Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | Introductory Courses and General Education | Summary of Requirements | Grades | Honors BA Process | Anthropology Courses

Department Website: http://anthropology.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

Anthropology encompasses a variety of historical and comparative approaches to human cultural and biological diversity, ranging from the study of human evolution to the study of cultures as systems of meaningful symbols. Faculty in the Department of Anthropology specialize in sociocultural, linguistic, archaeological, and biological anthropological approaches. They take up questions of anatomy, ecology, and genomics, as well as psychological, economic, philosophical, and historical issues, often in comparative perspective. Anthropology can lead (through graduate study) to careers in research and teaching in university and museum settings. More often it provides a background for further work in other disciplines of the social sciences, humanities, and biological sciences, as well as for professional careers in government, non-governmental work, business, law, medicine, social services, and other fields.

For more information, see the Department of Anthropology website.

Program Requirements

The BA program in anthropology consists of twelve courses, of which at least ten are typically chosen from those listed or cross-listed as Department of Anthropology courses. The requirements for the major are:

  1. ANTH 21107 Anthropological Theory
  2. One Methods course (ANTH 21420 Ethnographic Methods, ANTH 28400 Bioarchaeology and the Human SkeletonANTH 29500 Archaeology Laboratory Practicum, or an approved alternative in archaeological, linguistic, or biological anthropology)
  3. One Discovering Anthropology course. Designated courses will be added to a list each term. Descriptions will be available on the Department of Anthropology website.
  4. Seven electives in Anthropology
  5. Two electives from Anthropology or from a related discipline, with approval from the director of undergraduate studies. To seek approval of non-departmental courses, submit a completed Course Petition Form (available in Haskell 119) and syllabus for the course(s) to the director of undergraduate studies. Ideally this petition should be submitted before the end of the second week of the quarter in which the student is enrolled in the course, but petitions may also be submitted for courses that have already been completed.

Students are encouraged to construct individual programs; and, in so doing, they should consult periodically with the preceptor and the director of undergraduate studies. We strongly urge students who are majoring in anthropology to complete several introductory courses before enrolling in upper-level courses. Anthropology provides a broad view of the human career and condition. Students may select courses widely across all four subfields (sociocultural, linguistic, archaeological, and biological anthropology) within the major, or may focus their work within or across any of the subfields. 

Students should confer with the director of undergraduate studies before declaring a major in anthropology and must obtain the endorsement of the director of undergraduate studies on the Student Program Form before graduating with a major in anthropology. Students should submit a copy of the approved form to their College adviser.

Students interested in the Anthropology major should endeavor to complete the three required courses (Theory, Methods, and Discovering Anthropology) by the end of their third year. When possible, completion of those courses by the end of second year is recommended as they provide foundational concepts that facilitate understanding of higher level course work.

Note: These requirements are in effect starting with the graduating Class of 2018. Students who matriculated prior to Autumn 2014 may adopt the modified requirements if appropriate and should consult with the department to design their program of study.

Introductory Courses and General Education

Courses designated as Discovering Anthropology provide introductions to some of the substantive, methodological, and theoretical issues of sociocultural, archaeological, linguistic, and biological anthropology. These courses do not presume any previous study of anthropology and may be taken in any order. However, students are urged to complete the general education requirement in the social sciences before taking more advanced courses in sociocultural anthropology. SOSC 11400-11500-11600 Power, Identity, Resistance I-II-III or SOSC 12100-12200-12300 Self, Culture, and Society I-II-III are particularly recommended.

Several sequences that satisfy the general education requirement in civilization studies typically feature anthropological approaches and content. These courses are cross-listed with Anthropology and may be used toward the major if they are not used toward the general education requirement: ANTH 20701-20702-20703 Introduction to African Civilization I-II-III , ANTH 23101-23102-23103 Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III, ANTH 24001-24002-24003 Colonizations I-II-III, and ANTH 24101-24102 Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II. With prior approval, other civilization courses (if taken in addition to the courses used toward the general education requirement) can be used toward the Anthropology major, in accordance with the individual student’s needs or interests and up to the two-course limit for non-departmental courses.

The director of undergraduate studies may refer students who wish to emphasize archaeological, biological, linguistic, or sociocultural anthropology to faculty in these fields for assistance in the development of their individual programs.

Readings and Research Courses

When desirable for a student's individual anthropology program and with the approval of the director of undergraduate studies, preferably in advance, a student may also obtain course credit for supervised individual reading or research (ANTH 29700 Readings in Anthropology).

Students electing to write a bachelor’s essay for honors are urged to enroll in ANTH 29910 Bachelor's Essay Seminar in Winter Quarter of fourth year. They also have the option of taking ANTH 29900 Preparation of Bachelor's Essay, in which the student does supervised reading or research in preparation for the BA essay, in Autumn Quarter of fourth year. However, students can only use a total of two independent readings or research courses toward the major, chosen from among ANTH 29700, ANTH 29900, ANTH 29910, and BA essay seminars in other departments when required for a joint second major. Additional readings and research courses would count as general elective credits.

Field Courses

Students attending field schools or taking courses offered by other universities can solicit approval to obtain course credit (up to the two-course limit for nondepartmental courses) when appropriate for their individual program of study. Credit from other institutions would first need to be approved by the College and then by the director of undergraduate studies, if intended to count toward the major.

Summary of Requirements

Note: These requirements are in effect starting with the graduating Class of 2018. Students who matriculated prior to Autumn 2014 may adopt the modified requirements if appropriate and should consult with the department to design their program of study.

ANTH 21107Anthropological Theory100
One Methods course *100
Ethnographic Methods
Bioarchaeology and the Human Skeleton
Archaeology Laboratory Practicum
One Discovering Anthropology course §100
Seven electives in Anthropology ±700
Two electives in Anthropology or approved related disciplines ±200
Total Units1200

Grades

Courses counted toward the major must be taken for quality grades (no P/F grading).

Honors BA Process

Students who wish to be considered for honors must apply to the director of undergraduate studies before the end of their third year. Eligible candidates must have a GPA of 3.6 or higher in courses in the major and typically a GPA of 3.25 overall. To receive honors, students must develop an extended piece of research via a bachelor's essay under the approved supervision of a faculty member. BA projects involving alternative media (like film, photography, photo-essay, or art installation) might be acceptable if accompanied by a written text.

To execute a successful BA essay, students should begin considering their research question early on. Students should begin looking for a faculty supervisor in their third year and aim to have a topic identified by the beginning of the fourth year so that they have sufficient time to complete the necessary research and to write the paper. Students writing BA honors papers are strongly urged to enroll in ANTH 29910 Bachelor's Essay Seminar in Winter Quarter of their fourth year. If possible, students should also consider starting their research under the independent supervision of their faculty supervisor in Autumn Quarter by registering for ANTH 29900 Preparation of Bachelor's Essay. Students who take these courses, ANTH 29700 Readings in Anthropology, and/or BA seminars for a second major may only use a maximum of two these courses toward the Anthropology major. 

For award of honors, the BA essay must receive a grade of A or A- from the faculty supervisor and from the second reader. Students being recommended for honors must submit two copies of the completed paper to the program administrator no later than fifth week of the quarter of graduation. The faculty supervisor must be chosen from the Anthropology faculty. Affiliated faculty may serve with approval of the director of undergraduate study. The second reader may be any credentialed scholar/scientist approved by the director of undergraduate study.

This program may accept a BA paper or project used to satisfy the same requirement in another major if certain conditions are met. Approval from both program chairs is required. Students should consult with the chairs by the earliest BA proposal deadline (or by the end of their third year, if neither program publishes a deadline). A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Anthropology Courses

ANTH 19601. Populism and Its Discontents. 100 Units.

Populism and its Discontents is a reading-based undergraduate discussion seminar. Populism is currently the word on everyone's lips. But what does it mean? We begin with the ambiguous status of populism in current public debates; populism is at once imagined as the lifeblood of genuine democracy and at the same time as the dark force that threatens democracy from within. Why should this be? Questions to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: Are there progressive and regressive forms of populism? Does populism look different in today's social media-saturated world than it did a hundred years ago? Does populism in the Global South force us to reconsider what we think we know about its Euro-American variants? Students will be asked to complete assignments drawing on the assigned readings and audiovisual materials and on contemporary media sources.

Instructor(s): William Mazzarella     Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2019
Prerequisite(s): 3rd or 4th year standing
Note(s): (This is a 3CT Capstone Course.)

ANTH 20003. Discovering Anthropology: Reading Race. 100 Units.

Before and since Anthropology became a discrete scientific field of study, questions about the biological reality, potential utility and misuse of the concept of race in Homo sapiens have been debated. We will read and discuss a sample of writings by 18th, 19th, and 20th century and contemporary authors who attempted to define human races and those who have promoted or debunked the utility of the concept of race with special attention to it role in retarding social progress, and the extermination and exploitation of some populations and individuals.

Instructor(s): R. Tuttle     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 38305, CRES 20003, HIPS 20003

ANTH 20009. Embodiment: Governance, Resistance, Ethics. 100 Units.

What does a study of the body teach us about governance and the experience of being governed? This course approaches bodies from three angles. First, bodies are targets of governance. They are objects to be reformed, regulated, contained, disciplined, educated, incarcerated, treated, trained, and "cared" for. Next, as bodies get targeted for reform, they are also converted into potent sites of resistance and critique. Certain bodies in certain places elicit discomfort, unsettling common ideals of private and public, of developed and backward, of religious and secular, and, with them, dominant understandings of modern citizenship. Finally, bodies in their sensory and affective capacities are also mobilized as resources for crafting belonging beyond the assigned terms of law or the state. Drawing from ethnographic texts and with special emphasis on Latin America, this course introduces students to the anthropology of embodiment as well as related themes of bio-politics, gender, intimacy, political subjectivity, care and self-making, post/colonialism, race, and aesthetics. In so doing, the hope is to generate new ways to make sense of matters near and far-from Lenin's body to Trump's hands, reproductive labor to sex work, dirty protest to women's marches, indigenous eco-rituals to queer intimacies.

Instructor(s): Mareike Winchell     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20009

ANTH 20010. Anthropology of the Future. 100 Units.

Two major subfields of anthropology - archaeology and ethnography - have traditionally been oriented around the human past and the human present. But what about the future? Conceptions of the future and future-oriented behavior have long been understood to be a critical plane of difference between political economies, religions, and cultural groups, yet they have rarely been an explicit focus of study. When we shift the temporal frame to the future, questions that arise include: do all cultures have theories of the future? how much about human societies are intentional? how does ideology shape future possibilities? what role do imagined futures play in political life? We will consider theories of temporality, past futures (Aztec, Polynesian, Italian), and movements such as millenarianism, messianic religions, Marxism, Dadaism, utopian communities, Afro-futurism, transhumanism, and today's neo-futurist movements that deploy radical technology and speculative design in response to looming climate change. We will also explore the intimate relationship between speculative fiction (e.g., Ursula K. LeGuin, Kurt Vonnegut) and anthropology.

