Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Language Requirement | Junior Tutorial | Electives in the Major and Distribution Requirements | Summary of Requirements for the Major | Grading | Bachelor's Thesis and Honors | Minor Program in East Asian Languages and Civilizations | Courses

Department Website: http://ealc.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (EALC) offers a BA program in East Asian studies that introduces students to the traditional and modern civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, and provides them with the opportunity to achieve a basic reading and speaking knowledge of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. This program is interdisciplinary, and students may take relevant courses in both the humanities and the social sciences.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in EALC. Information follows the description of the major.

Before declaring their major in EALC, students must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies (typically before the end of their second year) to discuss their areas of interest.

Program Requirements

Students must complete thirteen courses toward an EALC major. No courses may be double-counted toward general education requirements or minor requirements. Students who plan to major in EALC are strongly encouraged (but not required) to meet the general education requirement in civilization studies by taking EALC 15411-15412-15413 East Asian Civilization I-II-III (HIST 15411-15412-15413 East Asian Civilization I-II-III). Students planning to major in EALC should meet with EALC’s Director of Undergraduate Studies to discuss their program of study and complete the major course approval form, ideally by the end of their second year.

Language Requirement

To graduate with an EALC major, students must demonstrate competency in a primary East Asian language that is equivalent to the intermediate (second-year) level of the language. Language credit toward the major will be awarded ONLY for courses taken and successfully completed either at the University of Chicago or through a study abroad or summer program pre-approved by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. To demonstrate extant competency, students have the following options: (1) place into and complete a higher-level language course (20300 or higher), including Literary Chinese or Literary Japanese; or (2) successfully complete an EALC content course that requires the use of texts in the original language. For this second option, students are required to meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to find a suitable course and to get permission to count the course in advance.

Junior Tutorial

All majors are required to take EALC 28989 Junior Tutorial in East Asian Studies. While it is expected that majors take this course in their junior year, exceptions can be made in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies to take the course earlier or later in the program of study.

Electives in the Major and Distribution Requirements

Students are required to complete an additional nine courses in the major. Out of these courses, one course must be on content from before 1900, one course must be on content from after 1900, and one course must be on an East Asian country/region outside of the student's country/region of focus (as determined by the language used to fulfill the language requirement). All courses used to fulfill the distribution requirements must be EALC courses; one course can be used to fulfill up to two of these requirements.

Of the remaining elective courses, up to six of may be for language credit. Many students will take an additional year of their primary East Asian language or a year of a secondary East Asian language. A beginning language sequence in the primary East Asian language cannot be counted toward the major; beginning sequences are acceptable for secondary languages. Up to three quarters of Literary Chinese or Literary Japanese may count either as language or as content courses.

Students who complete their general education requirement in civilization studies with a sequence other than EALC 15411-15412-15413 East Asian Civilization I-II-III (HIST 15411-15412-15413 East Asian Civilization I-II-III) may take any of those East Asian Civilization courses as an elective in the major. 

A maximum of six approved courses taken while studying abroad may be counted toward program requirements by petition to the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Summary of Requirements for the Major

Three courses in a second-year or more advanced level East Asian language *300
EALC 28989 Junior Tutorial in East Asian Studies100
Nine elective courses related to East Asia §900
Total Units1300

Grading

Students must receive quality grades in all courses taken to meet requirements in the major. No P/F grades are offered in language courses.

Bachelor's Thesis and Honors

Students who have maintained an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher are eligible for honors, but only students who complete a bachelor’s thesis that earns an “A” grade will be awarded honors in the department. Students who do not wish to be considered for honors are not required to submit a bachelor's thesis for graduation. To be eligible to write a bachelor's thesis, students must have maintained an overall GPA of 3.5 or higher and submit an acceptable proposal to the department. Students typically choose an adviser for their BA project in Spring Quarter of their third year and no later than the beginning of Autumn Quarter of their fourth year. The project must be approved by both the adviser and the Director of Undergraduate Studies early in the student's fourth year, typically no later than second week of Autumn Quarter. Interested students should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies for details concerning the proposal.

To be eligible for honors, students must enroll in Autumn and Winter Quarters of EALC 29500-29600 Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II. EALC 29500 Senior Thesis Tutorial I may count as one credit (100 units) toward the major; EALC 29600 Senior Thesis Tutorial II may count only as general elective credit. Registration in the second quarter of the BA thesis seminar and continuation of the BA thesis is contingent on satisfactory performance in the first quarter of the BA thesis seminar. The BA paper must be substantially complete by the end of Winter Quarter. The BA paper may draw on material from other courses in the major; however, to receive credit for the Senior Thesis Tutorial and to be considered for honors, the student must write a paper that represents significant additional work. The BA paper is read by two members of the department and, if judged to be of A quality, the student is recommended for graduation with honors. Length and scope of the project should be agreed upon in consultation with the adviser. Use of original language material is desirable but not required.

Students may not use the BA project or paper from another program for the optional BA paper in EALC. Students who wish to discuss an exception to this policy should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies before the end of their third year. Consent to use a single paper or project requires the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser. 

Minor Program in East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Students in other fields of study may complete a minor in EALC. There are two options for a minor in EALC: a content-focused minor and a language-focused minor. Both minors require a total of seven courses chosen in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. For the content-focused minor, up to three of these courses may be in an East Asian language. For the language-focused minor, one content course and six language courses are required; at least three of the language courses must be taken at the second-year level or above. For both minors, language courses do not need to be in the same language, and both literary and modern language courses can count. Credit by petition may not be used for the language courses. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Students who plan to pursue an EALC minor are encouraged to take EALC 15411-15412-15413 East Asian Civilization I-II-III (HIST 15411-15412-15413 East Asian Civilization I-II-III) to meet the general education requirement in civilization studies. Students who elect the minor program in EALC must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor and submit the Consent to Complete a Minor Program form. Students choose courses in consultation with the Director of Undergraduate Studies. The director's approval should be submitted to the student's College adviser. Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements.

Chinese Courses

CHIN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 10100. Elementary Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn

CHIN 10200. Elementary Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18. Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 10300. Elementary Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Chinese. 300 Units.

This course provides 140 contact hours and participants may be eligible to receive a FLAS grant from their home institution or from UChicago to support their study. The SLI accepts the FLAS award as full tuition for summer Chinese. All students participating Summer CHIN 10123 will participate in a four skills proficiency assessment for the course. Students will receive University of Chicago certification describing their language skills in reading, writing, speaking and listening, based on the results of the proficiency assessment.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer

CHIN 11100-11200-11300. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter series is intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. Consultation with instructor encouraged prior to enrollment. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 11100. First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF. Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Chinese Language Program

CHIN 11200. First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students-II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 11300. First-Year Chinese for Heritage Students-III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 11400. Heritage Chinese: Developing Foundational Skills. 100 Units.

This intensive, online course is designed to build on heritage learners' skills to prepare them for success in courses offered during the academic year. Skill areas include in-depth practice in reading and writing, along with review and expansion of targeted grammar structures, development of precision in vocabulary as well as practice writing and typing Chinese characters. Students can expect to do 25-30 hours of asynchronous work each week, in addition to weekly synchronous meetings.

Terms Offered: Summer

CHIN 15000. Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 15001. Elementary Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 15002. Elementary Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 15003. Intermediate Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 15004. Intermediate Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 15005. Advanced Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 15006. Advanced Chinese in Beijing. 100 Units.

CHIN 15007. Elementary Chinese in Hong Kong. 100 Units.

CHIN 15008. Elementary Chinese in Hong Kong. 100 Units.

CHIN 15009. Intermediate Chinese in Hong Kong. 100 Units.

CHIN 15010. Intermediate Chinese in Hong Kong. 100 Units.

CHIN 15011. Advanced Chinese in Hong Kong. 100 Units.

CHIN 15012. Advanced Chinese in Hong Kong. 100 Units.

CHIN 15013. Elementary Chinese in London. 100 Units.

N/A

Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2020

CHIN 15014. Elementary Chinese in London. 100 Units.

N/A

Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2020

CHIN 15015. Intermediate Chinese in London. 100 Units.

N/A

Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2020

CHIN 15016. Intermediate Chinese in London. 100 Units.

N/A

Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2020

CHIN 15017. Advanced Chinese in London. 100 Units.

N/A

Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2020

CHIN 15018. Advanced Chinese in London. 100 Units.

N/A

Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2020

CHIN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to enhance students’ reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 20100. Intermediate Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20200. Intermediate Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 34300

CHIN 20101. Intermediate Modern Chinese for CPS Students. 100 Units.

StarTalk Chinese-Year 2

CHIN 20123. Summer Intensive Intermediate Chinese. 300 Units.

Summer Intermediate Chinese is an 8-week course designed for students who have already completed one year of college-level study of Modern Chinese (Mandarin). Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized, and materials from Chinese culture will also be incorporated into the course. Class will meet for five three-hour periods a week, with additional speaking practice during the afternoon. This intensive summer Chinese course requires students to spend several additional hours per day preparing for class through drill sessions, independent study, and other activities. The curriculum for Intensive Intermediate Chinese is the equivalent of the CHIN 20100-20200-20300 sequence during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago.

Terms Offered: Summer

CHIN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 20401. Advanced Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

For both graduates and undergraduates. The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures, and requires discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China. Over the course of this sequence, the emphasis will shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20402. Advanced Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures, and requires discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China. Over the course of this sequence, the emphasis will shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with orginal Chinese source materials. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20401 or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): For both graduates and undergraduates. No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20403. Advanced Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

For both graduates and undergraduates. The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures, and requires discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China. Over the course of this sequence, the emphasis will shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20402, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): For both graduates and undergraduates. No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20501-20502-20503. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 20501. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Open to both graduate and undergraduate students. This sequence introduces a range of essays by journalists and scholars on Chinese cultural and social issues after 2001. Students will not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures, but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Additional two one-to-one tutorial sessions during the quarter will be arranged for each student to prepare for their language projects.

