Contacts | Program of Study | Program Requirements | BA Paper | Summary of Requirements | Grading | Honors | Study Abroad | Proficiency Certificate | Minor Program in Germanic Studies | Minor Program in Norwegian Studies | German Courses | Norwegian Courses | Yiddish Courses

Department Website: http://german.uchicago.edu

Program of Study

The program for the BA degree in Germanic Studies is intended to provide students with a wide ranging and highly personalized introduction to the language, literature, and culture of German-speaking countries and to various methods of approaching and examining these areas. It is designed to be complemented by other areas of study (e.g., anthropology, art history, comparative literature, economics, film studies, history, philosophy, political science, sociology).

Students in other fields of study may also complete a minor in Germanic Studies. Information follows the description of the major.

Program Requirements

Students majoring in Germanic Studies typically register for six German language courses at the second-year level and above, plus six courses in German literature and culture, including two literature or culture courses taken in German, and GRMN 29900 BA Paper. With prior approval of the director of undergraduate studies, students may count up to three relevant German-oriented courses from other departments in the humanities or social sciences toward the requirements of the major in Germanic Studies. Students must meet with the director of undergraduate studies to discuss a plan of study as soon as they declare their major and no later than the end of Spring Quarter of their third year. Students must have their programs approved by the director of undergraduate studies before the end of their third year.

BA Paper

The BA paper typically is a research paper of a minimum of twenty-five pages. While the paper may be written in either English or German, it must include a bibliography that makes ample use of German-language sources. Students must submit a proposal for their BA paper to their faculty adviser by the beginning of the eighth week of Autumn Quarter in their senior year. A first draft of the paper is due on the first day of Spring Quarter, and the completed paper must be submitted by the beginning of the sixth week of Spring Quarter.

Germanic Studies will accept a paper or project used to meet the BA requirement in another major, under the condition that original German sources are used. Students should consult with both chairs by the earliest BA proposal deadline (or by the end of their third year, when neither program publishes a deadline). A consent form, to be signed by both chairs, is available from the College adviser. It must be completed and returned to the College adviser by the end of Autumn Quarter of the student's year of graduation.

Summary of Requirements

Second-Year German300
Deutsche Märchen; Deutsch-Amerikanische Themen; Kurzprosa aus dem 20. Jahrhundert *
Third-Year German: Any three of the following courses:300
Erzählen
Drama und Film
Gedichte
Philosophie
Two courses in literature or culture taken in German200
Four courses in German literature and culture **400
GRMN 29900BA Paper100
Total Units1300
*

Or credit for the equivalent as determined by petition.

**

Three may be courses in other departments and/or Languages Across Chicago courses

Grading

Students who are majoring in Germanic Studies must receive a quality grade in all courses taken to meet requirements in the major. Nonmajors have the option of taking courses for P/F grading (except for language courses, which must be taken for quality grades).

Honors

Honors are reserved for students who achieve overall excellence in grades for courses in the College and within the major, as well as complete a BA paper that shows proof of original research or criticism. Students with an overall GPA of at least 3.0 for College work and a GPA of at least 3.5 in classes within the major, and whose GRMN 29900 BA Paper is judged superior by two readers, will be recommended to the Master of the Humanities Collegiate Division for honors.

Study Abroad

As early in their course of study as possible, interested students are encouraged to take advantage of one of the study abroad options that are available in the College. The five options are:

  1. A program in Vienna, which is offered each Autumn Quarter, includes three courses of European Civilization, as well as German language instruction on several levels.
  2. The College also co-sponsors, with the Berlin Consortium for German Studies, a yearlong program at the Freie Universität Berlin. Students register for regular classes at the Freie Universität or at other Berlin universities. To be eligible, students must have completed the second year of German language courses or an equivalent, and should have completed all general education requirements.
  3. Third-year majors can apply for a Romberg Summer Research Grant to do preparatory work for the BA paper.
  4. Students who wish to do a summer study abroad program can apply for a Foreign Language Acquisition Grant (FLAG) that is administered by the College and provides support for a minimum of eight weeks of study at a recognized summer program abroad. Students must have completed GRMN 10300 Elementary German for Beginners III or its equivalent to be eligible for FLAG support for the study of German. For more information, visit study-abroad.uchicago.edu/sitg.

