Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Summary of Requirements: Major in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies | Summary of Requirements: Minor in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies | Grading | Honors | Advising | Degree Listing | Courses: Africa Past and Present | Courses: African American Studies | Courses: Asian American Studies | Courses: Latina/o Studies | Courses: Native American Studies | Courses: Comparative/General Studies

Department Website: http://csrpc.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The BA program in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies offers an interdisciplinary curriculum through which students can examine the histories, languages, and cultures of the racial and ethnic groups in and of themselves, in relationship to each other, and, particularly, in structural contexts of power. Focusing on genocide, slavery, conquest, confinement, immigration, and the diaspora of peoples around the globe, Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies examines the material, artistic, and literary expressions of peoples who originated in Africa, Latin America, Asia, and Europe, who moved voluntarily or were forcefully bound over to the Americas and here evolved stigmatized identities, which were tied to the cultures and histories of their natal lands in complicated ways.

A student who obtains a BA in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies will be well prepared for admission to graduate programs in the humanities and social sciences, to professional schools in law, medicine, public health, social work, business, or international affairs, and to careers in education, journalism, politics, creative writing, and the nonprofit sector. A degree in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies offers training designed to impart fundamental skills in critical thinking, comparative analysis, social theory, research methods, and written expression.

Areas of specialization include: Africa Past and Present, African American Studies, Latino/a Studies, Asian American Studies, and Native American Studies. This major/minor is also available to students interested in the study of Africa in a comparative framework.

Program Requirements

Students are encouraged to meet the general education requirement in the humanities and/or social sciences before declaring their major. Students must meet with the student affairs administrator to discuss a plan of study as soon as they declare their major (no later than the end of Spring Quarter of their third year). Students are also required to consult with the student affairs administrator to chart their progression through their course of study.

A. Civilization Requirement

The major requires eleven to twelve courses, depending on whether the student counts two or three civilization studies courses chosen from those listed below. The CRES civilization requirement can only be fulfilled by taking courses from those listed below (other civilization sequences may be approved by petition). Courses can be taken in any order, but they must be in the same sequence. For example, a student can take Colonizations III and then Colonizations I, but they cannot fulfill the civilization requirement by taking Colonizations III and Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. If a student has counted all three civilization courses towards general education, then a CRES elective must be added.

CRES 24001-24002-24003 Colonizations I-II-III300
Colonizations I
Colonizations II
Colonizations III
SOSC 22551-22552-22553 African Civilizations: Colonialism, Migration, Diaspora I-II-III300
African Civ in Paris-1
African Civ in Paris-2
African Civ in Paris-3
LACS 16100-16200-16300 Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III300
Introduction to Latin American Civilization I
Introduction to Latin American Civilization II
Introduction to Latin American Civilization III
SOSC 19019-19020-19021 Latin American Civilization in Oaxaca I-II-III300
Latin American Civilization in Oaxaca I
Latin American Civilization in Oaxaca II
Latin American Civilization in Oaxaca III
HIST 10101-10102-10103 Introduction to African Civilization I-II-III300
Introduction to African Civilization I
Introduction to African Civilization II
Introduction to African Civilization III
SALC 20100-20200 Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II200
Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I
Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II
EALC 10800-10900-11000 Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III300
Intro To East Asian Civilization I
Intro to East Asian Civilization II
Intro to East Asian Civilization III
Jewish Civilization*200
Jewish Civilization I: Ancient Beginnings to Early Medieval Period
Jewish Civilization II: Late Medieval to Modern Period

B. Research Project or Essay Requirement

A substantial essay or project is to be completed in the student's fourth year under the supervision of a Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies adviser, who is a member of the program's core faculty. Students must choose an essay adviser and submit a formal BA proposal to the student affairs administrator by the end of their third year of study. BA essays are due on May 1 of their fourth year or by fifth week of their quarter of graduation.