Instructor(s): S. Dawdy     Terms Offered: Autumn. Autumn 2018
Prerequisite(s): PQ: This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): MAAD 25010

ANTH 20011. Peasants: Anthropology, Rural Life, Capitalism. 100 Units.

Only a few short decades ago, rural societies were at the center of anthropological inquiry and key sources of ethnographic insight. Today, anthropological attentions have redirected toward cityscapes and urban experiences, leading a recent review piece to wonder: "Where have all the peasants gone?" The answer, of course, is nowhere. Peasants may have slipped by the wayside of analysis, but nearly half of the world's population today remains rural, and more than ever, countrysides are acutely affected by the economic transformations reshaping our world and the uncertainties facing our future: the challenges of food security, sustainable living, (agricultural) biotechnology, ecological precariousness, global poverty, and escalating rates of urbanization and urban migration. In a decidedly non-trendy move, then, this course will take the anthropology of peasantry as its focus, and will make the case that small-scale farming communities remain highly relevant sites for diagnosing capitalism's changing conditions and its lived consequences. Our discussions will be at once historical, conceptual, and ethnographic, and will draw on a broad set of case-studies around the globe. We will review classic debates about peasantries in relation to the history of capitalism, and reflect on the analytical possibilities and limitations of the peasant concept.

Instructor(s): Francois Richard     Terms Offered: Autumn. Autumn 2018
Prerequisite(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 33705

ANTH 20144. London Program: Institution. 100 Units.

In the first part of the course, focusing on William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge's monumental poetic work Lyrical Ballads (1798), we will consider the implications of revolutions abroad and of institutionalizations of arts and culture at home for the rise of modern literary culture in Romantic-era Britain. Wordsworth famously envisioned a new role for the poet as that of a "man speaking to men" who could make "incidents and situations from common life" the proper matter of literature. As he did so, Wordsworth was confronting both the disappointed hope of the "blissful dawn" of the French Revolution and a cultural milieu reshaped by the emergence of institutions like the British Museum (1753), the Royal Academy of Art (1768), and the National Gallery (1824)-all of which continue to define British national culture. In the second part of the course, we will consider analogous developments of the present moment, including the institutionalization of new arts like fashion, to consider where (in what scenes, and in what forms of writing and media) we might look for Lyrical Ballads of our own time. (C, F)

ANTH 20400. Anthropology of Olympic Sport. 100 Units.

If cultural differences are as powerful as Anthropology has conventionally stressed, how is it possible that over 200 national and innumerable sub-national and transnational cultural formations have found common cause in the modern Olympic Games? This course explores, theoretically and historically, the emergence of the Olympic Games as the liturgy of the world system of nation states and the current dialectic between the Olympic Movement and the Olympic Sports Industry. Extensive reading and in independent research paper will be required.

Instructor(s): John MacAloon     Terms Offered: TBD

ANTH 20405. Anthropology of Disability. 100 Units.

This seminar undertakes to explore "disability" from an anthropological perspective that recognizes it as a socially constructed concept with implications for our understanding of fundamental issues about culture, society, and individual differences. We explore a wide range of theoretical, legal, ethical, and policy issues as they relate to the experiences of persons with disabilities, their families, and advocates. The final project is a presentation on the fieldwork.

Instructor(s): M. Fred     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Third- or fourth-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): HMRT 35210, CHDV 30405, MAPS 36900, CHDV 20505, SOSC 36900, ANTH 30405, HMRT 25210

ANTH 20420. Anthropology of Olympic Sport. 100 Units.

If cultural differences are as powerful as Anthropology has conventionally stressed, how is it possible that over 200 national and innumerable sub-national and transnational cultural formations have found common cause in the modern Olympic Games? This course explores, theoretically and historically, the emergence of the Olympic Games as the liturgy of the world system of nation states and the current dialectic between the Olympic Movement and the Olympic Sports Industry. Extensive reading and an independent research paper will be required.

Instructor(s): John MacAloon     Terms Offered: Winter. Winter 2019
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 25090, MAPS 47501, ANTH 30420

ANTH 20540. The Chicago Climate Change & Culture Institute-I. 100 Units.

Climate change is arguably the greatest environmental, political and cultural challenge of our times. We are already beginning to feel its impacts in changing weather patterns and rising temperatures. In the years to come, Earth scientists tell us that climate change will impact every human being on the planet. We need to become informed and engaged about what awaits us and what we can do to avoid worst - case scenarios. This 3 - week intensive course of study focuses on three key questions: Why did climate change happen? How is it impacting different communities across the world? What can be done to prepare the world for a more environmentally secure future? The 4CI program features lectures by leading experts on climate change from the Social Sciences, Earth Sciences, Humanities, Art and Architecture. Seminar discussions and site visits to a variety of local initiatives working toward clean energy and sustainability goals round out the program. 4CI will give you the answers you want about climate change and the tools you need to start making a positive difference, whether that is on your campus, in your community or at your workplace. The program leverages the intellectual resources of one of the world's most prestigious research universities and will aquaint you with a city that proudly stands on the cutting edge of sustainable urbanism.

Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2018
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 30540, ENST 20540

ANTH 20541. The Chicago Climate Change & Culture Institute-II. 100 Units.

Climate change is arguably the greatest environmental, political and cultural challenge of our times. We are already beginning to feel its impacts in changing weather patterns and rising temperatures. In the years to come, Earth scientists tell us that climate change will impact every human being on the planet. We need to become informed and engaged about what awaits us and what we can do to avoid worst - case scenarios. This 3 - week intensive course of study focuses on three key questions: Why did climate change happen? How is it impacting different communities across the world? What can be done to prepare the world for a more environmentally secure future? The 4CI program features lectures by leading experts on climate change from the Social Sciences, Earth Sciences, Humanities, Art and Architecture. Seminar discussions and site visits to a variety of local initiatives working toward clean energy and sustainability goals round out the program. 4CI will give you the answers you want about climate change and the tools you need to start making a positive difference, whether that is on your campus, in your community or at your workplace. The program leverages the intellectual resources of one of the world's most prestigious research universities and will aquaint you with a city that proudly stands on the cutting edge of sustainable urbanism.

Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2018.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 30541, CRES 20541

ANTH 20701-20702-20703. Introduction to African Civilization I-II-III.

Completion of the general education requirement in social sciences recommended. Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. African Civilization introduces students to African history and cultures in a three-quarter sequence.

ANTH 20701. Introduction to African Civilization I. 100 Units.

Part one of the sequence takes a historical approach. We consider how different types of historical evidence-documentary, oral, and material-can be used to investigate processes of change and transformation in Africa from the early Iron Age through the emergence of the Atlantic world in the fifteenth century. We will investigate state formation in comparative perspective and examine case studies from the Swahili coast, the empires of Ghana and Mali, and Great Zimbabwe. The course also examines the diffusion of Islam, European contact, and the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

Instructor(s): E. Osborn     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20701, MDVL 10101, HIST 10101

ANTH 20702. Introduction to African Civilization II. 100 Units.

The second segment of the African Civilizations sequence uses anthropological perspectives to investigate colonial and postcolonial encounters in West and East Africa. The course objective is to show that while colonialism was brutal and oppressive, it was by no means a unidirectional process of domination in which Europeans plundered the African continent and enforced a wholesale adoption of European culture. Rather, scholars today recognize that colonial encounters were complex culture, political, and economic fields of interaction. Africans actively adopted, reworked, and contested colonizers' policies and projects, and Europeans drew heavily from these encounters to form liberal conceptions of self, nation, and society. Over the course of the quarter, students will learn about forms of personhood, political economy, and everyday life in the twentieth century. Course themes will include social reproduction, kinship practices, medicine, domesticity, and development. Note(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. CHDV Distribution C*. Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 20702,CRES 20802,HIST 10102

Instructor(s): J. Cole     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Taking these courses in sequence is recommended but not required; this sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, C
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 20802, HIST 10102, CHDV 21401

ANTH 20703. Introduction to African Civilization III. 100 Units.

Part Three investigates the long nineteenth century. It considers the Egyptian conquest of Sudan, Omani colonialism on the Swahili coast, and Islamic reform movements across the Sahara. It will also explore connections between the end of the transatlantic slave trade and the formal colonization of the African continent.

Instructor(s): K. Hickerson     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 10103, CRES 20703

ANTH 21107. Anthropological Theory. 100 Units.

Since its inception as an academically institutionalized discipline, anthropology has always addressed the relation between a self-consciously modernizing West and its various and changing others. Yet it has not always done so with sufficient critical attention to its own concepts and categories-a fact that has led, since at least the 1980s, to considerable debate about the nature of the anthropological enterprise and its epistemological foundations. This course provides a brief critical introduction to the history of anthropological thought over the course of the discipline's long twentieth century, form the 1880s to the present. Although we focus on the North American and British traditions, we review important strains of French and, to a lesser extent, German social theory in chronicling the emergence and transformation of modern anthropology as an empirically based, but theoretically informed, practice of knowledge production about human sociality and culture.

Instructor(s): S. Palmie     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 30000

ANTH 21201. Chicago Blues. 100 Units.

This course is an anthropological and historical exploration of one of the most original and influential American musical genres in its social and cultural context. We examine transformations in the cultural meaning of the blues and its place within broader American cultural currents, the social and economic situation of blues musicians, and the political economy of blues within the wider music industry.

Instructor(s): M. Dietler     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): The course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 21201

ANTH 21303. Making the Natural World: Foundations of Human Ecology. 100 Units.

Humans have "made" the natural world both conceptually, through the creation of various ideas about nature, ecosystem, organism, and ecology, and materially, through millennia of direct action in and on the landscape. Students will consider the conceptual underpinnings of contemporary notions of ecology, environment, and balance through the examination of specific historical trajectories of anthropogenic landscape modification and human society.

Instructor(s): Alison Anastasio     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): ENST 21201 and 21301 are required of students who are majoring in Environmental Studies and may be taken in any order.
Equivalent Course(s): ENST 21301

ANTH 21306. Explorations in Oral Narrative. 100 Units.

A study of storytelling in non-literate and folk societies, antecedent to the complexities of modern narrativity, itself anchored in and energized by literacy. Despite the impact of literacy on modern minds, this course argues for the persistence of ancient themes, plots, characters, and motifs. A further argument is made for the foundational role of storytelling in the creation of culture and construction of society. The central place of storytelling is shown in the humanistic and social sciences: anthropology, economics, history, philosophy, politics, psychoanalysis. Student storytelling and performance of brief stories is encouraged and discussed in light of the main arguments of the course.