Instructor(s): Meng Li     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20403, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20502. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Instructor(s): M. Li     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20501, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): For both graduates and undergraduates. No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20503. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students will not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures, but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): M. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20502, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): For both graduates and undergraduates. No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20508-20509-20510. Readings in Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence involves advanced readings in classical Chinese with selections from philosophical and historical writings.

CHIN 20508. Intermediate Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Selected readings in pre-modern Chinese literature from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. The course covers important works in topics ranging from philosophy, history and religion to poetry, fiction and drama. Specific content varies by instructor.

Instructor(s): Laura Skosey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 40800, EALC 40800

CHIN 20509. Intermediate Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

Selected readings in pre-modern Chinese literature from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. The course covers important works in topics ranging from philosophy, history and religion to poetry, fiction and drama. Specific content varies by instructor.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 40800, or CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor.
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 40900, CHIN 40900

CHIN 20510. Intermediate Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

This quarter we will read selected tales from Liaozhai zhiyi 聊齋誌異, Pu Songling's蒲松齡seventeenth-century masterpiece. Problems to be addressed include how to deal with allusions (diangu 典故) and engage with period/ individual style in literary Chinese. We will work on not only understanding the meaning of the text but also on producing stage by stage polished English translations.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Course may be repeated for credit with consent of instructor. Undergraduate enrollment is encouraged. CHIN 40900, or CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41000, EALC 41000

CHIN 20601-20602-20603. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

CHIN 20601. Fifth Year Modern Chinese. 100 Units.

Open to both grads and undergrads. This course is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in Chinese language environment. Besides selected influential Chinese articles, TV and Radio broadcast will be also included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general skills of listening and reading but also speaking and writing skill in academic style through the teaching materials and instructor-guided language projects. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Additional two one-to-one tutorial sessions during the quarter will be arranged for each student to prepare for their language projects.

Instructor(s): Yi-Lu Kuo     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20503 or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20602. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Open to both grads and undergrads. This course is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in Chinese language environment. Besides selected influential Chinese articles, TV and Radio broadcast will be also included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general skills of listening and reading but also speaking and writing skill in academic style through the teaching materials and instructor-guided language projects. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Additional two one-to-one tutorial sessions during the quarter will be arranged for each student to prepare for their language projects.

Instructor(s): Yi-Lu Kuo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20601, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20603. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Open to both grads and undergrads. This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking, and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

Instructor(s): Yi-Lu Kuo     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20602, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors. Must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20701-20702-20703. Business Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence aims at improving overall language skills and introduces business terminology. Students learn about companies and their services and/or products, the stock market, real estate market, insurance, and e-commerce. The class meets for three ninety-minute sessions a week.

CHIN 20701. Business Chinese I. 100 Units.

Part one of this three-quarter sequence aims at improving overall language skills and introduces business terminology. Students will learn about companies and their services and/or products, the stock market, real estate market, insurance, and e-commerce. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered in 2024-2025.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 31100

CHIN 20702. Business Chinese II. 100 Units.

Not offered in 2024-2025.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20701, or CHIN 31100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 31200

CHIN 20703. Business Chinese III. 100 Units.

Not offered in 2024-2025.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20702, or CHIN 31200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 31300

CHIN 20800-20900-21000. Elementary Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students will read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20800. Elementary Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 20800

CHIN 20900. Elementary Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20800, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 20900

CHIN 21000. Elementary Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20900, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 21000

CHIN 21306. Journey to the West II. 100 Units.

TBD

Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 38500, CHIN 31306, RLIT 49200, CMLT 28500

CHIN 21801. Introduction Classical Chinese Poetry. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Classical lyric poetry. The emphasis is on learning how to read poems in the original, but some critical writings in English on Chinese poetry and poetics will also be assigned to provide a context for interpretation.

Equivalent Course(s): EALC 31801, CHIN 31801

CHIN 22110-22120-22130. Second-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students' reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript.

CHIN 22110. Second-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students' reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. PQ: Chin 11300 or placement of 20100. Students must take a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): PQ: Chin 11300 or placement of 20100. Students must take a quality grade. No auditors.

CHIN 22120. Second-Year Chinese for Heritage Students II. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students' reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. PQ: Chin 22110 or placement. Students must take a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PQ: Chin 22110 or placement. Students must take a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 22130. Second-Year Chinese for Heritage Students III. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence is intended for bilingual/heritage speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Paralleled with the Intermediate sequence for non-heritage speakers, the goal of this sequence is to further develop students' reading, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics in personal settings and some academic or professional settings. Upon completing this sequence, students are expected to pass the Practical Proficiency Test to earn a certificate on their transcript. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. PQ: CHIN 22120 or placement. Students must take a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): PQ: CHIN 22120 or placement. Students must take a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 23110-23120-23130. Third-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I-II-III.

This three-quarter series are intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese who already have intermediate level ability to understand and speak mandarin Chinese in daily communication, although they may have some accent or some difficulty using the language in formal settings. While all the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be trained in CHIN 23100, the emphasis will be on standard Mandarin pronunciation, discourse level discussion on topics about modern China, and advanced reading and writing.

CHIN 23110. Third-Year Chinese for Heritage Students I. 100 Units.

This three-quarter series are intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese who already have intermediate level ability to understand and speak mandarin Chinese in daily communication, although they may have some accent or some difficulty using the language in formal settings. While all the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing will be trained in CHIN23100, the emphasis will be on standard Mandarin pronunciation, discourse level discussion on topics about modern China , and advanced reading and writing. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 22130 Second-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers-3 or placement exam

CHIN 23120. Third-Year Chinese for Heritage Students II. 100 Units.

Please see description for CHIN 23110

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 23110 or placement exam

CHIN 23130. Third-Year Chinese for Heritage Students III. 100 Units.

Please see the description for CHIN 23110.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 23120 or placement

Japanese Courses

JAPN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This is the first year of a three-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 10100. Elementary Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 10200. Elementary Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted. This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10300. Elementary Modern Japanese-III. 100 Units.

This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10123. Summer Intensive Elementary Japanese. 300 Units.

This 8-week summer intensive course is the equivalent of three quarters of Elementary Japanese (10100-10300) in the regular academic year (30 weeks). Students will develop four skills-speaking writing, listening and reading. Students are expected to spend four to six hours outside of class every day for review and for preparation for the following day. The course is so intense that knowledge of 漢字 (kanji) is very helpful to finish this course successfully. Please do the following as preparation before starting this course. 1) Access the Japanese site on Canvas and take a look at the syllabus and files under Module. 2) Order the textbook Communicating in Japanese. Please see instructions on Canvas for how to purchase online. 3) Memorize how to read and write Hiragana and Katakana, using the textbook

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

JAPN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. Classes conducted mostly in Japanese. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 20100. Intermediate Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

JAPN20100 continues to work on building a solid foundation for basic Japanese language skills while preparing students to progress to an Intermediate level. The emphasis on the spoken language gradually shifts toward reading and writing in JAPN 20200 and 20300, but spoken Japanese continues to be enriched throughout the sequence. Students at this level will be able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week, conducted mostly in Japanese. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20200. Intermediate Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade.

JAPN 20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

JAPN 20401. Advanced Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

The goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease and to solidify the grammar, vocabulary and kanji foundation built during the students' study at Elementary and Intermediate Modern Japanese levels. Students will expand their four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) as well as the socio-cultural knowledge they need for communication, thereby easing their transition into Advanced Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions each week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20402. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20401, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20403. Advanced Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. The purpose of the course is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. All work in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20402, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20500-20600-20700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This sequence is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class. Videos/DVDs are used to improve listening comprehension skills. There are also writing assignments. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

JAPN 20500. 4th-Year Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

This course is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced low level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes, reading assignments include academic theses, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class and are required to write their own thoughts on each reading along with a summary. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions each week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20403, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20600. 4th-Year Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

This course is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced low level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes, reading assignments include academic theses, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class and are required to write their own thoughts on each reading along with a summary. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions each week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20500, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20700. 4th-Year Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20600, or JAPN 40600, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 21200-21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I-II.

This sequence focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. Our goals are to get students accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and to enable them to speak with high fluency. To keep the balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Students are encouraged to watch videos and practice their speaking.

JAPN 21200. Intermediate Modern Japanese Through Japanimation I. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese through full-length Japanese animated films. To ensure balance in learning, writing and reading materials are also provided. Students at this level are able to handle successfully a variety of uncomplicated communicative tasks in straightforward social situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions each week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. The goals are getting accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and being able to speak with a high degree of fluency. To keep a balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Watching videos and practicing speaking are the keys to success in this course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor

Korean Courses

KORE 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to the Korean Language I-II-III.

This introductory sequence is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year’s game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 10100. Introduction to the Korean Language I. 100 Units.

KORE 10100 is the first course of the three Introductory Korean sequences which is designed to build students' solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. Students will learn how to read and write in Hangeul (the Korean alphabet) and how to communicate on a variety of daily topics such as self, family, location, food, and daily activities. In order to provide sufficient practice and opportunity to use what has been learned in real life situations, there will be small group practice sessions. In addition, students will be introduced to Korean culture through media, music, and other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10200. Introduction to the Korean Language II. 100 Units.

KORE 10200 is the second quarter of the Introductory Korean sequences. It is designed to continue to build students' solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. Students will learn how to communicate on a variety of familiar topics and how to handle straightforward social situations or transactions. In order to provide sufficient practice and opportunity to use what has been learned in class in real life situations, there will be small group sessions. In addition, the course will introduce students to Korean culture through media, music, and other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a letter grade.

KORE 10300. Introduction to the Korean Language III. 100 Units.