This program may accept a BA paper or project used to satisfy the same requirement in another major if certain conditions are met and with the required consent of both program chairs. Students should also consult with the chairs by the earliest BA proposal deadline or, if one program fails to publish a deadline, by the end of their third year. A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

C. BA Colloquium Requirement

Students must attend a BA colloquium that begins with a general meeting and individual meetings during the second half of Spring Quarter of their third year and continues through Autumn, Winter, and Spring Quarters of their fourth year. They may register for CRES 29800 BA Colloquium: Theory and Methods in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies in any one of those quarters, though most majors register for it during Autumn Quarter. They submit a completed thesis during Spring Quarter of their fourth year. (Students who plan to graduate before the Spring Quarter of their fourth year will need to register for the BA Colloquium earlier and should meet with the student affairs administrator to plan an appropriate program). This course is designed to introduce students to a range of qualitative research methods and to help determine which method would fit a research project of their own design in the field of race and ethnic studies. It functions as a research workshop in which students identify a research topic, develop a research question, and explore a range of methods that may or may not be appropriate for the research project.

D. Requirements for the Major and the Minor

THE MAJOR

Students have two ways to fulfill the elective requirements for the major:

Option 1 allows students to focus four courses on one specific area of specialization—Africa Past and Present, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Latina/o Studies, or Native American Studies (other diasporic communities may qualify by petition)—and a second four-course cluster drawn from a different area or four comparative courses. For example, one may choose to take four courses focused on African American Studies and choose a second four courses focused exclusively on Asian American Studies or four courses in the Comparative/General Studies category.

Option 2 is designed for students who wish to explore comparative race and ethnic studies primarily through a disciplinary (e.g., anthropology, English, history) or interdisciplinary program focus (e.g., gender studies, Latin American studies), or who wish to graduate with a double major in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies. Accordingly, one four-course cluster of electives must be focused on one area (Africa Past and Present, African American Studies, Asian American Studies, Latina/o Studies, Native American Studies). A second cluster of four courses should fall within a specific discipline or interdisciplinary area.

The requirements for Options 1 and 2 are virtually identical: one or two civilization studies courses, eight electives, a BA colloquium, and a BA essay. The BA program in CRES consists of eleven to twelve courses, of which at least seven courses must be chosen from those listed or cross-listed as CRES courses. One upper-level language course may be used to meet the major requirements. The course requires approval by the student affairs administrator.

Summary of Requirements: Major in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies

1–2 course(s) of a single civilization sequence *100-200
4 courses in one specific area of specialization **400
4 courses in a second area of specialization or 4 comparative courses ***400
CRES 29800BA Colloquium: Theory and Methods in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies100
CRES 29900Preparation for the BA Essay100
Total Units1100-1200

Sample CRES Major Specializing in Asian American Studies

CRES 24003Colonizations III *100
CRES 26913The Politics of Immigration: Race, Rights, and Activism100
CRES 24305Autobiog Writ: Gender& Modern Korea100
CRES 14400Japan and the West: 19th Century100
CRES 20104Urban Structure and Process100
CRES 20173Inequality in American Society100
CRES 28703Baseball and American Culture, 1840 to Present100
CRES 29800BA Colloquium: Theory and Methods in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies100
CRES 29900Preparation for the BA Essay100
Total Units900

THE MINOR

The minor in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies consists of five to seven courses, depending upon whether the two civilization studies courses are taken for general education. Credit toward the minor for courses taken at any other institution must be discussed with the director of undergraduate studies in advance of registration. Language courses may not be used to fulfill the CRES minor requirements. Students must receive the student affairs administrator's approval of the minor program on a form obtained from their College adviser. This form must then be returned to their College adviser by the end of Spring Quarter of their third year.

Courses in the minor program may not be (1) double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers. Courses taken to complete a minor are counted toward electives.

Summary of Requirements: Minor in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies

Up to 2 courses of a single civilization sequence *000-200
4 courses in one specific area of specialization (Africa Past and Present, African American Studies, Latina/o Studies, Asian American Studies, or Native American Studies)400
1 comparative course100
Total Units500-700

Sample CRES Minor Specializing in African American Studies

CRES 16101Introduction to Latin American Civilization I100
CRES 16102Introduction to Latin American Civilization II100
CRES 22150Contemporary African American Politics100
CRES 24601Martin and Malcolm: Life and Belief100
CRES 25102The Politics of Blackness in the Americas100
Total Units500

Grading

All courses must be taken for a quality grade unless a course only offers a P/F grading option.

Honors

The BA with honors is awarded to all students who meet the following requirements: a GPA of at least 3.25 overall and 3.5 in the major, and a grade of A- or above on the BA essay.