Instructor(s): J. Fernandez     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course qualifies as a "Discovering Anthropology" selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 45301

ANTH 21333. The Lived Body: Anthropology, Materiality, Meaningful Practice. 100 Units.

The body is implicated in all facets of human life. It is at once constraint and enabler, relational and personal, "real" and "imagined." It is both individually performed and socially determined, the site of both domination and resistance. Anthropological theory has moved far from "Cartesian dualism" in which mind and body can and must be separate; this course will travel through ways of understanding bodies that have supplemented or bypassed this idea, or have existed outside of it entirely. We will consider what it means to have a body, to know a body, to be defined by a body-in short, to live a body. This course's topical readings are oriented around the idea that "embodiment" involves both material entities and socially embedded processes. We will consider experience, consciousness, sensation, perception, and affect; we will interrogate processes, functions, and ways of knowing that are often taken for granted; we will prise apart the ways power is inscribed on and with bodies, both internally and externally. To do so, we will balance theory and ethnography in both our consumption and production of scholarly material, including a final "auto-ethnography" in which students adopt a new body practice for the quarter.

Instructor(s): A. Ford     Terms Offered: Spring

ANTH 21341. Making Plants Work: Anthropology of Human-Plant Relationships. 100 Units.

Food, drink, fuel, pharmaceuticals, clothing, cosmetics, construction material, furniture… Plants and their byproducts are everywhere we look. How have plants become so ubiquitous to human life? How have plants been used, adapted, processed, and sold over the course of history? How can studying plants and their interactions with humans provide a different perspective on the past, and insight into the future? This course explores how humans have made plants "work," and how these working plants have, in turn, shaped the world in which we live. While often perceived as passive in comparison to human and animal counterparts, plants have played a critical role in shaping global social, economic, ecological, and political dynamics. As desired products, plants have entangled far-flung individuals and societies into complex relationships that reverberate across time and space. This course will survey the history of human-plant interactions through three units: domestication, colonialism, and modern technologies. We will examine a wide range of case studies, in an effort to gain comparative and multivocal understanding of human-plant relationships. In doing so, course materials touch on topics of general anthropological interest: political ecology, agency, social inequality, labor, global processes, the impacts of colonialism, the production of knowledge, and human/non-human relationships.

Instructor(s): Pacyga, Johanna     Terms Offered: Spring

ANTH 21342. Welcome to the Good Life: The Black Edition. 100 Units.

What do we mean when we say "the good life"? In the United States, the good life has long been synonymous with the idea of the American dream (the white picket fence, secure union job, stable marriage with 2.5 kids). But over the past several years, this romanticized image has increasingly been thrown into crisis with the rise of a destabilized national economy, political infighting, and in the aftermath of the housing collapse. It seems as though the veil has been lifted and the American Dream has been exposed as a fantasy object, if not a complete impossibility. But for people of color, and black people in particular who have been historically disenfranchised and thus unable to access the housing, education, and medical resources necessary to make the American dream a reality, this fantasy has always already been understood as such. Indeed, black experiences reveal how whiteness as a structural mechanism stands at the foundation of the American Dream.

Instructor(s): Bock, Emily     Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2019
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 21342

ANTH 21343. Anthropology and/of Tourism: Of Otherness and Encounters. 100 Units.

Travelling as a mode of self-cultivation and world awareness has always captivated our imagination. With increasing ease of travel, tourism is a $ 2.3 trillion industry, with 1.25 billion annual travelers. How does reading ethnographies of tourism help us examine encounters with others as anthropology's central prerogative? From Emerson's quote - is the meaning of an encounter located within us or in the object? Is otherness some inherent quality or a product of specific narratives and practices? Encountering otherness being anthropology's primary research methodology, can ethnographers be compared to tourists? How is the discipline itself implicated in unequal power relations of cultural encounters? We will read ethnographies covering a range of concerns about tourism - its linkages with colonialism/neo-colonialism, its role in stereotyping indigenous cultures, its impact on the environment, on gender dynamics, on representations of nationhood and on cultivation of bourgeois selfhood. Our aim is to use anthropological insights to appraise the phenomenon of tourism as a whole, identifying its pros and cons; and to also flip this perspective to ask: what insights does tourism give us into encounters and othering as foundational concerns of anthropology?

Instructor(s): Das, Suchismita     Terms Offered: Winter. Winter 2019
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 21343

ANTH 21344. The Meaning of Police. 100 Units.

The purpose of this class is to offer students an intellectual toolkit for thinking critically and engaging politically with contemporary problems of police. It will introduce classical as well as emerging themes, drawing on research from diverse social and geographical locations. We will discuss, among other things, the paradox of legal lawlessness, the relationship between law and the body, and the unstable distinction between public and private violence. Paying attention to classed, sexed, and racialized notions of danger and threat, we will discuss the historical fabrication of criminality as well as the complex legacies of security and protection that underpin practices of criminal punishment. While subjecting policing to an anthropological interrogation-asking what police means for different people in different times and places-we will also consider the uneasy affinity between policemen and ethnographers in order to ask what it can teach us about police, and how it might illuminate our understanding of ethnography.

Instructor(s): Maoz, Eilat     Terms Offered: Autumn. Autumn 2018
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 21344

ANTH 21406. Celebrity and Science in Paleoanthropology. 100 Units.

This seminar explores the balance among research, "showbiz" big business, and politics in the careers of Louis, Mary, and Richard Leakey; Alan Walker; Donald Johanson; Jane Goodall; Dian Fossey; and Biruté Galdikas. Information is gathered from films, taped interviews, autobiographies, biographies, pop publications, instructor's anecdotes, and samples of scientific writings.

Instructor(s): R. Tuttle     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 21100, ANTH 38300

ANTH 21420. Ethnographic Methods. 100 Units.

This is a course on how to do ethnographic research. While recent decades have seen scholars rightfully insist on the artistic and inherently personal quality of 'doing' and 'writing' ethnography, the course aims to illuminate the regulating structures of thought and practice underpinning every piece of original ethnographic work. The course is both a reading and a research workshop. As a reading workshop, it seeks to enable students to read ethnography like ethnographers: identifying and learning from the inner workings of the research project at the heart of each ethnographic text. As a research workshop, the course progressively leads students to construct and implement a research project of their own. Students will methodically enact the physical techniques and analytic practices emerging from their reading of ethnography. Throughout the course, we will grapple with the challenges facing an ethnographic researcher, and identify the building blocks of an ethnographic project. In this effort, we will focus on the posing of a research question; the formulation of conceptual frameworks; constructing a statement of problem; actors and informants; the semiotics and pragmatics of interviewing; analysis of interactions qua participant-observer, and historical approaches in ethnography. Students will also experiment with forms of non-verbal visual representation.

Instructor(s): Escobar Gonzalez, Ines     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Preference given to third-year anthropology majors, others by consent only

ANTH 21428. Apes and Human Evolution. 100 Units.

This course is a critical examination of the ways in which data on the behavior, morphology, and genetics of apes have been used to elucidate human evolution. We emphasize bipedalism, hunting, meat eating, tool behavior, food sharing, cognitive ability, language, self-awareness, and sociability. Visits to local zoos and museums, film screenings, and demonstrations with casts of fossils and skeletons required.

Instructor(s): R. Tuttle     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): BIOS 10130. NO BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES MAJORS OR NON-BIOLOGY PRE-MED STUDENTS, except by petition.
Equivalent Course(s): EVOL 38600, BIOS 13253, HIPS 21428, ANTH 38600

ANTH 21431. Counting, Calculation and Computation: Anthropologies of Number. 100 Units.

This seminar introduces undergraduates to anthropologies of counting, calculation and computation. The course is split into two parts. In part one (Weeks 1-3), we will explore anthropological and historical approaches to number, mathematics and calculation per se, with the goal of developing an analytical toolset through which we can approach the categories "counting" and "number" more critically and creatively. In part two (Weeks 4-10), we expand on this toolset ethnographically, moving through a series of cases to examine how number, counting and calculation are situated variously in contemporary social life, with powerful ethical, political and even biological effects. We will move through themes including war and genocide, health and the body, human-machine interfaces, "state science", environmental metrics, and software algorithms and "big data". The ultimate objective will be to train students to identify and interrogate some of the myriad ways that number is always-already situated in social life - not coming objectively "from nowhere". At the same time, we will try to firmly root our project in an anthropology of number per se, approaching our ethnographic selections from a footing slightly outside of STS or familiar humanist critiques of statistics. Together, we will test whether this footing leads us somewhere new.

Instructor(s): Mullee, John     Terms Offered: Winter. Winter 2019

ANTH 21525. Love, Conjugality, and Capital: Intimacy in the Modern World. 100 Units.

A look at societies in other parts of the world demonstrates that modernity in the realm of love, intimacy, and family often had a different trajectory from the European one. This course surveys ideas and practices surrounding love, marriage, and capital in the modern world. Using a range of theoretical, historical, and anthropological readings, as well as films, the course explores such topics as the emergence of companionate marriage in Europe and the connections between arranged marriage, dowry, love, and money. Case studies are drawn primarily from Europe, India, and Africa.

Instructor(s): J. Cole, R. Majumdar     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Any 10000-level music course or consent of instructor
Note(s): This course typically is offered in alternate years.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 43101, CRES 23101, CHDV 22212, ANTH 32220, SALC 33101, GNSE 23102, HIST 26903, CRES 33101, GNSE 31700, HIST 36903, CHDV 33212

ANTH 21730. Science, Technology and Media via Japan. 100 Units.

This course will explore issues of culture, technology, and environment in Japan through the lens of Science and Technology Studies (STS) and Media Studies. The course is designed for undergraduate students. Its overall aim is to introduce students to some of the fundamental concepts, themes, and problematics in these fields via the particular social and historical circumstances in Japan. Some of the central concerns will be around issues of environment, disaster, gender, labor, media theory, gaming, and animation. In addition, we will devote attention to the recent emergence of the term media ecology as a framework problematizing technologically engineered environments.

Instructor(s): M. Fisch     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course qualifies as a "Discovering Anthropology" selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 21730, MAAD 11730

ANTH 22129. The Vocation of a Scientist. 100 Units.

Max Weber wrote that to be a scientist one needed a "strange intoxication" with scientific work and a "passionate devotion" to research as a calling. And yet, such passion seemed to conflict with the ideal of value-neutral inquiry. This class considers the vocation of science since the turn of the twentieth century. What political, economic, and cultural forces have shaped scientific professions in the United States? How are scientists represented in public culture? How was American science experienced during the colonization of the Philippines? By exploring these questions, this class will examine the values and norms that make science into a meaningful vocation.

Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 21407, HIPS 21407

ANTH 22165. Politics of Technoscience in Africa. 100 Units.

Euro-American discourse has often portrayed Africa as either a place without science and technology or as the home of deep and ancient wisdom. European imperialists used the alleged absence of science and technology as a justification for colonialism while pharmaceutical companies sought out African knowledge about healing plants. In addition to their practical applications, science and technology carry significant symbolic weight in discussions about Africa. In this class, we examine the politics of scientific and technical knowledge in Africa with a focus on colonialism and its aftermath. How have different people produced and used knowledge about the environment, medicine, and technology? What kinds of knowledge count as indigenous and who gets credit for innovation? How have independent African governments dealt with the imperial legacies of science? From the interpretation of archaeological ruins to the design of new medical technologies, this class will examine science and technology as political practice in Africa.

Equivalent Course(s): KNOW 21410, CRES 21410, HIPS 21410

ANTH 22170. Taste and Technoscience. 100 Units.

This course examines the politics of food in the age of mass production, taking the sensory dimension of food as its orienting lens. From artificial flavors to molecular gastronomy, the 20th Century has been marked by technological innovations in our food. These changes have not only transformed what we eat but also how our food is made and how we think about what it does to our bodies, shifting the meaning of ideas about what constitutes "taste," "flavor," and even "food" itself. We will discuss what role scientific expertise has played in shaping how taste is produced as an intimate bodily experience. On the one hand, we will read historical and ethnographic accounts of the work of technoscientific professionals responsible for the design, analysis and production of the tastes and flavors of foods. Rarely rising to the level of explicit marketing, the scientific design of tastes and flavors forms the invisible infrastructure behind the dependable, even pleasurable, routines of everyday life: from the satisfying crunch of morning cereal to the indulgent sweet midnight snack. We will read social scientific literature examining the sites and methods for making and measuring the taste, flavor, texture and smell of food. We will situate ethnographic and historical readings within broader cultural discussions about the role and form of mass commodity production in contemporary life, the social life of chemicals, and the history and anthropology of the senses.

Instructor(s): Butler, Ella     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): GLST 24112

ANTH 22710. Signs and the State. 100 Units.

Relations of communication, as well as coercion, are central though less visible in Weber's famous definition of the state as monopoly of legitimate violence. This course reconsiders the history of the state in connection to the history of signs. Thematic topics (and specific things and sites discussed) include changing semiotic technologies; means; forces and relations of communication (writing, archives, monasteries, books, "the" internet); and specific states (in early historic India and China, early colonial/revolutionary Europe, especially France, Britain, and Atlantic colonies, and selected postcolonial "new nations").

Instructor(s): J. Kelly     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 41810

ANTH 22825. Globalization, Immigration, and Culture. 100 Units.

Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20602

ANTH 23026. Science in the South: Decolonizing the Study of Knowledge in Latin America & the Caribbean. 100 Units.

This seminar will bridge anthropologies and histories of science, technology, and medicine to Latin American decolonial thought. Throughout Latin America, techno-scientific objects and practices, with their presumed origin in the Euro-Atlantic North, are often complexly entangled with neo-imperial projects of development and modernization that elongate social forms of colonization into the present. Technoscience and its objects, however, can also generate new creative, political, and life-enhancing potentials beyond or despite their colonial resonances, or even provide tools to ongoing struggles for decolonization. Together, seminar participants will explore what a decolonial approach to the study of science, technology, and medicine in the Global South, particularly in Latin America, has been and could become and how decolonial theory can inflect our own disciplinary, conceptual, and political commitments as anthropologists of technoscience.

Instructor(s): S. Graeter     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 24706, LACS 24706

ANTH 23027. Toxic States: Corrupted Ecologies in Latin America and the Caribbean. 100 Units.

Concepts of purity and danger, the sacred and profane, and contamination and healing constitute central analytics of anthropological inquiry into religion, medicine, and ecology. This course brings diverse theories of corporeal corruption to bare on contemporary ethnography of toxicity, particularly in order to examine the impact of political corruption on ecological matters in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will both historicize a growing disciplinary preoccupation with materiality, contamination, and the chemical, as well as conceptualize its empirical significance within neo-colonial/liberal states throughout the region.

Instructor(s): S. Graeter     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): PPHA 39922, ANTH 32330, LACS 36417, LACS 26417

ANTH 23062. Contemporary Studies on Ayllu, Kinship, and Social Organization in the Andes. 100 Units.

The main goal of this course is to investigate the ayllu form of social organization of the Quechua and Aymara-speaking indigenous peasant populations of the central Andes from the perspective of kinship studies as conceived and developed in anthropology from the end of nineteenth century up to the 1980s. The course will also will introduce and exemplify the research methods useful to kinship studies.

Instructor(s): Pablo Sendón     Terms Offered: Autumn. Autumn 2018
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 42105, LACS 36061, LACS 23061

ANTH 23093. Latin American Extractivisms. 100 Units.

This course will survey the historical antecedents and contemporary politics of Latin American extractivisms. While resource extraction in Latin America is far from new, the scale and transnational scope of current "neoextractivisms" have unearthed unprecedented rates of profit as well as social conflict. Today's oil wells, open-pit mines, and vast fields of industrial agriculture have generated previously unthinkable transformations to local ecologies and social life, while repeating histories of indigenous land dispossession in the present. Yet parallel to neo-extractive regimes, emergent Latin American social movements have unleashed impassioned and often unexpected forms of local and transnational resistance. Readings in the course will contrast cross-regional trends of extractive economic development and governance with fine-grained accounts of how individuals, families, and communities experience and respond to land dispossession, local and transregional conflict, and the ecological and health impacts of Latin American extractivisms.

Equivalent Course(s): LACS 26416, PBPL 26416

ANTH 23096. Development and the Right to Housing in Latin America: A Critical Appraisal. 100 Units.

Bringing a wide variety of disciplinary texts into conversation, this course leads towards a holistic understanding of the historically-rooted and globally-entangled housing condition of Latin America's urban poor. It encourages students to read along the grain of developmental discourse at different stages of twentieth-century development, thus advancing students' capacity to critically situate and condition global and national policies. The course analytically foregrounds problems of governance, resource distribution, and sociopolitical complexity, providing students with a representative range of case studies from across the subcontinent and interrogating what it means for social and economic goods to be labeled human rights. Throughout the course students will examine diverse housing arrangements and policies in the context of national, regional, and global development histories. Ultimately, this course advances comprehension of the particularities of contemporary Latin American societies and the particularities shared with the Global South and the world at large.

Instructor(s): Inés Escobar González     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LACS 26622

ANTH 23101-23102-23103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I-II-III.

Taking these courses in sequence is not required. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This sequence is offered every year. This course introduces the history and cultures of Latin America (e.g., Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean Islands).

ANTH 23101. Introduction to Latin American Civilization I. 100 Units.

Autumn Quarter examines the origins of civilizations in Latin America with a focus on the political, social, and cultural features of the major pre-Columbian civilizations of the Maya, Inca, and Aztec. The quarter concludes with an analysis of the Spanish and Portuguese conquest, and the construction of colonial societies in Latin America. The courses in this sequence may be taken in any order.

Instructor(s): A. Kolata     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 36101, CRES 16101, SOSC 26100, HIST 16101, LACS 16100, LACS 34600

ANTH 23102. Introduction to Latin American Civilization II. 100 Units.

Winter Quarter addresses the evolution of colonial societies, the wars of independence, and the emergence of Latin American nation-states in the changing international context of the nineteenth century.

Instructor(s): M. Tenorio     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 16102, LACS 16200, HIST 36102, PPHA 39770, HIST 16102, LACS 34700, SOSC 26200

ANTH 23103. Introduction to Latin American Civilization III. 100 Units.

Spring Quarter focuses on the twentieth century, with special emphasis on the challenges of economic, political, and social development in the region.

Instructor(s): D. Borges     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 16103, LACS 34800, PPHA 39780, HIST 36103, HIST 16103, LACS 16300, SOSC 26300

ANTH 23405. War: What's It Good For? 100 Units.

War is a destructive force, but also an incredibly productive one in the transformation and reconfiguration of social relations. This course will explore war's presences and absences in social and political thought as well as ethnographies that examine the mutually reconstitutive relationships between war and society.

Instructor(s): Darryl Li     Terms Offered: Autumn

ANTH 23607. The Immigrant as American Prototype. 100 Units.

This undergraduate seminar explores how the figure of "the immigrant" has come to mediate various origin myths and anticipatory imaginations of "Americanness" in contemporary political struggles. A central proposition of the course is that "the immigrant" should be seen NOT as an "original" founding subject of the United States and its "American Dream" but rather, as a modern prototype-forged only since the late 19th century-for stress-testing different models of American presence and power in the world. Importantly, this is a world increasingly ordered, as well as destabilized, by the expanding logics of industrial and corporate capital-a historical development with reverberating effects into our contemporary debates over the relation of "the immigrant" to American "values" and global "competitiveness." Drawing on various historical, anthropological and audiovisual resources, this seminar aims to situate the emergence of "the immigrant" as American prototype in relation to (1) earlier cultural-historical archetypes of mass migration, such as "the settler" and "the emigrant" and (2) current debates over nativist and cosmopolitan models of American security-cum-prosperity that take "the immigrant" as the limit case for evaluating "the human," "the normal," and "the good life" across nationalist and globalizing space-times. Besides conventional reading and writing assignments, this seminar will offer students the opportunity to experiment with multimedia methods for ethnographic research through a final web-based project in which students will draw from current news and popular media sources to assemble and critically present on their own version of "the Immigrant" as American prototype.

Instructor(s): J. Chu     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 23607

ANTH 23700. Capitalism, Colonialism, and Nationalism in the Pacific. 100 Units.

This course compares colonial capitalist projects and their dialogic transfor­mations up to present political dilemmas, with special attention to Fiji, New Zealand, and Hawai'i, and a focus on the labor diaspora, the fates of indigenous polities, and tensions in contemporary citizenship. We will compare Wakefield's "scientific colonization" in New Zealand, Gordon's social experiments and indentured labor in Fiji, and the plantations, American annexation, tourism, and the military in Hawai'i. We will compare the colonial experiences of the Maori, Hawaiians, and indigenous Fijians, and also those of the immigrant laborers and their descendants, especially white New Zealanders, the South Asians in Fiji, and the Japanese in Hawai'i. General pro­positions about nationalism, capitalism "late" and otherwise, global cultural flows, and postcolonial subject positions will be juxtaposed with contemporary Pacific conflicts.

Instructor(s): J. Kelly     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 33700, CRES 23710, ANTH 33700

ANTH 23802. Populism and its Discontents. 100 Units.

