Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Summary of Requirements | Grading | Bachelor's Thesis and Honors | Minor Program in East Asian Languages and Civilizations | Courses

Department Website: http://ealc.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (EALC) offers a BA program in East Asian studies that introduces students to the traditional and modern civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, and provides them with the opportunity to achieve a basic reading and speaking knowledge of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. This program is interdisciplinary and students may take relevant courses in both the humanities and the social sciences.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in EALC. Information follows the description of the major.

Before declaring their major in EALC, students must meet with the Director of Undergraduate Studies (typically before the end of their second year) to discuss their areas of interest.

Program Requirements

Students must complete 1300 units toward an EALC major. Up to 300 of those units may be granted via petition based on the completion of a higher-level language course. No courses may be double-counted toward general education requirements or minor requirements. NOTE: The specific requirements described below will apply to students beginning with the Class of 2021.

Students who plan to major in EALC are strongly encouraged (but not required) to meet the general education requirement in civilization studies by taking EALC 10800-10900-11000 Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

Language Requirement

To graduate with an EALC major, students must demonstrate competency in a primary East Asian language that is equivalent to the intermediate (second-year) level of the language. Credit for 20100-20200-20300 or the equivalent is required in the major.

Topics in EALC

All students are required to take three "Topics in EALC" courses (EALC 10500-10799). These courses are meant to introduce students to issues in East Asian studies.

Electives in the Major

Students are required to complete seven additional courses (700 units) in the major. Up to 300 units may be additional language credit. Many students will take an additional year of their primary East Asian language or a year of a secondary East Asian language. A beginning language sequence in the primary East Asian language cannot be counted toward the major; beginning sequences are acceptable for secondary languages. This language credit must be earned by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Two quarters of Classical Chinese or Classical Japanese may count either as language or as content courses.

Students who complete their general education requirement in civilization studies with a sequence other than EALC 10800-10900-11000 Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III may take any of those courses as an elective in the major. Students may also take additional Topics in EALC courses as electives in the major.

A maximum of six approved courses taken while studying abroad may be counted toward program requirements by petition to the Director of Undergraduate Studies.

Language Credit Earned by Petition

Students with extant proficiency who place into and successfully complete a higher-level course (i.e., 20200 or higher) may petition to receive credit for the language courses between 20100 and the University of Chicago course completed. Credits granted via this petition process may be used toward major requirements, with limits.

Students may use up to 600 units total of language course work toward their major, but credit for no more than three of those courses (300 units) may be granted via petition on the basis of completing a higher-level course. No matter the language proficiency, all students must earn credit for at least 10 courses (1000 units) toward the major via course enrollment. The College also requires a minimum of 3800 units of credit earned by course enrollment.

Summary of Requirements

Three courses in a second-year East Asian language *300
Three "Topics in EALC" courses +300
Seven elective courses related to East Asia §700
Total Units1300
*

 Credit may be granted by examination.

+

EALC 10500-10799

§

Up to three of which may be a further year of the same language or a year of a second East Asian language

Grading

Students must receive quality grades in all courses taken to meet requirements in the major. No P/F grades are offered in language courses.

Bachelor's Thesis and Honors

Students who have maintained an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher are eligible for honors. Students who do not wish to be considered for honors are not required to submit a bachelor's thesis for graduation. However, all students are eligible to write a bachelor's thesis upon submitting an acceptable proposal to the department. Students typically choose an adviser for their BA project in Spring Quarter of their third year. The project must be approved by both the adviser and the director of undergraduate studies early in the student's fourth year, typically by third week of Autumn Quarter. Interested students should consult the director of undergraduate studies for details concerning the proposal.

To be eligible for honors, students must enroll in Autumn and Winter Quarters of EALC 29500-29600 Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II. EALC 29500 Senior Thesis Tutorial I may count as one credit (100 units) toward the major; EALC 29600 Senior Thesis Tutorial II may count only as general elective credit. The BA paper must be substantially complete by the end of Winter Quarter. The BA paper may draw on material from other courses in the major; however, to receive credit for the Senior Thesis Tutorial and to be considered for honors, the student must write a paper that represents significant additional work. The BA paper is read by two members of the department and, if judged to be of A quality, the student is recommended for graduation with honors. Length and scope of the project should be agreed upon in consultation with the adviser. Use of original language material is desirable but not required.

Students may not use the BA project or paper from another program for the optional BA in EALC. Students who wish to discuss an exception to this policy should consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies before the end of their third year. Consent to use a single paper or project requires the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser. 