Advising

Each student must choose an adviser who is a member of the Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies core faculty listed below by the time the BA essay proposal is turned in at the end of the third year. Students are expected to have consulted with the student affairs administrator to identify a faculty adviser and to design their program of study by the beginning of their third year (after the declaration of the major). Students may continue to seek advice from both the student affairs administrator and their faculty adviser while completing their programs of study.

Degree Listing

Students who major or minor in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies will have their area of specialization listed on their transcript. Thus a student with an African American Studies focus will have the degree listed as "Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies, with African American Studies." The same will apply for those students who focus on Africa Past and Present, Asian American Studies, Latina/o Studies, and Native American Studies.

Courses: Africa Past and Present

CRES 20701. Introduction to African Civilization I. 100 Units.

Part one of the sequence takes a historical approach. We consider how different types of historical evidence-documentary, oral, and material-can be used to investigate processes of change and transformation in Africa from the early Iron Age through the emergence of the Atlantic world in the fifteenth century. We will investigate state formation in comparative perspective and examine case studies from the Swahili coast, the empires of Ghana and Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also examines the diffusion of Islam, European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Instructor(s): E. Osborn     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 10101, ANTH 20701

CRES 20802. Introduction to African Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second segment of the African Civilizations sequence uses anthropological perspectives to investigate colonial and postcolonial encounters in West and East Africa. The course objective is to show that while colonialism was brutal and oppressive, it was by no means a unidirectional process of domination in which Europeans plundered the African continent and enforced a wholesale adoption of European culture. Rather, scholars today recognize that colonial encounters were complex culture, political, and economic fields of interaction. Africans actively adopted, reworked, and contested colonizers' policies and projects, and Europeans drew heavily from these encounters to form liberal conceptions of self, nation, and society. Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about forms of personhood, political economy, and everyday life in the twentieth century. Course themes will include social reproduction, kinship practices, medicine, domesticity, and development. Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. CHDV Distribution C*. Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20702,CRES 20802,HIST 10102

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, C
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 21401, ANTH 20702, HIST 10102

CRES 20303. Introduction to African Civilization III. 100 Units.

Part Three investigates the long nineteenth century. It considers the Egyptian conquest of Sudan, Omani colonialism on the Swahili coast, and Islamic reform movements across the Sahara. It will also explore connections between the end of the transatlantic slave trade and the formal colonization of the African continent.

Instructor(s): K. Hickerson     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 20213, HIST 10103, ANTH 20703

CRES 22706. Slavery and Freedom in the Atlantic World. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 22706

CRES 24813. South African Fictions and Factions. 100 Units.

This course examines the intersection of narrative in print and film (fiction and documentary) in Southern Africa since mid-20th-century decolonization. We begin with Cry, the Beloved Country, a best seller written by South African Alan Paton while in the US, and the original film version by a Hungarian-born, British-based director (Zoltan Korda) and an American screenwriter (John Howard Lawson), which together show both the international impact of South African stories and the important elements missed by overseas audiences. We will continue with fictional and nonfictional narrative responses to apartheid and decolonization in film and in print, and examine the power and the limits of what critic Louise Bethlehem has called the "rhetoric of urgency" on local and international audiences. We will conclude with writing and film that grapples with the complexities of the post-apartheid world, whose challenges, from crime and corruption to AIDS and the particular problems faced by women and gender minorities, elude the heroic formulas of the anti-apartheid struggle era. (B)

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 24813, CMST 24813, ENGL 24813

Courses: African American Studies

CRES 20104. Urban Structure and Process. 100 Units.

This course reviews competing theories of urban development, especially their ability to explain the changing nature of cities under the impact of advanced industrialism. Analysis includes a consideration of emerging metropolitan regions, the microstructure of local neighborhoods, and the limitations of the past American experience as a way of developing urban policy both in this country and elsewhere.

Instructor(s): F. Stuart     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 25100, SOCI 30104, GEOG 32700, GEOG 22700, SOCI 20104

CRES 22150. Contemporary African American Politics. 100 Units.