KORE 10300 is the third quarter of the Introductory Korean sequences. It is designed to continue to build students' solid foundation in modern Korean language and culture. Students will learn how to communicate on a variety of familiar topics and how to handle straightforward social situations or transactions. In order to provide sufficient practice and opportunity to use what has been learned in class in real life situations, there will be small group sessions. In addition, the course will introduce students to Korean culture through media, music, and other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a letter grade.

KORE 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Korean. 300 Units.

This eight-week course will provide beginners with a solid basic foundation in modern Korean. In particular, this course offers a balanced emphasis on oral communication practice, listening, and reading comprehension, and also develops students' writing abilities and familiarity with formal speech situations. Students will thus gain the skills for interpersonal interactions and interpretation, as well as for delivering presentations. Korean culture will also be incorporated into the course by working with contemporary Korean media, among other material. The course will also include visits to the Korean-speaking communities in the Chicago area for more direct experience of the language in its local context. The curriculum for Intensive Introductory Korean is the equivalent of the KORE 10100-10200-10300 sequence during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

KORE 10400. Heritage Korean: Developing Foundational Skills. 100 Units.

This intensive, online course is designed to build on heritage learners' skills to prepare them for success in courses offered during the academic year. Skill areas include in-depth practice in reading and writing, along with review and expansion of targeted grammar structures, development of precision in vocabulary, as well as practice writing and typing the Korean alphabet. Students can expect to do 25-30 hours of asynchronous work each week, in addition to weekly synchronous meetings.

Terms Offered: Summer

KORE 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Korean I-II-III.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students’ language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20100. Intermediate Korean I. 100 Units.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students' language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20200. Intermediate Korean II. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week. Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20300. Intermediate Korean III. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week. Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Korean I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20401. Advanced Korean I. 100 Units.

This sequence introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300 or equivalent or consent of instructor. For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade.

KORE 20402. Advanced Korean II. 100 Units.

For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Korean and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20401, or placement, or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a letter grade.

KORE 20403. Advanced Korean III. 100 Units.

This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Korean and meet for eighty-minute periods twice a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20402, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 21100-21200-21300. Fourth-Year Modern Korean I-II-III.

Fourth-Year Modern Korean I-II-III

KORE 21100. Fourth-Year Modern Korean I. 100 Units.

KORE 21100 is designed for the students who aim to improve their speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to an advanced level. This course will focus on enhancing speed, accuracy, and comprehension in advanced listening and reading of authentic texts (such as newspaper articles, essays, poems, reports etc.) as well as the refinement of writing skills in various styles. Students will also discuss social and cultural issues in Korea using their analytic skills and knowledge acquired in class.

Instructor(s): Wonkyung Na     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: KORE 20403, placement or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 21200. Fourth-Year Modern Korean II. 100 Units.

KORE 21200 is the second quarter of the Fourth-Year Modern Korean sequences. It is designed to continue to improve students' speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to an advanced level. This course will be focusing on enhancing speed, accuracy, and comprehension in advanced listening and reading of authentic texts (such as interviews, movies, novels, essays, reports, etc.) as well as the refinement of writing skills in various styles. Students will also discuss social, cultural, and political issues in Korea using their analytic skills and knowledge acquired in class.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: KORE 21100, placement or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 21300. Fourth-Year Modern Korean III. 100 Units.

In KORE 21300, students will learn basic principles, methods, and techniques in translation and apply appropriate strategies and methods to the practice and description of translation. Students will watch prerecorded lecture videos, complete their weekly translation assignments (Korean to English and English to Korean), and participate in group or individual sessions to discuss their translation works. Students will also choose a literary work or a text of their own choice for their final translation project. The materials covered in this class include medical guidelines, campaign flyers, newspaper articles, reports, brochures, resume, usiness/academic emails, and editorials.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: KORE 21200, placement or consent of instructor. Must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 22110. Understanding Contemporary Korean Society Through Media. 100 Units.

This content-based language course designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. There are two main goals for the course. The first objective of the course is to foster speed, accuracy, and comprehension in advanced listening and reading of authentic contemporary texts as well as the refinement of writing skills in various styles. The second objective is for the students to acquire a deeper analytic knowledge of cultural and social issues in contemporary Korea. By examining various articles, TV shows, and films, we are going to discuss contemporary Korean culture, politics and society. The themes that will be dealt with in the class are "The Hell Chosŏn discourse and Korean youth culture" "Pain and Sympathy: South Korean Society after the Sewol Ferry Disaster" and "Korea as Multi-Ethnic Society."

Equivalent Course(s): KORE 42110

KORE 22200. Contemporary Korean Society and History through Fiction and Film. 100 Units.

This content-based language course is designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. We analyze cultural and historical issues in contemporary Korea through four contemporary short novels and related film and media. Other goals are to foster fluency, accuracy, and comprehension in reading authentic contemporary texts, as well as advancing language skills for formal presentation, discussion, and writing.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403 or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 42200

KORE 22300. Changing Identity of Contemporary Korean Through Film and Literature. 100 Units.

KORE 42300 is a content-based language course designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. In particular, we deal with how contemporary Korean society can be understood through the diverse perspectives of emergent minority groups. Topics include Korean language and identity, gender and sexuality, and Korea as a multi-ethnic society. Class activities include watching contemporary films featuring minorities in Korea. We also read essays written by minorities (e.g., Korean-Japanese, Russian-Korean) and Korean social activists. Student are encouraged to foster their own views on contemporary social issues through diverse activities of discussion, debate, presentation, and writing.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403, or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 42300

KORE 29000. Business Korean. 100 Units.

This course aims to help students build an advanced-level speaking, vocabulary, and communication skills needed for a variety of Korean business settings. Students will become familiar with Korean business language and culture through classroom activities and homework assignments based on authentic materials. Topics will include searching for job opportunities related to Korea, composing CVs, preparing for job interviews and presentations, discussing business cases, and introducing current issues related to Korean economy and society.

Instructor(s): Won Kyung Na     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Successful completion of third year Korean or equivalent skills
Note(s): No auditors allowed. Must be taken for a letter grade.

East Asian Languages and Civilizations Courses

EALC 10566. Topics in EALC: Korean Bordercrossings. 100 Units.

TBA

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 10600. Ghosts & the Fantastic in Literature and Film. 100 Units.

What is a ghost? How and why are ghosts represented in particular forms in a particular culture at particular historical moments and how do these change as stories travel between cultures? This course will explore the complex meanings, both literal and figurative, of ghosts and the fantastic in traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tales, plays, and films . Issues to be explored include: 1) the relationship between the supernatural, gender, and sexuality; 2) the confrontation of death and mortality; 3) collective anxieties over the loss of the historical past 4) and the visualization (and exorcism) of ghosts through performance.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26006, CMST 24603, GNSE 24602

EALC 10655. Topics: Chinese Landscapes of Repair, Past and Present. 100 Units.

Reduce, remove, repair" has recently been proposed as a strategy through which the devastating effects of climate change and colonialism on earth systems, biodiversity, and human societies might still be reversed. In this course, we will explore a range of representations and practices related to "repair" in China, thinking about how we might repair our understanding of ourselves and of our relation to the world. Our first task will be to unpack basic concepts--repair, environment, nature, world--in relation to one another. We will consider literary, philosophical, and artistic works that question the notion that humans are separate from nature or the environment, and will study the specific means whereby different literary and visual genres call attention to elements--plants, water, air, earth, humans--in need of repair. Throughout the course, we will ask the following questions: How do we orient ourselves toward repair as a mode of living? What would our daily life look like-how would it change--if it were guided by the aspiration to repair rather than by the desire to progress, expand, extract, and conquer? What can help generate the wish to repair? Our materials will include ancient Chinese philosophical and literary texts and landscape paintings; Chinese contemporary literary works, artworks, and documentary films; and theoretical texts in environmental humanities. Finally, our course will also have a practical component, as we will try to learn about "reparative"

Instructor(s): Paul Copp, Paola Iovene     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Not offered in 2023-24.

EALC 10701. Topics in EALC: Poets/Teachers/Fighters: Writing Women in China and Beyond. 100 Units.

This course offers a survey of women's writing in late Imperial and modern China, exploring the ways in which women (and men) reimagined the collectivity of women and the concept of "women's literature" in order to stake out a position in the cultural sphere. How did Chinese women use literature to redefine what it meant to be a woman, and what was their role (both of women and of literature) in the major social and political upheavals and in the revolutionary movements of their day? Readings include essays, poetry, diaries and fiction by women writers from the 12th to the 21th century in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan. All assigned readings are in English translation, but students who read Chinese are encouraged to read the original texts.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Not offered in 2023-24.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 20700

EALC 10717. Topics in EALC: Themes in Traditional Chinese Thought. 100 Units.

An introduction to ideas and ways of thinking in traditional China, and to some extent East Asia more broadly. This year, we will focus on ideas of qi ("breath," "vital energy," "pyscho-physical stuff"), and related ideas about the human place in the cosmos, from their earliest appearance through their use in Neo-Confucian thought."

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Not offered in 2023-24.
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 25822

EALC 10722. Topics in EALC: Queer Literature and Politics in Contemporary East Asia. 100 Units.

In recent years, there has been a proliferation of queer literature from East Asia in English translation. This course will focus on such contemporary fiction, exploring how "queer" interfaces with issues of identity and subjecthood; desire, embodiment and reproduction; creativity and labor, and more. To this end, beyond issues of fictional representation, we will work to parse the relation between queer as an identity or subject position (queer people/characters) and queer as a set of interpretive strategies and ethical orientations to cultural texts (queer critique). In the first half of the quarter, we will examine some of this recent fiction alongside queer literary criticism and theory, and hold in-class workshops to conceptualize together the "queer" in queer literature and learn about the current situation of queer activism and cultural production in East Asia. In the second half of the quarter, we will read further East Asian literature through several thematic clusters - family, fandom, desire, etc. - while applying the interpretive approaches we learned in the first. The course may include readings by authors such as Wang Xiaobo, Park Sang Young, Murata Sayaka, Li Kotomi and Chi Ta-Wei among others. No prior knowledge is required; all readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): N. Ogonek     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 12161

EALC 10733. Nature & Dao. 100 Units.