Minor Program in East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Students in other fields of study may complete a minor in EALC. The minor in EALC requires a total of seven courses chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. No more than three of these courses may be in an East Asian language (neither first-year modern language courses nor credit by petition may be used for this language option). Students who plan to pursue an EALC minor are encouraged to take EALC 10800-10900-11000 Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III to meet the general education requirement in civilization studies. 

Students who elect the minor program in EALC must meet with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor by submitting a form obtained from their College adviser. Students choose courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to the student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers. 

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Chinese Courses

CHIN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 10100. Elementary Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

 This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.  Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies

CHIN 10200. Elementary Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 10300. Elementary Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. Additional small group discussions of 40 minutes per week will be arranged. Maximum enrollment for each section is 18.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 33300

CHIN 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Chinese. 300 Units.

Summer Introductory Chinese is an eight-week course that introduces the fundamentals of Modern Chinese (Mandarin). Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized, along with accurate pronunciation. Class will meet for five three-hour periods a week, with additional speaking practice during the afternoon. This intensive summer Chinese course requires students to spend several additional hours per day preparing for class through drill sessions, independent study, and other activities.
,All students enrolled in summer Chinese will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

CHIN 11100-11200-11300. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter series is intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. Consultation with instructor encouraged prior to enrollment. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 11100. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.  Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Director of Chinese Language Program

CHIN 11200. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 11300. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese to bilingual speakers. Bilingual Speakers are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write. By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week MWF.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to enhance students’ reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 20100. Intermediate Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Part 1 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.  

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20200. Intermediate Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Part 2 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.  

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Part 3 of this sequence aims to enhance students' reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.

CHIN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 20401. Advanced Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30100

CHIN 20402. Advanced Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20401, or CHIN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30200

CHIN 20403. Advanced Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

For both graduates and undergraduates. The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures, and requires discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China. Over the course of this sequence, the emphasis will shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with orginal Chinese source materials. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20402, or CHIN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30300

CHIN 20501-20502-20503. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 20501. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 30300, or CHIN 20403, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41100

CHIN 20502. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41100, or CHIN 20501, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41200

CHIN 20503. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade.  For both graduates and undergraduates. This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students will not only expand their volcabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures, but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41200, or CHIN 20502, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41300

CHIN 20508-20509-20510. Readings in Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence involves advanced readings in classical Chinese with selections from philosophical and historical writings.

CHIN 20508. Readings in Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion nineteenth- and early twentienth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 40800

CHIN 20509. Readings in Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 40800, or CHIN 20508, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 40900

CHIN 20510. Readings in Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 40900, or CHIN 20509, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41000

CHIN 20601-20602-20603. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

CHIN 20601. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41300, or CHIN 20503, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 51100

CHIN 20602. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51100, or CHIN 20601, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 51200

CHIN 20603. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51200, or CHIN 20602, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 51300

CHIN 20611. Sixth-year Modern Chinese. 100 Units.

This course is designed to help students attain the proficiency level of a well-educated Chinese speaker. Teaching materials include TV programs, novels, movies, newspaper articles, WeChat conversations and research papers published in recent years. This course also teaches students how to use Chinese reference materials for their research. The class meets for two 90-munite sessions each week. Two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions during the quarter will be arranged for each student to prepare for their language projects and special research needs.

Instructor(s): Youqin Wang     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20603/51300, placement or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 61100

CHIN 20800-20900-21000. Elementary Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students will read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20800. Elementary Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects fo the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read orginal texts of various genres including philosophy, memorials, poetry, and historical narratives; and third quarter is devoted solely to reading poetry. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30800

CHIN 20900. Elementary Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects fo the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read orginal texts of various genres including philosophy, memorials, poetry, and historical narratives; and third quarter is devoted solely to reading poetry. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20800, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30900

CHIN 21000. Elementary Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects fo the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read orginal texts of various genres including philosophy, memorials, poetry, and historical narratives; and third quarter is devoted solely to reading poetry.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: TBD
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20900, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 21100-21200-21300. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence offers texts from both Intermediate Modern Chinese (CHIN 20100-20200-20300) and Advanced Modern Chinese (CHIN 30100-30200-30300). Our goal is to help bilingual students further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Extensive reading is encouraged, and writing is strongly emphasized. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 21100. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I. 100 Units.

 The following credit is granted in Spring Quarter after successful completion of the year’s work: students receive course credits for CHIN 21100-21200-21300 and credit by petition for CHIN 30100-30200-30300. This three-quarter sequence offers texts from both Intermediate Modern Chinese (CHIN 20100-20200-20300) and Advanced Modern Chinese (CHIN 30100-30200-30300). Our goal is to help bilingual students further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Extensive reading is encouraged, and writing is strongly emphasized. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 21200. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade.  The following credit is granted in Spring Quarter after successful completion of the year’s work: students receive course credits for CHIN 21100-21200-21300 and credit by petition for CHIN 30100-30200-30300. This three-quarter sequence offers texts from both Intermediate Modern Chinese (CHIN 20100-20200-20300) and Advanced Modern Chinese (CHIN 30100-30200-30300). Our goal is to help bilingual students further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Extensive reading is encouraged, and writing is strongly emphasized. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 21300. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers III. 100 Units.