'Populism and its Discontents' is a reading-based undergraduate discussion seminar. Populism is currently the word on everyone's lips. But what does it mean? We begin with the ambiguous status of populism in current public debates; populism is at once imagined as the lifeblood of genuine democracy and at the same time as the dark force that threatens democracy from within. Why should this be? Questions to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: Are there progressive and regressive forms of populism? Dose populism look different in today's social media-saturated world than it did a hundred years ago? Does populism in the Global South force us to reconsider what we think we know about its Euro-American variants? Students will be asked to complete assignments drawing on the assigned readings and audiovisual materials and on contemporary media sources.

Instructor(s): W. Mazzarella     Terms Offered: Summer. Summer 2018
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 28078

ANTH 23906. Magic, Science, and Religion. 100 Units.

The relationship between the categories of magic, science, and religion has been a problem for modern social science since its inception in the nineteenth century. In the first half of this course, we will critically examine some of the classical and contemporary approaches to these concepts. In the second half, we will explore a number of detailed historical and ethnographic studies about modern phenomena that call some of the fundamental assumptions behind these categories into question.

Instructor(s): A. Doostdar     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 28900, KNOW 28900

ANTH 23911. Anthropology of Religion. 100 Units.

How do anthropologists study religion? This course is an introduction to classic concepts that have defined the social scientific study of religion such as ritual, taboo, transcendence, embodiment, and enchantment. To grasp how fieldwork is paired with theory, we will engage ethnographic writings on Orthodox Christianity in northern Ethiopia, Afro-Caribbean Santería in Chicago, and Islamic jinn veneration in Delhi India. We will further examine various themes in the socio-cultural inquiry of contemporary religion including asceticism, sexuality, sectarianism, and political theology.

Instructor(s): A. Heo     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): RLST 27650

ANTH 24001-24002-24003. Colonizations I-II-III.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world.

ANTH 24001. Colonizations I. 100 Units.

This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This three-quarter sequence approaches the concept of civilization from an emphasis on cross-cultural/societal connection and exchange. We explore the dynamics of conquest, slavery, colonialism, and their reciprocal relationships with concepts such as resistance, freedom, and independence, with an eye toward understanding their interlocking role in the making of the modern world. Themes of slavery, colonization, and the making of the Atlantic world are covered in the first quarter. Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. This course is offered every year. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 18301, SOSC 24001, CRES 24001

ANTH 24002. Colonizations II. 100 Units.

Modern European and Japanese colonialism in Asia and the Pacific is the theme of the second quarter.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 18302, SOSC 24002, CRES 24002

ANTH 24003. Colonizations III. 100 Units.

The third quarter considers the processes and consequences of decolonization both in the newly independent nations and the former colonial powers.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses can be taken in any sequence.
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 20702, HIST 18303, CRES 24003, SOSC 24003

ANTH 24101-24102. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I-II.

This sequence introduces core themes in the formation of culture and society in South Asia from the early modern period until the present. This sequence meets the general education requirement in civilization studies. These courses must be taken in sequence.

ANTH 24101. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia I. 100 Units.

The first quarter focuses on Islam in South Asia, Hindu-Muslim interaction, Mughal political and literary traditions, and South Asia's early encounters with Europe.

Instructor(s): M. Alam     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): SALC 20100, SOSC 23000, HIST 10800, MDVL 20100

ANTH 24102. Introduction to the Civilizations of South Asia II. 100 Units.

The second quarter analyzes the colonial period (i.e., reform movements, the rise of nationalism, communalism, caste, and other identity movements) up to the independence and partition of India.

Instructor(s): Dipesh Chakrabarty     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): SALC 20100,ANTH 24101,HIST 10800,SASC 20000,SOSC 23000
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 23100, SALC 20200, HIST 10900

ANTH 24302. Disability in Local and Global Contexts. 100 Units.

This is a course about intersections. Disability cuts across age, gender, class, caste, occupation, and religion- or does it? By some measures, people with disabilities are the largest minority group in the world today. In this course, we critically examine both the experiences of people with disabilities in a global context as well as the politics and processes of writing about such experiences. Indeed, questions of representation are perhaps at the core of this course. What role have the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and international organizations such as the United Nations, the World Health Organization, and other non-governmental social and human service agencies played in the creation of specific understandings of disability experience? We will ask whether disability is a universal category and we will consider how experiences of health, illness, disability, and debility vary. We will engage in "concept work" by analyzing the relationships between disability and impairment and we will critically evaluate the different conceptual and analytical models employed to think about disability. In doing so, we will engage with broader questions about international development, human rights, the boundaries of the nation, the family and other kinship affiliations, and identity and community formation. How is disability both a productive analytic and a lens for thinking about pressing questions and concerns in today's world?

Equivalent Course(s): MAPS 46460, CHDV 25250

ANTH 24307. Lab, Field, and Clinic: History and Anthropology of Medicine and the Life Sciences. 100 Units.

In this course we will examine the ways in which different groups of people--in different times and places--have understood the nature of life and living things, bodies and bodily processes, and health and disease, among other notions. We will address these issues principally, though not exclusively, through the lens of the changing sets of methods and practices commonly recognizable as science and medicine. We will also pay close attention to the methods through which scholars in history and anthropology have written about these topics, and how current scientific and medical practices affect historical and anthropological studies of science and medicine.

Instructor(s): M. Rossi     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course fulfills part of the KNOW core seminar requirement. PhD students should register for KNOW 40202 to be eligible to apply for the SIFK dissertation fellowship.
Equivalent Course(s): HIST 35308, HIPS 25808, HIST 25308, KNOW 25308, ANTH 34307, CHSS 35308, KNOW 40202

ANTH 24308. History of Perception. 100 Units.

Knowing time. Feeling space. Smelling. Seeing. Touching. Tasting. Hearing. Are these universal aspects of human consciousness, or particular experiences contingent upon time, place, and culture? How do we come to know about our own perceptions and those of others? This course examines these and related questions through detailed readings of primary sources, engagement in secondary scholarship in the history and anthropology of sensation, and through close work with participants' own sensations and perceptions of the world around them.

Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 25309, ANTH 34308, KNOW 21404, HIST 25309, KNOW 31404, HIST 35309, CHSS 35309

ANTH 24309. Reproductive Worlds. 100 Units.

This course explores how human reproduction and the reproductive body is compelled, constrained, enabled, and narrated across the globe. The "natural" aspects of reproduction intersect in increasingly fraught and often surprising ways with its technological/ scientific, institutional/professional, religious/spiritual, and political/ideological aspects. The starting point for the course is that the reproduction of bodies is differently understood and politically contested among and for various groups of people. We will pay particular attention to the ways bodies, ideas, and technologies flow throughout global contexts, while exploring how inequalities at various levels (race, class, geographic region, nationality, gender, sexuality, practices of family making) impact the "nature" of the reproductive body, and how reproductive practices "reproduce" such inequalities. We will also explore how knowledge of the reproductive body is contested through biomedicine, law, and media, with particular attention to naturalizing discourse about gender and intuition. Finally, we will look at how ecology and reproduction are intertwined via concern about environmental toxicities and the impact of non-human actors.

Instructor(s): A. Ford     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 24308, PBPL 24308

ANTH 24312. Body & Soul: The Anthropology of Religion, Health, & Healing. 100 Units.

In this course, we will explore how people experience religion across social and historical contexts with a focus on how religion shapes ideas of what it means to be mentally healthy and how to treat illness. In the first half, we will focus especially on the role of the body in religious experiences: how people comport, discipline, and alter their bodies in attempts to create religious experiences. In the second half, we will turn to the mind: how religion mediates cultural understandings of mental health, well-being, and illness and the experience of a normatively healthy mind and body.

Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20805

ANTH 24315. Culture, Mental Health, and Psychiatry. 100 Units.

While mental illness has recently been framed in largely neurobiological terms as "brain disease," there has also been an increasing awareness of the contingency of psychiatric diagnoses. In this course, we will draw upon readings from medical and psychological anthropology, cultural psychiatry, and science studies to examine this paradox and to examine mental health and illness as a set of subjective experiences, social processes, and objects of knowledge and intervention. On a conceptual level, the course invites students to think through the complex relationships between categories of knowledge and clinical technologies (in this case, mainly psychiatric ones) and the subjectivities of persons living with mental illness. Put in slightly different terms, we will look at the multiple links between psychiatrists' professional accounts of mental illness and patients' experiences of it. Questions explored include: Does mental illness vary across social and cultural settings? How are experiences of people suffering from mental illness shaped by psychiatry's knowledge of their afflictions?

Instructor(s): E. Raikhel     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, C, D
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 27302, CHDV 33301, ANTH 35115, CHDV 23301

ANTH 24316. Thinking Psychoanalytically: From the Sciences to the Arts. 100 Units.

Since Freud's seminal investigation into the nature of the mind, psychoanalytic thinking has offered a unique approach to unconscious, relational, and meaningful dimensions of human experience. Despite assaults on the field from numerous quarters, psychoanalytic thinking remains central to the work of practitioners across an array of disciplines. After an introduction to key psychoanalytic concepts including the unconscious, repression, and transference, we will investigate some of the ways in which these ideas are mobilized within clinical practice, neuroscience, anthropology, education, philosophy, literary studies, and the visual arts through a series of lectures presented by specialists from these fields. Along the way, we will gain an appreciation for some of the ways in which psychoanalytic perspectives continue to inspire a variety of current scientific and humanistic projects.

Instructor(s): A. Beal; Staff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Third or fourth-year standing
Equivalent Course(s): BPRO 28400

ANTH 24320. Cultural Psychology. 100 Units.

There is a substantial portion of the psychological nature of human beings that is neither homogeneous nor fixed across time and space. At the heart of the discipline of cultural psychology is the tenet of psychological pluralism, which states that the study of "normal" psychology is the study of multiple psychologies and not just the study of a single or uniform fundamental psychology for all peoples of the world. Research findings in cultural psychology thus raise provocative questions about the integrity and value of alternative forms of subjectivity across cultural groups. In this course we analyze the concept of "culture" and examine ethnic and cross-cultural variations in mental functioning with special attention to the cultural psychology of emotions, self, moral judgment, categorization, and reasoning.

Instructor(s): R. Shweder     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Undergraduates must be in third or fourth year.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: B, C
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 21001, PSYC 33000, AMER 33000, CHDV 31000, ANTH 35110, PSYC 23000, CHDV 21000, GNSE 31000

ANTH 24330. Medical Anthropology. 100 Units.

This course introduces students to the central concepts and methods of medical anthropology. Drawing on a number of classic and contemporary texts, we will consider both the specificity of local medical cultures and the processes which increasingly link these systems of knowledge and practice. We will study the social and political economic shaping of illness and suffering and will examine medical and healing systems-including biomedicine-as social institutions and as sources of epistemological authority. Topics covered will include the problem of belief; local theories of disease causation and healing efficacy; the placebo effect and contextual healing; theories of embodiment; medicalization; structural violence; modernity and the distribution of risk; the meanings and effects of new medical technologies; and global health.

