Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Summary of Requirements | Bachelor's Thesis and Honors | Grading | Minor Program in East Asian Languages and Civilizations | Courses

Department Website: http://ealc.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations (EALC) offers a BA program in East Asian studies that introduces students to the traditional and modern civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, and provides them with the opportunity to achieve a basic reading and speaking knowledge of Chinese, Japanese, and Korean. This program is interdisciplinary and students may take relevant courses in both the humanities and the social sciences.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in EALC. Information follows the description of the major.

Program Requirements

Students must take 13 courses toward an EALC major, with the possibility of placing out of three language credits. No courses may be double-counted toward general education requirements or minors requirements.

Students who plan to major in EALC are strongly encouraged (but not required) to meet the general education requirement in civilization studies by taking EALC 10800-10900-11000 Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III. This sequence is cross-listed with HIST 15100-15200-15300 Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

All EALC majors are required to take a three-quarter, second-year sequence in East Asian languages and to take EALC 27105 Concentrator's Seminar: Issues in East Asian Civilization, usually offered in the Winter Quarter.

To graduate with an EALC major, students must demonstrate competency in a primary East Asian language that is equivalent to at least two years of study through course work or petition. A beginning language sequence in the primary East Asian language cannot be counted as credit toward the major.

Three courses toward the major may be either an additional year of the primary East Asian language or a year of a secondary East Asian language. This language credit must be earned by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers. Students may use up to a total of six language courses to count toward their major and may not place out of more than three language credits: No matter the language proficiency, all students must take at least ten courses toward the major. A minimum of three of these courses should be in the same discipline (e.g., history, literature, art history). A maximum of six approved courses taken while studying abroad may be counted toward program requirements by petition.

Students wishing to meet their general education requirement with a sequence other than East Asian Civ, may take any East Asian Civ sequence course as a regular “content” course and count it toward the major.

Before declaring their major in EALC, students must meet with the director of undergraduate studies (typically before the end of their second year) to discuss their areas of interest.

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in EALC. Information follows the description of the major.

Summary of Requirements

Three courses in a second-year East Asian language *300
EALC 27105Concentrator's Seminar: Issues in East Asian Civilization100
Nine courses related to East Asia (three of which may be a further year of the same language, or a year of a second East Asian language, and three of which should be in one discipline)900
Total Units1300
*

Or credit for the equivalent as determined by petition.

Bachelor's Thesis and Honors

Students who have maintained an overall GPA of 3.25 or higher are eligible for honors. Students who do not wish to be considered for honors are not required to submit a bachelor's thesis for graduation. However, all students are eligible to write a bachelor's thesis upon submitting an acceptable proposal to the department. Students typically choose an adviser for their BA project in Spring Quarter of their third year. The project must be approved by both the adviser and the director of undergraduate studies early in the student's fourth year, typically by third week of Autumn Quarter. Interested students should consult the director of undergraduate studies for details concerning the proposal.

Students may not use the optional BA paper in this major to meet the BA paper or project requirement in another major. Students who wish to discuss an exception to this policy should consult the director of undergraduate studies before the end of their third year. Consent to use a single paper or project requires the approval of both program chairs on a form available from the College adviser. To be eligible for honors, students must enroll in Autumn and Winter Quarters of EALC 29500-29600 Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II. EALC 29500-29600 Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II may count as one credit toward the major. The BA paper must be substantially complete by the end of Winter Quarter. The BA paper may draw on material from other classes in the major; however, to receive credit for the Senior Thesis Tutorial and to be considered for honors, the student must write a paper that represents significant additional work. The BA paper is read by two members of the department and, if judged to be of A quality, the student is recommended for graduation with honors. Length and scope of the project should be agreed upon in consultation with the adviser. Use of original language material is desirable but not required.

Grading

Students must receive quality grades in all courses taken to meet requirements in the major.

Minor Program in East Asian Languages and Civilizations

Students in other fields of study may complete a minor in EALC. The minor in EALC requires a total of seven courses chosen in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. No more than three of these courses may be in an East Asian language (neither first-year modern language courses nor credit by petition may be used for this language option). Students who plan to pursue an EALC minor are encouraged to take EALC 10800-10900-11000 Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III to meet the general education requirement in civilization studies. EALC minors are not required to take EALC 27105.

Students who elect the minor program in EALC must meet with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor by submitting a form obtained from their College adviser. Students choose courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to the student's College adviser by the deadline above on a form obtained from the adviser.

Courses in the minor (1) may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and (2) may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers. 

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Chinese Courses

CHIN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. By the end of Spring Quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. In Spring Quarter, students are required to submit a video project for the Chinese Video Project Award. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. A drill session with the TA is held one hour a week in addition to scheduled class time. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 10100. Elementary Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies

CHIN 10200. Elementary Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 10300. Elementary Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

This three-quarter sequence introduces the fundamentals of modern Chinese. Section I and II are for "true beginners", and Section 3 is for "partial beginners". ("Partial beginners" are those who can speak Chinese but do not know how to read or write.) By the end of the spring quarter, students should have a basic knowledge of Chinese grammar and vocabulary. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing are equally emphasized. Accurate pronunciation is also stressed. A video project is required in Spring quarter, which will be entered in the competition for the Chinese Video Project Award. Maximum enrollment for each section is 20. Sections I and II meet for five one-hour enrollment for each section periods, plus an additional one-hour drill session with the TA each week. Section 3 meets for three one hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 11100-11200-11300. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter series is intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week. Consultation with instructor encouraged prior to enrollment. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 11100. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies

CHIN 11200. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11100, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 11300. First-Year Chinese for Bilingual Speakers III. 100 Units.

This three-quarter series is intended for bilingual speakers of Chinese. Our objectives include teaching students standard pronunciation and basic skills in reading and writing, while broadening their communication skills for a wider range of contexts and functions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11200, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to enhance students’ reading, listening, speaking, and writing skills by dealing with topics at an intermediate linguistic level. In addition to mastering the content of the textbook, students are required to complete two language projects each quarter. Chinese computing skills are also taught. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted. Two sections.