The following credit is granted in Spring Quarter after successful completion of the year’s work: students receive course credits for CHIN 21100-21200-21300 and credit by petition for CHIN 30100-30200-30300. This three-quarter sequence offers texts from both Intermediate Modern Chinese (CHIN 20100-20200-20300) and Advanced Modern Chinese (CHIN 30100-30200-30300). Our goal is to help bilingual students further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Extensive reading is encouraged, and writing is strongly emphasized. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 21800. Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Classical Chinese lyric poetry. The emphasis is on learning how to read poems in the original, but some critical writings in English on Chinese poetry and poetics will also be assigned to provide a context for interpretation.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Good knowledge of Chinese characters/Kanji. Previous quarters of Literary Chinese desirable but can be taken independently with consent of instructor.
Note(s): May be counted as a content course for EALC majors and minors.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 31800,CHIN 31800

CHIN 21801. Introduction to Classical Chinese Poetry. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the fundamentals of Classical lyric poetry. The emphasis is on learning how to read poems in the original, but some critical writings in English on Chinese poetry and poetics will also be assigned to provide a context for interpretation.

Instructor(s): Judith Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Two quarters of elementary Literary Chinese or consent
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 31801,CHIN 31801

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Japanese Courses

JAPN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This is the first year of a three-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 10100. Elementary Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

PQ: Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted. This is the first year of a three-year probram designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocubulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for fove fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 31100

JAPN 10200. Elementary Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted. This is the first year of a three-year probram designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocubulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for fove fifty-minute periods a week..

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 31200

JAPN 10300. Elementary Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

 This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 31300

JAPN 10123. Summer Intensive Elementary Japanese. 300 Units.

Summer Elementary Japanese is designed to introduce the basic Japanese grammar, vocabulary, and cultural concepts that are essential for oral communication, listening, writing, and preparing to read for research purposes. The course will meet for three to four hours in the mornings, and students are expected to spend several hours preparing for class in the afternoons and evenings. It is strongly recommended that students learn the Japanese writing system—particularly hiragana—prior to the start of the course. The curriculum for Summer Elementary Japanese is the equivalent of the 10100-10200-10300 sequence during the regular academic year.
,All students enrolled in Summer Intensive Elementary Japanese will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

JAPN 19000. Introduction to Classical Japanese. 100 Units.

Introduction to the grammar and style of premodern Japanese through a variety of literary texts. Emphasis will be placed on extensive grammatical analysis and translation. Work with original manuscripts will also be introduced as the course progresses. 

Instructor(s): R. Jackson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Three years modern Japanese or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 39000

JAPN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. Classes conducted mostly in Japanese. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 20100. Intermediate Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 32100

JAPN 20200. Intermediate Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 32200

JAPN 20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. The course is conducted mostly in Japanese and meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors permitted.
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 32300

JAPN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

JAPN 20401. Advanced Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30100

JAPN 20402. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20401, or JAPN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30200

JAPN 20403. Advanced Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

 The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. The purpose of the course is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. All work in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20402, or JAPN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30300

JAPN 20500-20600-20700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This sequence is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class. Videos/DVDs are used to improve listening comprehension skills. There are also writing assignments. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

JAPN 20500. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening c

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20403, or JAPN 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 40500

JAPN 20600. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20500, or JAPN 40500, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 40600

JAPN 20700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

PQ: JAPN 40600 or equivalent. Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20600, or JAPN 40600, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 40700

JAPN 20800. Reading Scholarly Japanese I. 100 Units.

This course focuses on reading of scholarly Japanese materials that will enable students to read academic Japanese. The materials are selected from a wide range of disciplines by the instructor and by students.

Instructor(s): H. Noto     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30800

JAPN 20900. Reading Scholarly Japanese II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on reading of scholarly Japanese materials that will enable students to read academic Japanese. The materials are selected from a wide range of disciplines by the instructor and by students.

Instructor(s): H. Noto     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20900/30900, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30900

JAPN 21200-21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I-II.

This sequence focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. Our goals are to get students accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and to enable them to speak with high fluency. To keep the balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Students are encouraged to watch videos and practice their speaking.