This course explores the issues, actions, and arguments that comprise black politics today.Our specific task is to explore the question of how do African Americans currently engage in politics and political struggles in the United States. This analysis is rooted in a discussion of contemporary issues, including the election of the first African American president, Barack Obama, the emergence of the Movement for Black Lives, the exponential incarceration of black people, and the intersection of identities and the role black feminism in shaping the radical freedom tradition in black politics. Throughout the course we attempt to situate the politics of African Americans into the larger design we call American politics. Is there such a thing as black politics? If there is, what does it tell us more generally about American politics?

Instructor(s): C. Cohen     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LLSO 25902, PLSC 22150

CRES 24601. Martin and Malcolm: Life and Belief. 100 Units.

This course examines the religious, social, cultural, political, and personal factors behind the two most prominent public leaders and public intellectuals emerging from the African American community in the 1950s and 1960s: Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. We review their autobiographies, domestic trends within the United States, and larger international forces operating during their times. Their life stories provide the contexts for the sharp differences and surprising commonalities in their political thought and religious beliefs. The operative question is: What can Malcolm and Martin tell us about America during one of the most dynamic periods in the nation's personality metamorphosis? We use documentary videos of each man's speeches and of the social contexts in which they lived. (B)

Instructor(s): D. Hopkins     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 24601

CRES 25405. Child Poverty and Chicago Schools. 100 Units.

This discussion- and debate-based course begins with a sociological and historical examination of child poverty, focusing on its origin, experience, and perpetuation in disadvantaged Chicago communities. Class meetings will involve debating school reform efforts, such as "turnaround" schools, charter schools, Promise Neighborhoods, and stepped-up teacher evaluations. Further, the barriers that have contributed to the failure of previous reform initiatives-barriers that include social isolation, violence, and the educational system itself-will be identified and analyzed in-depth.

Instructor(s): C. Broughton     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): 2nd year standing required; attendance on the first day of class is required or registration will be dropped.
Equivalent Course(s): PBPL 25405

CRES 27502. Africans in the Early Americas. 100 Units.

During the era of the transatlantic slave trade, more than 350,000 Africans were forcibly trafficked to what is now the United States. The experiences of these men and women and their descendants-particularly their exploitation under a system of racialized slavery-profoundly shaped the course of US history up to and including the present day. These individuals were significant, but they were also only one part of the more than 12 million people who came from Africa to the Americas in the colonial period. Focusing on the diverse experiences of Africans and their descendants-as slaves, but also as colonizers, soldiers, revolutionaries, family members, and free men and women-this course surveys the history of Africans in the Americas from the late fifteenth through the late nineteenth century. Adopting a broad geographic and temporal perspective allows for an exploration of the evolving relationships between labor, gender, and race in North, Central, and South America, including the Spanish, French, and English Caribbean. In this course we will ask: How did the experiences of Africans in the colonial and early republican United States compare with those of Africans in other parts of early America? How might learning about and comparing the experiences of free and enslaved Africans and Afro-descended peoples in different parts of the Americas re-shape our understanding of the multiple origins, meanings, and possibilities of race and national belonging?

Instructor(s): T. Murphy     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 29004, LACS 27502

Courses: Asian American Studies

CRES 10800-10900-11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

CRES 10800. Intro To East Asian Civilization I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn Summer
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only; all students attend the MW lecture and register for one F discussion section.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 10800, HIST 15100, SOSC 23500

CRES 10900. Intro to East Asian Civilization II. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar, Winter; Staff, Summer     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15200, EALC 10900, SOSC 23600

CRES 11000. Intro to East Asian Civilization III. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 23700, EALC 11000, HIST 15300

CRES 24255. Everyday Maoism: Work, Daily Life, and Material Culture in Socialist China. 100 Units.

The history of Maoist China is usually told as a sequence of political campaigns: land and marriage reform, nationalization of industry, anti-rightist campaign, Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, etc. Yet for the majority of the Chinese population, socialism was as much about material changes as about politics: about the two-story brick houses, electric lights and telephones (loushang louxia, diandeng dianhua) that the revolution had promised; about new work regimes and new consumption patterns-or, to the contrary, about the absence of such change. If we want to understand what socialism meant for different groups of people, we have to look at the "new objects" of socialist modernity, at changes in dress codes and apartment layouts, at electrification and city planning. We have to analyze workplaces and labor processes in order to understand how socialism changed the way people worked. We also have to look at the rationing of consumer goods and its effects on people's daily lives. The course has a strong comparative dimension: we will look at the literature on socialism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, to see how Chinese socialism differed from its cousins. Another aim is methodological. How can we understand the lives of people who wrote little and were rarely written about? To which extent can we read people's life experiences out of material objects?