Instructor(s): E. Raikhel     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): PQ: Undergraduates must have completed or currently be enrolled in a SOSC sequence.  Graduate option is only open to Master's students.
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C, D; 4
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 23204, CHDV 43204, ANTH 40330, HIPS 27301

ANTH 24345. Anthropology and 'The Good Life': Ethics, Morality, Well-Being. 100 Units.

This course takes a critical, historical and anthropological look at what is meant by "the good life." Anthropologists have long been aware that notions of "the good" play an essential role in directing human behavior, by providing a life with meaning and shaping what it means to be a human being. Over the past several years, however, there has been an increasing demand for clarification on what is meant by "the good life," as well as how cultural conceptions of "the good" relate to science, politics, religion, and personal practice. In this course, we will take up that challenge by exploring what is meant by "the good," focusing on three domains in which it has most productively been theorized: ethics, morality, and well-being. Through a close reading of ethnographic and theoretical texts, as well as through analysis of documents and resources used and produced by different communities in order to explore the good life, we will gain an understanding of the different theoretical and methodological approaches for understanding the good in the social sciences, the various cultural logics shaping knowledge and practices of the good, and how human experience is shaped by those iterations in the process. The topics to be discussed include: the good life, moral reason, moral relativism, utility, deontology, virtue, happiness, well-being, flourishing, techniques of the self, spiritual exercises, professional ethics, neuroethics, and the moral sentiments.

Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 35130, CHDV 32200, MAPS 32200

ANTH 24350. Historical Epistemology & Contemporary Biomedicine. 100 Units.

No description available

ANTH 24351. Philosophies of Praxis and Conjuncture. 100 Units.

ANTH 24355. Experiencing Madness: Empathic Methods in Cultural Psychiatry. 100 Units.

This course provides students with an introduction to the phenomenological approach in cultural psychiatry, focusing on the problem of "how to represent mental illness" as a thematic anchor. Students will examine the theoretical and methodological groundings of cultural psychiatry, examining how scholars working in the phenomenological tradition have tried to describe the lived experiences of various forms of "psychopathology" or "madness." By the end of the course, students will have learned how to describe and analyze the social dimension of a mental health experience, using a phenomenologically-grounded anthropological approach, and by adopting a technical vocabulary for understanding the lived experiences of mental illness (for instance, phenomena, life-world, being-in-the-world, intentionality, epoché, embodiment, madness, psychopathology, melancholia/depression, schizophrenia, etc). In addition, given the ongoing problematic of "how to represent mental illness," students will also have the opportunity to think through the different ways of presenting their analysis, both in the form of weekly blog entries and during a final-week mock-workshop, where they will showcase their work in a creative medium appropriate to that analysis.

Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 32822, MAPS 32800, HIPS 22800, ANTH 35135, CHSS 32800

ANTH 24510-24511. Anthropology of Museums I-II.

This sequence examines museums from a variety of perspectives. We consider the World’s Columbian Exposition of 1893, the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, the image and imagination of African American culture as presented in local museums, and museums as memorials, as exemplified by Holocaust exhibitions. Several visits to area museums required.

ANTH 24510. Anthropology Of Museums-1. 100 Units.

Using anthropological theories and methodology as a conceptual framework, this seminar will explore the organizational and ideological aspects of museum culture(s). The course includes visits to museums with guest museum professionals as guides into the culture of museums.

Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 34501, SOSC 34500, MAPH 34400, CHDV 34501, MAPS 34500

ANTH 24511. Anthropology Of Museum-2. 100 Units.

Using anthropological theories and methodology as a conceptual framework, this seminar will explore the organizational and ideological aspects of museum culture(s). The course includes visits to museums with guest museum professionals as guides into the culture of museums.

Instructor(s): M. Fred     Terms Offered: Autumn Winter
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and consent of instructor
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: C
Equivalent Course(s): SOSC 34600, MAPS 34600, ANTH 34502, CHDV 38102

ANTH 24520. Temple or Forum: Designing the Obama Presidential Center. 100 Units.

Throughout this seminar participants will research and discuss key issues pertaining to the development and implications of presidential libraries and museums. These insights will become the foundation for a final project in which they will work in small teams to design a potential exhibit for the Obama Presidential Center in Jackson Park.

Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 31108, MAPS 31108

ANTH 24810. Atmospherics. 100 Units.

In a world of changing climate, how do we change the political? What affective chemistry is needed to recognize and mobilize on behalf of shifting air currents? This seminar explores the conceptual and material chemistries of atmosphere. The course will investigate key texts on climate change, embodiment, and affect, as well as recent ethnographic explorations of environmental sensibilities across air, ice, ocean, and land.

Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2019
Note(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): HIPS 24810

ANTH 25100. Anthropology of the Body. 100 Units.

Drawing on a wide and interdisciplinary range of texts, both classic and more recent, this seminar will variously examine the theoretical debates of the body as a subject of anthropological, historical, psychological, medical, and literary inquiry. The seminar will explore specific themes, for example, the persistence of the mind/body dualism, experiences of embodiment/alienation, phenomenology of the body, Foucauldian notions of bio-politics, biopower and the ethic of the self, and the medicalized, gendered, and racialized body, among other salient themes.

Instructor(s): S. Brotherton     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): CHDV Distribution: D
Equivalent Course(s): CRES 25112, ANTH 45100, CHDV 25100, GNSE 25112

ANTH 25117. About Nature: From Science to Sense. 100 Units.

Consider mushrooms," Anna Tsing (2012) suggests to those who are curious about human nature and she points to the relational and biological diversity found at the unruly edges of the global empire-the governmentalized, politicized, commoditized culture nature of capitalism. This class follows the suit, tracking the scent of what evidently remains, thrives, withdraws, overwhelms, and inspires wonder in the guises of the natural, wild, organic, or awesome.

Instructor(s): L. Jasarevic     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): INST 27702, GLST 27702

ANTH 25118. Earthbound Metaphysics: Speculations on Earths and Heavens. 100 Units.

Social thought has recently reopened the subject matter of the "world": what is it made of, how does it hold together, who and what inhabits it? Proposals and inquiries generated in response are as imaginative as they are self-consciously urgent: written on the crest of the global ecological disaster, from within the zones of disturbance or the sites of extreme intervention into the living matter and forms of life, contemplating the end of the world and possibilities of extinction, redemption, cohabitation, or "collateral survival" (Tsing 2015). All are variously political. Foregrounding the plurality of the material worlds and lived worldviews on the one hand, and of the shared historical predicament on the other, social thinkers question universal values and conceivable relations, and search for alternate forms of grasping, engaging, and representing the pluriverse. This course goes along with such interests in the "worlds" and collects a number of compelling, contemporary texts that are variously oriented towards cosmopolitics, "minimalist metaphysics," "new materialisms," speculative realisms, eco-theology, and multispecies coexistence. Readings will stretch out to examine some classic ethnographic texts and past theoretical excursions into the perennial problem of how to know and tell the unfamiliar, native, worlds, which are swept by, mingling with, or standing out in the more globalizing trends of capitalist, scientific, and secular materialism.

Equivalent Course(s): GLST 27703

ANTH 25148. Israel in Film and Ethnography. 100 Units.

This seminar explores the dynamics of Israeli culture and society through a combination of weekly screenings of Israeli fiction and documentary films with readings from ethnographic and other relevant research. Among the (often overlapping) topics to be covered in this examination of the institutional and ideological construction of Israeli identity/ies: the absorption of immigrants; ethnic, class, and religious tensions; the kibbutz; military experience; the Holocaust; evolving attitudes about gender and sexuality; the struggle for minorities' rights; and Arab-Jewish relations. In addition to the readings, participants will be expected to view designated films before class related to the topic.

Equivalent Course(s): CMES 35148, NEHC 25148, NEHC 35148, JWSC 25148, MAPS 35148, ANTH 35148

ANTH 25150. Anthropology of Israel. 100 Units.

This seminar explores the dynamics of Israeli culture and society through a combination of weekly screenings of Israeli fiction and documentary films with readings from ethnographic and other relevant research. Among the (often overlapping) topics to be covered in this examination of the institutional and ideological construction of Israeli identity/ies: the absorption of immigrants; ethnic, class, and religious tensions; the kibbutz; military experience; the Holocaust; evolving attitudes about gender and sexuality; the struggle for minorities' rights; and Arab-Jewish relations.

Equivalent Course(s): MAPS 35150, ANTH 35150, JWSC 25149, NEHC 25147, CMES 35150, NEHC 35147

ANTH 25200. Approaches to Gender in Anthropology. 100 Units.

This course examines gender as a cultural category in anthropological theory, as well as in everyday life. After reviewing the historical sources of the current concern with women, gender, and sexuality in anthropology and the other social sciences, we critically explore some key controversies (e.g., the relationship between production and reproduction in different socio-cultural orders; the links between "public" and "private" in current theories of politics; and the construction of sexualities, nationalities, and citizenship in a globalizing world).

Instructor(s): S. Gal     Terms Offered: TBD
Equivalent Course(s): GNSE 25201

ANTH 25207. Gender, Sexuality, & Religion. 100 Units.

In many cultural contexts today, religion is often seen as a socially conservative force in public and political realms. For instance, Christian "pro-life" movements in the US often draw on tropes of women's "traditional" role as mothers to argue against easily accessible abortion clinics or contraceptives; recent faith-based objections to legal protections for LGBTQ individuals; and debates in the US and Western Europe about Muslim women's use of the veil as inherently disempowering women. Social scientists have often noted the logics of duality that shape our contemporary world: religious/secular, traditional/modern, conservative/liberal, private/public, etc. Within this logic, religious peoples are presumed to be traditional or "primitive" and therefore hostile to modernity or foreclosed from being modern. Similarly, to be progressive or liberal, one is assumed to be secular and skeptical of religion. Is it always the case, though, that religion is conservative, traditional, and works to maintain the status quo of possible gender roles and sexual identities in society? The goal of this course is to investigate this question. We will look at contemporary places around the world, multiple religions, and various genders and sexualities in order to complicate the picture of how religion and gender inform one another.

Equivalent Course(s): RLST 26909, CHDV 20802, GNSE 20802

ANTH 25209. Morality across the Life Course. 100 Units.