This course is about ways some fundamental questions about life have been asked and answered in Chinese traditions. What is the world-especially what we today might call the "natural" or "more-than-human" world? How should one live, and see one's life, within it? What is our relationship with it? How can we best understand it? How should our understanding guide our own lives and practices? We'll explore some traditional Chinese responses to these questions as they have been expressed in philosophy, religious practice, painting, literature, gardening, and travel.

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Note: This course is open only to students in the College. There are no prerequisites.
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 23906

EALC 14504. The History of Everyday in Modern Korea. 100 Units.

Everyday" is easily perceived as too trivial to discuss its importance or mundane to have no historical value. In contrast, postcolonial, postmodern, poststructural, and even posthuman seem to have attempted to deconstruct pre-existing systems, social structures, our relationships with other people, objects (either living or not living), environment, and cultures (from ideology to affects, you name it). Yet, what we easily call macro-level or meta-narratives feels too heavy to lift. We will try to learn how to fill the gap between abstract and concrete and try to understand history as something specific and commonplace: Everyday. Using modern Korea as a lens, this course will address topics related to everyday-from what we do everyday (housing, eating, and clothes) to how we do everyday (earning, spending, meeting, thinking, feeling, etc.) How does food reflect the history of any society's culture? What historical situations have created so-called "the Apartment Republic" in South Korea? Why did the Korean public become crazy about dancing in the 1950s? How has SPAM become a popular holiday gift set? Likewise, we can ask various questions about our notions of everydayness and discuss the multiple meanings of everydayness, the politics of everyday, and its relationships in modern Korean History.

Instructor(s): E. Park     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 14504

EALC 14601. Twentieth-Century China through Great Trials. 100 Units.

This course surveys China's turbulent twentieth century through the lens of great trials. From communist show trials to international courts, from struggle sessions to investigative journalism, and from trial by mob to trial by media, students will witness public and private "justice" in action both in and beyond the courtroom and across the long century's radically different governmental regimes. Our view of China will explore both the sweeping events of revolution and individual experiences. There is no prerequisite for this course.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 14601, LLSO 24600

EALC 14745. Recasting the Past: East Asian Classics on Modern Stages. 100 Units.

Performance exists in repetition. Theater is a space where we continue to bring the past to the present, making new moments while maintaining old memories. In this class, we will explore the relationship between performance and repetition by looking at how classical performance in East Asia continue/discontinue on modern stages. From Royal Shakespeare Company's translation and adaptation of Yuan drama to avant-garde Japanese theatre' artists recycling of classical performance training techniques, from museum performances that breathe life into the collected theatrical objects to underground variety theater that revives Edo-kabuki--all the materials in the class center on the ways in which modern East Asia negotiates with the disruption of traditions as well as social and personal dislocations that modernity has brought about. By closely looking at a variety of cases, we will consider: How does performance provide us alternative lens to probe into the changing cultural values, historical backgrounds, and social identities in East Asia? What are some ways that we can rethink the premodern/modern divide in East Asian Studies? How can the studies of East Asian performance, both classical and modern, enrich our understandings of the interplay between theater, history, and memory?

Instructor(s): Yiwen Wu     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 20245

EALC 14750. Production and Reproduction: Women in Modern China, Japan, and Korea. 100 Units.

The course introduces both women's history and theories concerning production and reproduction in modern China, Japan, and Korea. By bringing both production and reproduction into the discussion, the course extends the definition of "work" from workplaces to households, from formal work settings to informalities. We will read and analyze women's economic engagements in different contexts and localities (e.g. factories, households, political mobilizations, global trade, and sex work) together with scholarships from socio-economic historians, anthropologists, and feminist scholars. Historians have provided a broad chronological framework and empirical studies, such as the birth of feminist movements in twentieth-century East Asia, the pattern of gendered and highly specialized economic development, and women's work as handicraft makers, factory employers, and sex workers. Anthropologists have established such analytical categories as "skill," "practical knowledge," and "gynotechnics" that were largely overlooked when discussing women's work. Recent Marxist feminist scholars have extended Marxist examination of value to female labor, and contributed to our understanding of social reproduction by theorizing capitalism and its supporting system. With different concepts and frameworks, students are encouraged to reassess the complex meanings of differences outside of contemporary Western feminist theories.

Instructor(s): Yuanxie Shi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 12129, HIST 14602

EALC 14848. Sino-Soviet Relations. 100 Units.

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the history of the relationship between China and the Soviet Union, surveying some of the most representative texts and sources on the topic. For the Chinese side, we cover both ROC and PRC. Moreover, we extend our timeline beyond the collapse of the USSR to inquire how the historical Sino-Soviet alliance is being perceived in the present day. Our focus will primarily be on state-level politics and highbrow cultural production, but we will also pay attention to the social history of the expansive border regions and population movement. Students are expected to bring their own expertise and interest to the class by presenting on an individualized research topic, in addition to writing an in-class midterm and a final paper. All readings are in English.

Instructor(s): Y. Ji     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 15008. Gender and Sexuality in World Civilizations III: Feminism in Korea. 100 Units.

This course will explore contending strands of feminist thought and practice in modern Korea. Building on previous coursework on feminism and the postcolonial critique of Western feminism, we will consider how various Korean expressions of women's equality developed in historically contiguous and critical relation to other global feminist ideals and movements (e.g., "The New Woman", "revolutionary motherhood", Women of Asia, #MeToo, radical militant feminism, transfeminism, etc…). We will engage a diverse range of historical, literary, and ethnographic sources that probe feminist, proto-feminist, and anti-feminist ideas throughout different periods from Japanese colonialism to the North-South division to the neoliberal South Korean present.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Priority will be given to students who enrolled in GNSE 15002 and 15003
Note(s): This course counts as the third quarter of Civ for students who have completed the first two quarters of the sequence (GNSE 15002 and 15003). Priority will be given to students who enrolled in GNSE 15002 and 15003. If there is space, the course will be open to any student during add/drop.
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 15008

EALC 15411-15412-15413. East Asian Civilization I-II-III.

NEED SEQUENCE DESCRIPTION

EALC 15411. East Asian Civilization I, Ancient Period-1600. 100 Units.

This course examines the politics, society, and culture of East Asia from ancient times until c. 1600. Our focus will be on examining key historical moments and intellectual, social, and cultural trends with an emphasis on viewing the region as a whole. Students will read and discuss culturally significant texts and be introduced to various approaches to analyzing them. This will include discussions of differences in how we approach textual and non-textual evidence (such as archaeological artifacts and reconstructed climate data), and especially the challenges of recovering other meanings from texts that were written and/or later used to legitimate particular regimes, or to project current practices back into the distant past so that they seem to be manifestations of a society's defining traditions.

Instructor(s): K. Pomeranz and S.Burns     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): HIST 15411-15412-15413 meets the general education requirement in civilization studies via three civilization courses. HIST 15411-15412, HIST 15411-15413, or HIST 15412-15413 meets the general education requirement in civilization studies via two civilization courses.
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 25411, HIST 15411

EALC 15412. East Asian Civilization II, 1600-1895. 100 Units.

Second quarter of East Asian civilization sequence covering what are now China, Japan, and Korea from roughly 1600-1895. Major themes include demographic and economic change, plus the social and cultural effects of widespread but uneven commercialization; state formation, rebellion, and political change; migration, urbanization, and territorial expansion; changes in family and gender roles; changes in the "natural" environment, particularly as related to agricultural expansion; changes in religion, ideology, and relationships between "elite" and "popular" culture; and increasingly consequential encounters with Western Europeans, Russians, and Americans, especially in the 19th century. The course aims to treat East Asia as a single, interacting region, rather than as three (or more) sharply separated proto-nations; however, it will also call attention to the enormous diversity both among and within China, Japan, and Korea, treating those differences as constantly evolving, and as something to be explained rather than assumed.

Instructor(s): S. Burns and K. Pomeranz     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): HIST 15411-15412-15413 meets the general education requirement in civilization studies via three civilization courses. HIST 15411-15412, HIST 15411-15413, or HIST 15412-15413 meets the general education requirement in civilization studies via two civilization courses.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15412, SOSC 25412

EALC 15413. East Asian Civilization III, 1895-Present. 100 Units.

The third quarter of the East Asian civilization sequence covers the emerging nation-states of China, Korea, and Japan in the context of Western and Japanese imperialism and the rise of an interconnected global economy. Our themes include industrialization and urbanization, state strengthening and nation-building, the rise of social movements and mass politics, the impact of Japanese colonialism on the homeland and the colonies, East Asia in the context of US-Soviet rivalry, and the return of the region to the center of the global economy in the postwar years. Similar to the first and second quarters, we will look at East Asia as an integrated region, connected by trade and cultural exchange even when divided into opposing blocs during the Cold War. As much as possible, we will look beyond nation-states and their policies to explore the underlying trends shared by the three East Asian nations, such as mass culture, imperialism, and the impact of the cold war.

Instructor(s): Y. Dong & J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): HIST 15411-15412-15413 meets the general education requirement in civilization studies via three civilization courses. HIST 15411-15412, HIST 15411-15413, or HIST 15412-15413 meets the general education requirement in civilization studies via two civilization courses.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 15413, SOSC 25413

EALC 16100. Art of the East: China. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the arts of China focusing on the bronze vessels of the Shang and Zhou dynasties, the Chinese appropriation of the Buddha image, and the evolution of landscape and figure painting traditions. This course considers objects in contexts (from the archaeological sites from which they were unearthed to the material culture that surrounded them) to reconstruct the functions and the meanings of objects, and to better understand Chinese culture through the objects it produced.

