s seminal book On Love (first Latin edition De amore 1484; Ficino’s own Italian translation 1544). Ficino’s philosophical masterpiece is the foundation of the Renaissance view of love from a Neo-Platonic perspective. It is impossible to overemphasize its influence on European culture. On Love is not just a radically new interpretation of Plato’s Symposium. It is the book through which sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe read the love experience. Our course will analyze its multiple classical sources and its spiritual connotations. During our close reading of Ficino’s text, we will show how European writers and philosophers appropriated specific parts of this Renaissance masterpiece. In particular, we will read extensive excerpts from some important love treatises, such as Castiglione’s The Courtier (Il cortigiano), Leone Ebreo’s Dialogues on Love, Tullia d’Aragona’s On the Infinity of Love, but also selections from a variety of European poets, such as Michelangelo’s canzoniere, Maurice Scève’s Délie, and Fray Luis de León’s Poesía.

Instructor(s): A. Maggi     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 33900,CMLT 26701,CMLT 36701,FNDL 21103

ITAL 24217. Italy from Napoleon (1796) to the First Republic (1946) 100 Units.

This course is intended to be a historical overview and a useful resource for students seeking an introduction to nineteenth- and twentieth-century Italian literature and culture. We will explore the country’s history from the late eighteenth century to the aftermath of World War II and survey the difficulties Italy faced during the long Ottocento (1796–1946) in forging a nation-state. In doing so, we will weave together literary, artistic, political, social, and cultural history, and also stress the role of literature and the visual arts in shaping modern Italy.

Instructor(s): F. Moslemani     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in English, with readings available in Italian and English.

ITAL 24920. Primo Levi. 100 Units.

Witness, novelist, essayist, translator, linguist, chemist, and even entomologist. Primo Levi is a polyhedral author, and this course revisits his work in all its facets. We will privilege the most hybrid of his texts: The Search for Roots, an anthology that collects the author’s favorite readings--a book assembled through the books of the others, but which represents Levi’s most authentic portrait. By using this work as an entry point into Levi’s universe, we will later explore his other texts, addressing issues such as the unsettling relationship between survival and testimony, the “sinful” choice of fiction, the oblique path towards autobiography, and the paradoxes of witnessing by proxy.

Instructor(s): M. A. Mariani     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in Italian. Open to advanced undergrads.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 34920

ITAL 25217. Viaggio in Italia. 100 Units.

An ideal journey to Italy: we will travel to Firenze, Venezia, Ferrara, Urbino, Roma, and Palermo through literature and art. Visits to the rare books in the Special Collections Research Center and the Smart Museum of Art will allow us to investigate material aspects of selected works. Among others, Giotto, Ariosto, Michelangelo, Casanova, and Tomasi di Lampedusa will travel with us. This course is intended for students who have concluded their Italian language sequence and wish to explore Italian literature, art, and culture.

Instructor(s): F. Caneparo     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in Italian. No previous knowledge of Italian literature or art history is necessary.

ITAL 25918. From the Victim to the Witness, From the Witness to the Hero, and Back. 100 Units.

In recent years the Victim has risen to the role of ethical touchstone once attributed to the Hero. Through the analysis of the textual strategies and the reception of Primo Levi’s and Roberto Saviano’s works, the course aim to explain the reasons and dynamics of this paradigm shift. Since the Hero is someone who does something, while the Victim is someone who suffers the effects of other people’s actions, the question is: according to which conceptual framework may the testimony of a victimization be considered a sufficient condition for that person (or the role he/she epitomizes) to acquire the status of an exemplary figure, custodian of unalienable values and bearer of moral teachings?

Instructor(s): D. Giglioli     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in English. Italian majors and minors will write midterm and final in Italian. Graduate students in Italian will read Italian texts in the original Italian and write their final essay in Italian.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 35918,CMLT 25918,CMLT 35918

ITAL 26002. Philosophical Petrarchism. 100 Units.