CHIN 20100. Intermediate Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 20200. Intermediate Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 20300. Intermediate Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Chinese I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures. We begin with discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China and then shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Discussion in Chinese required. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 20401. Advanced Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30100

CHIN 20402. Advanced Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20401, or CHIN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30200

CHIN 20403. Advanced Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

The goal of this sequence is to help students develop advanced proficiency in reading, listening, speaking, and writing. This sequence emphasizes more advanced grammatical structures, and requires discussion in Chinese on topics relevant to modern China. Over the course of this sequence, the emphasis will shift to authentic Chinese texts in an effort to better prepare students to deal with original Chinese source materials. Class meets for five one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20402, or CHIN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 30300

CHIN 20501-20502-20503. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. The class meets for three one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 20501. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 30300, or CHIN 20403, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41100

CHIN 20502. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41100, or CHIN 20501, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41200

CHIN 20503. Fourth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

 This sequence introduces a range of influential literary works and scholarly essays on Chinese cultural and social issues from the 1920s to the 1990s. Students will not only expand their vocabulary and knowledge of grammatical structures, but also learn sophisticated speaking and writing skills through intensive readings and discussions. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41200, or CHIN 20502, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41300

CHIN 20508-20509-20510. Readings in Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence involves advanced readings in classical Chinese with selections from philosophical and historical writings.

CHIN 20508. Readings in Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like. 

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21000, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 40800

CHIN 20509. Readings in Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 40800, or CHIN 20508, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 40900

CHIN 20510. Readings in Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 40900, or CHIN 20509, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): Not offered every year; quarters vary.
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 41000

CHIN 20601-20602-20603. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence is designed to prepare students for academic research and activities in a Chinese language environment. Modern classic essays, documentary film and TV broadcasts will be included among the teaching materials. Students will learn not only general listening, speaking and reading skills but also academic writing. Class meets for three one-hour sessions each week. Students can arrange two additional one-on-one tutorial sessions to prepare for assigned language projects.

CHIN 20601. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 41300, or CHIN 20503, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 51100

CHIN 20602. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51100, or CHIN 20601, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 51200

CHIN 20603. Fifth-Year Modern Chinese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 51200, or CHIN 20602, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): CHIN 51300

CHIN 20800-20900-21000. Elementary Literary Chinese I-II-III.

This sequence introduces the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects to the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students will read original texts of genres that include philosophy, memorials, and historical narratives. Spring Quarter is devoted exclusively to reading poetry. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

CHIN 20800. Elementary Literary Chinese I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 20900. Elementary Literary Chinese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20800, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 21000. Elementary Literary Chinese III. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the basic grammar of the written Chinese language from the time of the Confucian Analects of the literary movements at the beginning of the twentieth century. Students read original texts of various genres including philosophy, memorials, poetry, and historical narratives; and third quarter is devoted solely to reading poetry.

Instructor(s): D. Harper     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 20900, or placement, or consent of instructor

CHIN 21100-21200-21300. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I-II-III.

This three-quarter sequence offers texts from both Intermediate Modern Chinese (CHIN 20100-20200-20300) and Advanced Modern Chinese (CHIN 30100-30200-30300). Our goal is to help bilingual students further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Extensive reading is encouraged, and writing is strongly emphasized. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

CHIN 21100. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 11300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 21200. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

CHIN 21300. Accelerated Modern Chinese for Bilingual Speakers III. 100 Units.

The following credit is granted in Spring Quarter after successful completion of the year’s work: students receive course credits for CHIN 21100-21200-21300 and credit by petition for CHIN 30100-30200-30300. This three-quarter sequence offers texts from both Intermediate Modern Chinese (CHIN 20100-20200-20300) and Advanced Modern Chinese (CHIN 30100-30200-30300). Our goal is to help bilingual students further develop listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. Extensive reading is encouraged, and writing is strongly emphasized. The class meets for five one-hour sessions a week.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): CHIN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Note(s): No auditors permitted.

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Japanese Courses

JAPN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This is the first year of a three-year program, which is intended to provide students with a thorough grounding in modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading, and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 10100. Elementary Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10200. Elementary Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 10300. Elementary Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

This is the first year of a three-year program designed to provide students with a thorough grounding in Modern Japanese. Grammar, idiomatic expressions, and vocabulary are learned through oral work, reading, and writing in and out of class. Daily practice in speaking, listening, reading and writing is crucial. Students should plan to continue their language study through at least the second-year level to make their skills practical. The class meets for five fifty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 19000. Introduction to Classical Japanese. 100 Units.

Introduction to the grammar and style of premodern Japanese through a variety of literary texts. Emphasis will be placed on extensive grammatical analysis and translation. Work with original manuscripts will also be introduced as the course progresses. 

Instructor(s): R. Jackson     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Three years modern Japanese or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 39000

JAPN 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The emphasis on spoken language in the first half of the course gradually shifts toward reading and writing in the latter half. Classes conducted mostly in Japanese. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade. No auditors permitted.

JAPN 20100. Intermediate Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20200. Intermediate Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20300. Intermediate Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Modern Japanese I-II-III.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. Our goal is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. Classes conducted in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

JAPN 20401. Advanced Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30100

JAPN 20402. Advanced Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20401, or JAPN 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30200

JAPN 20403. Advanced Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

The third year marks the end of the basic modern language study. The purpose of the course is to help students learn to understand authentic written and spoken materials with reasonable ease. The texts are all authentic materials with some study aids. All work in Japanese. The class meets for three eighty-minute periods a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20402, or JAPN 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 30300

JAPN 20500-20600-20700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I-II-III.

This sequence is intended to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing, and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After each reading, students are encouraged to discuss the topic in class. Videos/DVDs are used to improve listening comprehension skills. There are also writing assignments. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week.

JAPN 20500. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20403, or JAPN 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 40500

JAPN 20600. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20500, or JAPN 40500, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 40600

JAPN 20700. Fourth-Year Modern Japanese III. 100 Units.