More than half of the requirements for the major must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Proficiency Certificate

It is recommended that all students majoring in Germanic Studies complete the College's Advanced Language Proficiency Certificate in German as documentation of advanced functional ability in reading, writing, listening to, and speaking German. Students are eligible to take the examinations that result in the awarding of this certificate after they have completed courses beyond the second year of language study and subsequently have spent a minimum of one quarter abroad in an approved program; FLAG students are also eligible. For more information, visit college.uchicago.edu/academics/advanced-language-proficiency.

Minor Program in Germanic Studies

Students in other fields of study may complete a minor in Germanic Studies. The minor in Germanic Studies requires a total of six courses in addition to the second-year language sequence (GRMN 20100 Deutsche Märchen/GRMN 20200 Deutsch-Amerikanische Themen/ GRMN 20300 Kurzprosa aus dem 20. Jahrhundert) (or credit for the equivalent as determined by petition). These six courses usually include the third-year sequence and three literature/culture courses. One of the literature/culture courses must be taken in German. Note that credit toward the minor for courses taken abroad must be determined in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies.

Students who elect the minor program in Germanic Studies must meet with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor and must submit a form obtained from their College adviser. Students choose courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to the student's College adviser by the deadline above on the form.

Courses in the minor may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

The following group of courses would comprise a minor in Germanic Studies. Other programs may be designed in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. Minor program requirements are subject to revision.

Germanic Studies Sample Minor

GRMN 21103Erzählen100
GRMN 21203Drama und Film100
GRMN 21303Gedichte100
Three courses in German literature and culture300
Total Units600

Minor Program in Norwegian Studies

Students in any field may complete a minor in Norwegian Studies. A Norwegian Studies minor will consist of the beginning language cycle (NORW 10100-10200-10300 First-Year Norwegian I-II-III) as the language component of the minor. Three additional courses are required to complete the minor. Students choose these courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. These courses may include:

20000-level Norwegian language courses and/or literature courses
NORW 10400Intermediate Norwegian I: Introduction to Literature100
NORW 10500Intermediate Norwegian II100

Students who elect the minor program in Norwegian Studies must meet with the director of undergraduate studies before the end of Spring Quarter of their third year to declare their intention to complete the minor and must submit a form obtained from their College adviser. Students choose courses in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The director's approval for the minor program should be submitted to the student's College adviser by the deadline above on the form.

Courses in the minor may not be double counted with the student's major(s) or with other minors and may not be counted toward general education requirements. Courses in the minor must be taken for quality grades, and more than half of the requirements for the minor must be met by registering for courses bearing University of Chicago course numbers.

Minor program requirements are subject to revision.

German Courses

Language

FIRST-YEAR SEQUENCE

GRMN 10100-10200-10300. Elementary German for Beginners I-II-III.

This sequence develops proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking for use in everyday communication. Knowledge and awareness of the different cultures of the German speaking countries is also a goal.

GRMN 10100. Elementary German for Beginners I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for quality grade.

GRMN 10200. Elementary German for Beginners II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 10100 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for quality grade.

GRMN 10300. Elementary German for Beginners III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 10200 or 10201, or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for quality grade.

GRMN 10201. Elementary German II. 100 Units.

This is an accelerated version of the GRMN 10100-10200 sequence intended for students with previous knowledge of the language.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter
Prerequisite(s): Placement or consent of language coordinator
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

GRMN 13100. Reading German. 100 Units.

This course prepares students to read a variety of German texts. By the end of the quarter, students should have a fundamental knowledge of German grammar and a basic vocabulary. While the course does not teach conversational German, the basic elements of pronunciation are introduced.

Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Prior knowledge of German not required. No auditors permitted. This course does not prepare students for the competency exam. Must be taken for a quality grade.

SECOND-YEAR SEQUENCE

GRMN 20100-20200-20300. Deutsche Märchen; Deutsch-Amerikanische Themen; Kurzprosa aus dem 20. Jahrhundert.


GRMN 20100. Deutsche Märchen. 100 Units.

This course is a comprehensive look at German fairy tales, including structure and role in German nineteenth-century literature, adaptation as children's books in German and English, and film interpretations. This course also includes a review and expansion of German grammar.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 10300 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

GRMN 20200. Deutsch-Amerikanische Themen. 100 Units.