This course is a close reading of Petrarch’s Latin corpus. Readings include the Coronation Oration, The Secret, and selections from Remedies for Fortune Fair and Foul, On Illustrious Men, On Religious Leisure, and The Life of Solitude. Special attention is devoted to Petrarch’s letter collections (Letters on Familiar Matters, Letters of Old Age, Book without a Name, etc.) and his invectives. The aim of the course is to familiarize the student with the new and complete Petrarch that emerged in 2004 on the occasion of the 700th anniversary of his birth. Discussion will focus on Petrarch’s self-consciousness as the “father of humanism,” his relationship to Dante, autobiographism, dialogical inquiry, anti-scholasticism, patriotism, and Petrarch’s “civic” reception in the Quattrocento as well as on a comparative evaluation of the nineteenth-century Petrarchs of Alfred Mézières, Georg Voigt, and Francesco De Sanctis.

Instructor(s): R. Rubini     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in Italian.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 25802,ITAL 36002

ITAL 26401. Torquato Tasso. 100 Units.

This course investigates the entire corpus of Torquato Tasso, the major Italian poet of the second half of the sixteenth century. We read in detail the Gerusalemme Liberata and Aminta, his two most famous works, in the context of their specific literary genre. We then spend some time examining the intricacies of his vast collection of lyric poetry, including passages from his poem "Il mondo creato." We also consider some of his dialogues in prose that address essential issues of Renaissance culture, such as the theories of love, emblematic expression, and the meaning of friendship.

Instructor(s): A. Maggi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in Italian.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 36401,FNDL 26401

ITAL 26918. Writing Under Fascism: Indifference, Surrealism, Satire, Allegory. 100 Units.

Unlike other totalitarian regimes, the policy of the Italian fascist regime concerning writers, artists and intellectuals was not only a matter of violence and constriction, but also and above all a search for consent, a form of seduction and corruption: there is no dictatorship without hegemony, as Gramsci said. Whereas control over political practice and media coverage was tight, authors enjoyed a relative degree of freedom. It was impossible to criticize the regime openly, but it was possible to bypass censorship by using rhetorical and textual strategies such as existential realism, irony, allegory and surrealism. The aim of the course is to show the thematic items and the stylistic devices employed by Italian writers under Fascism in order to produce a deterritorialization (to use Gilles Deleuze’s expression) of totalitarian discourse about subjectivity, gender, agency and national culture.

Instructor(s): D. Giglioli     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in English. Italian majors and minors will write midterm and final in Italian.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 26918

ITAL 28702. Italian Comic Theater. 100 Units.

A survey of the history of Italian theater from the Erudite Renaissance Comedy to Goldoni’s reform. We will pay particular attention to the tradition of commedia dell’arte (scenarios, stock characters, and plot formation), ancient and medieval influences, evolution and emancipation of female characters, and the question of language. Readings include works by Plautus, Ariosto, Machiavelli, Angelo Beolco (Ruzante), Flaminio Scala, and Goldoni. Toward the end of the course we will consider the legacy of Italian Comedy in relation to the birth of grotesque and realist drama in Pirandello.

Instructor(s): R. Rubini     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 38702,TAPS 28702,TAPS 38702

ITAL 28818. Literature and Technology: Machines, Humans, and the Novel. 100 Units.

In his Scienza Nuova (New Science), Giambattista Vico writes that "the Egyptians reduced all preceding world time to three ages; namely, the age of gods, the age of heroes, and the age of men." What the Egyptians and Vico could not have predicted was that history had yet another age in store: the age of the machine. Carlyle baptized, Marx outlined it, Heidegger warned against it; Deleuze and Guattari proclaimed that "everything is a machine"; and Ted Kaczynski even went as far as to kill in order to free human beings from the "technological slavery" the machine age had purportedly brought about. And yet, as Heidegger wrote, "everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it." So what is technology? What impact did it have on human beings and on the writing of literature as the Industrial Revolution exploded onto the European continent? In this course we will pose anew the question concerning technology within the one field that Heidegger deemed akin to the essence of technology: art, and by deduction, literature. Together, we will trace the ecological, economical, and emotional footprints of various machines and technological devices (automata, trains, phonographs, cameras). We will delve into the topic with Charlie Chaplin's Modern Times, continue with a reflection on the human being as a machine (Frankenstein and Pinocchio), transition to accounts on cities, prog

Instructor(s): Ana Ilievska     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): PORT 28818,CMLT 21200

ITAL 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course provides directed readings in special topics not covered as part of the program in Italian. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): ITAL 10300 or 20300, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

ITAL 29900. BA Paper Preparation: Italian. 100 Units.

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of undergraduate adviser
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Portuguese/Luso-Brazilian Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

PORT 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary Portuguese I-II-III.

This sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Portuguese. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Portuguese (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills. Although the three courses constitute a sequence, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them.

PORT 10100. Beginning Elementary Portuguese I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Portuguese and for students who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

PORT 10200. Beginning Elementary Portuguese II. 100 Units.

This course is a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in PORT 10100.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10100 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

PORT 10300. Beginning Elementary Portuguese III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in PORT 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10200 or placement
Note(s): Successful completion of PORT 10300 fulfills the competency requirement. Must be taken for a quality grade.

PORT 12200. Portuguese for Spanish Speakers. 100 Units.

This course is intended for speakers of Spanish to develop competence quickly in spoken and written Portuguese. In this intermediate-level course, students learn ways to apply their Spanish language skills to mastering Portuguese by concentrating on the similarities and differences between the two languages.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20100 or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 12200

PORT 13120. Accelerated Portuguese for Speakers of Romance Languages. 300 Units.

Our summer Portuguese course helps students gain intermediate skills in spoken and written Portuguese quickly by building on their prior knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to make very quick progress and to develop their abilities for further study at the advanced level or for professional purposes. All students enrolled in Accelerated Portuguese will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-7/28/17
Prerequisite(s): At least one year of recent college-level study of Spanish, French, or Italian.
Note(s): This course provides 140 contact hours and accepts the FLAS grant as full tuition.

PORT 14100. Portuguese for Romance Language Speakers. 100 Units.

This course helps students quickly gain skills in spoken and written Portuguese by building on their prior working knowledge of another Romance language (Spanish, French, Catalan or Italian). By relying on the many similarities with other Romance languages, students can focus on mastering the different aspects of Portuguese, allowing them to develop their abilities for further study. This class covers content from PORT 10100 and 10200.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): 20100 in another Romance Language or instructor’s consent.

PORT 14500. Portuguese for the Professions: Intensive Business Portuguese. 100 Units.

This is an accelerated language course that covers vocabulary and grammar for students interested in working in a business environment where Portuguese is spoken. The focus of this highly interactive class is to develop basic communication skills and cultural awareness through formal classes, readings, discussions, and writings.

Instructor(s): A. Lima     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10200, SPAN 20100 or consent.

PORT 20100-20200. Intermediate Portuguese; Advanced Portuguese.

In this intermediate/advanced-level sequence, students review and extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, phonetics, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills in describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of Portuguese literature, culture, and contemporary society.

PORT 20100. Intermediate Portuguese. 100 Units.

This course is a general review and extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore selected aspects of Luso-Brazilian tradition through a variety of texts.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10300 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

PORT 20200. Advanced Portuguese. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their descriptive and narrative skills through exposure to written and oral documents (e.g., literary texts, interviews). Students are taught the grammatical and lexical tools necessary to understand these documents, as well as to produce their own analysis and commentaries.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PORT 20100 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

PORT 21500. Curso de Aperfeiçoamento. 100 Units.

This course helps students develop their skills in understanding, summarizing, and producing written and spoken arguments in Portuguese through readings and debates on various issues of relevance in contemporary Luso-Brazilian societies. Special consideration is given to the major differences between continental and Brazilian Portuguese. In addition to reading, analyzing, and commenting on advanced texts (both literary and nonliterary), students practice and extend their writing skills in a series of compositions.

Instructor(s): A. Lima     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 20200 or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

Literature and Culture

PORT 28818. Literature and Technology: Machines, Humans, and the Novel. 100 Units.

In his Scienza Nuova (New Science), Giambattista Vico writes that "the Egyptians reduced all preceding world time to three ages; namely, the age of gods, the age of heroes, and the age of men." What the Egyptians and Vico could not have predicted was that history had yet another age in store: the age of the machine. Carlyle baptized, Marx outlined it, Heidegger warned against it; Deleuze and Guattari proclaimed that "everything is a machine"; and Ted Kaczynski even went as far as to kill in order to free human beings from the "technological slavery" the machine age had purportedly brought about. And yet, as Heidegger wrote, "everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it." So what is technology? What impact did it have on human beings and on the writing of literature as the Industrial Revolution exploded onto the European continent? In this course we will pose anew the question concerning technology within the one field that Heidegger deemed akin to the essence of technology: art, and by deduction, literature. Together, we will trace the ecological, economical, and emotional footprints of various machines and technological devices (automata, trains, phonographs, cameras). We will delve into the topic with Charlie Chaplin's Modern Times, continue with a reflection on the human being as a machine (Frankenstein and Pinocchio), transition to accounts on cities, prog

Instructor(s): Ana Ilievska     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ITAL 28818,CMLT 21200

PORT 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course is directed readings in special topics not covered as part of the program in Portuguese. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): PORT 10300 or 20200, depending upon the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Spanish Courses

Language

Must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors are permitted.