Open to both undergraduates and graduates. This course is designed to improve Japanese reading, speaking, writing and listening ability to the advanced high level as measured by the ACTFL (American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages) Proficiency Guidelines. Weekly assignments will require students to tackle modern Japanese texts of varying length and difficulty. Organized around a range of thought-provoking themes (from brain death and organ transplants to Japanese values on work and religion), reading assignments will include academic theses in psychology and anthropology, literary texts, and popular journalism. After completing the readings, students will be encouraged to discuss each topic in class. Videos/DVDs will be used to improve listening comprehension skills. There will also be writing assignments.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20600, or JAPN 40600, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JAPN 40700

JAPN 21200-21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I-II.

This sequence focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. Our goals are to get students accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and to enable them to speak with high fluency. To keep the balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Students are encouraged to watch videos and practice their speaking.

JAPN 21200. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

JAPN 21300. Intermediate Modern Japanese through Japanimation II. 100 Units.

This course focuses on learning spoken Japanese that is aimed at native speakers. The goals are getting accustomed to that sort of authentic Japanese and being able to speak with a high degree of fluency. To keep a balance, writing and reading materials are provided. Watching videos and practicing speaking are the keys to success in this course.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): JAPN 21200, or placement, or consent of instructor

East Asian Languages & Civilizations - Korean Courses

KORE 10100-10200-10300. Introduction to the Korean Language I-II-III.

This introductory sequence is designed to provide a basic foundation in modern Korean language and culture by focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Students in KORE 10100 begin by learning the complete Korean writing system (Hangul), which is followed by lessons focusing on basic conversational skills and grammatical structures. To provide sufficient opportunities to apply what has been learned in class, there are small group drill sessions, weekly Korean television drama screenings, and a number of other cultural activities (e.g., Korean New Year’s game competitions). The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 10100. Introduction to the Korean Language I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10200. Introduction to the Korean Language II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 10300. Introduction to the Korean Language III. 100 Units.

This introductory course is designed to provide beginners with a solid foundation in modern Korean focusing on the balanced development of the four basic language skills of speaking, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Along with basic conversational and grammatical patterns, the course introduces students to Korean culture through various channels such as Korean movies, music, and a number of other cultural activities.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20100-20200-20300. Intermediate Korean I-II-III.

As a continuation of KORE 10100-10200-10300, this sequence is intended to continue to build on students’ language skills with an emphasis on enhancing the speaking ability, presentational skills, composition writing skills, and usage of more complex constructions. Approximately 150 Chinese characters are introduced for the achievement of basic literacy and vocabulary expansion. The curriculum also includes media, authentic reading materials, and weekly Korean language table meetings to maximize cultural exposure and opportunities to apply Korean language skills in real life situations. The class meets for five fifty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20100. Intermediate Korean I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 10300, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20200. Intermediate Korean II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20100, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20300. Intermediate Korean III. 100 Units.

This course introduces readings from a wide selection of written styles including journalistic pieces, college-level textbooks and literary prose. The class focuses on exercises in reading comprehension and discussions on various topics/issues related to contemporary Korea. Some audio and videotapes (e.g., televised news programs, movies, and dramas) will be used in order to improve the students' capacity in advanced Korean. Classes are conducted in Koran and meet for eighty-minute periods two times a week.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20200, or placement, or consent of instructor

KORE 20401-20402-20403. Advanced Korean I-II-III.

This sequence introduces a wide selection of authentic reading materials from Korean newspaper articles, college-level textbooks, and literary prose as an entry point to discuss topics and issues in Korean society, culture, and history. The primary objective is further enhancement of advanced reading comprehension, composition writing, and presentational skills. In addition, Chinese character (Hanja) lessons are incorporated into each lesson with the purpose of expanding vocabulary to the advanced level. The class meets for two eighty-minute sessions a week. All courses in this sequence must be taken for a quality grade.

KORE 20401. Advanced Korean I. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 30100

KORE 20402. Advanced Korean II. 100 Units.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20401, or KORE 30100, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 30200

KORE 20403. Advanced Korean III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20402, or KORE 30200, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 30300

KORE 22200. Contemporary Korean Society and History through Fiction and Film. 100 Units.

This content-based language course is designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. We analyze cultural and historical issues in contemporary Korea through four contemporary short novels and related film and media. Other goals are to foster fluency, accuracy, and comprehension in reading authentic contemporary texts, as well as advancing language skills for formal presentation, discussion, and writing.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403 or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 42200

KORE 22300. Changing Identity of Contemporary Korean through Film and Literature. 100 Units.

This content-based language course is designed to meet the needs of high-advanced level students of Korean, including international/heritage language students who have studied in Korea up to the primary school levels. In particular, we deal with how contemporary Korean society can be understood through the diverse perspectives of emergent minority groups. Topics include Korean language and identity, gender and sexuality, and Korea as a multi-ethnic society. Class activities include watching contemporary films featuring minorities in Korea. We also read essays written by minorities (e.g., Korean-Japanese, Russian-Korean) and Korean social activists. Student are encouraged to foster their own views on contemporary social issues through diverse activities of discussion, debate, presentation, and writing.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 20403, or KORE 30300, or placement, or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 42300

KORE 23100. Microeconomics and the Korean Economy. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): KORE 22100, or KORE 22200, or KORE 22300
Equivalent Course(s): KORE 53100

East Asian Languages & Civilizations Courses

EALC 10500. Topics in EALC: Major Works of East Asian Buddhism. 100 Units.

An exploration of key textual and artistic works of East Asian Buddhism, including Chinese translations of Indic scriptures such as the Lotus and Vimalakirti sutras, Chan/Soen/Zen treatises and dialogues, and important works of Buddhist visual and material culture, including shrine murals, devotional prints, reliquaries, and sculptures.

Instructor(s): P. Copp     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 28610

EALC 10600. Traditional E A Lit: Ghosts and the Fantastic. 100 Units.