Morality across the Life Course. What does it mean to be a moral person? And how do moral expectations within a given society shift across the life course? Social scientists have noted that what it means to be a moral child may not always be the same as what it means to be a moral adolescent or middle-aged adult. At the same time, scholars have been interested in how moral ideals pass from one generation to another through processes such as socialization. Social reproduction must also deal with globalization and other sources of social change. By honing in on such processes of social reproduction and change, many have suggested we may better understand how moral beliefs change across generations and over time. In this course we will explore these processes of moral development, socialization, and change, drawing largely on anthropological and psychological research. While early developmental psychologists theorized moral development as stage-based and teleological (i.e., an ultimate, ideal adult moral personhood towards which developmental stages were progressive steps), anthropologists and cultural psychologists working in many different cultural contexts have complicated this understanding of morality. We will begin the quarter by looking at some of the early texts and theories about moral development in addition to early concerns about social reproduction across generations. Afterwards we will turn to a series of ethnographic monographs in order to explore in detail how particular life course stages are conceptualized in moral terms in various parts of the world and in different contexts of social change.

Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20803

ANTH 25255. Borders, (Im)mobilities and Human Rights. 100 Units.

What is the human cost of border control? To what extent do individuals possess the right to move to other states? How do different states with large populations of refugees and asylum seekers develop and enforce migration policies, and what do the differences in these policies reveal about the social histories and futures of these states? To address these questions, we will consider how borders, institutions, and categories of migrant groups mutually shape one another. We will explore the interrelationships between categories of migration-forced, economic, regular, and irregular-in order to understand the multiple and unequal forms of mobility experienced by those who inhabit these categories. By utilizing a framework of human rights, this course will investigate how contemporary issues in migration-such as border management, illicit movement, and the fuzzy distinction between forced and economic migration-raise and reopen debates concerning the management of difference. We will draw on the work of anthropologists, sociologists, and geographers, as well as journalists, legal, and medical professionals. Our readings each week will include a mix of conceptual, ethnographic, long-form journalism, and policy texts. When possible, we will also invite representatives from different Chicago-based organizations that promote and protect the rights of people in various situations of migration to come to our class to discuss their work.

Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 23403, HMRT 23403, GLST 23403

ANTH 25305. Anthropology of Food and Cuisine. 100 Units.

Contemporary human foodways are not only highly differentiated in cultural and social terms, but often have long and complicated histories. Anthropologists have long given attention to food. But, until quite recently, they did so in an unsystematic, haphazard fashion. This course explores several related themes with a view towards both the micro- and macro-politics of food by examining a range of ethnographic and historical case studies and theoretical texts. It takes the format of a seminar augmented by lectures (during the first few weeks), scheduled video screenings, and individual student presentations during the rest of the course.

Instructor(s): S. Palmie     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course qualifies as a Discovering Anthropology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 35305

ANTH 25401. Consumption. 100 Units.

The modern period was associated with industrial production, class society, rationalization, disenchantment, the welfare state, and the belief in salvation by society. Current societies are characterized by a culture of consumption; consumption is central to lifestyles and identity, it is instantiated in our technological reality and the complex of advertising media, structures of wanting and shopping. Starting from the question "why do we want things" we will discuss theories and empirical studies that focus on consumption and identity formation; on shopping and the consumption of symbolic signs; on consumption as linked to the re-enchantment of modernity; as a process of distinction and of the globalization of frames; and as related to time and information. The course is built around approaches that complement the "productionist" focus of the social sciences. Students interested in economic sociology and anthropology can supplement this course by one on Markets and Money.

Instructor(s): K. Knorr Cetina     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): SOCI 20150, SOCI 30150, ANTH 35401

ANTH 25411. California: Utopia/Dystopia. 100 Units.

California is a bellwether for the nation, and the site of both utopian and dystopian imaginaries. From Silicon Valley's reinvention of the world through technology, to Hollywood's national storytelling through film, from Disney's fantasyland to San Francisco's communes to LA's metropolis, California is a lightening rod for various visions of the future. It epitomizes the "frontier" where traditions hold less sway, especially for women and LGBTQ people. Both reactionary and progressive when confronted with social change, California previews debates that later happen on a national stage. Its current opposition to federal immigration policy should be considered alongside its history of legalized sinophobia and Japanese internment. It exaggerates American ideals and disgraces; consider the Gold Rush, which epitomized an American Dream of wealth for the taking and entailed a brutal genocide of Native Californians. The Bay Area sustainability cult exists alongside the most polluted places in the country. California hosts extremes of poverty and wealth, urban and rural, liberalism and conservatism (Reagan was, after all, Californian). We will consider California through ethnography, history, literature, sociology, theory, film, photography, and music. How do ideas about a place, and its lived reality, mutually shape each other? What is the role of utopian/dystopian thinking? A premise of the course is that utopia for some is dystopia for others.

ANTH 25905-25906. Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia.

No sequence description available.

ANTH 25905. Introduction to the Musical Folklore of Central Asia. 100 Units.

This course explores the musical traditions of the peoples of Central Asia, both in terms of historical development and cultural significance. Topics include the music of the epic tradition, the use of music for healing, instrumental genres, and Central Asian folk and classical traditions. Basic field methods for ethnomusicology are also covered. Extensive use is made of recordings of musical performances and of live performances in the area.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Knowledge of Arabic and/or Islamic studies helpful but not required
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20765, NEHC 30765, REES 35001, MUSI 33503, REES 25001, MUSI 23503

ANTH 25906. Shamans and Oral Poets of Central Asia. 100 Units.

This course explores the rituals, oral literature, and music associated with the nomadic cultures of Central Eurasia.

Instructor(s): K. Arik     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): NEHC 20765 and 20766 may be taken in sequence or individually.
Equivalent Course(s): NEHC 20766, NEHC 30766

ANTH 25908. Balkan Folklore. 100 Units.

Vampires, fire-breathing dragons, vengeful mountain nymphs. 7/8 and other uneven dance beats, heart-rending laments, and a living epic tradition. This course is an overview of Balkan folklore from historical, political, and anthropological perspectives. We seek to understand folk tradition as a dynamic process and consider the function of different folklore genres in the imagining and maintenance of community and the socialization of the individual. We also experience this living tradition firsthand through visits of a Chicago-based folk dance ensemble, "Balkan Dance."

Instructor(s): A. Ilieva     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 35908, CMLT 33301, NEHC 20568, REES 39009, CMLT 23301, REES 29009, NEHC 30568

ANTH 25975. AdvRdgs: Anthropology of the Modern Subject. 100 Units.

Anthropology of the Modern Subject will frame its consideration of modernity through two intersecting lenses: the subject and the state. During the first week, we will engage with foundational texts representing various conceptions of the modern project. During the following two sessions, we will consider the formation of the modern subject and its relation to the state, focusing on two primary concerns that have structured debate in these areas: discourse and secularism. During the final two sessions, we examine two paradigms that have fundamentally questioned and re-imagined the modern project and its ostensible subjects: Bruno Latour's posthumanist writings and Deleuze and Guattari's critique of modern conceptions of the subject and its relation to capital.

Instructor(s): John D. Kelly     Terms Offered: Autumn. Autumn 2918
Prerequisite(s): Consent of Instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 55854

ANTH 26100. Ancient Celtic Societies. 100 Units.

This course explores the prehistoric societies of Iron Age "Celtic" Europe and their relationship to modern communities claiming Celtic ancestry. The course aims to impart an understanding of (1) the kinds of evidence available for investigating these ancient societies and how archaeologists interpret these data, (2) processes of change in culture and society during the Iron Age, and (3) how the legacy of Celtic societies has both persisted and been reinvented and manipulated in the modern world. Issues include the relationship between language, material culture, and society; colonial interaction; urbanization; art and religion; gender roles; and cultural identity in the construction of tradition.

Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 46500

ANTH 26710-26711. Ancient Landscapes I-II.

This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI’s ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

ANTH 26710. Ancient Landscapes I. 100 Units.

This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI's ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 36710, GEOG 25400, NEAA 30061, NEAA 20061, GEOG 35400

ANTH 26711. Ancient Landscapes II. 100 Units.

This is a two-course sequence that introduces students to theory and method in landscape studies and the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to analyze archaeological, anthropological, historical, and environmental data. Course one covers the theoretical and methodological background necessary to understand spatial approaches to landscape and the fundamentals of using ESRI's ArcGIS software, and further guides students in developing a research proposal. Course two covers more advanced GIS-based analysis (using vector, raster, and satellite remote sensing data) and guides students in carrying out their own spatial research project. In both courses, techniques are introduced through the discussion of case studies (focused on the archaeology of the Middle East) and through demonstration of software skills. During supervised laboratory times, the various techniques and analyses covered will be applied to sample archaeological data and also to data from a region/topic chosen by the student.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): NEAA 20061
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 36711, GEOG 25800, NEAA 30062, GEOG 35800, NEAA 20062

ANTH 26760. Archaeology of Bronze Age China. 100 Units.

Bronze Age" in China conventionally refers to the time period from ca. 2000 BC to about 500 BC, during which bronze, an alloy of copper and other metals such as tin and lead, was the predominant medium used by the society, or to be more precise, the elite classes of the society. Bronze objects, in the forms of vessels, weapons, and musical instruments, were reserved for the upper ruling class of the society and were used mostly as paraphernalia during rituals and feasting. "Bronze Age" in China also indicates the emergence and eventual maturation of states with their bureaucratic systems, the presence of urban centers, a sophisticated writing system, and advanced craft producing industries, especially metal production. This course surveys the important archaeological finds of Bronze Age China and the theoretical issues such as state formation, craft production, writing, bureaucratic systems, urbanization, warfare, and inter-regional interaction, etc. It emphasizes a multi-disciplinary approach with readings and examples from anthropology, archaeology, art history, and epigraphy. This course will also visit the Smart Museum, the Field Museum, and the Art Institute of Chicago to take advantage of the local collections of ancient Chinese arts and archaeology.

Instructor(s): Y. Li     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 46760, EALC 28015, EALC 48015

ANTH 26765. Archaeology of Anyang: Bronzes, Inscriptions, and World Heritage. 100 Units.

Anyang is one of the most important archaeological sites in China. The discoveries of inscribed oracle bones, the royal cemetery, clusters of palatial structures, and industrial-scale craft production precincts have all established that the site was indeed the last capital of the Shang dynasty recorded in traditional historiography. With almost continuous excavations since the late 1920s, work at Anyang has in many ways shaped and defined Chinese archaeology and the study of Early Bronze Age China. This course intends to examine the history of research, important archaeological finds, and the role of Anyang studies in the field of Chinese archaeology. While the emphasis is on archaeological finds and the related research, this course will also attempt to define Anyang in the modern social and cultural contexts in terms of world heritage, national and local identity, and the looting and illegal trade of antiquities.

Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): EALC 28010, ANTH 36765, EALC 48010

ANTH 26900. Archaeological Data Sets. 100 Units.