SPAN 10100-10200-10300. Beginning Elementary Spanish I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for beginning and beginning/intermediate students in Spanish. It provides students with a solid foundation in the basic patterns of spoken and written Spanish (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) to develop their speaking, listening, writing, and reading skills to the level required to demonstrate competency on the Spanish examination. Although the three classes constitute a sequence leading to the Spanish competency examination, there is enough review and recycling at every level for students to enter the sequence whenever it is appropriate for them.

SPAN 10100. Beginning Elementary Spanish I. 100 Units.

This course is intended for students who have no previous knowledge of Spanish, and for those who need an in-depth review of the basic patterns of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 10200. Beginning Elementary Spanish II. 100 Units.

This course offers a rapid review of the basic patterns of the language and expands on the material presented in SPAN 10100.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10100 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 10300. Beginning Elementary Spanish III. 100 Units.

This course expands on the material presented in SPAN 10200, reviewing and elaborating the basic patterns of the language as needed to prepare students for the Spanish competency examination.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10200 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 10123. Summer Intensive Elementary Spanish. 300 Units.

Summer Elementary Spanish is an eight-week course which helps beginning students build a solid foundation in the basic patterns of written and spoken Spanish and their use in everyday communication. It is specifically designed to help you obtain functional competency in speaking, reading, writing and listening in Spanish. The curriculum in Summer Elementary Spanish is the equivalent of SPAN 10100-10200-10300 during the regular academic year.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/10/17
Note(s): Successfully completing this course will fulfill the College language competency requirement.

SPAN 20100-20200-20300. Language, History, and Culture I-II-III.

In this intermediate-level sequence, students review but most of all extend their knowledge of all basic patterns (e.g., grammar, vocabulary, sociocultural norms) of the language. They develop their oral and written skills in describing, narrating, and presenting arguments. They are exposed to texts and audio-visual materials that provide them with a deeper understanding of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPAN 20100. Language, History, and Culture I. 100 Units.

This course is a general extension of all basic patterns of the language for intermediate students. Students explore the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world through a variety of texts and audio-visual materials.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10300 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20200. Language, History, and Culture II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on both objective and subjective description of people, places, and life processes. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore different genres while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media, as well as through in-class discussion.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20100 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20300. Language, History, and Culture III. 100 Units.

This course develops the use of persuasive and argumentative language. Our focus is on analyzing and debating current issues pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, and articulating sound personal perspectives on these issues. A variety of written, oral, listening, and reading activities allow students to explore an ample selection of topics, while reviewing grammatical and lexical items pertaining to each individual theme in context. Cultural awareness is enhanced through exposure to an array of target-language media as well as through in-class oral presentations and discussions.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20200 or placement
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20303. Curso de composición y de conversación para hablantes nativos. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to teach heritage learners of Spanish how to use formal written and spoken language to debate and to formulate cogent arguments. Students are expected to analyze particular topics related to the Spanish-speaking world and to participate within an academic forum. Challenging grammatical structures and orthographic conventions are reviewed and practiced in a variety of writing exercises and through class discussions. Students are exposed to a wide range of literary and non-literary texts and audio-visual materials that exemplify the different cultures and regional varieties within the Spanish-speaking world.

Instructor(s): Staff
Note(s): This course is designed for students who have a personal, familial, or community connection to Spanish but who have received the majority of their formal education in English and may have little experience using Spanish in formal settings. Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20304. Spanish for the Professions. 100 Units.

This course is designed as an alternative to SPAN 20300 for students aspiring to use Spanish in a professional context. In order for both courses to serve as equal preparation for the following course in the sequence (SPAN 20400), the textbook used and the grammatical topics covered in SPAN 20300 and 20304 are identical, while some readings, listenings, and vocabulary will differ. Students will expand their lexical and cultural knowledge of their chosen professional area through self-selected readings and a presentation, and will hone linguistic skills relevant to any workplace environment.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20200 or consent of instructor.