What is a ghost? How and why are ghosts represented in particular forms in a particular culture at particular historical moments and how do these change as stories travel between cultures? This course will explore the complex meanings, both literal and figurative, of ghosts and the fantastic in traditional Chinese, Japanese, and Korean tales, plays, and films . Issues to be explored include: 1) the relationship between the supernatural, gender, and sexuality; 2) the confrontation of death and mortality; 3)  collective anxieties over the loss of the historical past  4) and the visualization (and exorcism) of ghosts through performance.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course can replace what used to be the Concentrators Seminar to fulfill a requirement as an EALC major.
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26006

EALC 10601. Traditional E Asian Lit: Crime & Punishment. 100 Units.

This course will investigate the literary production of justice in premodern East Asia. Drawing on Chinese, Japanese, and Korean literary traditions, we will read selections from novels, short stories, plays, and biographies that center around criminal acts and their aftermath, paying particular attention to the acts of textual interpretation and the performances of judgment in which character, author, and reader are simultaneously engaged. Over the course of the class, we will ask: What are the moral and narrative possibilities for rebels, pirates, and thieves? How can we account for the popularity of both outlaw romances and legal procedurals? How can earthly and karmic laws, central and local authorities, family and state commitments be reconciled? What do narratives of investigation and punishment tell us about the limits of human knowledge and the potential for redemption? What constitutes justice, and is it possible in this world or only the next?

Instructor(s): Ariel Fox     Terms Offered: Winter

EALC 10800-10900-11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

EALC 10800. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia I. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Summer,Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10800,SOSC 23500,HIST 15100

EALC 10900. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia II. 100 Units.

See sequence description.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Summer,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 10900,SOSC 23600,HIST 15200

EALC 11000. Introduction to the Civilizations of East Asia III. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This is a sequence on the civilizations of China, Japan, and Korea, with emphasis on major transformation in these cultures and societies from the Middle Ages to the present.

Instructor(s): B. Cumings     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to undergraduates only.
Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is not required.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 11000,SOSC 23700,HIST 15300

EALC 14111. Modern Japanese Poetry. 100 Units.

This class is a survey of major poets and movements of modern Japanese poetry in English translation. It will include a diverse selection of modern Japanese poetry, including classically influenced forms such as tanka and haiku, modern free verse, prose poetry, and avant-garde modes such as Surrealism and Constructivism. We will pay particular attention to poetry by women, queer poets, and other underrepresented groups.  The skills introduced here include how to close read and interpret poetry on an aesthetic and emotional level, how to connect poetry to its cultural and historical context, and how to write a paper of literary analysis that uses evidence from the text to make an argument.  No Japanese language ability required. Readings in Japanese will be available for those who are interested.

Instructor(s): M. S. Tarcov     Terms Offered: Winter

EALC 14801. History of the People's Republic of China. 100 Units.

Until quite recently, historians left the study of socialist China to sociologists and political scientists. Now, 40 years after Mao's death, Chinese socialism has definitely passed into history, and historians have begun to reassess the legacy of the Chinese revolution and the Mao years. Our course begins with the introduction of Marxist thought and Leninist organization techniques in the 1920s and the early stages of the revolution in Jiangxi and Yan'an. In the following weeks, we will discuss land reform and collectivization in the countryside, the socialist transformation of urban society, and the establishment of the basic institutions of socialism since the 1950s: the work units (danwei) that structured urban life, the rural collectives, and the hukou system that tied most people to their place of registration. While we will discuss political campaigns from the Campaign to Suppress Counterrevolutionaries to the Cultural Revolution and its aftermath, the focus will be on the factors that shaped the everyday life of urban and rural people: such things as the rationing of consumer goods and the politicization of interpersonal relations. One central theme in this course will be the legacy of state socialism and the impact of structures built in the Mao years on developments in postsocialist China. Depending on enrollment, the course will be held as a seminar or with alternating lectures and discussions. All readings will be in English.

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 14801

EALC 15100. Beginning the Chinese Novel. 100 Units.

This course will look at four of the most famous novels of pre-modern China: Romance of the Three Kingdoms, Water Margin, Journey to the West, and Dream of the Red Chamber. Deeply self-conscious about the process of their own creation and their place within the larger literary canon, these novels deploy multiple frames, philosophical disquisitions, authorial ciphers, invented histories, and false starts before the story can properly begin. By focusing on the first ten chapters of each novel, this course will serve as both an introduction to the masterworks of the Chinese novel and an exploration of the fraught beginnings of a new genre. All readings available in English.

Instructor(s): A. Fox     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 20301

EALC 15405. The Dao De Jing: Text, Philosophy, and Religion. 100 Units.

In this course, we will introduce the foundational text of the Daoist tradition: the Dao De Jing or Classic of Way and Virtue attributed to Laozi. One of the most translated classics in the world, the Dao De Jing contains a bewildering array of ideas written in terse and cryptic language. After a few introductory sessions examining the text’s historical background, date, and authorship, we will move on to consider critical analyses of the text and its manuscript counterparts excavated in China in the past few decades. As we will see, these manuscripts call into question the assumptions of traditional textual scholarship and pose new problems that are still being debated. The second half of the quarter will be devoted to the philosophical and religious aspects of the Dao De Jing. We will explore issues such as the meaning(s) of dao and de, the relationship between opposites, the concept of wu-wei (nonaction), the use of paradox and irony, mysticism, and self-cultivation. In the last two weeks, we will turn to look at the commentarial history of Dao De Jing in China as well as its reception in the West.

Instructor(s): B. Zhou     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 35405,RLST 28617

EALC 16911. Modern Japanese Art and Architecture. 100 Units.

This course takes the long view of modern Japanese art and architecture with a focus on the changing relationships between object and viewer in the 19th and 20th centuries. Beginning in the late eighteenth century with the flowering of revivalist and individualist trends and the explosion of creativity in the woodblock prints of Hokusai and others, we will then turn to examine Western-style architecture and painting in the late nineteenth century; socialism, art criticism, and the emergence of the avant garde in the early twentieth century. Also covered are interwar architectural modernism, art during World War II, and postwar movements such as Gutai and Mono-ha. No familiarity with art history or Japan is required.

Instructor(s): C. Foxwell     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 16910

EALC 17107. Chinese Calligraphy and Civilization. 100 Units.