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34255, HIST 24507, HIST 34507, EALC 24255

CRES 24706. Edo/Tokyo: Society and the City in Japan. 100 Units.

This course will explore the cultural and cultural history of Edo/Tokyo from its origins in the early seventeenth century through circa 1945. Issues to be explored include the configuration of urban space and its transformation over time in relation to issues of status, class, and political authority; the formation of the "city person" as a form of identity; and the tensions between the real city of lived experience and the imagined city of art and literature. We will pay particular attention to two periods of transformation, the 1870s when the modernizing state made Tokyo its capital, and the period of reconstruction after the devastating earthquake of 1923. Assignments include a final research paper of approximately 15 to 18 pages.

Instructor(s): S. Burns
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34706, HIST 24706, CRES 34706, EALC 34706, EALC 24706

CRES 26913. The Politics of Immigration: Race, Rights, and Activism. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): PLSC 26913, PLSC 36913

CRES 27900. Asian Wars of the Twentieth Century. 100 Units.

This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, racial, and military aspects of the major Asian wars of the twentieth century: the Pacific War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. At the beginning of the course we pay particular attention to just war doctrines and then use two to three books for each war (along with several films) to examine alternative approaches to understanding the origins of these wars, their conduct, and their consequences.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 37907, HIST 27900, HIST 37900, EALC 27907

Courses: Latina/o Studies

CRES 16101-16102-16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

CRES 16101. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America.

Instructor(s): A. Kolata     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 26100, HIST 36101, ANTH 23101, HIST 16101, LACS 16100, LACS 34600

CRES 16102. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16102, ANTH 23102, SOSC 26200, LACS 16200, LACS 34700, HIST 36102

CRES 16103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 16103, LACS 34800, ANTH 23103, SOSC 26300, LACS 16300, HIST 36103

CRES 21903. Intro. a las lit. hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia. 100 Units.

This course examines an array of representative texts written in Spanish America from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century, underscoring not only their aesthetic qualities but also the historical conditions that made their production possible. Among authors studied are Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Simón Bolívar, and José Martí.

Instructor(s): L. Brewer-Garcia     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 21903, LACS 21903

CRES 27101. Intro to Brazilian Culture: Essay, Fiction, Cinema and Music. 100 Units.

During the twentieth century, literature, social thought, music and cinema were completely intertwined in Brazil. This class is an introduction to Brazilian culture through these four types of cultural production and their interaction. We will read authors such as Euclides da Cunha, Gilberto Freyre, Mario de Andrade, Clarice Lispector, and listen to samba, bossa nova, and tropicalismo.

Instructor(s): A. Melo     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 37105, PORT 37100, PORT 27100, LACS 27105

CRES 27303. Topics in US-Mexico Borderlands History. 100 Units.

This course explores the history of the U.S.-Mexican borderlands, from its native past to its present, as a geographical place and as a site of contested sovereignties. It is organized around major themes in the history of the region, including indigenous and European imperialism, settler colonialism, nationalism, migration, labor, and citizenship. Special attention will also be given to the themes of cultural hybridity, transculturation, and the fluidity of social identities defined by the categories of class, ethnicity, gender, nationality, and race. The structure of this course emphasizes the interaction of historical forces across imperial, national, and cultural boundaries, highlighting the dynamism of borderlands as historical phenomena and as a method of interpreting and understanding the past. Students enrolled in this course will gain critical thinking and analytical skills as well as a broader understanding of topics in U.S. and Mexican history that continue to influence contemporary political debates. They will be encouraged to look beyond the rigid dichotomies that often divide the borderlands and investigate the full spectrum of cultural, economic, and social relationships that bring people together as well as those that push them apart. Students will also learn to look for common patterns that emerge across time and space while remaining attentive to the nuances of local identities, cultures, and histories.

Instructor(s): D. Webb     Terms Offered: Autumn

CRES 27504. Racism without Race. 100 Units.