Issues may range from social topics such as family roles or social class, to literary genres such as exile or immigrant literature. Review and expansion of German grammar continues.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 20100 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

GRMN 20300. Kurzprosa aus dem 20. Jahrhundert. 100 Units.

This course is a study of descriptive and narrative prose through short fiction and other texts, as well as media from the twentieth century, with a focus on grammatical issues that are designed to push toward more cohesive and idiomatic use of language.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 20200 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

THIRD-YEAR SEQUENCE

GRMN 21103-21203-21303-21403. Erzählen; Drama und Film; Gedichte; Philosophie.

It is not necessary to take these courses in sequence, but three of the four courses are required for the major. These courses serve as preparation for seminar-style classes. Students work with a variety of texts and learn to present and participate in instructor- and student-led discussions of relevant issues and topics. Student also write short essays and longer research papers. Work in grammar, structure, and vocabulary moves students toward more idiomatic use of German.

GRMN 21103. Erzählen. 100 Units.

This course develops advanced German skills through the study of narratives of various authors from different periods.

Terms Offered: Autumn
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 20300 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

GRMN 21203. Drama und Film. 100 Units.

This course develops advanced German skills through the study of dramas and/or films of various authors/directors from different eras.

Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 20300 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

GRMN 21303. Gedichte. 100 Units.

This course develops advanced German skills through the study of poetry of various authors from different periods.

Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 20300 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

GRMN 21403. Philosophie. 100 Units.

This course develops advanced German skills through the study of philosophical texts of various authors from different periods.

Terms Offered: Spring; Offered in even-numbered years.
Prerequisite(s): GRMN 20300 or placement
Note(s): No auditors permitted. Must be taken for a quality grade.

Literature and Culture

All literature and culture courses are conducted in German unless otherwise indicated. Students who are majoring or minoring in German and take courses taught in English are expected to do the majority of their course work in German.

GRMN 23715. Berlin in Fragments. 100 Units.

Berlin at the turn of the 19th century was the epicenter of Germany’s rapid urbanization and industrialization, and as such it became a privileged site for observing and experiencing modernity. One of the most prominent features of life in the modern metropolis, as noted by contemporaries, was its fragmentary character, both in social terms—the atomization of society as a whole—and in mental terms—the psychic instability of the atomized individual. This course explores a variety of critical and artistic responses to fragmentation: critical efforts to render the fragmented urban landscape legible, and literary and other artistic efforts to explore the potentialities of fragmentation through innovative forms and techniques. The main part of the course will focus on the Weimar period: literature, film and criticism of the Golden Twenties. Afterwards we will turn to short fiction, poetry, and film of post-unification Berlin. Authors include Carl Sternheim, Walter Benjamin, Siegfried Kracauer, Joseph Roth, Alfred Döblin, Georg Heym, Jacob von Hoddis, Alfred Lichtenstein, Gottfried Benn, Bertolt Brecht, Durs Grünbein, and Tanja Dückers. Films by Joe May, Walther Ruttman, Fritz Lang.

Instructor(s): C. Benert     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Readings and discussions in German.

GRMN 24016. Queer Theory and Literature Around 1900. 100 Units.

Readings in the History of Subjectivity: Queer Theory and Literature around 1900. If, as scholars have claimed, not just the modern gay identity but modern sexuality in general was forged principally in Germany in the years leading up to 1900, then some of the most important documents for our modern sense of self are to be found in the pathbreaking German gay movement. This movement defies some fundamental expectations—such as that gay liberationists should be broadly left-wing in politics—even as it anticipates certain theses that were not articulated in academic queer theory until very recently, such as that questions around homosexuality do not pertain merely to a minority of individuals but rather structure the aesthetic and societal fields in their entirety. This course will read documents from the early German gay movement (all available in English translation) alongside fundamental essays in queer theory and a broader sampling of modern literature that has responded to or influenced both traditions. It will be of interest equally to students of literary modernism, gender and sexuality, and the history of discourses and subject-formations. Texts from Sacher-Masoch, George, Musil, Mann, James, Gide, Proust, Deleuze, Foucault, Sedgwick, Bersani, and Arnold Davidson. Readings and discussion in English.

Instructor(s): S. Haswell Todd     Terms Offered: Winter

GRMN 24916. Becoming Nothing. 100 Units.