JAPN 21200. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. The goals are getting accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and being able to speak with a high degree of fluency. To keep a balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Watching videos and practicing speaking are the keys to success in this course. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. The goals are getting accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and being able to speak with a high degree of fluency. To keep a balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Watching videos and practicing speaking are the keys to success in this course. 

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Korean Courses

KORE 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to the Korean Language I-II-III.

This introductory sequence is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year’s game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 10100. Introduction to the Korean Language I. 100 Units.

This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Along with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, the course introduces students to Korean culture through various channels such as Korean movies, music, and a number of other cultural activities.  Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10200. Introduction to the Korean Language II. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Along with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, the course introduces students to Korean culture through various channels such as Korean movies, music, and a number of other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10300. Introduction to the Korean Language III. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Along with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, the course introduces students to Korean culture through various channels such as Korean movies, music, and a number of other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10123. Summer Intensive Introductory Korean. 300 Units.

This eight-week course will provide beginners with a solid basic foundation in modern Korean. In particular, this course offers a balanced emphasis on oral communication practice, listening, and reading comprehension, and also develops students' writing abilities and familiarity with formal speech situations. Students will thus gain the skills for interpersonal interactions and interpretation, as well as for delivering presentations. Korean culture will also be incorporated into the course by working with contemporary Korean media, among other material. The course will also include visits to the Korean-speaking communities in the Chicago area for more direct experience of the language in its local context. The curriculum for Intensive Introductory Korean is the equivalent of the KORE 10100-10200-10300 sequence during the regular academic year at the University of Chicago.
,All students enrolled in Summer Intensive Introductory Korean will conclude the program by participating in an ACTFL Oral Proficiency Interview. Each student will then receive an independent, certified rating of speaking ability to document the student's speaking abilities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2017 dates: 6/19/17-8/11/17

KORE 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Korean I-II-III.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students’ language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20100. Intermediate Korean I. 100 Units.

Must be taken for a letter grade. As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20200. Intermediate Korean II. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week.  Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20300. Intermediate Korean III. 100 Units.

As a continuation of Beginning Korean, this course is to help students increase their communication skills (both oral and written) in the Korean language. Through an integrated framework of listening, speaking, reading, and writing, this course aims to increase fluency and accuracy in Korean. Videotapes and additional reading materials will be used in a supplementary fashion and approximately 100 Chinese characters will be introduced for the achievement of basic literacy. Classes are conducted mostly in Korean and meet for fifty-minute periods five times a week.  Must be taken for a letter grade.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Korean I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20401. Advanced Korean I. 100 Units.

For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Korean and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 30100

KORE 20402. Advanced Korean II. 100 Units.

For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Korean and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20401, or KORE 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 30200

KORE 20403. Advanced Korean III. 100 Units.

 For graduates and advanced undergraduates. Must be taken for a letter grade. This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Koran and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20402, or KORE 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 30300

KORE 21100. Fourth-Year Modern Korean-1. 100 Units.

The first in a series of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Instructor(s): Wonkyung Na     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 41100

KORE 21200. Fourth-Year Modern Korean-2. 100 Units.

The second of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 41100 or consent
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 41200

KORE 21300. Fourth-Year Modern Korean-3. 100 Units.

The third of three consecutive courses focuses on improving speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills to high-advanced level. Through intensive readings and discussions, students will build extensive vocabulary and complex grammatical structures as well as developing sophisticated speaking skills and academic writing skills. The materials introduced in this class include newspaper articles dealing with current social, cultural, or economic issues in Korea, literary works such as poems and novels, and authentic media such as TV documentaries or movies.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 41200 or consent
Note(s): Must be taken for a letter grade. No auditors.
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 41300

KORE 22200. Contemporary Korean Society and History through Fiction and Film. 100 Units.

This content-based language course is designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. We analyze cultural and historical issues in contemporary Korea through four contemporary short novels and related film and media. Other goals are to foster fluency, accuracy, and comprehension in reading authentic contemporary texts, as well as advancing language skills for formal presentation, discussion, and writing.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403 or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 42200

KORE 22300. Changing Identity of Contemporary Korean through Film and Literature. 100 Units.

This content-based language course is designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. In particular, we deal with how contemporary Korean society can be understood through the diverse perspectives of emergent minority groups. Topics include Korean language and identity, gender and sexuality, and Korea as a multi-ethnic society. Class activities include watching contemporary films featuring minorities in Korea. We also read essays written by minorities (e.g., Korean-Japanese, Russian-Korean) and Korean social activists. Student are encouraged to foster their own views on contemporary social issues through diverse activities of discussion, debate, presentation, and writing.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403, or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 42300

KORE 23100. Microeconomics and the Korean Economy. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 22100, or KORE 22200, or KORE 22300
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 53100

KORE 29000. Business Korean. 100 Units.