If the invention of writing is regarded a mark of early civilization, the practice of calligraphy is a unique and sustaining aspect of Chinese culture. This course introduces concepts central to the study of Chinese calligraphy from pre-history to the present. We discuss materials and techniques; aesthetics and communication; copying/reproduction/schema and creativity/expression/personal style; public values and the scholar's production; orthodoxy and eccentricity; and official scripts and the transmission of elite culture through wild and magic writing by "mad" monks.

Instructor(s): P. Foong     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 17000 through 18999 course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 17107

EALC 17110. Sinotopos: Chinese Landscape Representation and Interpretation. 100 Units.

This course surveys major areas of study in the Chinese landscape painting tradition, focusing on the history of its pictorial representation during pre-modern eras. Areas for consideration may include: first emergence and subsequent developments of the genre in court and literati arenas; landscape aesthetics and theoretical foundations; major attributed works in relation to archaeological evidence. Emphasis is on artistic options and the exercise of choice within the context of social, political, religious, and economic forces. Students are expected to gain skills in formal analysis through looking with reading, and a critical perspective on the processes of art historical placement and interpretation based on assigned readings in secondary literature.

Instructor(s): P. Foong     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): For nonmajors, this course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 17710

EALC 17207. Image and Word in Chinese Art. 100 Units.

The dynamic interplay between painting, poetry, and calligraphy in the Chinese tradition is encapsulated by Su Shi's observation that there is "poetry in painting, and painting in poetry." Further articulation of this truism requires us to examine developing modes of visual expression, and to define ways in which a painting might be "written," or a text "imaged." We consider case studies which demonstrate increasingly fluid negotiation between these mediums: from pictures that labor in "illustrative" juxtaposition with didactic texts (image vs. word), to representations of the natural world that are inscribed with poetry as sites of social and cultural identity (image cf. word), and which achieve formal and conceptual integration in expressive purpose (imageword).

Instructor(s): P. Foong     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 17000 through 18999 course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 17207

EALC 17211. Arts of Medieval Japan. 100 Units.

The arts of medieval Japan are known for their material luxury and otherworldly splendor, as in images of Buddhist paradise, and, conversely, for their rusticity and understatement, as exemplified by developments in ink painting, architecture, and ceramics. This course will examine the worldviews, historical circumstances, and practices of making and appreciation that underscore both trends. We will explore how the aesthetic tensions within and between objects relate to the social and political tensions among groups during this age of unrest and instability. The course spans the period between 1200 and 1550.

Instructor(s): C. Foxwell     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. This course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 17211

EALC 19800. History of Ancient China. 100 Units.

This course will survey the history of China from the late Shang dynasty (c. 1200 B.C.) through the end of the Qin dynasty (207 B.C.). We will explore both traditional and recently unearthed sources, and will take a multi-disciplinary approach.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 39800

EALC 19909. History of Chinese Theater. 100 Units.

This course covers the history of Chinese theater from its emergence as a full-fledged art form in the 10th to 11th centuries (the Northern Song) up through its incorporation into modern urban life and nationalist discourse in the first decades of the 20th century (the Republican period). In addition to reading selections from masterpieces of Chinese dramatic literature such as Orphan of Zhao, Romance of the Western Chamber, and The Peony Pavilion, we will pay particular attention to the different types of venues, occasions, and performance practices associated with different genres of opera at different moments in time. A central theme will be the changing status of the entertainer and the cultural meanings assigned to acting. All texts to be read in English translation.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): An additional graduate session may be offered weekly or biweekly if there is sufficient demand.
Equivalent Course(s): TAPS 28454

EALC 20210. Arts of Asia: Korea. 100 Units.

This course is an introduction to the visual arts of Korea from prehistory to the contemporary period and is organized both chronologically and thematically. The course considers objects within a variety of contexts (i.e., archaeological, cultural, historical, social, and ritual/religious) to both examine the meaning and function of the objects and to consider the issues of cultural transmission and exchange. In addition to better understand Korean culture, the aim of the course is to develop the skills of formal analysis, critical thinking, and writing about visual arts.

Instructor(s): E. Hyun     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): Students must attend first class to confirm enrollment. For nonmajors, any ARTH 14000 through 16999 course meets the general education requirement in the arts.
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 16109

EALC 20330. City and Text in Late Imperial China. 100 Units.

This course will ask how the urban transformation of late imperial society was experienced and understood by writers and readers across the cities of the lower Yangzi region. What kinds of spaces were made possible by the late imperial city? How were these new physical and imaginative spaces—both generating and generated by the political, ritual, and commercial functions of the city—made legible and meaningful? We will look at attempts to represent and interpret the urban landscape in a range of literary genres (poetry, vernacular fiction, diaries, travelogues), visual materials (maps, landscape paintings), and inscribed objects (steles, rocks, walls). In addition to these primary materials, we will also engage with the growing body of scholarly work on the premodern city in diverse fields such as local history, architecture, and religion. Each student will focus on one city, which will serve as a lens through which to view the various thematic issues addressed in our discussions.

Instructor(s): A. Fox     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 44103,EALC 40330

EALC 20404. Reading the Yijing. 100 Units.

In this course, we will read both the original text of the Yijing and also related texts, beginning with Shang oracle-bone inscriptions and proceeding through Warring States, Qin, and Han divinatory texts.

Instructor(s): E. Shaughnessy     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Classical Chinese reading ability
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 30404

EALC 20421. Japanese Documentary. 100 Units.

This course will examine documentary film in Japan, beginning with its prewar origins and into the present. It will also look at other forms of documentary media, such as photograpy and written reportage. We will pay particular attention to the political and social movements in which these filmmakers and artists participated--from Pacific War-era propaganda to 1960s radicalism. We will also look at theoretical approaches to documentary produced in Japan and elsewhere. What kind of reality does documentary seek to represent? How is this reality constructed--both aesthetically and politically?

Instructor(s): Marianne Tarcov     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 30421,CMST 34921,CMST 24921

EALC 20441. Gender, Sexuality, Security Culture, and Protest in Post 3-11. 100 Units.