This course closely examines three famous characters of German Modernist prose, famous above all for the way each of them embodies and calls into question the fraught task of becoming a healthy, happy member of modern society.  Franz Kafka’s performance artist in Der Hungerkünstler wants nothing more than to starve himself into obscurity, Robert Walser’s main character in Jakob von Gunten is a student who aspires to become “an adorable, spherical zero,” and Irmgard Keun’s Das kunstseidene Mädchen tells the story of a young woman in the Weimar Republic who aspires to become “glamour” and ends up contending with dismal poverty and the threat of prostitution.  In addition to reading these literary works, we will work on unfolding the historical context and the philosophical significance reflected in the crisis of individuality faced by each of these characters.  Materials include several film adaptions and theoretical texts by Friedrich Nietzsche, Siegfried Kracauer, and Niklas Luhmann.

Instructor(s): M. Lampert
Note(s): Readings and discussions in German.

GRMN 25516. Dwelling: Literature and Architecture. 100 Units.

In this course, we will examine peculiar scenes of dwelling—such as the labyrinthine home of Kafka’s “The Burrow” or the anatomical architectures in Musil’s stories. We will explore the function of spatial structures beyond their role as passive backdrops: What is their narrative function? What role do they play in knowledge-formation? Most importantly, we will redirect our gaze from a study of dwelling understood as a spatial location to an examination of dwelling as a spatial action: What does it mean to inhabit a space? What is habitation? How can we conceptualize the role of the guest and the neighbor in inhabiting? How is the relationship between house and nature, home and environment articulated in literary dwellings? What is the relation between large-scale habitation (in a city) and small-scale habitation (in a room)? These and other questions will guide our readings of Freud, Benjamin, Heidegger, Bachelard, Rilke, Kafka, Derrida, etc. Films by Ursula Meier and Tevfik Başer. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): I. Christian     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): This course will take place in conjunction with a conference on “Literary Habitation” organized in the Autumn Quarter.

GRMN 25817. W. G. Sebald: On The Natural History of Destruction. 100 Units.

The difficulty of categorizing the sort of literary practice Sebald engaged in is notorious. The genres and hybrid styles with which his “novels” have been identified include: travel writing, memoir, photo essay, documentary fiction, magical realism, postmodern pastiche, cultural-historical fantasy, among others. And given the fact that his work so often deals, if only indirectly, with the Holocaust and its aftershocks, his work has furthermore been associated with that highly problematic generic and historical constellation, “Holocaust literature.” The seminar will address all of Sebald’s major works in the hope of elucidating this singular intersection of historical and literary complexity.

Instructor(s): E. Santner     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): Texts will be available in English and German, discussion will be held in English. We will “accompany” our reading of Sebald with a reading of Lucretius’s poem, On Nature.
Equivalent Course(s): GRMN 35817,FNDL 25817

GRMN 26816. Authority and Enjoyment. 100 Units.

A far reaching distrust and crisis of authority seems to be coextensive with the European Enlightenment and modernity—but what is authority? At least one thing is certain: our relation to authority is never simple and straightforward, but is the site of intense fantasmatic activity, mixing guilt, defiance, respect, resentment, terror, justice, and love. The word itself is highly evocative, and part of its power lies in the halo of images and meanings it conjures. This seminar will examine a series of questions: Why are we so invested in authority? Can authority be avoided by more inclusive horizontal organizations, or is it inevitably bound up with the social link and even the structure of language itself (the symbolic order)? To what extent is the father the paradigmatic instance of authority, and are we living the end of patriarchy or do we rather witness the return of the father? How has the figure of the master changed under capitalism, and in what new forms does authority appear today? If authority is neither inherently “bad” nor “good,” what use may be made of it for individual and collective emancipation? 

Instructor(s): A. Schuster     Terms Offered: Autumn
Note(s): Readings will include: Walter Benjamin on language and judgment; Hannah Arendt on the crisis of authority; Alexandre Kojève’s The Notion of Authority which analyzes its four ideal types (Father, Judge, Leader, Master); Jean Genet’s play The Balcony, dealing with the comedy of modern authority; the fantastical figure of the father in the work of Franz Kafka; and the vicissitudes of the Oedipus complex in psychoanalytic theory, focusing on Sigmund Freud (Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality) and Jacques Lacan (Seminar VIII Transference). We will also watch Lars Von Trier’s The Boss of It All, Andrey Zvyagintsev’s The Return, and Nicholas Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause.
Equivalent Course(s): GRMN 36816

GRMN 27517. Metaphysics, Morbidity, & Modernity: Mann’s The Magic Mountain. 100 Units.