This course aims to help students build an advanced-level speaking, vocabulary, and communication skills needed for a variety of Korean business settings. Students will become familiar with Korean business language and culture through classroom activities and homework assignments based on authentic materials. Topics will include searching for job opportunities related to Korea, composing CVs, preparing for job interviews and presentations, discussing business cases, and introducing current issues related to Korean economy and society.

Instructor(s): Won Kyung Na     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Successful completion of third year Korean or equivalent skills
Note(s): No auditors allowed. Must be taken for a letter grade.

East Asian Languages & Civilizations Courses

EALC 10500. Topics in EALC: Major Works of East Asian Buddhism. 100 Units.

An exploration of key textual and artistic works of East Asian Buddhism, including Chinese translations of Indic scriptures such as the Lotus and Vimalakirti sutras, Chan/Soen/Zen treatises and dialogues, and important works of Buddhist visual and material culture, including shrine murals, devotional prints, reliquaries, and sculptures.

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 28610

EALC 10508. Topics in EALC: Popular Culture, Past & Present. 100 Units.

This course explores the influence of popular culture in shaping so-called civilization in China, Japan, and Korea. Among the topics to be addressed are local cults and spirit mediums, food and drink, games, literacy, and mass media.

Instructor(s): Donald Harper     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 10602. Topics in EALC: Past, Present, & Future of the Novel. 100 Units.

This is an introductory course to the study of fiction in modern East Asia. In particular, it examines the evolution of the novel in Japan, China, and Korea as a form of imaginative writing. We will examine major canonical works from each country: three from the early 20th century; three from mid-century; and three from the early 21st century. How did the novel form develop in East Asia relative to creative writing elsewhere around the world? How did it respond to East Asia's shifting political and economic position? What is the cultural role of the novel in contemporary East Asian society? These are just a few of the questions that will animate our exploration of these texts. All works will be read in their English translation.  

Instructor(s): Hoyt Long     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 10703. Topics in EALC: Contemporary East Asian Horror Cinema. 100 Units.

Since the mid 1990s, Asian Horror films have been enormously popular. Films like The Ring (Japan) and A Tale of Two Sisters (South Korea) were not only extremely successful in their countries of origin, but have gained worldwide cult followings since their original releases. Their worldwide fans and distributors sometimes distinguish these films by their country of origin (J-Horror vs. K-Horror vs. C-Horror), but sometimes opt for collective designations (Asian Horror). We will be considering the usefulness of each designation by considering both tendencies that are unique to each national cinema (such as the “Haunted Girls High School” trope found in K-Horror films like Whispering Corridors and Memento Mori, or the “Haunted New Media” trope common in J-Horror films like The Ring and Pulse), as well as the marketing of a pan-Asian “extreme” horror in films like Audition and A Tale of Two Sisters, not to mention international co-productions like Three... Extremes. In so doing, we will be considering the relationship of these films to other aspects of contemporaneous East Asian filmmaking, from other genre films that are grouped under the “extreme” designation to the arthouse tendencies of “slow cinema” that can be found in horror films like Visible Secret and Pulse. This course will be an introduction to the major films and filmmakers of horror from Japan, South Korea, and Hong Kong from the mid 1990s to the mid 2000s (roughly the peak of its international following).

Instructor(s): William Carroll     Terms Offered: Spring,Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 14603

EALC 10800-10900-11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

EALC 10800. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I. 100 Units.

East Asian Civilizations I covers China.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10800,SOSC 23500,HIST 15100

EALC 10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia II. 100 Units.

East Asian Civilizations II covers Japan.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Autumn,Summer
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10900,SOSC 23600,HIST 15200

EALC 11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia III. 100 Units.

East Asian Civilizations III covers Korea.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 11000,SOSC 23700,HIST 15300

EALC 18606. Structuring China's Built Environment. 100 Units.

This course asks a basic question: Of what does China’s built environment in history consist? Unlike other genres of art in China, a history of China’s built environment still waits to be written, concerning both the physical structure and spatial sensibility shaped by it. To this end, students will be introduced to a variety of materials related to our topic, ranging from urban planning, buildings, tombs, gardens, and furniture. The course aims to explore each of the built environments—its principles, tradition, and history—based on existing examples and textual sources, and to propose ways and concepts in which the materials discussed throughout the quarter can be analyzed and understood as a broader historical narrative of China’s built environment.

Instructor(s): W. Lin     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 18606

EALC 20421. Japanese Documentary. 100 Units.