Instructor(s): W. Lin     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 16100

EALC 16806. Arts of Japan. 100 Units.

This course surveys the arts of the Japanese archipelago through the study of selected major sites and artifacts. We will consider objects in their original contexts and in the course of transmission and reinterpretation across space and time. How did Japanese visual culture develop in the interaction with objects and ideas from China, Korea, and the West? Prehistoric artifacts, the Buddhist temple, imperial court culture, the narrative handscroll, the tea ceremony, folding screens, and woodblock prints are among the topics covered.

Instructor(s): C. Foxwell     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 16800

EALC 17212. Sonic Cultures of Japan. 100 Units.

This course engages with the various techniques and practices associated with sound in Japanese culture, ranging from the 18th century through the contemporary era. The media covered will include literature, language reform movements, theater, cinema (both silent and sound), recorded music, radio broadcasting, manga, video games and anime. We will also read recent sound-oriented approaches to literary and cultural studies from scholars from both Japan and elsewhere. All readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): Michael Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26085, MADD 17212

EALC 17215. Sound and Listening in Modern Chinese Literature. 100 Units.

Whether it is the tonalities and idiosyncracies of individual speech and dialogue in the polyphonic novel, the depiction of urban sounds and noises in Eileen Chang's prose about 1930's Shanghai, the borrowing of folk songs in political lyrics during the Mao era, or Western pop and rock music in experimental fictions from the 1980s, sound culture in its various forms and transformations has long left its imprint on modern literary imaginations. Sound is inseparable from technologies and ideologies of listening; in this course, we will use literary texts as aural technologies to approach historical sonic cultures, and read them as archives of sonic experiences. Through reading modern Chinese literary works together with the history of Chinese sound cultures, we ask: how does literature from different historical periods capture transient sounds? What can literature tell us about how sound is experienced in different historical periods? What are the strengths and limits of language as a medium of articulating aural experiences? How is the difference between sound and noise, listening and other senses, drawn in different historical periods, and what role does literature play in it?

Instructor(s): Siting Jiang     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 17400. Navigating the "Modern" in Modern Japanese Literature, 1800-1945. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the idea of the modern in Japanese literature, how it is envisioned, construed, complicated, and debated through the century from 1840 to 1945. We will read texts from decades before the Meiji Restoration of 1868, which is commonly seen as the starting point of "modern Japan," up until the end of WWII in 1945. This course introduces key texts, both literary and critical, and asks the students to critically think about what the "modern" means across different time periods, from different points of view, and against different historical, political, and cultural backgrounds. The purpose of this course is threefold: 1) to familiarize students with the knowledge of Japanese literature and Japanese cultural history of this time; 2) to prompt students to think about literary and cultural history in a critical and informed manner, especially in the case where they are not familiar with the culture; 3) to train students with skills in close reading and in critically examining scholarly discourses. All required readings will be provided in English. Proficiency in the Japanese language is not required.

Instructor(s): Danlin Zhang     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 20800. Elementary Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20800

EALC 20900. Elementary Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20800, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 20900

EALC 21000. Elementary Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

Introduction to the Chinese literary language from the first millennium B.C.E. to the end of the imperial period. While surveying a variety of literary genres (such as, philosophical and historical texts, poetry, and essays), focus is on grammatical structures and translation methods.

Instructor(s): L. Skosey     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20900, or placement, or consent of instructor. Auditing is not permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 21000

EALC 21415. Readings in Later Daoist Thought. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to read and explore primary sources (in classical Chinese) in Daoist philosophical thought written after the founding documents of the classical period (i.e., the Daodejing and Zhuangzi). Texts to be read will most likely be selected from such sources as the Liezi 列子,the Yinfujing 陰符經,and the Guanyinzi 關尹子 (文始真經).

Instructor(s): Brook Ziporyn     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Classical Chinese proficiency required.
Note(s): This course meets the HS or CS Committee distribution requirement for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 51415, DVPR 51415, RLST 25845, EALC 51415

EALC 21702. Buddhist Thought in Japan. 100 Units.

In this seminar we will explore the intellectual history and social contexts of fundamental motifs of Buddhist thought in, especially but not exclusively, premodern Japan. Eschewing narrow sectarian boundaries, we will focus on the four traditions of the Lotus sūtra, the Pure Land, the tantric teachings and Zen construed inclusively as trans-sectarian sources of religious meaning and models of cultivation. Building on an initial exploration of the wider East Asian context of Japanese Buddhism, we will deepen our understanding of these four traditions through a careful examination of primary sources in translation. The course will also incorporate field trips to Japanese Buddhist groups in the Chicago area.

Instructor(s): Stephan Licha     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 21702

EALC 22245. Monsters and Marvels: The Abnormal in China, Japan, and Korea. 100 Units.

This course presumes that to describe what is normal in human culture, premodern and modern, we can observe how one culture's monsters and marvels define the abnormal. The history of monsters and marvels in China, Japan, and Korea is explored on several levels: indigenous constructions of monsters and marvels in each culture; cross-influences among the three cultures; the place of monsters and marvels in everyday life; their religious and political significance; and their influence in Chinese, Japanese, and Korean aesthetic products-literature, visual and plastic arts, and performance. The focus is premodern with an eye to modern revivals in East Asia and globally.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: Autumn

EALC 22401. Zen Before Zen: Chan Buddhism in China. 100 Units.

This course is part of a two-sequence series, to be followed by a course on Japanese Zen Buddhism taught by Professor Stephan Licha in Winter 2025. "Chan" is a partial Chinese transliteration of the Sanskrit word "Dhyana," meaning meditation practice; the same Chinese character is pronounced "Zen" in Japanese. This course will consist of the close reading (in English translation) and discussion of both the Indian Buddhist scriptures and indigenous Chinese sources that form the core of the tradition spanning Chan and Zen, with a few secondary descriptions of Chan institutions and cultural influences. Our focus will be on the development of ideas concerning the nature of sentience and the implications this has for understanding the existential predicament of sentient beings, touching on central themes of dependent co-arising, non-self, Emptiness, consciousness-only, Buddha-nature and original enlightenment, and the methods of realization (doctrinal, non-doctrinal, and indeed anti-doctrinal) proposed to redress this existential predicament at each stage of Chan history. This will be done both with an eye to the historical continuity of these sometimes seemingly contradictory forms thought and practice, and also to extract from them whatever transhistorical philosophical and spiritual valences we care to derive from the texts.

Instructor(s): Brook Ziporyn     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course meets the HS or CS Committee distribution requirement for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 32401, RLST 22401, HREL 32400, DVPR 32402

EALC 22402. Japanese Zen Buddhism. 100 Units.

What is Zen? Impossibly, seemingly, everything to everybody. In this course, we will explore Zen's protean transformations through a close reading of primary sources in translation. Rather than asking what Zen is, we will focus on how in these materials the Zen traditions are continually de/re-constructed as contingent religious identities from medieval Japan to the contemporary United States and Europe. The focus of the course will be the premodern Japanese Zen tradition, its background in Chinese Chan, and its reception in the West. The course will include field trips to Zen communities in the Chicago area. Students wishing to take this course are strongly encouraged to also take Prof. Ziporyn's course on Chan during the fall quarter.

Instructor(s): Stephan Licha     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course meets the HS or SCSR Committee distribution requirement for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 32402, EALC 32402, RLST 22402

EALC 22715. Antisocial Modernism: Troubled Subjects in 20th-Century East Asian Literature and Film and Beyond. 100 Units.

This course aims at an in-depth examination of the "dark side" of modernism through closing readings of various kinds of outsiders, misfits, and sociopaths in literature and film, with a focus on but not limited to East Asia and the 20th Century. If being "social" amounts above all to an acknowledgement of the plurality of human lives and an acquiescence to live together with others, what then does it mean to reject such a fundamental premise? In this course, we will investigate a variety of fictional characters who cannot or will not conform with the implicit conventions of communal life-criminals, lunatics, or simply people who find themselves struggling to sympathize with the feelings of others, etc. In tackling the aforementioned questions, our inquiry will be guided by a range of distinct methodological approaches such as moral philosophy, psychoanalysis, and queer theory. Readings may include works by Lu Xun, Ma-Xu Weibang, Yi Sang, Kinugasa Teinosuke, Edogawa Rampo, Akutagawa Ryūnosuke, Dazai Osamu, Mishima Yukio, Abe Kōbō, Murakami Haruki, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Herman Melville, Samuel Beckett, Gaston Leroux, Aimé Césaire, and Derek Jarman. All readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): J. Hou     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Not offered in 2023-24.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 22715

EALC 23001. Censorship in East Asia: The Case of Colonial Korea. 100 Units.

Looking into the intricate workings and profound impact of state publication control in the Japanese Empire during the first half of the twentieth century, this seminar examines how censorship influenced literary and other forms of publication within the Korean colony. Students analyze the manipulation of information and representation by engaging with a diverse array of primary sources, including literature, periodicals, police reports, censors' documents, posters, and postcards, among others. Not only do they seek a nuanced understanding of censorship and its impact on cultural production engaging themselves with the original materials from colonial Korea, but also do they gain a broad historical knowledge of modern Korea under Japanese rule and further East Asia under Japan's dominance and hegemony. Throughout the course, focus is placed upon manuscript ("pre-publication") censorship. [Consent Required; Proficiency in Korean or Japanese is not required.]

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): RDIN 23001, MADD 16001, EALC 43000, CRES 23001

EALC 23005. The Spirit of Reality TV in East Asia. 100 Units.