Our main task in this course is to explore in detail one of the most significant novels of the twentieth century, Thomas Mann’s The Magic Mountain. But this novel is also a window onto the entirety of modern European thought, and it provides, at the same time, a telling perspective of the crisis of European culture prior to and following on World War I. It is, in Thomas Mann’s formulation, a time-novel: a novel about its time, but also a novel about human being in time. For anyone interested in the configuration of European intellectual life in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, Mann’s great (and challenging) novel is indispensible reading. Lectures will relate Mann’s novel to its great European counterparts (e.g., Proust, Joyce, Musil), to the traditions of European thought from Voltaire to Georg Lukacs, from Schopenhauer to Heidegger, from Marx to Max Weber.

Terms Offered: Winter
Note(s): This is a LECTURE course with discussion sections. All readings in English.
Equivalent Course(s): CMLT 27517,FNDL 27517

GRMN 27717. Opera in the Age of Its Mechanical Reproducibility. 100 Units.

Focusing on a diverse set of productions of Mozart’s "The Magic Flute" by Ingmar Bergman, William Kentridge, Martin Kusej, Simon McBurney, and Julie Taymor, we will seek to locate opera in the contemporary medial landscape, exploring some of the theoretical stakes, dramaturgical challenges, and interpretive achievements that characterize opera on film, DVD, and via live-streaming. Readings by W. Benjamin, T. W. Adorno, F. Jameson, M. Dolar, C. Abbate, P. Auslander, et al.

Instructor(s): D. Levin     Terms Offered: Spring
Equivalent Course(s): GRMN 37717,TAPS 28422,TAPS 38422,CMST 28301,CMST 38301,MUSI 24517,MUSI 34517

GRMN 29700. Reading and Research Course in German. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
Note(s): Students must consult with the instructor by the eighth week of the preceding quarter to determine the subject of the course and the work to be done. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

GRMN 29900. BA Paper. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Fourth-year standing. Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies.
Note(s): Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Languages Across Chicago (LxC)

LxC courses have two possible formats: (1) an additional course meeting during which students read and discuss authentic source material and primary texts in German; or (2) a course in another discipline (such as history) that is taught entirely in German. Prerequisite German language skills depend on the course format and content. LxC courses maintain or improve students’ German language skills while giving them a unique and broadened perspective into the regular course content.

Norwegian Courses

Language

NORW 10100-10200-10300. First-Year Norwegian I-II-III.

The aim of this sequence is to provide students with minimal proficiency in the four language skills of speaking, reading, writing and listening—with a special emphasis on speaking. To achieve these goals, we undertake an overview of all major grammar topics and work to acquire a substantial vocabulary.

NORW 10100. First-Year Norwegian I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Kenny     Terms Offered: Autumn

NORW 10200. First-Year Norwegian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Kenny     Terms Offered: Winter

NORW 10300. First-Year Norwegian III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Kenny     Terms Offered: Spring

NORW 10400. Intermediate Norwegian I: Introduction to Literature. 100 Units.

This course combines intensive review of all basic grammar with the acquisition of more advanced grammar concepts. While our main priority remains oral proficiency, we work to develop our reading and writing skills. We challenge our reading ability with more sophisticated examples of Norwegian prose and strengthen our writing through essay writing. The centerpiece of the course is the contemporary Norwegian novel Naiv. Super.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Kenny     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): NORW 10300 or consent of instructor

NORW 10500. Intermediate Norwegian II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Terms Offered: TBD. Not offered in 2016-17

Literature and Culture

NORW 26700. Literature of the Occupation. 100 Units.

The German Occupation of Norway, which lasted from April 9, 1940, to May 7, 1945, is indisputably the most significant event in modern Norwegian history. The aim of this course is to use literature of and about this period to characterize the Occupation experience in Norway. While our texts come primarily from Norwegians, one novel is German and two others, American. Given the context for these works, we will consider them not only as fiction, but also as history and even propaganda. Ultimately, we will address the issue of national myth-making: To what extent have Norwegians mythologized their Occupation experience and is this apparent in our texts?