This course focuses on the methodological basis of archaeological data analysis. Its goals are twofold: (1) to provide students with an opportunity to examine research questions through the study of archaeological data; and (2) to allow students to evaluate evidential claims in light of analytical results. We consider data collection, sampling and statistical populations, exploratory data analysis, and statistical inference. Built around computer applications, the course also introduces computer analysis, data encoding, and database structure.

Instructor(s): A. Yao     Terms Offered: Autumn. Not offered 2018-19; will be offered 2019-20.
Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 46900

ANTH 27116. Language and Migration: Individual, Social and Institutional Perspectives. 100 Units.

This class offers a broad range of perspectives on issues regarding language in the context of migration. For instance we analyze the ways in which language has been instrumentalized by Nation-States to regiment and restrain the mobility of targeted populations. We deconstruct the straightforward correlation between socio-economic integration and language competence in discourse produced by politicians and some academics alike. We also analyze how different types of mobility (e.g., slavery, colonization, and free individual migration) produce, at different times, differing sociolinguistic dynamics.

Equivalent Course(s): LING 30249, CHDV 30249, ANTH 37116

ANTH 27305. Pornography and Language. 100 Units.

The course explores the place and role of language in pornographic films. Why does language occur in filmed pornography at all? What kind of language occurs? What role does it play? How is it gendered? How does it frame the narrative or drive it forward? How does language subvert or undermine the visual representation of sex? What does any of this tell us about gender, sexuality and erotics in non-pornographic contexts? Course readings focus on theories of pornographic representation, theories of language, gender and erotics, and methods of transcribing and analyzing dialogue. The course requires students to watch a wide range of pornography, including different varieties of straight, gay and trans porn, so anyone enrolling in the course must be interested in pornography as a social and cultural phenomenon and must also have experience watching porn and thinking about it.

Instructor(s): D. Kulick     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): Upper-level undergrad course.
Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 20405, LING 29405

ANTH 27400. Language/Power/Identity in South East Europe. 100 Units.

This course familiarizes students with the linguistic histories and structures that have served as bases for the formation of modern Balkan ethnic identities and that are being manipulated to shape current and future events. The course is informed by the instructor's thirty years of linguistic research in the Balkans as well as his experience as an adviser for the United Nations Protection Forces in Former Yugoslavia and as a consultant to the Council on Foreign Relations, the International Crisis Group, and other organizations. Course content may vary in response to ongoing current events.

Instructor(s): V. Friedman     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): LING 27200, ANTH 37400, REES 33119, LING 37200, HUMA 27400, REES 23119

ANTH 27430. Linguistic Politics: Language Revitalization. 100 Units.

Linguists and the general public have long been alarmed about the number of languages that disappear from use, and so are no longer spoken in the world. Their speakers shift to other languages. As part of the response, social groups have been mobilizing for many decades to prevent such lapses/losses and shifts in use and to document, revitalize, archive and mobilize the resources of communication. This course takes up the processes by which shift happens, asking what "language" is in these transformations; what and how linguistic forms, cultural values, and social institutions are involved and what social activism can or cannot accomplish in the "saving" of languages.

Instructor(s): S. Gal     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): LING 27430

ANTH 27601. Populism and Its Discontents. 100 Units.

Populism and its Discontents is a reading-based undergraduate discussion seminar. Populism is currently the word on everyone's lips. But what does it mean? We begin with the ambiguous status of populism in current public debates; populism is at once imagined as the lifeblood of genuine democracy and at the same time as the dark force that threatens democracy from within. Why should this be? Questions to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: Are there progressive and regressive forms of populism? Does populism look different in today's social media-saturated world than it did a hundred years ago? Does populism in the Global South force us to reconsider what we think we know about its Euro-American variants? Students will be asked to complete assignments drawing on the assigned readings and audiovisual materials and on contemporary media sources.

ANTH 27605. Language, Culture, and Thought. 100 Units.

Survey of research on the interrelation of language, culture, and thought from the evolutionary, developmental, historical, and culture-comparative perspectives with special emphasis on the mediating methodological implications for the social sciences.

Instructor(s): J. Lucy     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): CHDV Distribution, B, C
Equivalent Course(s): PSYC 21950, PSYC 31900, CHDV 31901, ANTH 37605, LING 27605, LING 37605, CHDV 21901

ANTH 27700. Romani Language and Linguistics. 100 Units.

An introduction to the language of the Roms (Gypsies). The course will be based on the Arli diealect currently in official use in the Republic of Macedonia, but due attention will be given to other dialects of Europe and the United States. The course will begin with an introduction to Romani linguistic history followed by an outline of Romani grammar based on Macedonian Arli. This will serve as the basis of comparison with other dialects. The course will include readings of authentic texts and discussion of questions of grammar, standardization, and Romani language in society.

Instructor(s): Victor Friedman     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 47900, LING 37810, LING 27810

ANTH 27902. Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya-2. 100 Units.

This sequence is a basic introduction to the modern Yucatec Maya language, an indigenous American language spoken by about 750,000 people in southeastern Mexico. Three consecutive quarters of instruction are intended for students aiming to achieve basic and intermediate proficiency. Students receiving FLAS support must take all three quarters. Others may elect to take only the first quarter or first two quarters. Students wishing to enter the course midyear (e.g., those with prior experience with the language) must obtain consent of instructor. Materials exist for a second year of the course; interested students should consult the instructor. Students wishing to continue their training with native speakers in Mexico may apply for FLAS funding in the summer.

Equivalent Course(s): CHDV 47902, LACS 47902, LACS 27902, CHDV 27902

ANTH 27903. Modern Spoken Yucatec Maya-3. 100 Units.

No description available

Equivalent Course(s): LACS 47903, LACS 27903, CHDV 27903, CHDV 47903, ANTH 47903

ANTH 28110. Human Origins: Milestones in Human Evolution and the Fossil Record. 100 Units.

This course aims at exploring the fundamentals of human origins by tracking the major events during the course of human evolution. Starting with a laboratory based general introduction to human osteology and muscle function, the latest on morphological and behavioral evidence for what makes Homo sapiens and their fossil ancestors unique among primates will be presented. Our knowledge of the last common ancestor will be explored using the late Miocene fossil record followed by a series of lectures on comparative and functional morphology, adaptation and biogeography of fossil human species. With focus on the human fossil record, the emergence of bipedalism, advent of stone tool use and making, abandonment of arboreality, advent of endurance walking and running, dawn of encephalization and associated novel life histories, language and symbolism will be explored. While taxonomic identities and phylogenetic relationships will be briefly presented, the focus will be on investigating major adaptive transitions and how that understanding helps us to unravel the ecological selective factors that ultimately led to the emergence of our species. The course will be supported by fresh data coming from active field research conducted by Prof. Alemseged and state of the art visualization methods that help explore internal structures. By tracing the path followed by our ancestors over time, this course is directly relevant to reconnoitering the human condition today and our place in nature.

Instructor(s): Z. Alemseged     Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): Three quarters of a Biological Sciences Fundamentals sequence, or consent of Instructor.
Equivalent Course(s): BIOS 22265, ORGB 33265

ANTH 28400. Bioarchaeology and the Human Skeleton. 100 Units.

This course is intended to provide students in archaeology with a thorough understanding of bioanthropological and osteological methods used in the interpretation of prehistoric societies by introducing bioanthropological methods and theory. In particular, lab instruction stresses hands-on experience in analyzing the human skeleton, whereas seminar classes integrate bioanthropological theory and application to specific cases throughout the world. Lab and seminar-format class meet weekly.

Instructor(s): M. C. Lozada     Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This course qualifies as a Methodology selection for Anthropology majors.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 38800, BIOS 23247

ANTH 29500. Archaeology Laboratory Practicum. 100 Units.

This hands-on lab practicum course exposes students to various stages of artifact processing on a collection from a recently excavated site (e.g., washing, sorting, flotation, identification, data entry, analysis, report preparation, curation). The primary requirement is that students commit to a minimum of nine hours of lab work per week, with tasks assigned according to immediate project needs.

Instructor(s): F. Richard, S. Dawdy     Terms Offered: TBD. Various
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor
Note(s): This course qualifies as a Methodology selection for Anthropology majors. Undergraduates may take it only once for credit.
Equivalent Course(s): ANTH 59500

ANTH 29601. Populism and Its Discontents. 100 Units.

Populism and its Discontents is a reading-based undergraduate discussion seminar. Populism is currently the word on everyone's lips. But what does it mean? We begin with the ambiguous status of populism in current public debates; populism is at once imagined as the lifeblood of genuine democracy and at the same time as the dark force that threatens democracy from within. Why should this be? Questions to be covered include, but are not limited to, the following: Are there progressive and regressive forms of populism? Does populism look different in today's social media-saturated world than it did a hundred years ago? Does populism in the Global South force us to reconsider what we think we know about its Euro-American variants? Students will be asked to complete assignments drawing on the assigned readings and audiovisual materials and on contemporary media sources.

Instructor(s): William Mazzarella     Terms Offered: Spring. Spring 2019
Prerequisite(s): PQ: 3rd or 4th year standing
Note(s): This is a 3CT Capstone Course

ANTH 29700. Readings in Anthropology. 100 Units.

Independent research projects.

Instructor(s): Select section from pull down list under ANTH 29700 in the Time Schedule     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. At the discretion of the instructor, this course is available for either a quality grade or for P/F grading.

ANTH 29900. Preparation of Bachelor's Essay. 100 Units.

Reading and Research course for Anthropology majors preparing to write a BA Essay.

Instructor(s): Select section from pull-down list under ANTH 29900 in the Time Schedule     Terms Offered: Autumn,Spring,Winter
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form. At the discretion of the instructor, this course is available for either a quality grade or for P/F grading. For honors requirements, see Honors section under Program Requirements.

ANTH 29910. Bachelor's Essay Seminar. 100 Units.

This course is designed to help anthropology undergraduates to develop, formulate, and write a promising research question that can be addressed in scholarly paper of 40 pages. To do this, we will develop a specialized set of writing skills, techniques, and strategies. First, we will address the problem of processing research "data", focusing in particular on the relationship between questions and evidence. Second, we will engage with the writing-process proper, with a special focus on how to craft an argument of this length, including planning, outlining, and drafting. Third, we will explore the rhetorical qualities and characteristics of academic writing as a textual genre, with the goal of mastering the art of developing convincing argumentation.

Instructor(s): Staff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): Open only to fourth year anthropology students currently writing BA Essays
Note(s): Open only to students currently writing BA honors papers.


Contacts

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Director of Undergraduate Studies
Shannon Dawdy
Haskell 202
773.834.0829
Email

Administrative Contact

Program Administrator
Anne Chien
H 119
773.702.8551
Email

Preceptor/BA Advisor


TBA