Over the last several decades, reality television has become a central ingredient in media diets all across the world. One can practically trace a line from early hits like Survivor and Big Brother, which were quickly formatted for global circulation, to the recent viral success of Squid Game, a fictionalized account of a death-game tournament that spawned its own reality show. Why do audiences everywhere find reality TV so entertaining? What moral lessons do viewers take away from these shows? And what might scholars learn by taking this popular aesthetic form, in all its cultural variation, seriously? This course brings together media studies, aesthetic criticism, area studies, and the sociology of religion to try to answer some of these questions. The course will help students to think about the moral and spiritual beliefs embedded in popular cultural forms, but also to understand how these forms are now circulated and consumed in our contemporary media environment and what they tell us about late-stage global capitalism. Course readings will introduce students to scholarship in television studies, aesthetic criticism, religious studies, and cultural studies, providing them with the necessary foundations to analyze reality TV from multiple disciplinary perspectives. We will also screen examples of reality TV and its offshoots, with a specific focus on East Asian shows and the competition or elimination format.

Instructor(s): H. Long     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Students will develop skills in visual analysis, interpretation of secular religion and belief structures, social theory, and basic research and writing methods.
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 27005, EALC 33005, AASR 33005

EALC 23044. Generations, Gender, and Genre in Korean Fiction & TV Drama. 100 Units.

The seminar analyzes the issues of generations, gender, and genres that arise from a selection of popular literary and television dramas from modern and contemporary Korea. The selection for the course is marked by the creative contributions of Korean women as novelists, scriptwriters, directors, among others. It includes prose fiction by renowned authors such as Park Wan-sŏ (1931-2011), Han Kang (1970- ), and Cho Nam-joo (1978- ), as well as television series like Mr. Sunshine (2018; scripted by Kim Eun-sook), The Red Sleeve (2021; dir. by Chŏng Chi-in; adapted the 2017 novel by from Kang Mi-kang), and My Liberation Notes (2022; written by Park Hae-yeong). Through a blend of close textual analysis and historical contextualization, the course aims to uncover the ways in which the gendered and generational identities of these creators might have helped certain configurations of concerns, needs, and aspirations saliently emerge in response to social, cultural, historical, and political currents of their time. [Consent Required; No prior knowledge of the Korean language is necessary]

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 33044, GNSE 30136, GNSE 20136, MADD 13044

EALC 23201. Confucian Philosophy and Spirituality. 100 Units.

The goal of this course is to introduce you to the central themes and texts of classical Confucian and Neo-Confucian traditions, both as philosophical works to be evaluated and digested for their doctrinal content and as literary artifacts from a perhaps unfamiliar cultural sphere. This will call for the development of two distinct but related sets of skills, namely, the ability to think through and comprehend philosophical arguments and ideas, and the equally crucial ability to reflect on one's own assumptions as they come into play in one's reaction to and evaluation of those ideas. Readings will include, from the classical period, the Four Books (Great Learning, Doctrine of the Mean, Analects of Confucius, Mencius), Xunzi, the Book of Changes, and from Sung-Ming Neo-Confucian writings of Zhou Dunyi, Zhang Zai, the Cheng Brothers, Zhu Xi and Wang Yangming.

Instructor(s): Brook Ziporyn     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course meets the HS or CS Committee distribution requirement for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): HREL 33001, EALC 33201, RLST 23001, DVPR 33001

EALC 23202. Li Zhi and 16th Century China: The Self, Tradition, and Dissent in Comparative Context. 100 Units.

The 16th century Chinese iconoclast Li Zhi (Li Zhuowu) has been rightly celebrated as a pioneer of individualism, one of history's great voices of social protest, an original mind powerfully arguing for genuine self-expression, and more. He was a Confucian official and erudite in the classics, yet in his sixties he takes the Buddhist tonsure, and late in life befriends the Jesuit Matteo Ricci. He sought refuge in a quiet monastery devoting his life to scholarship, yet invited constant scandal. His A Book to Burn "sold like hotcakes," and attracted enough trouble that reportedly readers would surreptitiously hide their copies tucked up their sleeves, and was later banned by the state soon after his death. In this seminar, we will place Li both within the context of the history of "Confucian" thought, and within the literary, religious, and philosophical conversations of the late Ming. Using his writings as a productive case study, we will think about topics including "religion," tradition and innovation, "spontaneity" and "authenticity," and the relationship between "classics" and commentaries. Throughout, we will bring our discussions into comparative analysis, considering views of thinkers and traditions from other times and places. Chinese not required; for those interested, we will read select essays of Li's in Chinese and students may choose translation as a final project.

Instructor(s): Pauline Lee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course meets the HS or CS Committee distribution requirement for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34519, HREL 33202, HIST 24519, DVPR 33202, RLST 23202, EALC 33202, FNDL 23202

EALC 23908. Bergson and China: Buddhist and Confucian Reboots. 100 Units.

This course will explore Henri Bergson's philosophy as set forth in Time and Free Will, Matter and Memory, and Creative Evolution, and its reception in late Imperial and early Republican China (late 19th and early 20th centuries). Of special interest will be the role played by Bergsonian ideas in the Yogacara revival and the formation of New Confucianism during this period, with particular focus on figures like Zhang Taiyan, Xiong Shili and Liang Shumin. This will require us to deeply engage Bergson's idea of "duration" (durée) and its interpretation, particularly in relation to a reconsideration of the Yogacara Buddhist notion of ālaya-consciousness (storehouse consciousness) and the Confucian idea of ceaseless generation and regeneration (shengsheng bu xi) as derived from interpretive traditions centered on the Book of Changes (Yijing).

Instructor(s): Brook Ziporyn     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): All readings will be available in English. Chinese reading proficiency is recommended but not required. This course meets the HS or CS Committee distribution for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): DVPR 33908, HREL 33908, RLST 23908, FNDL 23908, EALC 33908

EALC 24120. Chinese Thought and The Good Life. 100 Units.

This course examines the ideas of thinkers with vastly different responses to the question: What is the life well lived? In our study, we will focus on early China (5th century to 221 BCE), a seminal and vibrant period in Chinese thought. Some thinkers (such as "Laozi") argue the good life is the simple one, others (Xunzi) insist that it is the life of achieved great intellectual, aesthetic, or moral ambition. Yet others argue that central to the life well lived are rich, nuanced, and strong ties to family (Confucius), acting on one's developed intuitions (Mengzi), or developing one's capacity to play in the moment whatever the circumstances (Zhuangzi). Two thinkers we will study focus on the means for making the social world supportive of a life that is good. Hanfeizi argues for the importance of well-defined, objective, enforced laws. Sunzi illuminates the art of war. We will explore topics such as notions of the self, conceptions of the greater cosmos, the role of rituals, ideas about human nature, and the tension between tradition and self-expression. The course includes lectures, class discussions, self-designed spiritual exercises, creating a class "Commentary" on the Analects, essays of varied lengths, and writers' circles.

Instructor(s): Pauline Lee     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 24115, RLST 24115

EALC 24123. History of Food in Japan. 100 Units.

Although food is an essential part of human existence, it has only recently become the object of historical analysis, and historical research has drawn attention to its significance in relation to issues of health, gender, class, technology, and culture. This course explores the history of food in Japan in the period from c. 1600 to the postwar era. Topics to be examined include changing practices of consumption and production, medical discourse and conceptions of a proper diet, the impact of introduction of new foods and new methods of preparation, the rise of nutritional science, the development of a "national cuisine," and the impact of war and defeat upon food culture.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24123, HIST 34123, EALC 34123

EALC 24124. Post-empire: Japan and East Asia. 100 Units.

This course is on the post-imperial and postcolonial history in East Asia. After Japan declared defeat on August 15th, 1945, the empire has officially ended. Yet, the aftermath and afterlife of Japan's empire still deeply influenced the social and political environment in this region. How did the post-imperial connections shape Japan and its Asian neighbors? How did different actors react to this sudden change of political environment? This course pays close attention to the imperial and post-imperial continuity and changes.

Instructor(s): Y. Dong     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34124, HIST 24124, EALC 34124

EALC 24225. The History of the Book in East Asia: From Bamboo to Webtoon. 100 Units.

This seminar offers an overview of the development and history of the "book" and its physical forms, broadly conceived, in East Asia from ancient times to the present. Drawing on recent scholarship, selected primary sources, and rare books housed within the library system, this course familiarizes students with the evolution of the book and methods of book production in China, Korea, and Japan, the principles and practices of material bibliography and the application of such to physical and digital objects, and selected topics salient to the social and cultural meanings of books: authorship, the book trade, reading, censorship, and more. Assignments include a short paper, a short presentation, and a longer final paper. All readings in English, but knowledge of East Asian history or languages helpful.

Instructor(s): G. Reynolds     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CHSS 34215, HIST 34215, HIPS 24215, HIST 24215, EALC 34225

EALC 24256. Everyday Maoism: Revolution, Daily Life, and Material Culture in Socialist China. 100 Units.

The history of Maoist China is usually told as a sequence of political campaigns, from land reform to the Cultural Revolution. Yet for the majority of the Chinese population, the promise of socialism was as much about material transformations as it was about political change: a socialist revolution would bring better living conditions, new work regimes and new consumption patterns. If we want to understand what socialism meant for different groups of people, we have to look at the "new objects" of socialist modernity, at changes in dress codes and apartment layouts, at electrification and city planning - or at the persistence of an older material life under a new socialist veneer. In this course, we will analyze workplaces in order to understand how socialism changed the way people worked, and look at rationing and consumption in the households to see how socialism affected them at home. We will look at how specific objects came to stand in for the Maoist revolution, for socialist modernity, or for feudal backwardness. The course has a strong comparative dimension: we will read some of the literature on socialism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe, to see how Chinese socialism differed from its cousins. Another aim is methodological. How can we understand the lives of people who wrote little and were rarely written about? To which extent can we read people's life experiences out of the material record of their lives?