As seen in the visual artist Rokudenashiko’s recent conviction for obscenity for disseminating artistic portrayals of her own vagina, contemporary Japan has faced a heightened level of monitoring and policing, both by the state and in other less formalized realms of society, of marginal and subversive expressions of gender and sexuality. Our primary texts come from popular culture, film, visual art, and literature, which have provided lightning rods for controversy and protest in this charged climate. This course investigates the fraught relationship between marginal expressions of gender and sexuality on the one hand, and society’s notions of security and safety on the other. Whose safety matters? How do women and other minorities use artistic production, within and alongside the realm of popular culture, to advocate for their own conceptions of safety and what it might mean? From the erotic performance of feminine agency found in soft-core pornographic pink films, to the slippage between fantasy and reality found in the staged violence of women’s pro-wrestling, to the eco-feminism of activist Ishimure Michiko, and beyond, this course will explore the state of gender, femininity, and sexual politics in Japan, from the 1960s on into the present day.

Instructor(s): M Tarcov     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 30441,GNSE 20441,GNSE 30441

EALC 22024. Mystery Fiction and Japanese Modernity. 100 Units.

This course explores the shifting forms of Japanese mystery fiction and the functions the mystery genre has served both within modern Japanese literature and in Japanese mass culture as a whole. On the one hand, mystery writing in Japanese has proven to be a resilient and popular brand of “low” culture, often excluded from the realm of “pure” literature due to its focus on violence, lawlessness, and perversity. On the other, the treatment of these recurring themes according to established “rules” of the mystery genre has helped promote the creation of a reading public that shares a set of taboos and mores. Meanwhile, the problems tackled incisively by Japanese mystery works are often reflections of the larger societal problems posed by their time—including Westernization, imperial expansion, defeat in the Second World War, the arrival of economic prosperity, the collapse of the bubble economy, political corruption, and a perception of decline in the cohesiveness of community. Through examining mysteries, we will hope to arrive at a better understanding of how Japanese literature and society speak to and alter one another. Course materials include short stories, novels, and film from the 1920s to the present day by such writers and directors as Edogawa Rampo, Matsumoto Seicho, Miyabe Miyuki, Tanizaki Jun’ichiro, Kirino Natsuo, Kurosawa Akira, and Ichikawa Kon. All readings for this course are available in English.

Instructor(s): N. Lambrecht     Terms Offered: Spring

EALC 22027. The Modern Japanese Novel. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to modern Japanese literature through the form of the novel. We begin in the late-nineteenth century, when a new generation of writers sought to come to terms with this world historical form, and end in the twenty-first, with writers trying to sustain the form through graphic art and digital media. Along the way, we will consider some of the key debates that have structured the novel's evolution: between elite and mass forms, truth and fiction, art and politics, self and other, native and foreign. The course also looks at how the form has evolved in response to shifting modes of cultural production and shifting patterns of literary consumption. Authors covered will include Natsume Soseki, Tanizaki Jun'ichiro, Kawabata Yasunari, Oe Kenzaburo, Tawada Yoko, Murakami Haruki, and Mizumura Minae. All works will be read in English.

Instructor(s): H. Long     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Undergrads only

EALC 22032. Future Fantasies: Science Fiction and Media History in Japan. 100 Units.

We will examine three important moments of confluence between Japanese media history and the development of science fiction media, with the goal of understanding more about society's relationship with its science and technology.  This course also aims to give you skills for reading popular cultural texts critically, thinking comparatively, and making rigorous academic arguments.  Topics covered include the rise of cinema, science and empire, the bomb and the Cold War, cyborg embodiment, and networked sociality.  No Japanese proficiency is required.

Instructor(s): B. White     Terms Offered: Winter

EALC 23001. Censorship in East Asia: The Case of Colonial Korea. 100 Units.

This course examines the operation and consequences of censorship in the Japanese Empire, with focus on its effects in colonial Korea. It begins with two basic premises: first, both the Japanese colonial authorities’ measures of repression, and the Korean responses to them, can be understood as noticeably more staunch and sophisticated when compared to any other region of the Empire; and second, the censorship practices in Korea offers itself as a case that is in itself an effective point of comparison to better understand other censorship operations in general and the impact of these operations across different regions. With a view to probing an inter- and intra-relationship between censorship practices among a variety of imperial/colonial regions, this course studies the institutions related to censorship, the human agents involved in censorship—both external and internal—and texts and translations that were produced in and outside of Korea, and were subject to censorship. Overall, the course stresses the importance of establishing a comparative understanding of the functions of censorship, and on the basis of this comparative thinking we will strive to conceptualize the characteristics of Japanese colonial censorship in Korea.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 33001,EALC 43000

EALC 24255. Everyday Maoism: Work, Daily Life, and Material Culture in Socialist China. 100 Units.

The history of Maoist China is usually told as a sequence of political campaigns: land and marriage reform, nationalization of industry, anti-rightist campaign, Great Leap Forward, Cultural Revolution, etc. Yet for the majority of the Chinese population, the revolution was as much about material changes as about politics: about the two-story brick houses, electric lights, and telephones (loushang louxia, diandeng dianhua) that socialism promised; about new work regimes and new consumption patterns—or, in many cases, about the absence of positive change in their material lives. If we want to understand what socialism meant for different groups of people, we have to look at the "beautiful new things" of socialist modernity, at changes in dress codes and apartment layouts, at electrification and city planning. We have to analyze workplaces and labor processes in order to understand how socialism changed the way people worked. We also have to look at the rationing of consumer goods and its effects on people's daily lives. The course has a strong comparative dimension: we will look at the literature on socialism in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe to see how Chinese socialism differed from its cousins. Another aim is methodological. How can we understand the lives of people who wrote little and were rarely written about? To which extent can a focus on material artifacts and daily work routines help us to understand people's life experiences?

Instructor(s): J. Eyferth     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34255,HIST 24507,HIST 34507

EALC 24306. Twentieth-Century China through Great Trials. 100 Units.