In early 2010 a member of staff at the Regenstein library contacted the police to report an unruly student. The police arrived at the scene and charged the student with criminal trespass and resisting arrest. The student was put in a choke hold and handcuffed before being taken to the local police station where he was held in a cell overnight.According to witnesses, the library staff member's response was unwarranted and so too were the actions taken by the police officers. Individuals later interviewed for the Chicago Maroon described the student's treatment as an instance of 'racial profiling.' How are we to make sense of this incident and others similar to it? There is strong evidence to suggest that the reactions of the authority figures involved were shaped by their attitudes toward skin color. It would seem farfetched, however, to conclude that these reactions reflected an ideology of racial differentiation or what we might call 'traditional' race ideology: the view that human beings can be classified scientifically according to race and that some races are better than, or superior to, others. Theories of race and racial difference have largely been discredited and there are no longer any official institutions, respected academics or public individuals who espouse these. How then do we explain the continued salience of skin color, and what value is there in applying terms such as 'race' and 'racism' to describe it? The following course seeks to reframe the way we go about analyzing contemporary forms of social differentiation based on skin color. It looks at skin color as a culturally recognizable sign, which, like other signs, acquires significance only within the context of a broader set of semiotic ideologies and practices. This means directing our attention to the ways in which color-as-sign takes on meaning in the world we live. Such an approach offers a conceptual framework for a comparative study of past and present forms of discrimination based on skin color while also remaining sensitive to the particularities that define these.

Instructor(s): Y.Hilal
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 22155

CRES 28000. United States Latinos: Origins and Histories. 100 Units.

An examination of the diverse social, economic, political, and cultural histories of those who are now commonly identified as Latinos in the United States. Particular emphasis will be placed on the formative historical experiences of Mexican Americans and mainland Puerto Ricans, although some consideration will also be given to the histories of other Latino groups, i.e., Cubans, Central Americans, and Dominicans. Topics include cultural and geographic origins and ties; imperialism and colonization; the economics of migration and employment; legal status; work, women, and the family; racism and other forms of discrimination; the politics of national identity; language and popular culture; and the place of Latinos in US society. Equivalent Course(s): AMER 28001,CRES 28000,GNSE 28202,HIST 38000,LACS 28000,LACS 38000,CRES 38000,GNSE 38202,AMER 38001

Instructor(s): R. Gutiérrez     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 28000, AMER 28001, GNSE 28202, GNSE 38202, CRES 38000, AMER 38001, LACS 38000, HIST 28000, HIST 38000

CRES 29000. Latin American Religions, New and Old. 100 Units.

This course will consider select pre-twentieth-century issues, such as the transformations of Christianity in colonial society and the Catholic Church as a state institution. It will emphasize twentieth-century developments: religious rebellions; conversion to evangelical Protestant churches; Afro-diasporan religions; reformist and revolutionary Catholicism; new and New Age religions.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 39000, HIST 39000, LACS 29000, MAPS 39200, CRES 39000, RLST 21401, HIST 29000, HCHR 39200

CRES 36500. Hist of Mexico 1876, to Present. 100 Units.

From the Porfiriato and the Revolution to the present, a survey of Mexican society and politics, with emphasis on the connections between economic developments, social justice, and political organization. Topics include fin de siècle modernization and the agrarian problem; causes and consequences of the Revolution of 1910; the making of the modern Mexican state; relations with the United States; industrialism and land reform; urbanization and migration; ethnicity, culture, and nationalism; economic crises, neoliberalism, and social inequality; political reforms and electoral democracy; the zapatista rebellion in Chiapas; and the end of PRI rule.

Instructor(s): E. Kourí and M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 26500, LACS 26500, LLSO 26500, HIST 26500, HIST 36500, LACS 36500

Courses: Native American Studies

CRES 27501. Urban Indians: Native Americans and the City. 100 Units.

The majority of Native Americans in the United States now live in urban areas and this has been the case for more than half a century, but discussions about cities rarely acknowledge their presence beyond (sometimes) lumping them in with catchall categories often labeled "Other." In this course, students will encounter and examine the distinct experiences and contributions of Native Americans in cities, large and small, past and present. We'll look, first, at the context in which the population shift away from rural and reservation spaces took place and discuss the ways in which being/becoming "urban" and the process of "urbanization" may not be as straightforward as expected. Students will then dive into studies of the daily struggles and successes of Native American city-dwellers, with an emphasis on mid-20th-century Chicago. Readings and in-class activities will explore issues related to: housing, work, stereotypes and discrimination, cultural survival and traditionalism, physical and mental health, the rise of pan-Indianism, activism, schooling, class divisions, multi/locality, generational differences, identity and intersectionality, representation and the arts, and the very recognition or lack thereof mentioned above. The knowledge and analytic skills developed in this course will therefore serve as an uncommon window into Native American studies and urban studies, as well as broader race- and place-conscious work in the social sciences and humanities.