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): MA students can take with instructor's permission.
Note(s): Not offered in 2023-24. This course is almost identical to EALC 24255/34255, except that it is designed for undergradates only.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24512

EALC 24407. (Un)popular Fiction: Chosŏn Era Novels and Readership. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the prose literature of the Chosŏn dynasty (1392-1910) of Early Modern Korea with a focus on novels and short stories, their readers, and their detractors. We will examine major works of early modern Korean literature in translation, investigate elite and popular literary culture, and explore the status of novels according to contemporary critics. The course highlights questions of cosmopolitan and vernacular language, translation, script, the materiality of texts, readership and reading practices, gender, class, canonization, cross-cultural influence with China and Japan, and the legacies of Chosŏn literature in contemporary North and South Korea.

Instructor(s): G. Reynolds     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24406

EALC 24408. Post-1945 South Korean Politics and Society. 100 Units.

This course aims to go through recent English-written monographs in the Korean Studies field each week and to learn how scholarship addresses South Korean politics and socioeconomic changes in terms of class, gender, modernization, and development politics. By reading and discussing significant scholarly works, this course will help students extend their understanding of modern South Korean society and its relationship to the family, the state, civil society, popular culture, class, and the economy in both local and global contexts.

Instructor(s): E. Park     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24407

EALC 24455. New Histories of Chinese Labor. 100 Units.

Past scholarship has often reduced the history of Chinese labor to the history of the Chinese labor movement or the history of the Communist Party in its function as "the leading core" of the proletariat. The factory proletariat, of course, was never more than a small segment of the Chinese labor force - less than five percent under the Republic, less than ten in the People's Republic. Recent work has been more inclusive, looking at work outside the formal sector, in agriculture, handcrafts, and service industries; at the work of women in formal employment and at home; at sex work and emotional work; at unemployment and precarious work; at the work of internal migrants; at Chinese workers abroad; at coerced work in private industry (the 2007 "kiln slaves' incident"); and at carceral labor in Xinjiang and elsewhere. Most of the readings will deal with work in the Mao and post-Mao years, right up to the present. We will combine readings on Chinese labor history with more general texts on the relationship between productive and reproductive work, wage work and non-wage work, male and female work, autonomous and heteronomous work. The guiding question throughout the course is if a new Chinese labor movement is necessary, possible, or probable, and if it is not, under which conditions it might become so.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24306, EALC 34455, HIST 34306

EALC 24501. Women and Work in Modern East Asia. 100 Units.

Worldwide, women do about 75 percent of the world's unpaid care and domestic work. They spend up to three hours more per day cooking and cleaning than men do, and anywhere from two to ten hours more per day looking after children and the elderly. Women's underpaid work at home and in industry subsidized the early stages of industrialization in nineteenth-century Britain, early twentieth-century Japan, and contemporary China, and women's unpaid contributions to their households enable employers worldwide to keep wages low. We know, at least in outline, how women came to carry double burdens in Europe and North America, but little research has been done so far about this process in East Asia. In this course, we will discuss when and how China, Japan, and Korea developed a division of labor in which most wage work was gendered male and reproductive work was marked female. Are current divisions of labor between men and women rooted in local cultures, or are they the result of industrial capitalist development? How do divisions of labor differ between the three East Asian countries, and how did developments in one East Asian country affect others?

Instructor(s): Jacob Eyferth     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Not offered in 2023-24.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24518, EALC 34501, GNSE 30121, GNSE 20121, HIST 34518

EALC 24518. Taiwan in Asia and the World. 100 Units.

This course examines the distinctive history of the island of Taiwan, from seventeenth-century Spanish colony to outpost of the Dutch empire, from multiethnic pirate cove to Qing coastal fortress, from an essential point of origin for Austronesian languages and cultures to Japan's first model colony, and from decades living under martial law to today's vibrant democratically elected government. There may never have been a time when Taiwan's future was so heatedly debated, or viewed as so central to global politics, as it is at this moment. Readings spanning three centuries and an array of governing regimes. We will explore the historical arguments and narratives that constitute the cultural identity of this diverse and contested place. In addition to reading primary sources and historiography over the quarter, students will develop and share their own research. This will culminate with either a paper or public history project.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 29631

EALC 24609. Buddhist Meditation: Tradition, Transformation, Modernization. 100 Units.

From the Satipaṭṭhāna sutta of the Pāli canon to the "mindfulness" boom of recent years, Buddhism and meditation often appear inseparable. The aim of this seminar is to historicize and critically question this seemingly natural intimacy, for while it certainly cannot be denied that the various Buddhist traditions have always had on offer a plethora of techniques for mental (and physical) cultivation, it is far from clear how or even if all these could be subsumed under the in its current usage relatively recent category of "meditation". Drawing on Buddhist meditation literature from various traditions, historical periods, and literary genre, in this seminar we will take up a twofold question: First, how has the encounter with Buddhist techniques of cultivation shaped the modern understanding of "meditation", and second, up to which extend, and at what cost, has this very modern understanding conversely conditioned us to see Buddhism as a "meditative religion" par excellence?

Instructor(s): Stephan Licha     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course meets the HS Committee distribution requirement for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 34600, SALC 24600, EALC 34600, RLST 24600, HIST 24122, HREL 34600, HIST 34122

EALC 24615. History of Energy in East Asia. 100 Units.

This course discusses the history of major energy sources in East Asia with a focus on coal, hydropower, and nuclear power plant. We pay close attention to both the technological side of the history of energy and how different energy sources interact with the social and political environment in Japan, China, and Koreas.

Instructor(s): Y. Dong     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34615, HIPS 24615, EALC 35615, HIST 24615, CHSS 34615, CEGU 24615

EALC 24626. Japanese Cultures of the Cold War: Literature, Film, Music. 100 Units.

This course is an experiment in rethinking what has conventionally been studied and taught as "postwar Japanese culture" as instances of global Cold War culture. We will look at celebrated works of Japanese fiction, film and popular music from 1945 through 1990, but instead of considering them primarily in relation to the past events of World War Two, we will try to understand them in relation to the unfolding contemporary global situation of the Cold War. We will also look at English-language writing on Japan from during and after the Cold War period. Previous coursework on modern Japanese history or culture is helpful, but not required. All course readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34626

EALC 24813. East Asian Science and Technology: Ways of Making. 100 Units.

This is the second part of the East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine series. In this series, we will read major works on the history of STM in East Asia and constantly are in conversation with studies of this history in the globe.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34813, HIST 34813, HIST 24813, CHSS 34813, HIPS 24813

EALC 24848. Sino-Soviet Relations. 100 Units.

This course is an interdisciplinary introduction to the history of the relationship between China and the Soviet Union, surveying some of the most representative texts and sources on the topic. For the Chinese side, we cover both ROC and PRC. Moreover, we extend our timeline beyond the collapse of the USSR to inquire how the historical Sino-Soviet alliance is being perceived in the present day. Our focus will primarily be on state-level politics and highbrow cultural production, but we will also pay attention to the social history of the expansive border regions and population movement. Students are expected to bring their own expertise and interest to the class by presenting on an individualized research topic, in addition to writing an in-class midterm and a final paper. All readings are in English

Instructor(s): Yueling Ji     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 25620. Japanese Animation: The Making of a Global Media. 100 Units.

This course offers an introduction to Japanese animation, from its origins in the 1910s to its emergence as global culture in the 1990s. The goal is not only to provide insight into Japanese animation within the context of Japan but also to consider those factors that have transformed it into a global cultural form with a diverse, worldwide fanbase. As such, the course approaches Japanese animation from three distinct perspectives on Japanese animation, which are designed to introduce students to three important methodological approaches to contemporary media - film studies, media studies, and fan studies or cultural studies. As we look at Japanese animation in light of these different conceptual frameworks, we will also consider how its transnational dissemination and 'Asianization' challenge some of our basic assumptions about global culture, which have been shaped primarily through the lens of Americanization.

Instructor(s): Thomas Lamarre     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Not offered in 2024-25.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 35620, SIGN 26070, CMST 25620, MADD 15620, EALC 35620

EALC 25811. Foundations of East Asian Buddhism. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to Buddhism in East Asia, examined through lenses of texts, art, and thought. We will examine important sources of the major currents of East Asian Buddhist thought and practice stretching from the earliest days of the religion in China to the East Asian Buddhist world of today, giving special consideration to major textual and artistic monuments, such as translated scriptures, Chan/Zen literature, paintings and sculptures, and pilgrimage sites.

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 22501, EALC 35811, HREL 35811

EALC 25812. East Asian Science and Technology: Ways of Knowing. 100 Units.

This course is the first half of the East Asian Science, Technology, and Medicine series. The second part of the course will be offered in the spring quarter by Professor Jacob Eyferth. In this series, we will read major works on the history of STM in East Asia and constantly are in conversation with studies of this history in the globe.

Instructor(s): Y. Dong     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 35812, CHSS 31812, HIST 24812, HIST 34812, HIPS 24812

EALC 25840. Philosophical Approaches to Peace of Mind: The Zhuangzi in Dialogue. 100 Units.

Philosophical activity across cultures and times has been closely associated with the management of affective states. One common goal is to minimize negative emotions by changing how events are interpreted and appraised. This course will focus on three strategies that appear across different traditions. The first argues that events are outside of our control, in some cases appealing to fate but in other cases appealing to chance. The second strategy is a skeptical approach that attacks our ability to judge any event as bad or good. The third strategy undermines the ontological status of the kinds of things we become attached to, either by rejecting the ultimate reality of individual substances or arguing that diverse things form a single whole. All of these strategies appear prominently in the classical Chinese text the Zhuangzi. The core of this course will consist of a close reading of parts of the Zhuangzi, considering these strategies as they intersect with and shed light on its various philosophies. We will also read in a comparative context. The other traditions used will be guided by student interest, but the most likely choices would be Stoicism and Epicureanism (for the first strategy), Sextus Empiricus (for the second), and arguments appearing South Asian Buddhist philosophies (for the third). Aside from better understanding the Zhuangzi, the goal of the course is to consider how similar strategies function in significantly different cultural contexts.