This course begins in the late nineteenth century and concludes at the present day. From international political negotiations to show trials, from struggle sessions to investigative journalism, the course will trace China's turbulent twentieth century through a series of trials, occurring at pivotal historical junctures. Students will witness public and private "justice" in action both in and beyond the courtroom and across the century's radically different governmental regimes. Readings and lectures will address the broader historical context as well as details of the various trials featured in the course.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 24307

EALC 24308. Republican China. 100 Units.

Increasingly historians of modern China have begun to turn to the complex decades between the fall of China's last dynasty and the establishment of the People's Republic of China, not merely to better understand the emergence of Communism or the fate of imperial traditions, but as a significant period in its own right. In addition to examining the major social and political changes of this period, this seminar course will explore the emergence of new cultural, artistic, and literary genres in a time notorious for its turbulence. Readings explore both new and classic interpretations of the period, as well as recent scholarship, which benefits from expanding access to Chinese archives. Students should expect regular short writing assignments. The course will culminate with each student choosing either a historiographical final paper or a close reading of a primary source in light of the issues explored in the course.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34308,EALC 34308,HIST 24308

EALC 24333. Actors and Playwrights in Chinese Theater. 100 Units.

Before there were playwrights, there were actors. In the Chinese case, representations of actors found in tombs or paintings (10th-11th c.) predate any extant plays; but by the 13th century, playwrights like Guan Hanqing were already producing literary masterpieces with courtesan-actresses starring in big public urban theaters. With each subsequent era and dramatic genre, the algorithm governing the relative importance of actors and playwrights shifts. This course will examine the development of Chinese theater up to the present day through a focus on the changing dynamics between actors and playwrights, troupes and patrons, public and private theatrical spaces. Thematic clusters to be explored include 1) dramatic character/role type/ actor/ actress/ star; 2) cross-dressing/gender/ sexuality; 4) literary texts/ performance/visual images; and 5) plays within plays.  We will read works such as The Injustice to Dou E (14th c.), The Peony Pavilion (1598), The Peach Blossom Fan (1699), Guan Hanqing (1958), and Secret Love in Peach Blossom Land  (1986). Students may have the option of doing a creative final project in lieu of a final paper. All texts to be read in English translation, but students with Chinese are encouraged to read materials in the original.  Previous courses on China or on theater are helpful but not required.

Instructor(s): J. Zeitlin     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34333,TAPS 28469

EALC 24500. Reading Qing Documents. 100 Units.

Reading and discussion of nineteenth- and early twentieth-century historical political documents, including such forms as memorials, decrees, local gazetteers, diplomatic communications, essays, and the like.

Instructor(s): G. Alitto     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Third-year Chinese level or approval of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34500,HIST 34500,HIST 24500

EALC 24510. Gender and Sexuality in Modern China. 100 Units.

This course explores changing ideas about gender and sexuality in modern China. "Modern" in the context of this course signifies a period in which China faced radical new paradigms for the role of sex and the meaning of gender. Although much that we will read describes the twentieth century, we will also discover that innovations in gender roles are not unique to the past hundred years. Nor, despite long-standing stereotypes to the contrary, has it only been the privilege of the elites to disrupt the traditional male-female binary. Readings will address such themes as the ways in which gender defines patterns in family life, in politics and under the law; marriage and homosexuality; prostitution and trafficking; performance and cross dressing; the implementation of the one child policy; gender roles in minority communities; and China's handling of HIV/AIDS. We will consider the role of old Confucian hierarchies and scrutinize the links between industrialization, women's liberation, nationalism, and the communist movement. Through these diverse topics, this seminar aims to expand students' conception of the areas in which gender plays a relevant and influential role.

Instructor(s): J. Ransmeier     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34510,EALC 34510,GNSE 24510,GNSE 34510,HIST 24510

EALC 24606. Japanese History through Film and Other Texts. 100 Units.

This course deals with theories of time, history, and representation while making those ideas and problems concrete through a study of the way in which history in Japan has been mediated by the cinema. It explores the "timefulness" of cinematic images without assuming their automatic relation to the world or dismissing films for their invention, compression, and elision of historical facts. A close reading of a wide range of films produced in and about Japan in tandem with primary and secondary materials on theories of time, images, and national history will highlight the historicity and history of both film and Japan.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): All readings are in English; no knowledge of Japanese is required.
Equivalent Course(s): SIGN 26008,HIST 24601

EALC 24614. Chinese Musicals. 100 Units.

Are there Chinese musicals? It very much depends on what we would consider a Chinese musical. To answer Adrian Martin’s call for “Musical Mutations: Before, Beyond and Against Hollywood,” this course will look for Chinese musicals in both obvious and unlikely places. The “musical mutations” under discussion include traditional opera adaptation, back-stage opera film, martial-arts opera film, Maoist opera film, musical comedy, song-and-dance film, melo-drama, Hong Kong musical, and most certainly the “apocalyptic” musical named by Martin, The Hole (Tsai Ming-liang, 1998). The tripartite developments of Chinese-language cinemas provide a privileged site to chart the ways the musical genre expands, transforms, and rejuvenates across time and borders.

Instructor(s): X. Dong     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Pre-requisite(s): CMST 10100, ARTH 20000, ENGL 10800, ARTV 25300, or consent of instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): CMST 24615

EALC 24700. Histories of Japanese Religion. 100 Units.

An examination of select texts, moments, and problems to explore aspects of religion, religiosity, and religious institutions of Japan's history.

Instructor(s): J. Ketelaar     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34700,EALC 34700,RLST 22505,HREL 34705,HIST 24700

EALC 24706. Edo/Tokyo: Society and the City in Japan. 100 Units.

This course will explore the cultural and cultural history of Edo/Tokyo from its origins in the early seventeenth century through circa 1945. Issues to be explored include the configuration of urban space and its transformation over time in relation to issues of status, class, and political authority; the formation of the "city person" as a form of identity; and the tensions between the real city of lived experience and the imagined city of art and literature. We will pay particular attention to two periods of transformation, the 1870s when the modernizing state made Tokyo its capital, and the period of reconstruction after the devastating earthquake of 1923. Assignments include a final research paper of approximately 15 to 18 pages.