SPAN 20400-20500. Composición y conversación avanzada I-II.

Third-year language sequence

SPAN 20400. Composición y conversación avanzada I. 100 Units.

This course targets the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20500. Composición y conversación avanzada II. 100 Units.

This course, the second segment of two in the third-year language sequence, continues the development of advanced writing skills and oral proficiency in Spanish through the study of a wide variety of contemporary journalistic texts and unscripted recordings. Students will review problematic grammatical structures, write a number of essays, and participate in multiple class debates, using the authentic readings and listening segments as linguistic models on which to base their own production.

Terms Offered: Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20400 or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20402. Curso de redacción académica para hablantes nativos. 100 Units.

This advanced language course helps students achieve mastery of composition and style through the acquisition of numerous writing techniques. A wide variety of literary, historiographic, and sociological texts are read. Through writing a number of essays and participating in class debates, students are guided in the examination of linguistic structures and organization of several types of written Spanish discourse. This course also enhances awareness of the cultural diversity within the contemporary Spanish-speaking world and its historical roots.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or placement. Open only to native and heritage speakers with consent of instructor.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 20602. Discurso académico para hablantes nativos. 100 Units.

This seminar/practicum focuses on developing vocabulary and discourse styles for academic verbal communication. This goal is achieved through exposure to taped formal and informal interviews and public debate in the media. Most important, however, is active class participation. Through a number of class presentations, students put into practice a variety of discourse styles (e.g., debates, lectures, seminars, interviews). We also read numerous Spanish newspapers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor. Open only to native speakers.
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.

SPAN 23333. Reading Spanish for Research Purposes. 100 Units.

This intensive course is designed to take students with a basic knowledge of Spanish to the level of reading proficiency needed for research. To that end, students will work on grammar, vocabulary, and reading strategies. Students will read a range of scholarly texts, a number of which will be directly drawn from their respective areas of research.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring,Summer
Prerequisite(s): One quarter of French or equivalent, placement into SPAN 10200, or an intermediate level of another Romance or classical language.

Literature and Culture

All literature and culture classes are conducted in Spanish unless otherwise indicated. Students who are majoring in Spanish do all work in Spanish. With prior consent of instructor, nonmajors may write in English.

SPAN 21100. Las regiones del español. 100 Units.

This sociolinguistic course expands understanding of the historical development of Spanish and awareness of the great sociocultural diversity within the Spanish-speaking world and its impact on the Spanish language. We emphasize the interrelationship between language and culture as well as ethno-historical transformations within the different regions of the Hispanic world. Special consideration is given to identifying lexical variations and regional expressions exemplifying diverse sociocultural aspects of the Spanish language, and to recognizing phonological differences between dialects. We also examine the impact of indigenous cultures on dialectical aspects. The course includes literary and nonliterary texts, audio-visual materials, and visits by native speakers of a variety of Spanish-speaking regions.

Terms Offered: Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 21100

SPAN 21500. Introducción al análisis literario. 100 Units.

Through a variety of representative works of Hispanic literature, this course focuses on the discussion and practical application of different approaches to the critical reading of literary texts. We also study basic concepts and problems of literary theory, as well as strategies for research and academic writing in Spanish.

Instructor(s): M. Santana     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

SPAN 21703. Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles clásicos. 100 Units.

This course involves careful reading and discussion of significant works from the Spanish Middle Ages, Renaissance, and the Golden Age, including Juan Manuel's Conde Lucanor, Jorge Manrique's Coplas, the anonymous Lazarillo de Tormes, and the theater of Calderón.

Instructor(s): F. de Armas     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

SPAN 21803. Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos españoles contemporáneos. 100 Units.

Este curso ofrecerá un amplio panorama de las literaturas españolas de los siglos XIX y XX. Buena parte de la historia cultural de España ha estado marcada por la ansiedad respecto al supuesto atraso cultural, político, social y económico del país. La modernidad se convierte así en objeto de deseo y de disputa cultural para los intelectuales españoles que luchan por definir en qué consiste y cómo alcanzarla. Este es el tema que nos guiará, de manera flexible, por las obras de autores como Mariano José de Larra, Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer, Rosalía de Castro, Emilia Pardo Bazán, Leopoldo Alas Clarín, Antonio Machado, Federico García Lorca, Ana María Matute, Max Aub y Manuel Rivas, entre otros, complementadas por algunas películas. En relación con este tema principal, se explorarán también el lugar del campo y la ciudad en la imaginación moderna, la cuestión nacional, las luchas por la emancipación de la mujer, las tensión creativa entre tradición y vanguardia artística, o los debates sobre la historia y la memoria del pasado reciente de España.