Instructor(s): A. Jenkins     Terms Offered: Winter

Courses: Comparative/General Studies

CRES 10200. Introduction to World Music. 100 Units.

This course is a selected survey of classical, popular, and folk music traditions from around the world. The goals are not only to expand our skills as listeners but also to redefine what we consider music to be and, in the process, stimulate a fresh approach to our own diverse musical traditions. In addition, the role of music as ritual, aesthetic experience, mode of communication, and artistic expression is explored.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Note(s): Background in music not required. Students must confirm enrollment by attending one of the first two sessions of class. This course meets the general education requirement in the dramatic, musical, and visual arts.
Equivalent Course(s): MUSI 10200

CRES 20104. Urban Structure and Process. 100 Units.

This course reviews competing theories of urban development, especially their ability to explain the changing nature of cities under the impact of advanced industrialism. Analysis includes a consideration of emerging metropolitan regions, the microstructure of local neighborhoods, and the limitations of the past American experience as a way of developing urban policy both in this country and elsewhere.

Instructor(s): F. Stuart     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 25100, SOCI 30104, GEOG 32700, GEOG 22700, SOCI 20104

CRES 20140. Qualitative Field Methods. 100 Units.

This course introduces techniques of, and approaches to, ethnographic field research. We emphasize quality of attention and awareness of perspective as foundational aspects of the craft. Students conduct research at a site, compose and share field notes, and produce a final paper distilling sociological insight from the fieldwork.

Instructor(s): O. McRoberts     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20140, SOCI 20140

CRES 20207. Race, Ethnicity, and Human Development. 100 Units.

Twenty-first century practices of relevance to education, social services, health care and public policy deserve buttressing by cultural and context linked perspectives about human development as experienced by diverse groups. Although generally unacknowledged as such post-Brown v. 1954, the conditions purported to support human development for diverse citizens remain problematic. The consequent interpretative shortcomings serve to increase human vulnerability. Specifically, given the problem of evident unacknowledged privilege for some as well as the insufficient access to resources experienced by others, the dilemma skews our interpretation of behavior, design of research, choice of theory, and determination of policy and practice. The course is based upon the premise that the study of human development is enhanced by examining the experiences of diverse groups, without one group standing as the "standard" against which others are compared and evaluated. Accordingly, the course provides an encompassing theoretical framework for examining the processes of human development for diverse humans while also highlighting the critical role of context and culture.

Instructor(s): M. Spencer     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Students should have one course in either Human Development or Psychology.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B*, C
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20207

CRES 21903. Intro. a las lit. hispánicas: textos hispanoamericanos desde la colonia a la independencia. 100 Units.

This course examines an array of representative texts written in Spanish America from the colonial period to the late nineteenth century, underscoring not only their aesthetic qualities but also the historical conditions that made their production possible. Among authors studied are Christopher Columbus, Hernán Cortés, Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz, Simón Bolívar, and José Martí.

Instructor(s): L. Brewer-Garcia     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): SPAN 20300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): SPAN 21903, LACS 21903

CRES 22706. Slavery and Freedom in the Atlantic World. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): HIST 22706

CRES 24001-24002-24003. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

CRES 24001. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world. Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter. Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 18301, ANTH 24001, SOSC 24001

CRES 24002. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 18302, ANTH 24002, SOSC 24002

CRES 24003. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 24003, SALC 20702, HIST 18303, SOSC 24003

CRES 27302. Gender, Sexuality, Indigenous Women in the Colonial Encounter. 100 Units.