Instructor(s): S. Burns     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 34706,CRES 34706,EALC 34706,CRES 24706,HIST 24706

EALC 24810. Literature and Performance in Medieval Japan. 100 Units.

This course acquaints students with some of the major genres of medieval Japanese literature and performance, including setsuwa (explanatory tales), sarugaku (“monkey music”) and dengaku (“field music”), imayō (popular songs), gunki monogatari (warrior tales), and the noh and kyōgen theaters. We will explore the religious, social, and political contexts from which these genres emerge, as well as the rich and intricate ways in which performance and literature overlap throughout the medieval period. Specific topics of interest include the significance of “medievality” in conceptions of Japanese culture, the shifting relationship between elite and commoner culture, the emergence of a “national” culture, and the role of women authors and performers. We will read primary texts in translation, examine visual materials, and watch and listen to recordings of contemporary performances. Additionally, we will read relevant secondary scholarship in order to broaden our understanding of both the medieval texts themselves and their reception over time and space. No Japanese language ability is necessary, although students who have taken Japanese literature or culture courses will be particularly well prepared.

Instructor(s): A. Lazarus     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 34810,TAPS 38495,TAPS 28495

EALC 25000. Modern Korean Women's Fiction. 100 Units.

With focus upon gendered aspects of the development of modern Korean literature, the course examines selected literary works by Korean female writers. Students read poetic and prose texts with a view to identifying and articulating gender-specific concerns and stylistic patterns. While discussing chosen fictional texts, the class also examines a selection of relevant nonfictional sources and documents that help us understand the literary stakes facing the writers. No knowledge of Korean is required.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 35000,GNSE 25000

EALC 26206. The Yi Jing. 100 Units.

In this course, we will survey the creation and development of the I Ching or Yi Jing, one of the most unique classics in world literature. Originally used as a divination manual, the Yi Jing came to be viewed as the paramount wisdom text in the Chinese intellectual tradition.  We will pay equal attention to how the text was first created and to how it came to be interpreted over the course of Chinese history. All readings will be in English, though students taking the course for graduate credit will be encouraged to extend their readings to Chinese sources.

Instructor(s): E. Shaugnessy     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): FNDL 26208,EALC 36206

EALC 26800. Korean Literature, Foreign Criticism. 100 Units.

Ever since the introduction of the modern/Western concept of “literature” to early twentieth-century Korea, literary production, consumption, and reproduction have gone hand in hand with the reception of the trends of “criticism” and “theory” propagated elsewhere, in the West in particular. This course examines the relationship between the ideas of “indigenous” and “foreign” as embodied by Korean writers in the fields of creative writing, journalism, and academia with a view to engaging and interrogating the idea of “national literature” and its institutional manifestations. It further examines artistic and theoretical endeavors by Korean writers and intellectuals to critically reflect upon and move beyond the unquestioned linguistic, ideological, and ethno-national boundaries.

Instructor(s): K. Choi     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 36800

EALC 27014. Voices from the Iron House: Lu Xun’s Works. 100 Units.

An exploration of the writings of Lu Xun (1881–1936), widely considered the greatest Chinese writer of the past century. We will read short stories, essays, prose poetry, and personal letters against the backdrop of the political and cultural upheavals of early 20th century China and in dialogue with important English-language scholarly works.

Instructor(s): P. Iovene     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 37014

EALC 27708. Feminine Space in Chinese Art. 100 Units.

“Feminine space” denotes an architectural or pictorial space that is perceived, imagined, and represented as a woman. Unlike an isolated female portrait or an individual female symbol, a feminine space is a spatial entity: an artificial world composed of landscape, vegetation, architecture, atmosphere, climate, color, fragrance, light, and sound, as well as selected human occupants and their activities. This course traces the construction of this space in traditional Chinese art (from the second to the eighteenth centuries) and the social/political implications of this constructive process.

Instructor(s): Wu Hung     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ARTH 39400,EALC 37708,ARTH 29400

EALC 28010. Archaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions, World Heritage. 100 Units.

Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China. This course intends to examine the history of research, important archaeological finds, and the role of Anyang studies in the field of Chinese archaeology. While the emphasis is on archaeological finds and the related research, this course will also attempt to define Anyang in the modern social and cultural contexts in terms of world heritage, national and local identity, and the looting and illegal trade of antiquities.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open to upper-level undergrads with consent of instructor only.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 48010

EALC 28015. Archaeology of Bronze Age China. 100 Units.

“Bronze Age” in China conventionally refers to the time period from ca. 2000 BC to about 500 BC, during which bronze, an alloy of copper and other metals such as tin and lead, was the predominant medium used by the society, or to be more precise, the elite classes of the society. Bronze objects, in the forms of vessels, weapons, and musical instruments, were reserved for the upper ruling class of the society and were used mostly as paraphernalia during rituals and feasting. “Bronze Age” in China also indicates the emergence and eventual maturation of states with their bureaucratic systems, the presence of urban centers, a sophisticated writing system, and advanced craft producing industries, especially metal production. This course surveys the important archaeological finds of Bronze Age China and the theoretical issues such as state formation, craft production, writing, bureaucratic systems, urbanization, warfare, and inter-regional interaction, etc. It emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach with readings and examples from anthropology, archaeology, art history, and epigraphy. This course will also visit the Smart Museum, the Field Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago to take advantage of the local collections of ancient Chinese arts and archaeology.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Open to advanced undergrads with consent of instructor only.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 48015

EALC 29500-29600. Senior Thesis Tutorial I-II.

One quarter of this sequence may be counted for credit in the major.

EALC 29500. Senior Thesis Tutorial I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

EALC 29600. Senior Thesis Tutorial II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of EALC Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.


Contacts

Chair


Jacob Eyferth
Wb 301H
773.834.1677
Email

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Ariel Fox
Wb 301J
773.702.7030
Email

Administrative Contacts

Departmental Coordinator
Dawn Brennan
Wb 301
773.702.1255
Email

Department Assistant
TBA