Instructor(s): M. Martínez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor

SPAN 21903. Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia. 100 Units.

This course examines an array of representative texts written in Spanish America from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century, underscoring not only their aesthetic qualities but also the historical conditions that made their production possible. Among authors studied are Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Simón Bolívar, and José Martí.

Instructor(s): L. Brewer-García     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 21903,LACS 21903

SPAN 21910. Contemporary Catalan Literature. 100 Units.

This course provides a survey of major authors, works, and trends in Catalan literature from the beginning of the twentieth century to the present. We study works representing various literary genres (novel, poetry, short story) and analyze the most important cultural debates of the period.

Instructor(s): A. Girons Masot     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 31900,SPAN 31910,CATA 21900

SPAN 22003. Introducción a las literaturas hispánicas: del Modernismo al presente. 100 Units.

En este curso haremos un recorrido panorámico por algunas de las principales tendencias de la escritura hispanoamericana y sus diásporas desde a finales del siglo XIX hasta el presente. Habremos de prestar particular atención no sólo a las dimensiones estéticas de los textos sino también a las condiciones socio-históricas y políticas que los posibilitaron y en las que, a su vez, ellos incidieron. Entre los autores y autoras a estudiar se encuentran José Martí, Rubén Darío, Mariano Azuela, María Luisa Bombal, Horacio Quiroga, Teresa de la Parra, Jorge Luis Borges, Luis Rafael Sánchez y Pedro Pietri, entre otros/as.

Instructor(s): L. Gandolfi     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 22003

SPAN 23117. Research and Performance: Latin American Baroque Music. 100 Units.

This course will examine the musical document as a source of musicological studies and its relationship to performance. We will look at various types of documents and assess specific problems of each age and geographical area. Topics include: major reservoirs of music documents in Latin America; the early music ensemble, Ars Longa, and the rescue of opera ominia; recording and performing Cuban and Latin American music in a historically informed way; the Sacred Music Collection from eighteenth century Cuba. There is a performance component to this course. Students are encouraged to have some background in music or Latin American history prior to entering the course.

Instructor(s): M. Escudero     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Recommended background of MUSI 153 or MUSI 272 OR SPAN 103 plus a course in Latin American history or literature
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 35114,MUSI 23718,MUSI 33718,SPAN 33117,LACS 25114

SPAN 24420. Unsettling Encounters: Colonial Latin America in Film. 100 Units.

This course explores a selection of foundational texts of Latin American literature in conversation with films about colonial Latin America by American and European directors. We will engage questions of how, when, and why images remember historical moments, and will consider the possibilities and limitations of using film to represent history. Students will learn and practice techniques of textual analysis and film criticism while discussing themes such as visual literacy, cultural imperialism, and economic colonialism.

Instructor(s): L. Brewer-García     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor.
Note(s): Taught in Spanish.
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 24420

SPAN 26117. Nuevas formas de la intimidad: escrituras lat.am. actuales. 100 Units.

La literatura del siglo XX se caracterizó por poner el foco en el “yo” del escritor. Ya sea para ocultarlo, para mostrarlo tímidamente o para exhibirlo sin prejuicios, lo cierto es que ese “yo” se transformó en el protagonista de los cambios literarios que apuntaron al siglo XXI. Este fenómeno, que se produjo tanto en la poesía como en la narrativa y en el teatro, permite hoy el surgimiento de formas nuevas que descolocan los viejos géneros literarios. Formas donde los restos de las novelas en primera persona, del “yo lírico” de la poesía, del viejo diario íntimo, de las autobiografías, de las crónicas, se pueden encontrar insertados en nuevas escrituras del presente que operan más a la manera de la producción escrita en las redes sociales, que con el protocolo estético de lo literario. Este curso se propone analizar el recorrido de estas verdaderas transformaciones subjetivas, en relación directa con los contextos históricosociales en los que se producen. Para esto se trabajarán textos narrativos, poéticos y teatrales de diversos creadores latinoamericanos contemporáneos.