This course will examine documentary film in Japan, beginning with its prewar origins and into the present. It will also look at other forms of documentary media, such as photograpy and written reportage. We will pay particular attention to the political and social movements in which these filmmakers and artists participated--from Pacific War-era propaganda to 1960s radicalism. We will also look at theoretical approaches to documentary produced in Japan and elsewhere. What kind of reality does documentary seek to represent? How is this reality constructed--both aesthetically and politically?

Instructor(s): Marianne Tarcov     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 30421

EALC 21730. Science, Technology and Media via Japan. 100 Units.

This course will explore issues of culture, technology, and environment in Japan through the lens of Science and Technology Studies (STS) and Media Studies. The course is designed for undergraduate students. Its overall aim is to introduce students to some of the fundamental concepts, themes, and problematics in these fields via the particular social and historical circumstances in Japan. Some of the central concerns will be around issues of environment, disaster, gender, labor, media theory, gaming, and animation. In addition, we will devote attention to the recent emergence of the term media ecology as a framework problematizing technologically engineered environments.

Instructor(s): M. Fisch     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course qualifies as a "Discovering Anthropology" selection for Anthropology Majors.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 21730

EALC 22027. The Modern Japanese Novel. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to modern Japanese literature through the form of the novel. We begin in the late-nineteenth century, when a new generation of writers sought to come to terms with this world historical form, and end in the twenty-first, with writers trying to sustain the form through graphic art and digital media. Along the way, we will consider some of the key debates that have structured the novel's evolution: between elite and mass forms, truth and fiction, art and politics, self and other, native and foreign. The course also looks at how the form has evolved in response to shifting modes of cultural production and shifting patterns of literary consumption. Authors covered will include Natsume Soseki, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Kawabata Yasunari, Oe Kenzaburo, Tawada Yoko, Murakami Haruki, and Mizumura Minae. All works will be read in English.

Instructor(s): H. Long     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Undergrads only

EALC 22615. Henri Bergson in Japan. 100 Units.

This seminar will explore the relationship between philosopher Henri Bergson (1859-1941) and a variety of Japanese thinkers and writers from across the twentieth century. We will look at instances of Japanese literature that respond to Bergson (including the fiction of Natsume Soseki), the work of Japanese philosophers who engaged in dialogue with him (for example, Kuki Shuzo), and the way Bergson's translators productively engaged with his ideas as they produced Japanese-language versions of his major works. Advanced Japanese language ability is required. 

Instructor(s): Michael Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 42615

EALC 23902. Self-Cultivation and the Way in Traditional China. 100 Units.

In this course we will explore three distinct but interrelated modes of self-cultivation and the contemplative life from premodern China: those exemplified by the Laozi, and in particular by those artists and philosophers who drew upon the text; by the Chan tradition in Tang and Song Buddhism; and by the Song Neo-Confucian philosopher and exegete Zhu Xi (1130–1200). We will read classic texts in these modes (and a few modern ones too) closely, attuning ourselves as best we can to their original contexts, and we will brood together on how we might use them in our own contemplative lives. Central to the course will be careful consideration of the different understandings of the Way (Dao) found in our texts and how these different Ways structured conceptions of the ideal human life.

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 23902

EALC 24213. Contact Zones: Japan's Treaty Ports, 1854–1899. 100 Units.

A series of treaties signed by the Tokugawa shogunate with Western powers in the 1850s designated port towns such as Nagasaki, Yokohama, Hakodate, and Kobe "treaty ports." Semicolonial sites in which Western citizens benefited from rights, such as extraterritoriality, the treaty ports were complicated places that both challenged Japan's sovereignty while also becoming conduits of economic, social, and cultural change. This seminar will explore the evolution of the treaty ports. The main assignment will be an original research paper on a topic of the student's choice.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34213,EALC 34213,GLST 26806,HIST 24213

EALC 24302. China: Rise or Return? Hist Perspectives on Chinese Culture. 100 Units.

This course addresses the development through time of the Chinese state, society, and culture from its beginning to the present. Only the most general of treatments is possible in addressing such an enormous subject, but the course provides an opportunity for individual research on a specialized topic of the student's choosing within this framework. No background in Chinese studies is required. The class discusses and critiques the weekly readings. Each set of readings centers on a broad historical question of crucial historical significance.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24310

EALC 24422. Japan and the Japanese: Society, Identity, History. 100 Units.