Instructor(s): K. Kenny     Terms Offered: Winter
Equivalent Course(s): GRMN 26700

NORW 29700. Reading and Research Course in Norwegian. 100 Units.

Students must consult with the instructor by the eighth week of the preceding quarter to determine the subject of the course and the work to be done. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Kenny     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and director of undergraduate studies.
Note(s): Students must consult with the instructor by the eighth week of the preceding quarter to determine the subject of the course and the work to be done. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Yiddish Courses

Language

YDDH 10100-10200-10300. Elementary Yiddish I-II-III.

The goal of this sequence is to develop proficiency in Yiddish reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills. Touchstones of global Yiddish culture are also introduced through song, film, and contemporary Yiddish websites.

YDDH 10100. Elementary Yiddish I. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Sunny Yudkoff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20300,YDDH 37300

YDDH 10200. Elementary Yiddish II. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Sunny Yudkoff     Terms Offered: Winter
Prerequisite(s): YDDH 10100/37300 or consent of instructor
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20400,YDDH 37400

YDDH 10300. Elementary Yiddish III. 100 Units.

No description available.

Instructor(s): Sunny Yudkoff     Terms Offered: Spring
Prerequisite(s): YDDH 10200/37400 or consent of instructor. No auditors.
Equivalent Course(s): JWSC 20500,YDDH 37500

YDDH 20101. Intermediate Yiddish: The Yiddish Press. 100 Units.

This course combines an intensive review of grammar with the acquisition of complex grammatical concepts. Specific attention is paid to regional variants in grammar and orthography. Students develop their writing, reading, listening, and speaking skills by focusing their attention on the literature and history of the Yiddish press and radio.

Instructor(s): S. Yudkoff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): YDDH 30101,JWSC 27502

YDDH 21101. Advanced Yiddish: The Yiddish Press. 100 Units.

This course supports students as they engage advanced grammatical concepts. Specific attention is paid to reading and writing at an advanced level and in different registers. Students develop these skills by focusing their attention on the literature and history of the Yiddish press. Students also pursue independent research projects on international Yiddish media outlets.

Instructor(s): S. Yudkoff     Terms Offered: Autumn
Equivalent Course(s): YDDH 31101,JWSC 27602

YDDH 25917. Imagining the Shtetl. 100 Units.

For many, Fiddler on the Roof has come to define the portrayal of Jewish life in pre-war Europe. Central to this has been an idealized vision of the market town known as “the shtetl.” This course explores the construction, manipulation, and iterations of “the shtetl” across a variety of literary and visual texts, including works by the photographer Roman Vishniac, the Yiddish poet Moyshe Leyb-Halpern, the German modernist Joseph Roth, and the American novelist Jonathan Safran Foer. Reading texts by these authors and others, we will consider how ideas of Jewish “shtetl” life shift across genres and languages. We will also confront the difficult task of defining “the shtetl” as a communal space as well as interpreting how varieties of nostalgia manifest in these texts. Alongside these primary works, we will draw on critical work by Svetlana Boym, Dan Miron, and Jeffrey Shandler. All readings are in English. A section may be organized for reading sources in Yiddish.

Instructor(s): S. Yudkoff     Terms Offered: Spring
Note(s): This course may be used to fulfill the general education requirement in civilization studies.
Equivalent Course(s): YDDH 35917,GRMN 25917,GRMN 35917,CMLT 26216,JWSC 20230,CRES 25917,CRES 35917,CMLT 36210

YDDH 29700. Reading and Research Course in Yiddish. 100 Units.

Students must consult with the instructor by the eighth week of the preceding quarter to determine the subject of the course and the work to be done. Students are required to submit the College Reading and Research Course Form.

Instructor(s): Sunny Yudkoff     Terms Offered: Autumn, Winter, Spring
Prerequisite(s): Consent of instructor and Director of Undergraduate Studies.


Contacts

Chair

Department Chair
Eric Santner
WB 204
773.834.0948
Email

Undergraduate Primary Contact

Lecturer and Director of Undergraduate Studies
Colin Benert

773.702.8494
Email

Secondary Contact

Language Program Director
Catherine Baumann
C 214
773.702.8008
Email

Administrative Contact

Department Coordinator
Ingrid Sagor


Email