Instructor(s): Kamenszain, Tamara     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course will be taught in Spanish
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 35115,SPAN 36117,LACS 25115

SPAN 27917. Catalan Multipart Singing in Modern and Contemporary History. 100 Units.

To sing together “a veus” (multipart) has historically been an experiential way to build social groups. The aim of this course is to present this activity across Catalonia from the 16th to the 21st century, paying special attention to how multipart singing has articulated a large part of association and shared community life since the middle 19th century. The Catalan example will be placed among multipart singing in Mediterranean Latin countries, where the phenomenon is shared with great intensity.

Instructor(s): J. Ayats     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Reading knowledge of Arabic, Catalan, French, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish. Prerequisite for students taking course for music credit: MUSI 23300.
Equivalent Course(s): CATA 37917,SPAN 37917,MUSI 27918,MUSI 37918,CATA 27917

SPAN 28017. Cervantes in the Americas. 100 Units.

Miguel de Cervantes continues to be a literary referent for some of the most important authors in the Americas. Jorge Luis Borges, Mario Vargas Llosa, Carlos Fuentes, Roberto Bolaño and Jorge Volpi are among those who have reflected on Cervantes’ literary works. In this course we will examine some of the most representative examples of the transatlantic dialog that emerged from the appropriation of Cervantes’ Don Quixote as inspiration for the production of literary texts in the Americas. Each text will be paired with a section of Don Quixote in order to establish a transatlantic dialog that aims to explore how certain cultural materials are re-appropriated and re-contextualized to produce new manifestations of art.

Instructor(s): M. Rosario     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Taught in Spanish.
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 28017

SPAN 29117. Theater and Performance in Latin America. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to theatre, performance, and visual art in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will examine the intersection of performance and social life by looking at performance practices in key historical moments in Latin America and the Caribbean. We ask: how have embodied practice, theatre and visual art been used to negotiate particular moments in Latin American history? We will study performances during independence, revolution, dictatorships, processes of democratization, truth and reconciliation, as well as the rise of neoliberalism. In our investigation, we will pay close attention to how ideologies of race, gender, and sexuality are articulated and disseminated within these performances at critical historical junctures. Our corpus may include blackface performance traditions in the Caribbean, indigenous performance, queer performance and we will look closely at the artistic works of Coco Fusco, Neo Bustamante, Las Yeguas del Apocalipsis, Yuyachkani, Griselda Gámbaro, and others. We will also read key theoretical work in Performance Studies including the work Joseph Roach, Richard Schechner, Diana Taylor, Jill Lane, and others.

Instructor(s): D. Roper     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taught in English.
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 28479 ,SPAN 39117,LACS 29117,LACS 39117,TAPS 34879,GNSE 29117,GNSE 39117,CRES 29117,CRES 39117

SPAN 29220. Espacio y memoria en el cine español. 100 Units.

Through the study of a selection of films and documentaries, this course will provide a critical examination of the history and poetics of cinema in Spain, with particular attention to the relation between the representation of space and the recovery of traumatic memory in contemporary culture.

Instructor(s): M. Santana     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Taught in Spanish.
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 39220

SPAN 29700. Readings in Special Topics. 100 Units.

This course involves directed readings on special topics not covered by courses offered as part of the program in Spanish. Subjects treated and work to be completed for the course must be chosen in consultation with the instructor no later than the end of the preceding quarter.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 10300 or 20300, depending on the requirements of the program for which credit is sought
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

SPAN 29900. BA Paper Preparation: Spanish. 100 Units.

In consultation with a faculty member, students must devote the equivalent of a one-quarter course to the preparation of a BA project. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of undergraduate adviser
Note(s): Must be taken for a quality grade.


Contacts

Preceptors/BA Advisors

Undergraduate Adviser (French)
Robert Morrissey
Wb 219
773.702.8479
Email

Undergraduate Adviser (Italian)
Maria Anna Mariani
Wb 215
773.834.6405
Email

Undergraduate Adviser (Catalan, Portuguese, and Spanish)
Mario Santana
Wb 217
773.702.4432
Email

Administrative Contacts

Project Assistant
Deborah Blumenthal
Wb 205
773.702.8481
Email

Department Coordinator
Jennifer Hurtarte
Wb 205
773.834.5880
Email