In this course, we will explore the shifting meanings of the terms “Japan” and “Japanese” focusing primarily on the early modern and modern periods as a way to trace the dynamics of identity formation. Using primary source excerpts from Japanese and foreign official and personal accounts, secondary texts, and visual materials, we will discuss the questions of nationalism, anti-foreignness, exceptionalism, and how the “Japanese” defined themselves against others and within their own society. The critical analysis of various communities, groups, individuals, and ideologies will help us delineate the key factors that shaped society, culture, and politics. Further, the course will train students in analyzing, comparing, and evaluating textual materials and in presenting their ideas orally and in writing. Topics covered: myths, power and status, individualism and collective identity, honor and shame, print culture and information, social networks and outcasts, foreign relations. No Japanese knowledge is required. Open to both BA and MA students.

Instructor(s): Aliz Horvath     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Grad number only open to MAPH or MAPS students, not PhD students.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34422,HIST 24809

EALC 24500. Reading Qing Documents. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third-year Chinese level or approval of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34500,HIST 34500,HIST 24500

EALC 24610. A History of Japanese Visual Culture. 100 Units.

This course will examine the rich and nuanced material history of Japan, drawing upon religious art, architecture, theater, fine arts, and crafts, as well as creations made through the technologies of photography, cinema, manga, and anime. Note that most of the materials examined will be from the pre-twentieth century. We will also use the Art Institute of Chicago, the Field Museum, and the Smart Museum as resources and some of the classes will be held off campus.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 24605,HIST 24609

EALC 24614. Chinese Musicals. 100 Units.

Are there Chinese musicals? It very much depends on what we would consider a Chinese musical. To answer Adrian Martin’s call for “Musical Mutations: Before, Beyond and Against Hollywood,” this course will look for Chinese musicals in both obvious and unlikely places. The “musical mutations” under discussion include traditional opera adaptation, back-stage opera film, martial-arts opera film, Maoist opera film, musical comedy, song-and-dance film, melo-drama, Hong Kong musical, and most certainly the “apocalyptic” musical named by Martin, The Hole (Tsai Ming-liang, 1998). The tripartite developments of Chinese-language cinemas provide a privileged site to chart the ways the musical genre expands, transforms, and rejuvenates across time and borders.

Instructor(s): X. Dong     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Pre-requisite(s): CMST 10100, ARTH 20000, ENGL 10800, ARTV 25300, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 24615

EALC 24621. Economic Change in China, circa 1800–2000. 100 Units.

An overview of Chinese economic development since the end of the eighteenth century, with attention to its social, political, and environmental ramifications. Topics in the first part of the course include the Qing property-rights system and its implications for rural society; merchant organization; internal trade; migration; and the imperial political economy. This section of the course concludes with explanations of the economic and other crises that caused late-nineteenth- and early-twentieth- century China to be called the "land of famine." Part two covers changes in China's relationship to the outside world, the beginnings of industrialization, and the complex patterns of regional growth and stagnation up through the victory of the Communist Party in 1949. Part three looks at both Maoist (1949–1976) and post-Maoist development, emphasizing the economic consequences of institutional changes, industrialization and urbanization (especially since 1978), and the evolving tensions with a so-called "socialist market economy." Mostly lecture, with some class time for discussions, plus an online discussion board; midterm, final, and two short papers (5–7 pages each).

Instructor(s): K. Pomeranz     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Some acquaintance with economics or with modern Chinese history may be helpful, but neither is required.
Equivalent Course(s): ECON 22020,HIST 24611

EALC 24622. Mediums and Contexts of Chinese Pictorial Art. 100 Units.

In this course, pictorial representations are approached and interpreted, first and foremost, as concrete, image-bearing objects and architectural structures—as portable scrolls, screens, albums, and fans, as well as murals in Buddhist cave-temples and tombs, and relief carvings on offering shrines and sarcophagi. The lectures and discussion investigate the inherent features of these forms, as well as their histories, viewing conventions, audiences, ritual/social functions, and the roles these forms played in the construction and development of pictorial images.

Instructor(s): Wu Hung     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 34602,EALC 34622,ARTH 24602

EALC 24650. Chinese Pagoda. 100 Units.

More often than not, the Chinese pagoda is considered the most representative of Buddhist architecture in pre-modern China. It is so ubiquitous that many have forgotten the fact that the pagoda actually has a non-Chinese origin; and its vertical building form – rather than the more usual, horizontal sprawl of traditional Chinese architecture – betrays a history that is everything but typical or representative of Chinese Buddhist architecture. Instead of seeing it merely as a building, accordingly, the course will investigate the ways in which the Chinese pagoda was uniquely conceived and constructed as a symbol, artifact, site, structure, space, etc., created to serve specific religious purposes, thereby exerting or evoking specific meanings that engaged both religious and nonreligious ideas and issues in pre-modern China. 

Instructor(s): W. Lin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 34650,EALC 34650,ARTH 24650

EALC 24950. Fictions of Selfhood in Modern Japanese Literature. 100 Units.