Instructor(s): Frank Perkins     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course meets the CS Committee distribution requirement for Divinity students.
Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 35840, HREL 35840, RLST 25840, EALC 35840, DVPR 35840

EALC 26201. Medicine and Culture in Modern East Asia. 100 Units.

This course will focus on the cultural history of medicine in China, Japan, and Korea from the mid-nineteenth century to the 1980s. We will be concerned with tracing the circulation of new medical knowledge and understanding its cultural and social implications. Topics to be explored include the introduction of "Western medicine" and its impact for "traditional" medicine; the struggles over public health, gender, medicine, and modernity; consumer culture; and medicine. No knowledge of an East Asian language is required, but those with reading skills will be encouraged to utilize them.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24206, HIST 34206, HIPS 24206, EALC 36201, CHSS 34206

EALC 26705. Approaches to Contemporary Chinese Art. 100 Units.

The aim of this course is to introduce a history of contemporary art from China since the 1970s. The course begins with a brief overview of modern art activities in China during the early 20th century along with art production amidst the Cultural Revolution era (1966-1976), under Mao. The course will then focus on contemporary avant-garde movements during the 1970s and 1980s, the response to urbanization in art at the onset of the new millennium, the influence of globalization since 2000, and a new generation of young artists from China as well as Chinese diasporic artists working transnationally. Critical attention will be paid to ways in which artists respond to the obsolescence of physical environments and interactions due to major investments in robotics, AI technologies, online communication platforms, and virtual monetary exchange applications. In addition to working with important secondary texts focused on contemporary art from China, students will have the unique opportunity to examine primary documents that I have obtained during my ongoing research activities in China. These include video footage, photo documentation, archival materials, and real artworks. We will also access Gao Minglu's extensive archives of contemporary Chinese art documents.

Instructor(s): E. Larson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 36705, ARTH 26705, ARTH 36705

EALC 27657. Rethinking Pilgrimage: Pop-culture Tourism and Religious Travel. 100 Units.

The term pilgrimage is usually associated with journeys to ancient religious sites such as the Vatican or Mecca. But why do superfans who travel to Disney World often describe this in terms of a pilgrimage? Why is it that when anime fans visit real-life sites from their favorite shows, this is frequently called a "journey to sacred sites" (seiichi junrei)? In this course we will discuss these and other questions about pilgrimage in its religious and secular forms. We will consider examples such as the Islamic Hajj, the Crusades, and a 750-mile Buddhist pilgrimage in Japan, alongside journeys to Platform 9¾ at King's Cross, Elvis's Graceland, and the sets of Hobbiton. After first exploring theories of travel, tourism, and pilgrimage through a global array of examples, the second half of the course consists of a deep dive into connections between anime tourism, religious travel in Japan, and the worldwide boom of Japanese pop culture. At the end of the course students will present a small research project on a pilgrimage/tourist destination of their own choosing. No prior coursework on religion required.

Instructor(s): Bruce Winkelman     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 27657, RLST 27657

EALC 27910. Virtual Ethnography: Encounters in Mediation. 100 Units.

From everyday social media platforms like Facebook, TikTok, Instagram, and WeChat, to more complex real-time immersive social and gaming sites, virtual realms are propagating at a fantastic rate while transforming what it means to live and interact in the physical world. As such virtual world, communities, and spaces increasingly command our attention, time, and money, scholars from various fields have begun to tackle questions concerning the ethics, logics, patterns, and social specificity of the virtual through experimental forms of virtual ethnography. This advanced undergraduate course introduces students to some these recent ethnographies and corresponding theoretical interventions into the nature of collective techno-life within virtual realms. Students will build on this material in order to develop an ethnographic inquiry into a virtual world of their choosing. In so doing, they will work individually and as a class through the processes of pre-field planning, fieldwork, and post-field analysis and writing.

Instructor(s): Thomas Lamarre and Michael Fisch      Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor required; email Professors Fisch and Lamarre a paragraph long description about what you bring and what you hope to get out of this seminar.
Note(s): Enrollment limit: 25
Equivalent Course(s): MADD 12910, CMST 27910, ANTH 27910, CDIN 27910

EALC 28010. Archaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions, and World Heritage. 100 Units.

Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China. This course intends to examine the history of research, important archaeological finds, and the role of Anyang studies in the field of Chinese archaeology. While the emphasis is on archaeological finds and the related research, this course will also attempt to define Anyang in the modern social and cultural contexts in terms of world heritage, national and local identity, and the looting and illegal trade of antiquities.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Open to undergraduates with consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 26765, ANTH 36765, EALC 48010

EALC 28405. Religion in Anime and Japanese Pop Culture. 100 Units.

How does Spirited Away reflect teachings of Japanese Buddhism and Shinto? Or what about Neon Genesis Evangelion? What can pop culture tell us about religion? In this course, we will consider what Japanese religions are (and are not) by looking at their representations in popular cultural forms of past and present. Sources are drawn from a range of popular cultural forms including anime and manga, but also literature, artistic performances, visual arts, and live-action movies. The course covers foundational aspects of Japanese religious life through non-traditional sources like Bleach, The Tale of Genji, and Your Name. At the end of the course, students will be able to speak to the great diversity of religious practices and viewpoints in Japan, not only its centers but also its peripheries and minorities. Meanwhile, we will consider broader questions about the complex connections between religion and popular culture. No prior knowledge of Buddhism, Shinto, or Japanese history is expected.

Instructor(s): Bruce Winkelman     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): MADD 14805, CMLT 28405, RLST 28405

EALC 28901. Discovering Ancient East Asia: Archaeology of China, Korea, and Japan. 100 Units.

What happened to Peking Man? Where did rice cultivation begin and who made the first pottery? Why were hoards of bronzes buried and what were they used for? This course will explore themes such as the origins of humans, the beginning of agriculture, early villages and cities, metal technology, ancient writing systems, and the rise of states and civilizations in East Asia. It will also discuss the current state of archaeological research in Asia, and the role of archaeology in nation building and modern geopolitics. The rich resources available in the museums of Chicago will also be explored.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 38901

EALC 28989. Junior Tutorial in East Asian Studies. 100 Units.

This seminar will introduce students to the materials and methodologies of East Asian studies. What are the ways one might make sense of an Anyang wine vessel, a Bashō haiku, a line from the Analects, a pansori performance, a short story by Akutagawa, or a K-pop ballad? Through a range of approaches to diverse objects of inquiry, we will explore the interdisciplinary breadth of EALC as well as the history and future of area studies. Assignments based around students' interests will also work towards developing field-specific research and writing skills. Required for all EALC majors; open to non-majors, space permitting.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 29200. Reading and Research EALC. 100 Units.

TBD

EALC 29500-29600-29700. Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II-III.

One quarter of this sequence may be counted for credit in the major.

EALC 29500. Senior Thesis Tutorial I. 100 Units.

For this course students are required to obtain a "College Reading and Research Course Form" from their College adviser and have it signed both by their faculty reader and by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Two quarters of this sequence may count as one credit for the EALC major, and are required for any undergraduate writing a B.A. Honors Thesis in EALC. It is highly recommended that students take this sequence autumn and winter, but a spring quarter course is offered for unusual circumstances.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

EALC 29600. Senior Thesis Tutorial II. 100 Units.

Senior Thesis Tutorial-II. PQ: signed consent form. For this course students are required to obtain a "College Reading and Research Course Form" from their College adviser and have it signed both by their faculty reader and by the Director of Undergraduate Studies. Two quarters of this sequence may count as one credit for the EALC major, and are required for any undergraduate writing a B.A. Honors Thesis in EALC. It is highly recommended that students take this sequence autumn and winter, but a spring quarter course is offered for unusual circumstances.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

EALC 29700. Senior Thesis Tutorial III. 100 Units.

The spring quarter section of the Senior Thesis Tutorial is devoted to making corrections and rewrites to the B.A. Paper, which is usually due to the Reader at the end of winter quarter.

Instructor(s): arranged     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EALC 29500 and/or EALC 29600
Note(s): Students continue to meet with the Preceptor for help with their papers.

EALC 29980. Books in Japan from the earliest times to the 1890s. 100 Units.

In this course we will explore the full range of Japanese books including both manuscripts and printed books ranging from daunting Chinese texts to beautiful illustrated books. We will also be looking at printed maps from the Edo period (1600-1868) and single-sheet ephemera, and we will be considering questions such as the role of censorship, the differences between wood-block printing and typography and why people continued to produce manuscripts during the age of print. We will mostly focus on materials produced in the Edo period and the Meiji period (1868-1912), ending up with the introduction of newspapers and magazines in the 1860s. There will be images available on the course website, but we will also be handling and closely examining books and manuscripts from the Regenstein Library and from my own collection. If you have never seen an old Japanese book before, you will learn how to make sense of the layout and organisation of a premodern Japanese book and to appreciate the craft and design skills that went into their production: even if you can't read them, they have beauty and appeal as hand-made artefacts. Some of the sessions in the course are accessible to those with no knowledge of Japanese but since script choice and calligraphy inevitably need to be discussed as well, those without any knowledge of Chinese characters will be at a disadvantage.

Instructor(s): P. Kornicki     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 39980


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Jacob Eyfeth


Email

Administrative Contact

Departmental Administrator
Dawn Brennan
WB 301
773.702.1255
Email

Chair


Hoyt Long
WB 301C
773.834.1868
Email