This course is premised on the belief that the history of gender and sexuality in colonial contexts is just as crucial and revealing as other more geopolitical, military, or diplomatic topics. In this sense, laws regulating marriage or Europeans exchanging of postcards of "exotic women" are just as significant as land annexations or military technology. Through the quarter, we will think through not only what the history of imperialism tells us about gender and sexuality, but also what this type of analysis reveals about colonialism and empire. What was the relationship between the socio- political organization of European empires and ideologies of gender and sexuality in both colony and metropole? We will also consider intersectional questions, such as the connections between regulating intimacy and the creation of race-based imperial hierarchies. To gain historical precision in examining these more abstract or theoretical questions, we will anchor our readings and discussion around particular indigenous woman and their contexts. While the study of gender and sexuality in a colonial context has come a long way in recent years, the majority of sources for examining gender and colonialism are about white women. To push back against this absence, we will take a case study approach to consider the lives and narratives surrounding indigenous women in colonial cultures.

Instructor(s): E. Fransee     Terms Offered: Autumn,TBD

CRES 27503. Reading the Border: Gender, Texts, and Performance. 100 Units.

Course description unavailable.

Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 27503, LACS 27503

CRES 27605. United States Legal History. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the connections between law and society in modern America. It explores how legal doctrines and constitutional rules have defined individual rights and social relations in both the public and private spheres. It also examines political struggles that have transformed American law. Topics to be addressed include the meaning of rights; the regulation of property, work, race, and sexual relations; civil disobedience; and legal theory as cultural history. Readings include legal cases, judicial rulings, short stories, and legal and historical scholarship.

Instructor(s): A. Stanley     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 37605, HMRT 37605, HIST 37605, AMER 27605, HMRT 27061, GNSE 27605, HIST 27605, CRES 37605, LLSO 28010

CRES 28011. Religions of the African Diaspora. 100 Units.

This course is intended as an introduction to religions of the African Diaspora. We will engage a range of themes relevant to the history, beliefs and practices, world-views, and communities of African-derived religions around the globe, including issues of race and race-making, class, gender, sexuality, the body, and representations in the media. We will begin with a discussion of the central terms and major challenges of the field. With those concerns in mind, we will trace the historical movements of Africans across the globe, examining the spread and development of religions through key themes and case studies. We will address a large number traditions, including Santeria, Condomble, Vodoun, Palo, Obeah, Christianity, Islam, and Judaism.

Equivalent Course(s): RLST 28011

CRES 29302. Human Rights II: History and Theory. 100 Units.

This course is concerned with the theory and the historical evolution of the modern human rights regime. It discusses the emergence of a modern "human rights" culture as a product of the formation and expansion of the system of nation-states and the concurrent rise of value-driven social mobilizations. It proceeds to discuss human rights in two prevailing modalities. First, it explores rights as protection of the body and personhood and the modern, Western notion of individualism. Second, it inquires into rights as they affect groups (e.g., ethnicities and, potentially, transnational corporations) or states.

Instructor(s): TBA     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): INRE 31700, HMRT 30200, HIST 29302, HIST 39302, LLSO 27100, HMRT 20200

CRES 29800. BA Colloquium: Theory and Methods in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies. 100 Units.

Please note: Students are encouraged to register for the BA Colloquium in the Spring Quarter of their third year. Third-year CRES majors will meet with the BA preceptor during the second half of Spring Quarter to get started on proposals, identifying a faculty adviser, and other preparatory tasks. This course is designed to introduce students to a range of qualitative research methods and to help determine which method would fit a research project of their own design in the field of race and ethnic studies. It functions as a research workshop in which students identify a research topic, develop a research question, and explore a range of methods that may or may not be appropriate for the research project. Students read each other's work and work through ideas that can serve as the proposal for a BA project.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn Spring Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
Note(s): Students are required to register for CRES 29800 in Spring Quarter of their third year.

CRES 29900. Preparation for the BA Essay. 100 Units.

Students may register for Preparation for the BA Essay during any quarter of their fourth year. Students should consult the CRES entry in the Time Schedules to locate the section numbers for faculty advisers.

Terms Offered: Autumn,Winter,Spring
Prerequisite(s): CRES 29800; consent of the faculty supervisor and director of undergraduate studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. Must be taken for a quality grade.

These courses are for reference only. Please see Class Search for specific offerings. See the Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture webpage for further information.


Contacts

Administrative Contact

Student Affairs Administrator
Sarah Tuohey
GRSP 310
773.702.2365
Email

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Student Affairs Administrator
Sarah Tuohey
GSRP 310
773.702.2365
Email