As Japanese leaders in the mid-19th century faced the threat of colonization at the hands of the Western powers, they launched a project to achieve “Civilization and Enlightenment,” quickly transforming Japan into a global power that possessed its own empire. In the process fiction became a site for both political engagement and retreat. A civilized country, it was argued, was supposed to boast “literature” as one of its Fine Arts. This literature was charged with representing the inner life of its characters, doing so in a modern national language that was supposed to be a transparent medium of communication. Between the 1880s and the early 1900s, a new language, new literary techniques, and a new set of ideologies were constructed to produce the “self” in novels and short stories. As soon as these new practices were developed, however, they became the objects of parody and ironic deconstruction. Reading key literary texts from the 1880s through the 1930s, as well as recent scholarship, this course will re-trace this historical and literary unfolding, paying special attention to the relationship between language and subjectivity. All readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): M. Bourdaghs     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Limit: 25
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34950

EALC 25301. Inventing the Chinese Short Story. 100 Units.

This class will trace the emergence of the vernacular short story as a new genre in the late Ming and early Qing. We will focus on the seveteenth-century story collections of Feng Menglong, Ling Mengchu, Aina Jushi, and Li Yu, whose stories map the social whole of late imperial China—from merchant schemes to courtesan romances, from the friendships of students to the follies of emperors. Alongside close readings of selected stories, we will examine the structure, sources, and publication histories of these collections and locate them in a broader discussion of the meanings and functions of vernacular literature. All readings in English, though students with Chinese reading ability will be encouraged to read the original texts

Instructor(s): Ariel Fox     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 35301,FNDL 25305

EALC 26515. Literature of the Fantastic and Operatic Adaptation. 100 Units.

This co-taught interdisciplinary course, offered through the Gray Center for Arts and Inquiry, explores literature of the fantastic (here including ghost stories and fairy tales) and the adaptation of such materials into opera, primary “Western-style” opera but also including some examples from Chinese opera. We will read some theoretical essays on adaptation, trans- or re-mediality, and the uncanny, but our focus will be on concrete examples and the historical arc of their transformation (which often entailed at least one intermediary step from story to play on the way to opera). This history, as in the famous case of Turandot, often involves an interesting chain of East-West crossings, misappropriations, and reappropriations; Chinoiserie has been a potent force in the history of Western opera and, in a new form, is currently in vogue again (at least judging from the recent proliferation of Chinese-themed Western-style or fusion operas being created and staged). We will select several specific operas or excerpts from opera as cases, reading their libretti, studying their music, and watching select productions on recorded media.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 36515,TAPS 26515,TAPS 36515,MUSI 24618,MUSI 34618

EALC 27907. Asian Wars of the Twentieth Century. 100 Units.

This course examines the political, economic, social, cultural, racial, and military aspects of the major Asian wars of the twentieth century: the Pacific War, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War. At the beginning of the course we pay particular attention to just war doctrines and then use two to three books for each war (along with several films) to examine alternative approaches to understanding the origins of these wars, their conduct, and their consequences.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 27900,EALC 37907,HIST 37900,HIST 27900

EALC 28010. Archaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions, World Heritage. 100 Units.

Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to upper-level undergrads with consent of instructor only.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 26765,ANTH 36765,EALC 48010

EALC 29100. History of Modern China 1. 100 Units.

This lecture course presents the main intellectual, political, economic, and social trends in modern China. The course covers ideological and organization structures, as well as the social movements that define a process variously described in Western literature as modernization, reform, and revolution (or political development). Emphasis is on institutional and intellectual developments during this period, especially in the twentieth century. Some attention is paid to historiographic analysis and criticism. Readings are in the English-language secondary literature.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24300

EALC 29500-29600. Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II.

One quarter of this sequence may be counted for credit in the major.

EALC 29500. Senior Thesis Tutorial I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

EALC 29600. Senior Thesis Tutorial II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

EALC 29700. Senior Thesis Tutorial-3. 100 Units.

The spring quarter section of the Senior Thesis Tutorial is devoted to making corrections and rewrites to the B.A. Paper, which is usually due to the Reader at the end of winter quarter.

Instructor(s): arranged     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): EALC 29500 and/or EALC 29600
Note(s): Students continue to meet with the Preceptor for help with their papers.


Contacts

Chair


Jacob Eyferth
Wb 301H
773.834.1677
Email

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Ariel Fox
Wb 301J
773.702.7030
Email

Administrative Contacts

Departmental Coordinator
Dawn Brennan
Wb 301
773.702.1255
Email

Department Assistant
Claire Ptaschinski
Wb 301
773.702.8549
Email